Fine sentence example

fine
  • This is a fine meal, do you think?
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  • That would be fine with me.
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  • What you have on is fine, but if you want to freshen up and wear something else, go ahead.
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  • You keep it all in such fine condition.
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  • There was a fine line between being frugal and being a miser.
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  • It looks like a fine place to raise children.
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  • It wasn't like he was such a fine catch, either.
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  • A matching china cabinet held fine china, crystal and silverware.
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  • Only his idea of tempting her with a fine house hadn't worked.
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  • Think of what all the fine ladies would say.
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  • "We'll be fine, Jule," she assured him.
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  • Fine, she could play too.
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  • This was fine with Great Britain but not with Maine.
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  • "Fine. I'll fix it," he said.
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  • That was fine with Dean.
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  • We will avoid war because it is unprofitable; and while that is not a moral reason, any reason that brings peace is fine by me.
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  • Fine. Look, it's late.
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  • "Fine," she said, at the end of her rope with him.
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  • The Emperor began to breathe heavily and rapidly, his lower lip trembled, and tears instantly appeared in his fine blue eyes.
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  • You're a mighty fine cook, but it isn't safe out here for a woman.
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  • The morning had been fine, but it was growing warm and sultry when at last we turned our faces homeward.
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  • Lucy is a fine young lady.
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  • There will be music and dancing, and many fine people will be there.
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  • Just fine, Miss Clara.
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  • "That's fine," said Zeb.
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  • You said he was fine when you came back upstairs!
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  • Wasn't it fine when those Germans gave us lifts!
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  • "Molly will make a fine mother herself one day," I commented.
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  • Fine. Let him sleep.
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  • He wished to teach you that no man should feel himself too fine to carry his own packages.
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  • If Miss Sullivan wrote fine English, the beauty of Helen Keller's style would, in part, be explicable at once.
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  • I thought of the big fire in the queen's kitchen, and knew that the cook would never allow a half-drowned child to be carried into that fine place.
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  • He was big and strong and soon became a fine sailor.
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  • "This is a fine country, and I like all the people that live in it," he told Dorothy.
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  • "He'll be fine," she assured him.
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  • "Fine. I'll assign him something to do," Damian said.
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  • "That would be a fine thing!" said she.
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  • You two make a fine pair, you know that?
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  • "I thought everything was fine," she said.
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  • That's worked fine by me.
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  • It is proved by my fine points.
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  • A fine supper was prepared, and the innkeeper himself waited upon his guest.
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  • My Betsy is fine looking woman, beautiful in my mind and in the eyes of most, but even I have to admit she lacks the room-stopping allure of Martha LeBlanc.
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  • Everything is going fine with the house.
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  • Her fine hair tickled his chin.
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  • "Swami is fine," I said.
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  • It's fine to have high ideals about not going too far, but the reality of it is, it can happen before you realize what is happening.
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  • He was dressed in fine style and carried a small cane.
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  • You certainly did a fine job raising her.
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  • He thinks that he makes a fine figure when he waits on you.
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  • Mother has a great many fine roses.
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  • I remembered the story of a conceited fellow, who, in fine clothes, was wont to lounge about the village once, giving advice to workmen.
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  • "I tell you," shouted Denisov, "he's a fine fellow."
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  • His size was inadequate for any hopes of a serious basketball future but he was obviously a fine athlete.
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  • It is a fine broad leaf to look on.
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  • Only I am sorry for the Emperor that he entrusts our fine army to such as he.
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  • "Isn't it fine?" cried Dorothy, in a joyous voice, as she sprang out of the buggy and let Eureka run frolicking over the velvety grass.
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  • I'd show the people a fine sight, I can tell you.
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  • Fine, but that's not what I asked.
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  • "Fine," she said, wrenching the office door open.
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  • In a fine Alfred Hitchcock movie called Notorious, the troubled character played by Ingrid Bergman gets very drunk at a party and asks Cary Grant to come for a drive.
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  • You revel in their fine thoughts.
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  • Then, too, there is in German literature a fine reserve which I like; but its chief glory is the recognition I find in it of the redeeming potency of woman's self-sacrificing love.
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  • Yes, he is a fine fellow and a very kind relation.
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  • He and Uncle Hugson have been having a fine visit.
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  • James Collins' shanty was considered an uncommonly fine one.
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  • "A fine thing too!" replied the captain, "and really..."
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  • And with such fine fellows to retreat and retreat!
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  • She's got a sharp tongue, but she could make shoe soles taste like fine steak.
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  • I'll be fine, he said in amusement.
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  • Fine, he could have it.
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  • "Jacob, bring a bottle!" shouted the host, a tall, handsome fellow who stood in the midst of the group, without a coat, and with his fine linen shirt unfastened in front.
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  • South Lowestoft has a fine esplanade, a park (Bellevue) and other adjuncts of a watering-place.
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  • It is not necessary that one should be able to define every word and give it its principal parts and its grammatical position in the sentence in order to understand and appreciate a fine poem.
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  • No one can have read Miss Keller's autobiography without feeling that she writes unusually fine English.
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  • No innate genius can invent fine language.
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  • A child of the muses cannot write fine English unless fine English has been its nourishment.
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  • Early in the morning, while all things are crisp with frost, men come with fishing-reels and slender lunch, and let down their fine lines through the snowy field to take pickerel and perch; wild men, who instinctively follow other fashions and trust other authorities than their townsmen, and by their goings and comings stitch towns together in parts where else they would be ripped.
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  • Behind Prince Bagration rode an officer of the suite, the prince's personal adjutant, Zherkov, an orderly officer, the staff officer on duty, riding a fine bobtailed horse, and a civilian--an accountant who had asked permission to be present at the battle out of curiosity.
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  • You'll make a fine thing of it, deploying in sight of the enemy!
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  • They obeyed at once, and next served a fine large turbot on a silver platter, with drawn gravy poured over it.
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  • I do not wish to split hairs, to make fine distinctions, or set myself up as better than my neighbors.
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  • "Fine fellows, the Pavlograds!" remarked the Emperor.
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  • "Fine men!" remarked Napoleon, looking at a dead Russian grenadier, who, with his face buried in the ground and a blackened nape, lay on his stomach with an already stiffened arm flung wide.
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  • "Isn't it fine, eh, Uncle Ignat?" said the boy, suddenly beginning to strike the keyboard with both hands.
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  • He managed without a housekeeper before she came, and he could get along fine now.
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  • When they questioned the mother of kidnap victim, she was fine, until she learned Youngblood was murdered.
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  • Fine. Let him stay, but send out Quinn.
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  • Fine. I can hardly wait to get elected so I can get rid of those two winners you hired before you bailed out.
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  • Everything is fine now.
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  • But it took a good many years for them to grow as large and fine as they are now.
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  • "It was fine, Dorothy," called one of the piglets.
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  • His beautiful clothes were soaked with water, and his fine white collar and ruffles were soiled and dripping.
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  • "Mine gives me fine clothes and plenty of money to spend," said the stranger.
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  • His fine eyes lit up with a thoughtful, kindly, and unaccustomed brightness, but he was looking not at his sister but over her head toward the darkness of the open doorway.
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  • It's a fine place!
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  • That would be fine, gentlemen!
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  • Only on horse back and in the mazurka was Denisov's short stature not noticeable and he looked the fine fellow he felt himself to be.
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  • There was a fine line between protecting and smothering, though.
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  • Sandwiches will be fine today.
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  • All my early lessons have in them the breath of the woods--the fine, resinous odour of pine needles, blended with the perfume of wild grapes.
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  • "That's fine," said he.
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  • Fine, let's get this over with.
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  • The sheets were so fine and light they seemed to melt against her skin.
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  • No, no, this is fine.
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  • Ann., 1890, 40, p. 56) employed an arrangement as follows: Four fine platinum or iron wires were joined in lozenge shape, and two sets of these R and S were connected up with two resistances P and Q to form a bridge with a galvanometer G and battery B.
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  • It contains an Evangelical and five Roman Catholic churches, among them that of St Michael, a fine Gothic edifice.
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  • The district is by no means devoid of fertility, the steep slopes facing the south enjoying so fine a climate as to render them very favorable for the growth of fruit trees, especially the olive, which is cultivated in terraces to a considerable height up the face of the mountains, while the openings of the valleys are generally occupied by towns or villages, some of which have become favorite winter resorts.
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  • Much has been done in keeping out the insects by fine wire netting placed on the windows and the doors of houses, especially in the railwaymens cottages.
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  • Yellow and red ochre mixed with grease are coarsely smeared over the bodies, grey in coarse patterns and white in fine patterns resembling tattoo marks.
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  • When the nematocyst is completely developed, the cnidoblast passes outwards so as to occupy a superficial position in the ectoderm, and a delicate protoplasmic process of sensory nature, termed the cnidocil (cn) projects from the cnidoblast like a fine hair or cilium.
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  • In addition, a fine of 150,000 golden gulden was levied on the city, and used to build the "Spanish Citadel" on the site of what is now the public park.
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  • Oh, but Denisov's a fine fellow.
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  • Fine orders! was being repeated on different sides.
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  • I'm sorry, sorry for that fine fellow.
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  • General Armfeldt has proposed a splendid position with an exposed rear, or why not this Italian gentleman's attack--very fine, or a retreat, also good!
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  • A judge of horses and a sportsman, he had lately procured himself a large, fine, mettlesome, Donets horse, dun-colored, with light mane and tail, and when he rode it no one could outgallop him.
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  • His face, despite its fine, rounded wrinkles, had an expression of innocence and youth, his voice was pleasant and musical.
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  • They'd make fine leg bands for us.
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  • Another pretext would be her snuff, which would seem too dry or too damp or not rubbed fine enough.
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  • Prince Sergey is a fine fellow and clever.
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  • Peasants having no clear idea of the cause of rain, say, according to whether they want rain or fine weather: "The wind has blown the clouds away," or, "The wind has brought up the clouds."
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  • That's a fine thing to be telling me while you're working on my truck.
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  • My spirit could not reach up to his, but he gave me a real sense of joy in life, and I never left him without carrying away a fine thought that grew in beauty and depth of meaning as I grew.
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  • Several hundred books, including many fine ones, were sent to me in a short time, as well as money and encouragement.
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  • She has a fine head, and it is set on her shoulders just right.
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  • Often, when the weather is fine, we drive from four to six, or go to see her aunt at Ivy Green or her cousins in the town.
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  • The weather is fine, and the air is full of the scent of strawberries.
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  • He has two neighbours, who live still farther north; one is King Winter, a cross and churlish old monarch, who is hard and cruel, and delights in making the poor suffer and weep; but the other neighbour is Santa Claus, a fine, good-natured, jolly old soul, who loves to do good, and who brings presents to the poor, and to nice little children at Christmas.
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  • "A fine mess we've made of it!" he remarked.
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  • "What a fine fellow you are, friend!" said the Cossack to a convoy soldier with a wagon, who was pressing onto the infantrymen who were crowded together close to his wheels and his horses.
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  • A fine brindled cow with a large udder was attached to the cart behind.
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  • Your fine cords would soon get a bit rubbed, said an infantryman, wiping the mud off his face with his sleeve.
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  • You'd look fine, said a corporal, chaffing a thin little soldier who bent under the weight of his knapsack.
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  • It was already quite dark when Prince Andrew rattled over the paved streets of Brunn and found himself surrounded by high buildings, the lights of shops, houses, and street lamps, fine carriages, and all that atmosphere of a large and active town which is always so attractive to a soldier after camp life.
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  • After passing a chasseur regiment and in the lines of the Kiev grenadiers--fine fellows busy with similar peaceful affairs--near the shelter of the regimental commander, higher than and different from the others, Prince Andrew came out in front of a platoon of grenadiers before whom lay a naked man.
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  • It's fine! answered Sidorov, who was considered an adept at French.
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  • "This is all very fine, but things must be settled," said Prince Vasili to himself, with a sorrowful sigh, one morning, feeling that Pierre who was under such obligations to him ("But never mind that") was not behaving very well in this matter.
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  • Fine young fellow! he said.
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  • Such a fine fellow must serve.
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  • The lad's a fine fellow, a fine fellow!
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  • "Yes, that was fine," said Rostov, smiling.
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  • One of them was leading by the bridle a fine large French horse he had taken from the prisoner.
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  • "That's a fine death!" said Napoleon as he gazed at Bolkonski.
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  • A fine fellow--your friend--I like him!
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  • It's a fine thing!
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  • "Fine doings!" answered Dmitrievna.
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  • Fine. I'll be in next Friday.
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  • I'll be fine after we rest for a little bit.
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  • Monarchy is not inherently bad, and there have been fine kings and queens in history.
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  • There is actually no place in this village for a work of fine art, if any had come down to us, to stand, for our lives, our houses and streets, furnish no proper pedestal for it.
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  • "Fine fellows!" said Rostov laughing.
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  • Two orderlies, a courier and a major-domo, stood near by, some ten paces from Prince Andrew, availing themselves of Kutuzov's absence and of the fine weather.
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  • Lisa thanked her for all the help and assured her that she would be fine.
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  • By tomorrow I'll be fine.
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  • He'll limp around for a week or so and then he'll be fine.
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  • I know what you're up to and thanks for the concern, but I'm fine now.
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  • Left-overs are fine.
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  • Don't worry; everything will work out fine.
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  • You're all drugged up but they say you're going to be fine.
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  • At least, as far as I can See, he'll be fine.
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  • Traci will be fine.
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  • I thought you did at first and I'll admit, I'm not completely certain things might not break bad, but for now, I'm fine.
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  • Yes. She sounded a bit sad—resigned, I guess, but she said everything was fine.
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  • Martha's going to be fine.
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  • A couple more slugs of this stuff and I'll be fine.
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  • Fine. Just tell me I have no reason to be jealous.
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  • And one would be fine with me.
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  • Alex came through the surgery fine.
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  • Something wasn't right, yet the doctor insisted he was doing fine.
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  • Fine. Lay there and ignore me.
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  • Such a lady as you would enjoy the fine restaurants.
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  • She sobered, But I'm not much on fine dining, though.
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  • Fine. What do you want?
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  • He can probably take you down to the underworld and you'll be fine.
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  • Yet, Wynn was fine.
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  • All he had to do was sell one of the original pieces of artwork displayed casually in the marble foyer and he'd be fine for years.
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  • Fine. I'm two doors down, Deidre.
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  • Nothing made sense to her numbed mind, aside from the fragrant ocean, the fine sand that slid through her fingers like silk, and the warm-cool sensations caused by a combination of afternoon sun and sea breeze.
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  • He'd been trying to walk that fine line all night.
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  • Assuming she hadn't missed more fine print in her deal with Darkyn, she wanted to survive the removal of the tumor.
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  • Fine. Name your bet!
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  • "He'll be fine," Katie bit off.
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  • "It's fine," Rhyn said.
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  • "I'm fine," he said again.
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  • She was quiet briefly, considering, before she said, "Fine. Sixty days."
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  • Fine. Then tell me you don't.
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  • "Fine. But I'm not going to training," Kiera answered.
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  • "I'm fine," she replied.
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  • "I'm fine, Jetr," she replied.
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  • We get along just fine.
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  • "Fine. Then we're even," she said.
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  • The statute, however, would not seem to have had much effect; for in spite of a proclamation of Queen Elizabeth in 1560 imposing a fine of £ 20 for each offence on butchers slaughtering animals during Lent, in 1563 Sir William Cecil, in Notes upon an Act for the Increase of the Navy, says that "in old times no flesh at all was eaten on fish days; even the king himself could not have license; which was occasion of eating so much fish as now is eaten in flesh upon fish days."
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  • Kiki wheezed for a long moment, then said, Yes, fine.
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  • Fine. I.ll send Toby out to check on you.
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  • Evelyn knew-- and Romas assured her-- Kiera would be fine.
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  • They were a handsome couple, the elegant woman's hair so fine and blonde it resembled white silk.
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  • I mentioned how this here place was a boarding house in the old days and now it's a fine bed and breakfast.
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  • They said they always heard Aunt Annie lived in a fine rooming house before she met up with Reverend Martin.
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  • "He'll be fine," Cynthia said, and then, gestured to the dress.
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  • I think you're remaining here is a fine idea.
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  • The sofa in the office would be fine and you could leave the door to your bedroom open, just a pinch.
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  • At the base they checked in with Fred and Donnie, who were doing fine without them, so they moved to even more challenging terrain.
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  • Piano George said they lost two fine black horses that slipped on the ice of the Sneffles road and I could hear the men talking loudly about it.
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  • "Your home is fine," Fitzgerald answered, sounding irritated as he moved to follow them.
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  • He hadn't set eyes on the man since he'd decked him in front of his inn and that was fine in his book.
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  • Fine. Don't come whining to me if they blacklist you.
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  • Fine, but if you start sounding suicidal, I'm going to slap you around.
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  • Fine, but I'm not going to let him verbally abuse you.
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  • Yeah, fine, just really tired.
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  • She's going to be fine, you know that.
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  • She is fine and that's all there is.
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  • Lisa will be fine and there is nothing we can do about the past.
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  • The dining room table was set with a linen tablecloth under a handmade lace cover, fine china, Waterford crystal and brass chargers.
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  • No, no it's fine; I just can't imagine it tasting good.
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  • The rhinestone earrings she had on were fine, but the rubies gave a pop of color that complimented the outfit beautifully.
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  • Yes, I'm fine, why?
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  • Fine, I thought I would start up stairs today.
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  • No, I'm sure he'll be fine soon, just needs some rest.
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  • No, I'll be fine, unless you'd rather do something else and meet me later.
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  • Elisabeth said, "I'm fine," while pointing to Jackson.
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  • Oh, he'll be fine.
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  • Fine, but I'm keeping this one.
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  • Fine, but mark my words.
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  • Fine, they were very understanding, said to take all the time I need.
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  • Fine. I am three hundred and twelve years old.
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  • Sure, that'll be fine.
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  • Fine, where the hell have you been?
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  • Fine. I'll see you in January then, love you.
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  • Alex sure picked a fine time to visit, didn't he?
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  • Last month you said it would be fine if he came up for a visit.
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  • Open enough to see that Josh would be a fine catch... for someone.
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  • When she left the dairy on her way to the house, Carmen was further convinced of Alex's love of fine things.
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  • It's fine to skimp on manners when it's just the two of us, but we don't have to look like complete rednecks in front of our guests.
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  • Fine goat herder you are.
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  • That sounds fine to me.
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  • He had become the perfect gentleman, and that suited her fine.
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  • Toast would be fine.
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  • I'm fine - and Alex doesn't even know I'm out here.
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  • "Fine," Larry said with a sigh.
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  • "We're fine, sir," Dan assured him.
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  • "Yeah. The girls are fine," Dan said.
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  • He's more than fine.
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  • I'm fine, dear, really.
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  • I heard everything is fine out west, though.
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  • But you'll be fine here.
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  • Everything west of the river is fine.
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  • "Fine," Kiki said and crossed his arms.
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  • If it'll shut you up, fine.
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  • Really, it's fine Toby.
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  • Yeah. She's in Hell.  She's fine.
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  • She's with Ully and Toby.  They're fine.
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  • "Fine.  That's one," she said.
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  • "I'm fine, Rhyn," Gabe said.
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  • "Fine," I responded, not really in a sharing mood.
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  • No. It was fine.
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  • She returned, saying that 10:30 would be fine.
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  • Follow a mother's instincts and it'll come out just fine.
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  • It greatly improved Dean's frame of mind and he was in fine spirits when he reached his desk.
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  • That's one fine woman back there and quite a looker.
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  • Monica grumbled that Segal was more interested in selling papers than the truth so if he wanted to kill her that was fine with her.
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  • A fine gentleman, most certainly.
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  • You're doing that just fine.
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  • "That sounds just fine," she answered.
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  • It was a fine feeling indeed.
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  • Old Vinnie here is going to be fine as long as he keeps on singing.
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  • I asked if I can talk with him and she said sure, it's fine that I come out this evening.
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  • This celibacy thing is fine as far as it goes, but everything will change after they exchange vows.
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  • No, it's daylight and I can see all the squiggly little things in the grass just fine.
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  • Fine, but at least tell Bill about it – or let me tell him.
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  • If that's what you call jumping all over me, we're going to get along fine.
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  • She ran her fingers up his arm, tracing the large vein – feeling the fine dark hair.
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  • "I like it up here just fine," Alex responded conversationally.
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  • He lifted her chin with a curled index finger "Everything will be fine, sweetheart."
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  • If everything was going to be fine, then why did she feel like their world was ending?
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  • He was back — and he was fine.
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  • It took a while, but she finally convinced him she would be fine staying alone.
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  • I think you're doing just fine on your own.
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  • "I'm fine," he said.
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  • You're fine now, and it's time for me to move onto the next mission, she insisted.
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  • Fine. That's part of it.
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  • We'll be fine, Darian.
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  • "I'll be fine, Darian," she called over her shoulder.
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  • "Fine," she said softly.
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  • It's fine if you do.
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  • No, no, I'm fine.
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  • We got along fine.
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  • That was fine with her.
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  • That's a fine thing to be telling us while we're riding out in the open like this.
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  • You're going to be fine.
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  • It's the fourth day and I feel fine.
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  • I'm sure you'll do fine without my help.
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  • He looked fine the way he was.
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  • "I'm fine," she said as she regained her balance and stepped away from him.
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  • If you want a cat, that's fine and if you don't want one, that's fine too.
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  • The stipulation on the passage of the money was fine with her.
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  • You're parents have spoiled you rotten with fine clothes and a cushion job.
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  • Camping equipment would be fine for her meager cooking needs.
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  • He glanced up and met her startled gaze with eyes the color of fine amber - not brown, not yellow, but an indistinct mixture of both.
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  • That would be fine.
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  • Things are fine here.
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  • You didn't ruin my evening, and you're doing just fine.
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  • Just keep to your right on the main road and you'll get to the highway just fine.
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  • Fine. You chop the wood and I'll make us some iced tea.
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  • Sandwiches would have been fine.
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  • Everything will be fine.
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  • "She's fine," Xander said.
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  • "Yeah, it's fine," she answered.
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  • Fine if you don't want to be Tuesday.
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  • "Fine. We'll go to lunch and then I'm going home," she told Gerry.
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  • "He'll be fine," he said, unconcerned.
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  • "Ugh. Fine," Ashley said with an exasperated sigh.
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  • "I'll be fine," Jessi replied without looking at him.
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  • Her body shook, and she'd be bruised, but she was otherwise fine.
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  • "Fine. Take us now," he snapped and held out his fist.
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  • Of the numerous churches in the city the most interesting are the Stiftskirche, with two towers, a fine specimen of 15th-century Gothic; the Leonhardskirche, also a Gothic building of the 15th century; the Hospitalkirche, restored in 1841, the cloisters of which contain the tomb of Johann Reuchlin; the fine modern Gothic church of St John; the new Roman Catholic church of St Nicholas; the Friedenskirche; and the English church.
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  • A large proportion of the most prominent buildings are clustered round the spacious Schlossplatz, with its fine promenades.
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  • The city contains a fine statue of Schiller, designed by Thorvaldsen; a bronze statue of Christopher, duke of Wurttemberg; a monument to the emperor William I.; an equestrian statue of King William I.
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  • If we examine such a substance as sugar we find that it can be broken up into fine grains, and these again into finer, the finest particles still appearing to be of the same nature as sugar.
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  • After receiving the Baule, the Bakhoy, now a river of fine proportions, flows W.
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  • In 1708 he published his De ratione studiorum, in 1710 De antiquissima Italorum sapientia, in 1720 De universi juris uno principio et fine uno, and in 1721 De constantia jurisprudentis.
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  • The first of these, De uno et universi juris principio et fine uno, was subdivided into two parts; so like.
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  • side of the Huatenay are two more fine squares, called the Cabildo and San Francisco.
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  • The streets cross each other at right angles and afford fine vistas on every side.
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  • Ten days after he sealed the statutes, on the 12th of April 1443, Chicheley died and was buried in Canterbury cathedral on the north side of the choir, under a fine effigy of himself erected in his lifetime.
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  • Delaware is the seat of the Ohio Wesleyan University (co-educational), founded by the Ohio Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1841, and opened as a college in 1844; it includes a college of liberal arts (1844), an academic department (1841), a school of music (1877), a school of fine arts (1877), a school of oratory (1894), a business school (1895), and a college of medicine (the Cleveland College of Physicians and Surgeons, at Cleveland, Ohio; founded as the Charity Hospital Medical College in 1863, and the medical department of the university of Wooster until 1896, when, under its present name, it became a part of Ohio Wesleyan University).
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  • His fine character and conscience earned him universal respect and confidence.
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  • But I was so shrewdly taxed with posing as a strong-minded woman and a philosopher that one fine day I said to myself, ` What, I wonder, is philosophy?'
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  • Ordinary observation of the landscape shows that there is another part, highly variable from day to day, and due to suspended matter, much of which is fine enough to scatter light of blue quality.
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  • So long as the precipitated particles are very fine, the light dispersed in a perpendicular direction is sky-blue and fully polarized.
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  • In place of its ancient fortifications Angouleme is encircled by boulevards known as the Remparts, from which fine views may be obtained in all directions.
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  • The crossing is surmounted by a dome, and the extremity of the north transept by a fine square tower over 160 ft.
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  • It is no less remarkable for its bright carmine attire, and an elongated crest of the same colour, than for its fine song.
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  • The speciality, however, is fine spinning, a process assisted by the damp climate.
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  • The old town contains one or two interesting churches, and commands a fine view.
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  • These fine jet droppers with a mixture of alcohol and water have proved very effective for balloon observations.
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  • It is thus customary in calculating diurnal inequalities either to take no account of days on which there is an appreciable rainfall, or else to form separate tables for " dry " or " fine " days and for " all " days.
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  • Gerdien's estimate of the convection current is for fine weather conditions.
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  • The difficulty is in accounting for the continuance in extensive fine weather districts of large positive charges in the atmosphere in face of the processes of recombination always in progress.
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  • When a mushroom is perfectly ripe and the gills are brown-black in colour, they throw down a thick dusty deposit of fine brown-black or purple-black spores; it is essential to note the colour.
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  • Less manure is used in these cellars than we generally see in the mushroom-houses of England, and the surface of each bed is covered with about an inch of fine white stony soil.
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  • The common mushroom (Agaricus campestris) is propagated by spores, the fine black dust seen to be thrown off when a mature specimen is laid on white paper or a white dish; these give rise to what is known as the "spawn" or mycelium, which consists of whitish threads permeating dried dung or similar substances, and which, when planted in a proper medium, runs through the mass, and eventually develops the fructification known as the mushroom.
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  • A layer of fine earth is then placed over the whole, and well beaten down, and the surface is covered with a thick coat of straw.
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  • In this last district, near the mouth of the old canal, stands a fine statue of Christopher Columbus, the gift of the empress Eugenie in 1870.
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  • Fina from his plans in 1468, and carved the fine marble altar, the original painting and gilding of which are still preserved.
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  • The cathedral contains other 14th-century and early Renaissance paintings, the former including some Passion scenes, the only certain work of Barna da Siena, and some fine choir stalls.
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  • The country round is fertile and well cultivated, and the place must have been one of considerable wealth before the T'aip'ing rebellion, as the ruins of many fine temples attest.
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  • The city has a fine court-house, a United States government building, a Carnegie library and a large auditorium.
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  • The glass industry began in Wheeling in 1821, and there a process was discovered by which in 1864 for soda ash bicarbonate of lime was substituted, and a lime glass was made which was as fine as lead glass; other factors contributing to the localization of the manufacture of glass here are the fine glass sand obtained in the state and the plentiful supply of natural gas for fuel Transportation and Commerce.
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  • for a free grammar school at his name-place, Wainfleet, sufficient to produce for the chantry-priest-schoolmaster Lro a year, the same salary as the headmaster of Magdalen School, and built the school which still exists almost untouched, a fine brick building with two towers, 76 ft.
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  • Since 1731 it has been composed of the two towns of Clermont and Montferrand, now connected by a fine avenue of walnut trees and willows, 2 m.
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  • To the south lies the fine promenade known as the Jardin Lecoq.
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  • It was not completed, however, till the 19th century, when the west portal and towers and two bays of the nave were added, according to the plans of Violletle-Duc. The fine stained glass of the windows dates from the 13th to the 15th centuries.
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  • In some birds, such as the herons, certain down-feathers or plumulae break off into a fine dust as fast as they are formed and form tracts defined in size and situation and known as "powder-down patches."
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  • south-east of the city on a fine hill, called Little Mountain until Jefferson Italianised the name.
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  • The forest products of the state include fine woods, rubber, ipecacuanha, sarsaparilla, jaborandi, vanilla and copaiba.
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  • The town hall, Athenaeum and museum are noteworthy buildings, the last having a fine biological collection.
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  • The name has a curious origin, which explains also the particular meaning of the adjective "spruce," neatly dressed, smart in appearance, fine.
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  • There are several fine public buildings, as the governor's palace, the new opera-house, the public library and museum of Maltese antiquities, and the auberges or lodges of the Knights of Malta (especially the Auberge de Castile) which are now used for military offices, club-rooms, and other purposes.
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  • The begum was charged with having abetted Chait Sing in his rebellion; and after the severest pressure applied to herself and her attendant eunuchs, a fine of more than a million sterling was exacted from her.
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  • A fixed fine, for example, operates very unequally on rich and poor.
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  • Stavanger commands a considerable tourist traffic. It is the starting-point of a favourite tour, embracing the fine valley of the Sand River, the great Lake Suldal and the Bratlandsdal.
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  • The Lyse Fjord, a branch of the Bukken Fjord, is a fine narrow inlet enclosed by precipitous mountains.
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  • Southward the coast becomes low, but northward it is steep and very fine, where the great spur of Flamborough Head projects eastward.
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  • In the old town of Bridlington the church of St Mary and St Nicholas consists of the fine Decorated and Perpendicular nave, with Early English portions, of the priory church of an Augustinian foundation of the time of Henry I.
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  • The angle between two objects, such as stars or the opposite limbs of the sun, was measured by directing an arm furnished with fine " sights " (in the sense of the " sights " of a rifle) first upon one of the objects and then upon the other (q.v.), or by employing an instrument having two arms, each furnished with a pair of sights, and directing one pair of sights upon one object and the second pair upon the other.
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  • Williamstown, the principal village, is a pleasant residential centre on the Green river; it is surrounded by beautiful scenery and its streets are shaded by some fine old trees.
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  • It contains many fine stone buildings.
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  • It is noted for the fine boxwood grown in the vicinity, is a port of call for Black Sea coasting steamers and carries on a considerable trade with Constantinople which might be increased were it not for the obstruction of the harbour by a bar.
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  • The scenery is fine, but wild and desolate in most parts, and of a kind that appeals rather to the northern genius than to the Italian, to whom, as a rule, Sardinia is not attractive.
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  • The mountains near Iglesias are also very fine.
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  • The south-west corner of the island was served by a direct road from Carales westward through Decimomannu (note the name Decimo, a survival, no doubt, of a Roman post-station ad decimum lapidem), where there is a fine Roman bridge over 100 yds.
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  • To the Pisan period belong a number of fine Romanesque churches, among which may be specially mentioned those of Ardara, S.
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  • It contains some fine carvings, many interesting old tombs, and a monument of Jan Nieuwenhuizen, the founder of the Society for Public Welfare (Tot Nut van het Algemeen) in 1785.
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  • He assisted at the taking of Wareham, and shortly afterwards compounded for his estates by a fine of X500 from which, however, he was afterwards relieved by Cromwell.
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  • The collegiate church (Stiftskirche) dates from about 1340, and contains a number of fine ducal monuments.
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  • In its vicinity is the famous place of pilgrimage Maria-Besnyd, with a fine Franciscan monastery, which contains the tombs of the Grassalkovich family.
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  • The fine campanile of the church is 246 ft.
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  • It was enclosed by Humphrey, duke of Gloucester, and laid out by Charles II., and contains a fine avenue of Spanish chestnuts planted in his time.
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  • Gyula-Fehervar is the seat of a Roman Catholic bishop, and has a fine Roman Catholic cathedral, built in the 1 nth century in Romanesque style, and rebuilt in 5443 by John Hunyady in Gothic style.
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  • The brick and opus reticulatum facing of the walls is especially fine.
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  • In addition to this they prosecuted him on a charge of embezzlement, and imposed a fine of 50 talents.
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  • There is also fine sea-bathing at English Bay on the outskirts of the city.
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  • There are numerous tile-works and potteries of fine ware; and a considerable trade is carried on in anchovies and oysters caught in the Scheldt.
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  • At the entrance to the latter the senate erected, in his honour, a triumphal arch which is still extant - a fine simple monument with a single opening.
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  • in length) is a fine bridge over the Ariminus (mod.
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  • The ruined church at Longpont (13th century) is the relic of an important Cistercian abbey; Urcel and Mont-Notre-Dame have fine churches, the first entirely in the Romanesque style, the second dating from the 12th and 13th centuries, to which period the church at Braisne also belongs.
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  • The old city walls have been replaced by pleasant gardens and walks, and there is a park in which stands a fine monument (1876) by J.
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  • Of a Benedictine abbey dedicated to the same saints there remain a gatehouse and lodge, and a fine doorway.
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  • A fine bridge over the Trent, and the municipal buildings, were provided by Lord Burton.
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  • The fine insistence on individual moral responsibility in xviii.
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  • It contains some fine tapestry and portraits, and the Lee Pennyfamiliar to readers of Sir Walter Scott's Talisman-which was brought from Palestine in the 14th century by the Crusading knight, Sir Simon Lockhart.
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  • It is remarkable for its fine tower and chime of bells, and contains the splendid allegorical monument of William the Silent, executed by Hendrik de Keyser and his son Pieter about 1621, and the tomb of Hugo Grotius, born in Delft in 1583, whose statue, erected in 1886, stands in the market-place outside the church.
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  • A fine collection of mechanical models is connected with the polytechnic school.
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  • Among the principal buildings are the First National bank, the immense Union station and the Saint Vincent hospital; besides several fine office and school buildings (including the beautiful manual training high school) and churches.
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  • It commands a fine harbour, affording safe anchorage for the greater part of the year.
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  • Its chief town and the residence of the governor used to be Joshekan-Kali, a large village with fine gardens, formerly famous for its carpets (kali), but now the chief place is Maimeh, a little city with a population of 2500, situated at an elevation of 6670 ft., about 63 m.
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  • A picturesque avenue leads to the church of St Mary, principally Early English and Perpendicular, with remains of Norman work, having a lofty tower surmounted by a spire, and containing several fine monuments, tombs and brasses.
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  • In the vicinity are several fine mansions.
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  • Opposite the cathedral is a very fine round tower 100 ft.
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  • But Sulla in Greece and Fimbria in Asia defeated his armies in several battles; the Greek cities were disgusted by his severity, and in 84 he concluded peace, abandoning all his conquests, surrendering his fleet and paying a fine of 2000 talents.
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  • There is a fine park outside the town belonging to the duke of Arenberg, whose ancestor, Charles de Ligne, bought it from Henry IV.
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  • A fine pavilion or kiosk, named de l'Etoile, has also survived.
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  • The parks are a fine feature of the city; by its charter a fixed percentage of all expenditures for public improvements must be used to purchase park land.
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  • The walls and ceiling of the fine Romanesque interior are covered with frescoes of 1570, subdued in colour and well suited to the character of the building; those of the octagonal cupola representing the Assumption of the Virgin are by Correggio, but much restored.
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  • In the sacristy are fine intarsias.
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  • The Madonna della Steccata (Our Lady of the Palisade), a fine church in the form of a Greek cross, erected between 1521 and 1539 after Zaccagni's designs, contains the tombs and monuments of many of the Bourbon and Farnese dukes of Parma, and preserves its pictures, Parmigiano's "Moses Breaking the Tables of the Law" and Anselmi's "Coronation of the Virgin."
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  • Francesco, probably the earliest Franciscan church in northern Italy (1230-1298; now a prison), is a Gothic building in brick with a fine rose-window.
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  • East Orange has a fine water-works system, which it owns and operates; the water supply is obtained from artesian wells at White Oaks Ridge, in the township of Milburn (about 10 m.
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  • Its bright red beak, the bare bluish skin surrounding its large grey eyes, and the tufts of elongated feathers springing vertically from its lores, give it a pleasing and animated expression; but its plumage generally is of an inconspicuous ochreous grey above and dull white beneath, - the feathers of the upper parts, which on the neck and throat are long and loose, being barred by fine zigzag markings of dark brown, while those of the lower parts are more or less striped.
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  • It stands on a wooded hill, its botanical gardens commanding a fine view westward of the bay and rock of St Michel.
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  • The chestnut covers considerable areas in Prigord, Limousin and Beam; resinotis trees (firs, pines, larches, &c.) form fine forests in the Vosges and The indigenous fauna include the bear, now very rare but still found in the Alps and Pyrenees, the wolf, harbouring chiefly in the Cvennes and Vosges, but in continually decreasing areas; the fox, marten, badger, weasel, otter, the beaver in the extreme south of the Rhne valley, and in the Alps the marmot; the red deer and roe deer are preserved in many of the forests, and the wild boar is found in several districts; the chamois and wild goat survive in the Pyrenees and Alps.
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  • The environs of Creil (Oise) and Chteau-Landon (Seine-et-Marne) are noted for their freestone (pierre de taille), which is also abundant at Euville and Lrouville in Meuse; the production of plaster is particularly important in the environs of Paris, of kaolin of fine quality at Yrieix (1-Jaute-Vienne), of hydraulic lime in Ardche (Le Teil), of lime phosphates in the department of Somme, of marble in the departments of HauteGaronne (St Beat), Hautes-Pyrnes (Campan, Sarrancolin), Isre and Pas-de-Calais, and of cement in Pas-de-Calais (vicinity of Boulogne) and Isre (Grenoble).
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  • breaches of law punishable by a fine not exceeding 12S.
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  • The other ministries with the largest outgoings were the ministry of war (the expenditure of which rose from 254 millions in 1895 to over 30 millions in 1995), the ministry of marine (103/4 millions in 1895, over 123/4 millionsin 1905), the ministry of public works (with an expenditure in 1905 of over 20 millions, 10 millions of which was assigned to posts, telegraphs and telephones) and the ministry of public instruction, fine arts and public worship, the expenditure on education having risen from 73/4 millions in 1895 to 93/4 millions in 1905.
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  • At Paris the cole Suprieure des Mines and the cole des Fonts et Chausses are controlled by the minister of public, works, the cole des Beaux-Arts, the cole des Arts Dcoratifs and the Conservatoire National de Musique et de Dclamation by the unr,ler-secretary for fine arts.
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  • In the provinces there are national schools of fine art and of music and other establishments and free subventioned schools.
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  • Among its interior adornments is an onyx font, some fine wood carving in the choir, and the silver doors to the shrines of its chapels.
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  • The municipal government is housed in an ancient tobacco factory converted to public uses, and a fine old Capuchin convent now serves as a public hospital.
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  • The Paseo, or public park, is distinguished for its fine trees and flowers.
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  • The four Gothic churches of St Nicholas,' St Mary, with a lofty steeple, St James and The Holy Ghost, and the fine medieval town hall, dating in its oldest part from 1306 and restored in 1882, are among the more striking buildings.
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  • There is a fine monument commemorating the war of 1870-71, one (1859) to the local patriot Ferdinand von Schill, and another (1900) to the poet and patriot E.
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  • 1 A remarkable series of 14th-century frescoes, in perfect condition, were disclosed in 1909 by the removal of the whitewash which had for centuries covered the interior of this fine church.
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  • It dyes silk and mordanted cotton a fine scarlet.
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  • The very fine torso of Athena in the Ecole des Beaux Arts at Paris, which has unfortunately lost its head, may perhaps best serve to help our imagination in reconstructing a Pheidian original.
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  • This town, which was laid out on an exceptionally fine site according to a scientific plan by the architect Hippodamus of Miletus, soon rose to considerable importance, and attracted much of the Aegean and Levantine commerce which had hitherto been in Athenian hands.
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  • Rhodes was again famous for its pottery in medieval times; this was a lustre ware at first imitated from Persian, though it afterwards developed into an independent style of fine colouring and rich variety of design.
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  • Flowing into the Pacific Ocean on the east coast there are some fine rivers, but the majority have short and rapid courses.
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  • In the Northern Territory are several fine rivers.
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  • The South Alligator river, flowing into Van Diemen's Gulf, is also a fine stream, navigable for over 30 m.
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  • A very fine freshwater fish is the Murray cod, which sometimes weighs Too lb; and the golden perch, found in the same river, has rare beauty of colour.
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  • The head hair is usually matted with grease and dirt, but when clean is fine and glossy.
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  • Messrs Hamilton Hume and Hovell set out from Lake George, crossed the Murrumbidgee, and, after following the river for a short distance, struck south, skirting the foothills of what are now known as the Australian Alps until they reached a fine river, which was called the Hume after the leader's father.
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  • able trade of rearing fine wool sheep, first commenced by Captain John McArthur in 1803.
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  • He was soon admitted a member of the French Academy of the Fine Arts, but on the revocation of the edict of Nantes he was obliged to take refuge in Holland, and his name was struck off the Academy roll.
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  • The phenomenon is due to very fine particles of dust suspended in the high regions of the atmosphere that produce a scattering effect upon the component parts of white light.
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  • These were due to an enormous amount of exceedingly fine dust blown to a great height by that terrific explosion, and then universally diffused by the high atmospheric currents.
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  • Copra is also produced in considerable quantity, and there is fine timber in the vicinity.
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  • Near the barracks is the Royal Artillery Institution, with a fine museum and a lecture hall.
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  • All its charters were annulled, its privileges and those of its gilds swept away, and a heavy fine imposed.
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  • On the Grand Place is the fine statue of Christine de Lalaing, princess d'Epinoy, who defended Tournai against Parma in 1581.
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  • They are about as tall as the average Malay, are slimly built, light of colour, and have wavy fine hair.
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  • quarry from which other red marbles are taken; and at Roxbury, Washington county, a fine serpentine, called "green marble," or verde antique, is quarried.
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  • It has a fine Renaissance facade, constructed about 1500 by Cardinal Giovanni de' Medici (afterwards Pope Leo X.), and some good terra cottas by the Della Robbia.
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  • Its sides show fine basaltic formation in places.
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  • Extending along the front of the town is the boulevard de la Republique, a fine road built by Sir Morton Peto on a series of arches, with a frontage of 3700 ft., and bordered on one side by handsome buildings, whilst a wide promenade overlooking the harbour runs along the other.
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  • The public buildings of chief interest are the kasbah, the government offices (formerly the British consulate), the palaces of the governor-general and the archbishop - all these are fine Moorish houses; the "Grand" and the "New" Mosques, the Roman Catholic cathedral of St Philippe, the church of the Holy Trinity (Church of England), and the Bibliotheque Nationale d'Alger - a Turkish palace built in 1799-1800.
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  • Here are the summer palace of the governor-general, many fine Moorish and French villas and luxurious hotels, all surrounded by beautiful gardens.
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  • The limestone forms fine scarps on the southern side of the lake, capped by beds regarded as the Yoredale series.
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  • The harbour, owing to its fine anchorage, was much in use, but the place was never a separate town, but always dependent on Formiae.
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  • In 1903 the foundations of this temple were discovered close to the Arch of Trajan, and many fragments of fine sculptures in both the Egyptian and the Greco-Roman style belonging to it were found.
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  • Sofia, a circular edifice of about 760, now modernized, the roof of which is supported by six ancient columns, is a relic of the Lombard period; it has a fine cloister of the 12th century constructed in part of fragments of earlier buildings; while the cathedral with its fine arcaded facade and incomplete square campanile (begun in 1279) dates from the 9th century and was rebuilt in 1114.
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  • In 1826 he described the prismatically-coloured films of metal, known as Nobili's' rings, deposited electrolytically from solutions of lead and other salts when the anode is a polished iron plate and the cathode is a fine wire placed vertically above it.
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  • This is a fine species, having when young straighter branches than Q.
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  • The wood is hard, heavy and of fine grain, quite equal to the best British oak for indoor use, but of very variable durability where exposed to weather.
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  • The actual building dates from the end of the 17th and the beginning of the 18th century, and contains a fine library with a collection of rare manuscripts and incunabula; near it is the small and old town of Tepl (pop. 2789).
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  • It contains, besides a fine library, a collection of the presents he received during his long career; numerous autographs, and other historical relics, a collection of rare coins, armour, portraits and various minerals.
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  • It stands at the mouth of the Veveyse and commands fine views of the snowy mountains seen over the glassy surface of the lake.
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  • The principal buildings are the church of St Lawrence in Gothic style, erected in 1821, and the mechanics' institute, a fine building, comprising class-rooms, a library, a.
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  • The ride to Dolgelley (Dolgellau) is fine.
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  • These ruins include the palace of Yesu II., which has several fine chambers.
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  • His fine collections of manuscripts and coins was purchased by the British Museum.
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  • The dry wind from the Sahara called harmattan, which carries great quantities of fine red sand, causes a fall of temperature in the (European) summer.
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  • Some of their carving is very fine.
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  • and his queen stood sponsors, Christine Antoinette Charlotte Desmares (1682-1753), was a fine actress in both tragedy and soubrette parts.
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  • of fine sewing cotton has been employed to measure the wind velocity passing over a kite, the tension of the cotton being recorded, and this plan has given satisfactory results.
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  • In order to see whether the heat came out of the chips he compared the capacity for heat of the chips abraded by the boring bar with that of an equal quantity of the metal cut from the block by a fine saw, and obtained the same result in the two cases, from which he concluded that "the heat produced could not possibly have been furnished at the expense of the latent heat of the metallic chips."
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  • A nervous system has been shown to exist in many species, and consists of a perioesophageal ring giving off usually six nerves which run forwards and backwards along the lateral and median lines; these are connected by numerous fine, circular threads in the sub-cuticle.
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  • unveiled a fine memorial arch commemorating Royal Engineers who fell in the South African War.
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  • Knit goods are manufactured, but the importance of the place is due to its sulphur springs, the waters of which are used for the treatment of skin diseases, gout, rheumatism, etc., and to the tonic air and fine scenery.
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  • In the desert tracts fine breeds of camels, cattle, horses and sheep are to be found wherever there is pasturage.
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  • Rajputana is of great archaeological interest, possessing some fine religious buildings in ruins and others in excellent preservation.
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  • Even if he refloated the ship he had to pay a fine of half its value for sinking it.
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  • The commonest of all penalties was a fine.
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  • The restoration of goods appropriated, illegally bought or damaged by neglect, was usually accompanied by a fine, giving it the form of multiple restoration.
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  • In the undulator apparatus, which is similar in general principle to the " siphon recorder " used in submarine telegraphy, a spring or falling weight moves a paper strip beneath one end of a fine silver tube, the other end of which dips into a vessel containing ink.
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  • The record of the signals given by this instrument was an undulating line of fine perforations or spots, and the character and succession of the undulations were used to interpret the signals desired to be sent.
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  • If a loop of very fine platinum wire, prepared by the Wollaston process, is included in an exhausted glass bulb like an incandescent lamp, then when electric oscillations are sent through it its resistance is increased.
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  • 47) and when electric waves fall on A they excite oscillations in the fine wire resistance R and increase the resistance, and so upset the balance of the bridge and cause the galvanometer to deflect.
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  • Fessenden employed a simple fine loop of Wollaston platinum wire in series with a telephone and shunted voltaic cell, so that when electric oscillations passed through the fine wire its resistance was increased and the current through the telephone suddenly diminished (R.
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  • A pair of fine wires of iron and constantan are twisted together in the middle, and one pair of unlike ends are connected to a galvanometer.
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  • He passed the oscillations to be detected through a fine wire or strip of gold leaf, and over this, but just not touching, suspended a loop of bismuth-antimony wire by a quartz fibre.
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  • The other pair of platinum wires are connected by a tellurium-bismuth thermo-couple, the junction of which just makes contact with the centre of the fine wire.
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  • The penal tribunals have jurisdiction in cases involving imprisonment up to ten years, or a fine exceeding 40, while the assize courts, with a jury, deal with offences involving imprisonment for life or over ten years, and have exclusive jurisdiction (except that the senate is on occasion a high court of justice) over all political offences.
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  • The chief timber of indigenous growth is padouk (Pterocarpus dalbergioides) used for buildings, boats, furniture, fine joinery and all purposes to which teak, mahogany, hickory, oak and ash are applied.
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  • While preserving most of the ancient features of its High Street, the town has tended to become a suburb of the capital, its fine beach and golf course hastening this development.
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  • It is a fine example of a Jacobean mansion, with a beautiful fountain in the middle of the court-yard.
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  • of Hexham, on the north bank of the river Tyne, which is here crossed by a fine seven-arched bridge dating from 1674.
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  • A remarkably fine cup turned in amber from a bronze-age barrow at Hove is now in the Brighton Museum.
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  • Its fragrant shoots and the fine yellow green of the young leaves recommend it to the ornamental planter.
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  • It is beautifully placed near the river, and is a fine cruciform structure, partly Early English and partly Perpendicular, with a central tower and lofty octagonal spire.
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  • See also Clayton, Churches of Sir C. Wren (1848-1849); Taylor, Towers and Steeples of Wren (London, 1881); Niven, City Churches (London, 1887), illustrated with fine etchings; A.
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  • In the library of All Souls at Oxford are preserved a large number of drawings by Wren, including the designs for almost all his chief works, and a fine series showing his various schemes for St Paul's Cathedral.
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  • The epithem is penetrated by a network of fine intercellular spaces, which are normally filled with water and debouch on one or more intercellular cavities below the epidermis.
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  • In other cases the leaf-gaps are very broad and long, the meristeles separating them being reduced to comparatively slender strands, while there is present in each gap a network of fine vascular threads, some of which run out to the leaf, while others form cross-connections between these leaf-trace strands and also with the main cauline meristeles.
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  • Finally the cauline meristeles themselves may be resolved into a number of fine threads.
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  • They possess a delicate Laticiferous layer of protoplasm, with numerous small nuclei lining Tissue the walls, while the interior of the tube (corresponding with the cell-vacuole) contains a fluid called latex, consisting of an emulsion of fine granules and drops of very various substances suspended in a watery medium in which various other substances (salts, sugars, rubber-producers, tannins, alkaloids and various enzymes) are dissolved.
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  • Communication between the various protoplasts of the colony is, however, carried on by means of fine protoplasmic threads, which are continuous through the cell-walls.
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  • Apart from their dependence in various ways upon neighboring cells, the protoplasts of all plants are probably connected together by fine strands of protoplasm which pass through the cell-wall (Tangl, Russow, Gardiner, Kienitz-Gerloff and others) ___________
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