Finds sentence example

finds
  • If my pa ever finds out, I'll get a whipping for sure.
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  • Unless Sirian finds the secret first.
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  • It's only a matter of time before he finds it now.
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  • Not far off, similar relics were found at Sobunar, Zlatiste and Debelobrdo; iron and bronze ornaments, vessels and weapons, often of elaborate design, occur in the huts and cemeteries of Glasinac, and in the cemetery of Jezerine, where they are associated with objects in silver, tin, amber, glass, &c. Among the numerous finds made in other districts may be mentioned the discovery, at Vrankamer, near Bihac, of 98 African coins, the oldest of which dates from 300 B.C. Many vestiges of Roman rule survive, such as roads, mines, ruins, tombs, coins, frescoes and inscriptions.
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  • "If he finds his mate …" "We can find her," Jule said.
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  • 4, p. 470, finds that the wisdom of the priests, in one land after another, rises to the thought of divine unity.
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  • Dr. Reisner, working for Boston, was not held up by the war, but continued his excavations in the Giza pyramid field and in Nubia, making good finds in both places.
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  • He succeeds in doing so, and finds himself in a wonderful park, which lies along the sea coast.
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  • The ferry-man of Ut-Napishtim brings him safely through these waters, despite the difficulties and dangers of the voyage, and at last the hero finds himself face to face with Ut-Napishtim.
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  • The middle and eastern divisions of the district, forming the south-western part of the Mahanadi delta, consist entirely of alluvial plains, watered by a network of channels through which the most southerly branch of that river, the Koyakhai, finds its way into the sea.
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  • The village Bolgari near Kanzan, surrounded by numerous graves in which most interesting archaeological finds have been made, occupies the site of one of the cities - perhaps the capital - of that extinct kingdom.
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  • This idea finds its most magnificent literary expression in Milton's Paradise Lost.
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  • Speaking generally, it may be noted that the Society includes various shades of opinion, from that known as " evangelical," with a certain hesitation in receiving modern thought, to the more " advanced "' position which finds greater freedom to consider and adopt new suggestions of scientific, religious or other thinkers.
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  • Pursuing their courses eastward the North and South Saskatchewan rivers unite in the Saskatchewan (Cree, rapid-flowing river), which finds its way to Lake Winnipeg, and thence by way of Nelson river to Hudson Bay.
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  • Cain's subsequent founding of a city finds a parallel in the legend of the origin of Rome through the swarms of outlaws and broken men of all kinds whom Romulus attracted thither.
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  • 1 In complete agreement with Jerome's vivid picture the visitor to the Roman Catacombs finds himself in a vast labyrinth of narrow galleries, usually from 3 to 4 ft.
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  • Interesting finds from the Stone Age, as well as remains of the mammoth, have been made.
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  • They form the highest portion of the Sudetic system which separates south-east Prussia from the Austrian empire, and finds its natural continuation towards the N.W.
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  • The Bohemian ridge is cleft about the middle by a deep gorge through which pour the headwaters of the river Elbe, which finds its source in the Siebengriinde.
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  • The acid finds considerable use in organic chemistry, being employed to discriminate between the different types of alcohols and of amines, and also in the production of diazo, azo and diazo-amino compounds.
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  • The liquid boils at -5° C. and the solid melts at -65° C. It forms double compounds with many metallic chlorides, and finds considerable application as a means of separating various members of the terpene group of compounds.
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  • Nearer the coast, where the melting on the surface is more considerable, the wet snow freezes hard during the winter and is more or less transformed into ice, on the surface of which rivers and lakes are formed, the water of which, however, soon finds its way through crevasses and holes in the ice down to its under surface, and reaches the sea as a sub-glacial river.
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  • Working out the calculations, Pettersson finds that the favourable constellation occurred and will occur in 3500 B.C., 1900 B.C., 250 B.C., 1433 A.D., 3300 A.D., and so on.
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  • The latter discolours the sand and so one finds, round the coast and towards the upper margin of the zone between highand low-water marks, an under layer of black sand formed in this way.
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  • They are called from the places in France where the most typical finds of palaeolithic remains have been made - Chellian from Chelles, a few miles east of Paris; Mousterian from the cave of Moustier on the river V ezere, Dordogne; Solutrian from the cave at Solutre near Macon; and Madelenian from the rocky shelter of La Madeleine, Dordogne.
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  • The inhabitants manufacture earthenware, which finds ready sale all through Egypt.
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  • It has a world-wide distribution, but finds its chief development in the temperate and frigid zones, especially of the northern hemisphere, and as Alpine plants.
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  • Finally, the laws of distribution of animals over Siberia cannot be made out until the changes undergone by its surface during the Glacial and Lacustrine periods are well established and the Post-Tertiary fauna is better known The remarkable finds of Quaternary mammals about Omsk and their importance for the history of the Equidae are merely a slight indication of what may be expected in this field.
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  • For the unipartite ternary quantic of order n he finds that the fundamental system contains a (n+4) (n -1) individuals.
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  • A wealthy man, addicted to his pleasures and his profits, finds religion to be a traffic so entangled, and of so many piddling accounts, that of all mysteries he cannot skill to keep a stock going upon that trade.
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  • Nevertheless when Guillaume seeks help from Louis the emperor he finds all his relations in Laon, in accordance with his historic Frankish origin.
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  • Denoting by W the work in ergs done upon a cubic centimetre of the metal (=_fHdB or f HdI), he finds W =nips approximately, where n 47r is a number, called the hysteretic constant, depending upon the metal, and B is the maximum induction.
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  • But he was an energetic, clear-headed man, of great practical force and skill, cultivated, accomplished, agreeable, flexible, possibly unscrupulous, just the sort of person whom a restless despot like Justinian finds useful.
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  • In Joel the enemies of Israel are the nations collectively, and among those specified by name neither Assyria nor Chaldaea finds a place.
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  • This conception, which finds its parallel in Dan.
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  • Alum finds application as a mordant, in the preparation of lakes for sizing hand-made paper and in the clarifying of turbid liquids.
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  • In social economy his views are very vague; he preserves the family, country and property, but finds in all three, as they now are, a despotism which must be eliminated.
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  • Passing to the effect of ordination, we meet with two views, each of which still finds advocates.
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  • But, as Ueberweg points out, it might fairly be urged by Aquinas that he does not pretend to explain how the individual is actually created, but merely states what he finds to be an invariable condition of the existence of individuals.
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  • When a man finds himself in this condition he assumes the women's dress and habits.
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  • None agrees in every point, but almost every detail finds a close parallel in some tomb or other.
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  • After losing many men the Great King comes back to the place where he crossed the Danube, finds the Ionians still guarding the bridge in spite of the attempts of the Scyths to make them desert, and safely re-enters his own dominions.
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  • The modern oriental open waistcoat finds its fellow in the jacket or bolero from ancient Crete, and seems to have been distinctively Aegean.
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  • Elongated and more pointed it is the archaic crown of the Pharaohs (symbolical of upper Egypt), is worn by a Hittite god of the 14th century, and finds parallels upon old FIG.
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  • This breast ornament finds analogies in the royal and high priestly dress of Egypt, and in the six jewels of the Babylonian king. ?
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  • It is when studied on these lines that pathology finds its proper place as a department of biology.
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  • The loss of an eye will be followed by atrophy of the optic nerve; the tissues in a stump of an amputated limb show atrophic changes; a paralysed limb from long disuse shows much wasting; and one finds at great depths of the sea fishes and marine animals, which have almost completely lost the organs of sight, having been cut off for long ages from the stimuli (light) essential for these organs, and so brought into an atrophic condition from disuse.
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  • Trambusti, curiously, finds confirmatory evidence of this in the division of cells in sarcoma.
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  • Oertel finds an explanation of this want of complete celldifferentiation, loss of function, and acquired vegetative activity in the non-homogeneous character of the nuclear chromatin elements of the cell, and maintains that the different properties of the cell are carried and handed down by the different orders of chromatin loops.
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  • One chief means employed by nature in accomplishing this object is the investment of those parts of the organism liable to be attacked with an armour-like covering of epidermis, periderm, bark, &c. The grape is proof against the inroads of the yeastplant so long as the husk is intact, but on the husk being injured the yeast-plant finds its way into the interior and sets up vinous fermentation of its sugar.
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  • His results, so far, have been confirmed by Starling, who finds that the amount of lymph-flow from the thoracic duct is dependent upon difference in pressure.
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  • From a theoretical point of view Hahnemann's is one of the abstract systems, pretending to universality, which modern medicine neither accepts nor finds it worth while to controvert.
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  • By his eminent labours in cellular pathology, Virchow, and Metchnikoff later, gave the last blow to the mere humoral pathology which, after an almost unchallenged prevalence for some two thousand years, now finds a resting-place only in our nurseries.
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  • Rising amid the ancient gneiss rocks of the St Gotthard, the Rhine finds its way down to the Lake of Constance between layers of Triassic and Jurassic formation; and between that lake and Basel it penetrates the chalk barrier of the Jura.
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  • But the source even of these - the passions of ambition and avarice - he finds in the fear of death; and that fear he resolves into the fear of eternal punishment after death.
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  • There is no modern survival of the name of Tyburn, which finds, indeed, its chief historical interest as attaching to the famous place of execution which lay near the modern Marble Arch.
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  • Gomme finds important evidence of the independence of London in the existence of a merchant law which was opposed to Anglo-Saxon law.
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  • Ankylostomiasis is a disease which finds a congenial habitat in the warm damp atmosphere of mines, and has become a veritable scourge in some mining regions.
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  • The system of "compositions" or fines, paid in many cases with the help of kinsmen, finds its natural place in the ancient, tribal period of English history and loses its vitality later on in consequence of the growth of central power and of the scattering of maegths.
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  • The clear juice in the meantime flows over the edge of the cylindrical vessel without disturbance and finds its way out by the short leg of the siphon, and so passes to the canal for collecting the defecated juice.
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  • In technological chemistry it finds application as a reducing agent, e.g.
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  • Rejecting the retributive view of punishment, he describes the sufferings of Christ as those of the perfect "Penitent," and finds their expiatory value to lie in the Person of the Sufferer, the God-Man.
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  • Brown is the first investigator to determine the theoretical motions with this degree of precision; and he finds that there is no such divergence between the actual and the computed motion.
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  • The theory of distillation finds a place in all treatises on physical chemistry.
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  • The Republican machine finds it easy with the support of the millionaire summer colony at Newport and the street railway corporations to corrupt the French-Canadians and a portion of the native element in the rural towns and maintain absolute control of the state government.
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  • It has been said with truth that an industrious collector of beetles, butterflies, neuroptera, &c., finds a greater number of species in a circuit of some miles near Tokyo than are exhibited by the whole British Isles.
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  • Ill-nourished, over-worked and, it may be, disappointed, he finds the struggle intolerable and so passes out into the darkness.
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  • The hardships of a campaign cause him little sufferin~ since he never frets over them, but the hour of combat finds him forgetful bf everything save victory.
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  • It is true, nevertheless, that love as a prelude to marriage finds only a small place in Japanese ethics.
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  • He was also the means of checking the fanaticism of the more turbulent Mahommedans in British India, which in times of internal troubles and misunderstandings finds vent in the shape of religious or political riots.
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  • The hinder portion of the body being drawn of ter, some part of it (c) finds another support on the rough ground or a projection; and, the anterior bends being stretched in a straight line, the front part of the body is propelled (from a to d) in consequence.
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  • In his addresses on the future of the Protestant Church (Reden fiber die Zukunft der evangelischen Kirche, 1849), he finds the essence of Christianity in Jesus's conceptions of the heavenly Father, the Son of Man and the kingdom of Heaven.
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  • Others see in the glass coloured figures of men, women and animals in motion; while in rarer cases the ball disappears from view, and the scryer finds himself apparently looking at an actual scene.
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  • San Antonio, a suburb of Cuernavaca, is noted for its pottery, which is highly attractive in form and colour, and finds a ready market among the visitors to that city.
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  • The following form which Seeberg gives as the creed of St Paul is an artificial combination of fragments of oral teaching, which naturally reappear in the teaching of St Peter, but finds no attestation in the later creeds of particular churches which would prove its claim to be their parent form: " The living God who created all things sent His Son Jesus Christ, born of the seed of David, who died for our sins according to the scriptures, and was buried, who was raised on the third day according to the scriptures, and appeared to Cephas and the XI I., who sat at the Der Katechismus der Urchristenheit, p. 85.
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  • He finds that materials fail for Pontus, Galatia, Cappadocia, Syria, Palestine, Egypt.
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  • By good fortune the earth here was very deep. On the higher level of the agora and the Apollo temple, where the depth of earth is comparatively slight, there is little hope of important finds.
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  • "It is generally recognized that this chapter holds quite an isolated place in the Pentateuchal history; it is the only passage which presents Abraham in the character of a warrior, and connects him with historical names and political movements, and there are no clear marks by which it can be assigned to any one of the documents of which Genesis is made up. Thus, while one school of interpreters finds in the chapter the earliest fragment of the political history of western Asia, some even holding with Ewald that the narrative is probably based on old Canaanite records, other critics, as Noldeke, regard the whole as unhistorical and comparatively late in origin.
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  • On the latter view, which finds its main support in the intrinsic difficulties of the narrative, it is scarcely possible to avoid the conclusion that the chapter is one of the latest additions to the Pentateuch (Wellhausen and many others)."
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  • Working with some inscriptions from Persepolis which were found to contain references to Darius and Xerxes, Grotefend had established the phonetic values of certain of the Persian characters, and his successors were perfecting the discovery just about the time when the new Assyrian finds were made.
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  • Every belief of mankind is in the last analysis amenable to reason, and finds its origin in evidence that can appeal to the arbitrament of common sense.
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  • Some recent finds have, indeed, seemed to make inferential reference to the Hebrews, and the marvellous collection of letters of the XVIIIth dynasty found at Tel el-Amarnaletters to which we shall refer later - have the utmost importance as proving a possible early date for the Mosaic accounts.
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  • The documents in question consist chiefly of letters, and constitute one of the most important of archaeological finds.
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  • The confidence which existed between Trajan and his army finds expression in some of the coins of his reign.
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  • The ignorance of the compiler regarding the sequence of the kings finds a parallel in that of the author of the book of Daniel; see C. C. Torrey, Amer.
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  • From a series of measures of the angle between Jupiter's satellites and the planet, made in June and July 1794 and in August and September 1795, Schur finds the mass of Jupiter =I / Io 4 8.55 1.45, a result which accords well within the limits of its probable error with the received value of the mass derived from modern researches.
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  • The reading of the positioncircle of the finder is then the reading to which the position-circle of the heliometer should be set, and from the readings of the micrometerscrew he finds, by a convenient table, the proper settings of the heliometer scales in distance.
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  • A more satisfactory explanation has been offered by Dieterich (Abraxas, 117 sqq.), who finds in this chapter an adaptation of the birth of Apollo and the attempt of the dragon Pytho to kill his mother Schopfung and Chaos § 3, Religionsgesch.
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  • Sir John Murray finds the source of the phosphoric acid to be the decomposition of large quantities of animal matter, and he illustrates this by the well-known circumstance of the death of vast shoals of fish when warm Gulf-Stream water displaces the cold current which usually extends to the American coast.
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  • Hackspill (Comptes Rendus, 5905, 141, p. 101) finds that metallic caesium can be obtained more readily by heating the chloride with metallic calcium.
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  • Frank of Charlottenburg, who finds that a concentrated solution of cuprous chloride in an acid, the liquid being made into a paste with kieselgiihr, is the most effective.
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  • The valley in which the city lies has no opening to the coast, and the water finds its way, often only with much care and artificial aid, through underground passages (katavothra) to the sea.
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  • In other words the intelligence when it once begins to define an object for itself, finds itself launched on a movement of selfasserting synthesis in which it cannot stop until it had recognized that the unity of the object with itself involves its unity with all other objects and with the mind that knows it.
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  • Similarly from the side of logic. It is not the teaching of idealism alone but of the facts which logical analysis has brought home to us that all difference in the last resort finds its ground in the quality or content of the things differentiated, and that this difference of content shows in turn a double strand, the strand of sameness and the strand of otherness - that in which and that by which they differ from one another.
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  • On the other hand, without the world mind: only through the action of the environment upon the subject is the idealizing activity in which it finds its being called into existence.
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  • The town is less well equipped with museums and similar institutions, the most noteworthy being the Prussia museum of antiquities, which is especially rich in East Prussian finds from the Stone age to the Viking period.
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  • The male god Dagon has his partner Astarte (qq.v.), and Baal-zebub, a famous oracle of Ekron (2 Kings i.) finds a parallel in the local " baals " of Palestine.'
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  • What he finds it necessary to condemn even in milder terms as bad doctrine is infallibily condemned; that is certain, Roman Catholic theologians tell us, though not yet de fide.
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  • It means that historians recognize the peculiar importance of those beliefs which are constitutive of church agreement; and it finds some support from the philosophical and political associations of ancient " dogma."
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  • The drainage of New York finds its way to the sea in various directions.
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  • The Great Lakes waterway naturally finds an outlet in New York City.
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  • The pleasant climate has certain drawbacks; the coastal farmer finds that blights and insect pests thrive in the comparative absence of hard frosts.
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  • Nor have there been many great finds of coins; indeed most of the pieces in European collections probably come from the same hoard.
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  • When the air rushes out from one pipe, it has not to force its way into the open air, but finds a cavity being prepared for it close at hand in the other pipe, and so the extensions and compressions at the ends are more easily reduced.
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  • 39) that Jeremiah more than once finds it necessary to protest that it is not of Yahweh's institution (vii.
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  • It hardly finds a place in the British civil system, and was condemned for hospitals in Germany, where it is at its best, by so eminent an authority as Professor Virchow.
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  • Attracted by his gifts, pirates from the North Sea kidnap the boy, but terrified by the storms which subsequently beset them, put him ashore on the coast of Cornwall, whence he finds his way to the court of his uncle King Mark.
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  • Sodium is largely employed in the manufacture of cyanides and in reduction processes leading to the isolation of such elements as magnesium, silicon, boron, aluminium (formerly), &c.; it also finds application in organic chemistry.
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  • By these ranges it is forced due south for 500 m., forming the boundary between the provinces of Shansi and Shensi, until it finds an outlet eastwards at Tung Kwan - a pass which for centuries has been renowned as the gate of Asia, being indeed the sole commercial passage between central China and the West.
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  • If the breach cannot be repaired the river leaves its old channel entirely, and finds a new exit to the sea along the line of least resistance.
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  • Carbon dioxide finds industrial application in the preparation of soda by the Solvay process, in the sugar industry, in the manufacture of mineral waters, and in the artificial production of ice.
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  • But experience has shown that the mistakes, so far as there have been mistakes, are unimportant; and in practice even these are rectified by the natural gravitation of the mind of man to that which it finds most nourishing and most elevating.
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  • The Tubingen school founded by Baur dominated the theological criticism of the New Testament during a great part of the 19th century and it still finds some support.
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  • This confined sea-water is gradually being displaced by the downward sinking of the rain-water through the rifts of the strata, and thus finds its way to the surface: so that these springs offer to us a share of the ancient seas, in which perhaps a hundred million of years ago the rocks of Kentucky were laid down."
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  • Reinach (Revue archeologique, 1904) finds the origin of the story in a picture, in which Sisyphus was represented rolling a huge stone up Acrocorinthus, symbolical of the labour and skill involved in the building of the Sisypheum.
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  • A wave of intense religious feeling passes over the land and finds its expression, according to the ordinary law of oriental life, in the formation of a sort of enthusiastic religious order.
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  • 11), burns like a fire within his bones till it finds utterance (Jer.
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  • Even the author of the OcOaxrt finds it necessary to defend the prophets who practised celibacy and strict asceticism against the depreciatory criticism of church members.
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  • We constantly meet with the idea that the soul, on leaving the body, finds its path to the highest heaven opposed by the deities and demons of the lower realms of heaven, and only when it is in possession of the names of these demons, and can repeat the proper holy formula, or is prepared with the right symbol, or has been anointed with the holy oil, finds its way unhindered to the heavenly home.
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  • It is an Oriental (Iranian) dualism which here finds expression, though in one point, it is true, the mark of Greek influence is quite clear.
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  • The subject is here that of a high goddess of heaven (she has 70 sons) whose friend and lover finds her in the misery of deepest degradation, frees her, and bears her home as his bride.
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  • The pulque industry is located on the plateau surrounding the city of Mexico, the most productive district being the high, sandy, arid plain of Apam, in the state of Hidalgo, where the " maguey " (A gave americana) finds favourable conditions for its growth - a dry calcareous surface with moisture sufficiently near to be reached by its roots.
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  • An investigation by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1909 finds that the crude Mexican oils are of low grade, but that while not equal to those found in the upper Mississippi basin for refining purposes, they furnish an excellent fuel for railway engines and other industrial purposes.
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  • The extraing to foot of rotifers; at, median blastoporic opening of antenna, united by a nerve to br, brain the cloaca leads us to a (letter omitted in B); bl, bladder, re ver y different view, which ceiving ramified kidney in B, C, D; finds negative support f, foot, and f.g, its cement-gland;.
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  • Religion, the same thought finds expression.
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  • In the realm of ideas the absolute finds itself, has its own nature over against itself as objective over against subjective, and thus is in the way of overcoming its abstractness, of becoming concrete.
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  • This conception of a difference, of an internal structure in the absolute, finds other and not less obscure expressions in the mystical contributions of the Menschliche Freiheit and in the scholastic speculations of the Berlin lectures on mythology.
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  • Thus (in Flatey) the grapes of Vinland are found in winter and gathered in spring; the man who first finds them, Leif's foster-father Tyrker the German, gets drunk from eating the fruit; and the vines themselves are spoken of as big trees affording timber.
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  • This passion finds its clearest expression in the Latin poems. Faustine was guarded by an old and jealous husband, and du Bellay's eventual conquest may have had something to do with his departure for Paris at the end of August 1557.
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  • Apart from the historic interest of the site, as the only Greek colony in Egypt in early times, the chief importance of the excavations lies in the rich finds of early pottery and in the inscriptions upon them, which throw light on the early history of the alphabet.
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  • Iodine finds application in organic chemistry, forming addition products with unsaturated compounds, the combination, however, being more slow than in the case of chlorine or bromine.
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  • But at all events Mani himself, on his own claim, is to be reckoned the last and greatest prophet, who took up the work of Jesus impatibilis and of Paul (for he too finds recognition), and first brought full knowledge.
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  • The northern boundary, after an arbitrary beginning, finds a natural extension along the Great Lakes, and thence continues along the 49th parallel of north latitude to the Pacific (see Bulletin 171, U.S. Geological Survey).
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  • Deducing from the figures of production since 1859 an equation of increase, one finds that in each nine years as much oil has been produced as in all preceding years together, and in recent years the factor of increase has been higher.
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  • As a rule, one finds (I) a mayor, elected directly by the voters within the city, who is the head of the administration; (2) adminis- trative officers or boards, some directly elected by the city voters, others nominated by the mayor or chosen by the council; (3) a council or assembly, consisting sometimes of two, but more frequently of one chamber, elected directly by the city voters; and (4) judges, usually elected by the city voters, but sometimes appointed by the state.
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  • For the consideration of some classes of business the Senate goes into executive or secret session, although what is done at this session usually leaks out, and finds its way to the public through the press.
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  • Its approval is necessary to any important action, and in general the president finds it advisable to keep the leaders of the senatorial majority, and in particular the Senate committee on foreign relations, informed of pending negotiations.
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  • It is not a government, as Europeans understand the term, but a group of heads of departments, whom their chief, though he usually consults them separately, often finds it useful to bring together for a talk about current politics and the course proper for the administration to take in them, or in order to settle some administrative question which lies on the borderland between the provinces of two ministers.
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  • Now, the functions of judicial tribunals of all courts alike, whether Federal or state, whether superior or inferioris to interpret the law, and if any tribunal finds a congressional statute or state statute inconsistent with the Constitution, the tribunal is obliged to hold such statute invalid.
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  • This tale, which still finds a place in Burke's Peerage in the account of the baron Kingsale, a descendant of the de Courci family, is a legend without historic foundation which did not obtain currency till centuries after John de Courci's death.
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  • The most probable derivation, however, finds in the name a connection with the Saxon tribe or family of Kensings.
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  • Apollonius' genius takes its highest flight in Book v., where he treats of normals as minimum and maximum straight lines drawn from given points to the curve (independently of tangent properties), discusses how many normals can be drawn from particular points, finds their feet by construction, and gives propositions determining the centre of curvature at any point and leading at once to the Cartesian equation of the evolute of any conic.
    0
    0
  • By way of the White river cut-off the Arkansas finds an additional outlet through the valley of that river in times of high water, and the White, when the current in its natural channel is deadened by the backwaters of the Mississippi, finds an outlet by the same cut-off through the valley of the Arkansas.
    0
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  • Blood then finds difficulty in passing through it, and, as a result, dropsy occurs in the belly (ascites).
    0
    0
  • The embryo of the taenia echinococcus finds its way from the stomach or intestine into a vein passing to the liver, and, settling itself in the liver, causes so much disturbance there that a capsule of inflammatory material forms around it.
    0
    0
  • If the stone happily finds its way into the intestine the distress suddenly ceases.
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  • First it finds the limit of goods of fortune in that desire and possession of them which will conduce to the contemplation of God, whereas that which prevents the service and contemplation of God is bad.
    0
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  • The divine archetypes, according to which sensible experience is regulated and in which it finds its real objectivity, are different in kind from mere sense ideas, and the question then arises whether in these we have not again the "things as they are," which Berkeley at first so contemptuously dismissed.
    0
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  • The range of the Safed Koh flanks the Kurram valley and encloses the Kabul basin, which finds its outlet to the Indus through the Mohmand hills.
    0
    0
  • With the exception of the Kunhar river, which flows down the Kagan valley to the Jhelum, the whole drainage of the province eventually finds its way into the Indus.
    0
    0
  • He finds a remarkable agreement between the theoretical and experimental values, which it would be important to confirm with the more suitable instruments which are now at our disposal, as we might in this way get an estimate of the energy of translatory motion of the luminous molecules.
    0
    0
  • Duffield finds that the iron lines divide themselves into three groups with pressure shifts which are approximately in the ratio i: 2: 4.
    0
    0
  • Incidentally Pappus describes the thirteen other polyhedra bounded by equilateral and equiangular but not similar polygons, discovered by Archimedes, and finds, by a method recalling that of Archimedes, the surface and volume of a sphere.
    0
    0
  • He finds that throughout the universe there is an unceasing redistribution of matter and motion, and that this redistribution constitutes evolution when there is a predominant integration of matter and dissipation of motion, and constitutes dissolution where there is a predominant absorption of motion and disintegration of matter.
    0
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  • (c) He explains the rise of consciousness by supposing that, while it requires brain as a condition, it consists in the emancipation of intelligence from will at the moment when in sensation the individual mind finds itself with an idea without will.
    0
    0
  • This being so, he finds in mathematics two kinds of transcendence - real, where the transcendent, though not actual in experience, can become partly so, e.g.
    0
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  • He finds them in the needs of man.
    0
    0
  • Within this territory the low ridge of Teumessus separates the plain of Ismenus and Dirce, commanded by the citadel of Thebes, from the upland plain of the Asopus, the only Boeotian river that finds the eastern sea.
    0
    0
  • Maintaining its eastern course from the Apure, the main stream finds its way along the southern side of the delta, where it is called the Corosimi river, and enters the sea at the Boca Grande; but in front of the Tortola island, at the beginning of the Corosimi and too m.
    0
    0
  • Summing up the history of the papacy from the Congress of Vienna to the fall of the temporal power, one finds statistical gains in Protestant countries offset perhaps by relative losses in Catholic lands, both largely due to the closely related forces of toleration and immigration.
    0
    0
  • The spinner who persists in over-weighting his yarn finds it difficult to obtain "repeat" orders.
    0
    0
  • There is a considerable amount of re-selling both in yarn and cloth, and, though the bulk of cotton goods finds the way through regular and normal channels to the consumer, these channels are not always direct.
    0
    0
  • But little gold at present finds its way across the Tibetan passes to India; and the export to China has diminished of late years.
    0
    0
  • An inhabitant of Lhasa, for example, finds the distinction between s and z', or between s and z, not in the consonant, but in the tone, pronouncing s' and s with a high note and z' and z with a low one.
    0
    0
  • Callendar finds that five molecules of water in the case of cane-sugar or two molecules in the case of dextrose are required to bring the curves into conformity with the observations of Berkeley and Hartley, which in fig.
    0
    0
  • Thus the pious Hindu, confronted by the impossibility of obtaining perfect knowledge by the senses or by reason, finds his sole perfection in the contemplation of the infinite (Brahma).
    0
    0
  • Thus the metaphysic of Plato finds reality only in the "Idea," of which all phenomena are merely imperfect copies.
    0
    0
  • Nitric acid finds extensive application in the manufacture of sulphuric acid, certain coal-tar colouring matters, explosives, and in the production of various nitrates.
    0
    0
  • At one time sea-water was thought to be injurious, but modern investigation finds no objection to it except on the score of appearance, efflorescence being more likely to occur when it is used.
    0
    0
  • Precipitated aluminium hydrate finds considerable application in dyeing.
    0
    0
  • Religious conviction is one of the most characteristic traits of the Dutch people, and finds expression in a large number of independent religious congregations.
    0
    0
  • This has now been explained by Blakeslee, who finds that the Mucorinae can be divided into two groups, termed homothallic and heterothallic respectively.
    0
    0
  • Miss Fraser in Humaria rutilans finds two reductions: a normal synaptic reduction in the first nuclear division of the ascus, and a peculiar reduction division termed brachymeiosis in the third ascus division.
    0
    0
  • If the membrane is of some impermeable substance, like gold leaf, the hyphae cannot dissolve its way through, but the tip finds the most minute pore and traverses the barrier by means of it, as it does a stoma on a leaf, We may hence conclude that a parasitic hyphae pierces some plants or their stomata and refuses to enter others, because in the former case there are chemotropically attractive substances present which are absent from the latter, or are there replaced by repellent poisonous or protective substances such as enzymes or antitoxins.
    0
    0
  • Brinell finds that, for certain normal conditions, if the sum of the percentage of manganese plus 5.2 times that of the FIG.
    0
    0
  • He thus finds that this sum should be either as great as 1 66, so that blowholes shall be absent; or as low as o 28, so that they shall be harmlessly deep-seated.
    0
    0
  • Whenever Hume finds it impossible to recognize in an idea the mere copy of a particular impression, he introduces the phrase " manner of conceiving."
    0
    0
  • The natural link of connexion Hume finds in the similarities presented by experience.
    0
    0
  • If Sanballat the Horonite was really a native of the Moabite Horonaim, he finds an appropriate place by the side of Tobiah the Ammonite and Gashmu the Arabian among the strenuous opponents of Nehemiah.
    0
    0
  • In this last achievement Professor Finke finds the solution of a problem which Langlois had declared to be insoluble.
    0
    0
  • The wooded hills are well stocked with deer, and a stray wolf occasionally finds its way from the forests of the Ardennes into those of the Hunsriick.
    0
    0
  • African locality must be mentioned.; considerable finds were reported in 1905 and 1906 from gravels at Somabula near Gwelo in Rhodesia where the diamond is associated with chrysoberyl, corundum (both sapphire and ruby), topaz, garnet, ilmenite, staurolite, rutile, with pebbles of quartz, granite, vIII.
    0
    0
  • In addition to the South American localities mentioned above, small diamonds have also been mined since their discovery in 1890 on the river Mazaruni in British Guiana, and finds have been reported in the gold washings of Dutch Guiana.
    0
    0
  • Indeed, wherever one finds a new and prosperous-looking village, it may be assumed to belong to the sultan.
    0
    0
  • But it is impossible for anyone who takes Pascal's simply as he finds them in connexion with the facts of Pascal's history to question his theological orthodoxy, understanding by theological orthodoxy the acceptance of revelation and dogma; it is equally impossible for any one in the same condition to declare him absolutely content with dogma and revelation.
    0
    0
  • The bulk of its water empties by the Mackenzie river into the Arctic Ocean, but a small portion finds its way by the Ark-i-linik river into Hudson's Bay.
    0
    0
  • It is to be noticed that none of the German finds (mostly in the south and west) show any traces of the highly developed artistic sense so characteristic of the dwellers in France at this period.
    0
    0
  • Our knowledge of the later Neolithic age, as of the succeeding periods, is largely gained from the remains of lake-dwellings, represented in Germany chiefly by Bavarian finds.
    0
    0
  • From the finds in Bavarian graves it appears that the chief weapons were the dagger and the long pointed Paistab (palstave), while a short dagger fixed like an axe on a long shaft is characteristic of the North.
    0
    0
  • Such a view finds support also in the New Testament canon implied in these epistles.
    0
    0
  • For when after death the powers of the air throng around and persecute, the soul flees into the first lodging of clay that it finds.
    0
    0
  • The ordinary Egyptian is not self-reliant or energetic by nature, and, like most Eastern people, finds it difficult to be impartial where duty and family or other personal relations are in the balance.
    0
    0
  • Dr Elliott Smith, who has examined thousands pf skeletons and mummies of all periods, finds that the prehistoric population of Upper Egypt, a branch of the North African-MediterraneanArabian race, changed with the advent of the dynasties to a stronger type, better developed than before in skull and muscle.
    0
    0
  • Malet had informed Sherif Pasha that, although Colonel Hicks finds it convenient to communicate with Lord Dufferin or with me, it must not be supposed that we endorse in any way the contents of his telegrams. - - - Her Majestys government are in no way responsible for his operations in the Sudan, which have been undertaken under the authority of His Highnesss government.
    0
    0
  • Thus the revelation of the divine name, vi.2 f., finds its counterpart in iii.
    0
    0
  • This, which we may distinguish as the French system, finds its most perfect expression in the classic Genera Plantarum (1862-1883) of Bentham and Hooker, a work containing a description, based on careful examination of specimens, of all known genera of flowering plants.
    0
    0
  • Through this space the fresh surface water finds its way, and dissolving the salt below rises in the inner tube as brine, but only to such a level that the two columns bear to one another the relation of ten to twelve, this being the inverse ratio of the respective weights of saturated brine and fresh water.
    0
    0
  • He finds no spindle fibres or true chromosomes, and considers the division direct, not indirect.
    0
    0
  • With reference to the existence of a chromatophore, he with others finds the colouring matter localized in granules in the peripheral region, but does not consider these individually or in the aggregate as chromatophores.
    0
    0
  • He finds that eight chromosomes appear in karyokinesis in the ordinary thallus cells, but sixteen in the gonimoblast filaments derived from the fertilized carpogonium.
    0
    0
  • Thus Borzi finds that Protoderma viride passes through a series of changes so varied that at different times it presents the characters of twelve different genera.
    0
    0
  • These ranges form together the great semicircular mountain-chain, known as the anti-Dacian system, through which the Danube finds a passage at the Iron Gates.
    0
    0
  • This twofold representation finds a parallel in the narratives of Samuel, whose history and the conditions reflected therein are analogous to the life and times of Elisha.
    0
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  • This should be useful for establishing the date and classification of the earlier finds, which are in the British Museum.
    0
    0
  • At Gortyna the first prehistoric finds of neolithic and Minoan periods were made in 1913.
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  • Minoan finds were made on several lesser sites: at Plati in the Lasithi Plain in 1914, houses and burials; in eastern Crete at Sphoungaras in 1912, and at Pachyammos in 1914, E.M.
    0
    0
  • A Geometric cemetery was dug by the Germans at Tiryns, and their finds have been accurately published (1912).
    0
    0
  • In Macedonia during the war some finds of the same period were made by British troops on mounds in the Vardar valley, and a cemetery was opened by the Y.M.C.A.
    0
    0
  • These are always the most numerous finds on classical Greek sites, and their importance is mainly historical.
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  • Work in the city had not been resumed after the war up to 1921; the last finds in 1914 were two colossal portrait statues of members of the Julio-Claudian family, perhaps Gaius and Lucius Caesar.
    0
    0
  • The graves are mostly of the 3rd century B.C. At Tanagra a large series of graves was opened by the Greek authorities in 1911, but the finds, though numerous, were poor.
    0
    0
  • Prehistoric sites were located on the characteristic mounds of the country, and some were superficially excavated; but most finds were accidental and unrecorded, and many were dispersed and lost.
    0
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  • Other important finds were seven statues of women from a sanctuary of Artemis Polo, .a temple and altar of Apollo Pythius, decorative terra-cottas from an archaic Prytaneion, a cemetery with carved and painted tombstones, and remains of a triumphal arch of Caracalla.
    0
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  • These provide means for classifying the rich finds from the cemetery which was excavated on the other bank of the river.
    0
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  • Here, as elsewhere in Magna Graecia, the architectural terra-cottas are a valuable part of the finds.
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  • The most familiar example perhaps is the top of Lochnagar, where, at the level of 3500 ft., the traveller finds himself on a broad undulating moor, more than a mile and a half long, sloping gently towards Glen Muick and terminating on the north in a range of granite precipices.
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  • They are only alike in the fact that in each case a moral cause is given for the position in which the individual finds himself now; and the moral cause is his own act, In the popular belief, followed also in the brahmin theology, the bridge between the two lives was a minute and subtle entity called the soul, which left the one body at death, through a hole at the top of the head, and entered into the new body.
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  • All the evidence he finds in support of this is (I) the existence of the custom above mentioned in Hawaii; and (2) the absence of special terms for the relationship of uncle, aunt and cousin, this indicating, he thinks, that these were regarded as fathers, mothers, brothers and sisters.
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  • It is the first shadow that falls across His path; His power finds a check in human wilfulness.
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  • Suddenly will the Son of Man come: happy the servant whom His Master finds at his appointed task.
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  • He was the medium of creation, the source of its light and its life - especially of that higher life which finds its manifestation in men.
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  • In Jesus Hegel finds the expression for something higher than mere morality: he finds a noble spirit which rises above the contrasts of virtue and vice into the concrete life, seeing the infinite always embracing our finitude, and proclaiming the divine which is in man and cannot be overcome by error and evil, unless the man close his eyes and ears to the godlike presence within him.
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  • In religious life, in short, he finds the principle which reconciles the opposition of the temporal mind.
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  • He finds his panacea in the concrete life of humanity.
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  • It therefore to some extent assumes from the first the position which it proposes ultimately to reach, and gives, not a proof of that position, but an account of the experience (Erfahrung) by which consciousness is forced from one position to another till it finds rest in Absolutes Wissen.
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  • But reason finds much in the world recognizing no kindred with her, and so turning to practical activity seeks in the world the realization of her own aims. Either in a crude way she pursues her own pleasure, and finds that necessity counteracts her cravings; or she endeavours to find the world in harmony with the heart, and yet is unwilling to see fine aspirations crystallized by the act of realizing them.
    0
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  • In the second or classical form of art the idea of humanity finds an adequate sensuous representation.
    0
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  • On this basis Bradley developed a theory of the Absolute which, while not denying that it must be conceived of spiritually, insisted that its spirituality is of a kind that finds no analogy in our self-conscious experience.
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  • He finds it where (a) the unity is for each individual, (b) the whole nature of the individual is to be for the unity.
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  • The differentiation of queen and workers is correlated with the habit of storing food supplies, and the consequent permanence of the community, which finds relief for its surplus population by sending off a swarm, consisting of a queen and a number of workers, so that the new community is already specialized both for reproduction and for labour.
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  • Bearing out the evidence of tradition as well as architecture, the numerous finds of individual objects in terra-cotta figurines, vases, bronzes, engraved stones, &c., point to organized civilized life on this site many generations before Mycenae was built, a fortiori before the life as depicted by Homer flourished - nay, before, as tradition has it, under Proetus the walls of Tiryns were erected.
    0
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  • We are aided in forming some estimate of the chronological sequence preceding the Mycenaean age, as suggested by the finds of the Heraeum, in the new distribution which Ddrpfeld has been led to make of the chronological stratification of Hissarlik.
    0
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  • Finds made in the excavations, however, have shown that the temple also had pedimental groups.
    0
    0
  • The European, especially if he come from India, is charmed by their apparently frank, openhearted, hospitable and manly manners; but the charm is not of long duration, and he finds that the Afghan is as cruel and crafty as he is independent.
    0
    0
  • The depot for it is Kandahar, whence it finds its - way to India, where it is much used as a condiment.
    0
    0
  • A large quantity of wool, together with silk, dried fruit, madder and asafetida, finds its way to India by the Kandahar route.
    0
    0
  • Indeed, the author of this article finds in the writings of Plato a grave and discriminating study of the several forms of sophistry, and no trace whatsoever of that blind hostility which should warrant us in neglecting his clear and precise evidence.
    0
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  • Ancient and well-known trade routes exist, by means of which merchandise from the Punjab finds its way over heights of 18,000 ft.
    0
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  • It was formerly fastened with strings, but now with the ghundi (the old form of button) and tukmah or loop. In southern India, Gujarat and in the United Provinces the arid is much the same as to length and fit as the English shirt; as the traveller goes northward from Delhi to the Afghan border he sees the kurta becoming longer and looser till he finds the Pathan wearing it almost to his ankles, with very full wide sleeves.
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  • In language, which he appears to regard as somehow acquired, he finds a solution for the problems of reason which Kant had discussed in the Kritik der reinen Vernunft.
    0
    0
  • The drainage finds its way to the Irrawaddy by three main streams (the Pwon, Ma-htun and Ma-de) on the west, and by two (the Kye-ni and Hput) on the east.
    0
    0
  • Joly has himself determined the mean specific heat of water between 12° and zoo° C. by this method, in terms of the latent heat of steam as above given, and finds the result 9952.
    0
    0
  • Other investigators had shown that Cicero's clausulae are generally variations of some three or four forms in which the rhythm is trochaic. Dr Thaddaeus Zielinski of St Petersburg, after examining all the clausulae in Cicero's speeches, finds that they are governed by a law.
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  • Solutrian "finds" have been also made in the caves of Les Eyzies and Laugerie Haute, and in the Lower Beds of Cresswell Cave (Derbyshire).
    0
    0
  • Kapteyn finds that magnitude for magnitude, the absolute brightness of the solar stars is only one-fifth of that of the Sirian stars, so that in the mean they must be at less than half the distance.
    0
    0
  • Her Mutation de fortune, in which she finds room for a great deal of history and philosophy, was presented to the same patron on New Year's Day, 1404.
    0
    0
  • He finds traces of a keen conflict of parties in the post-apostolic age.
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  • In his Kritische Untersuchungen ieber die kanonischen Evangelien, ihr Verheiltniss zu einander, ihren Charakter and Ursprung (1847) he turns his attention to the Gospels, and here again finds that the authors were conscious of the conflict of parties; the Gospels reveal a mediating or conciliatory tendency (Tendenz) on the part of the writers or redactors.
    0
    0
  • The latter finds confirmation in the statement that he was born in A.H.
    0
    0
  • As successor Tuzun chose al-Mostakfi billah (" he who finds full sufficiency with God"), a son of Moktafi.
    0
    0
  • From Allahabad, Cawnpore and Agra trade finds an outlet to the sea at Bombay as well as at Calcutta.
    0
    0
  • But even Sigwart's errors are outdone by Lotze, who not only reduces " Every NI is P " so " If S is M, S is P," but proceeds to reduce this hypothetical to the disjunctive, " If S is NI, S is P L or P 2 or 1 33, " and finds fault with the Aristotelian syllogism because it contents itself with inferring " S is P " without showing what P. Now there are occasions when we want to reason in this disjunctive manner, to consider whether S is I n or P 2 or P 3, and to conclude that " S is a particular P "; but ordinarily all we want to know is that " S is P "; e.g.
    0
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  • In order to lay bare the ground of certainty he raises the universal doubt, and, although, following Augustine,2 he finds its limit in the thought of the doubter, this of itself is not enough.
    0
    0
  • When Berkeley has eliminated the literal materialism of Locke's metaphors of sense-perception, Hume finds no difficulty in accepting the sensations as present virtually in their own right, any nonsensible ground being altogether unknown.
    0
    0
  • The clue to the discovery of transcendental conditions Kant finds in the existence of judgments, most manifest in mathematics and in the pure science of nature, which are certain, yet not trifling, necessary and yet not reducible to identities, synthetic therefore and a priori, and so accounted for neither by Locke nor by Leibnitz.
    0
    0
  • As Fichte's Ego finds that its non-ego springs from and has its home within its very self, so with Hegel thought finds itself in its " other," both subsisting in the Idea which is both and neither.
    0
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  • The view of inference with which he complements it is only less satisfactory because of a failure to distinguish the principle of nexus in syllogism from its traditional formulation and rules, and because he is hampered by the intractability which he finds in certain forms of relational construction.
    0
    0
  • He glances at Grassmann's methods, but is repelled because he is seeking a unifying principle, and he finds that Grassmann offers him not one but many principles.
    0
    0
  • In the third-order complex the centre locus becomes a finite closed quartic surface, with three (one always real) intersecting nodal axes, every plane section of which is a trinodal quartic. The chief defect of the geometrical properties of these bi-quaternions is that the ordinary algebraic scalar finds no place among them, and in consequence Q:1 is meaningless.
    0
    0
  • Employing this method, Callendar finds S = 0.497 for steam at one atmosphere Temperature Centigrade FIG.
    0
    0
  • According to theosophy, it would appear that these notions are for the most part mistaken, or at any rate they are quite insignificant in comparison with the interests with which the traveller along the Path soon finds himself absorbed.
    0
    0
  • As of old time," as Plutarch observed, " associated the heroes and snake most of all beasts with heroes," and in Photius local the term " speckled hero " thus finds an explanation.
    0
    0
  • There is formed a body of teaching in which all agree, and an organization in which the common experience finds expression and aid.
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  • This we should expect indeed from its insistence upon individual freedom; yet, notwithstanding certain notable exceptions, amid the diversity there is a substantial unity, a unity which in our day finds expression in common organizations for great practical ends, for example in the " Bible Societies," " Tract Societies," the " Young Men's Christian Associations," " Societies of Christian Endeavour," &c., which disregard denominational lines.
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  • To this school Christianity is the culmination of the ethical monotheism of the Old Testament, which finds its highest ideal in selfsacrificing love.
    0
    0
  • On the other hand, it finds its religious solution in the trust in a power not ourselves which makes for the same righteousness which was incarnate in Jesus Christ.
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  • Thoroughgoing reconstruction in every item of theology and in every detail of polity there may be, yet shall the Christian life go on - the life which finds its deepest utterance in the words of Christ, " Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart and thy neighbour as thyself "; the life which expresses its profoundest faith in the words Christ taught it to pray, "Our Father"; the life which finds its highest rule of conduct in the words of its first and greatest interpreter, " Let this mind be in you which was also in Christ Jesus our Lord."
    0
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  • Each fisherman then finds his kaivel, and the heap on which it lies is his.
    0
    0
  • It also finds an extensive use in organic chemistry as a substituting and oxidizing agent, as well as for the preparation of addition compounds.
    0
    0
  • Harnack finds that our sense of the trustworthiness of the book " is enhanced by a thorough study of the chronological procedure of its author, both where he speaks and where he keeps silence."
    0
    0
  • In the vault he finds the corpse of Grendel; he cuts off the head, and brings it back in triumph.
    0
    0
  • Yet in several respects the conditions under which the singer finds himself in the house of a chieftain like Odysseus or Alcinous are more in harmony with the character of Homeric poetry than those of the later rhapsodic contests.
    0
    0
  • Finally, when Kirchhoff finds traces in books x.-xii.
    0
    0
  • It seems clear, however, that the hypothesis of epics such as the Iliad and Odyssey having been formed by putting together or even by working up shorter poems finds no support from analogy.
    0
    0
  • The ancient designation Sudra finds no great favour in modern times, and we can point to no group that is generally recognized as representing it.
    0
    0
  • The picture thus presented by Hindu society - as made up of a confused congeries of social groups of the most varied standing, each held together and kept separate from others by a traditional body of ceremonial rules and by the notion of social gradations being due to a divinely instituted order of things - finds something like a counterpart in the religious life of the people.
    0
    0
  • In the later Saiva mythology this theory finds its artistic representation in Siva's androgynous form of Ardha-narisa, or "halfwoman-lord," typifying the union of the male and female energies; the male half in this form of the deity occupying the right-hand, and the female the left-hand side.
    0
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  • From the motion of the satellites he finds that the mass of Uranus is - T - A o o th of that of the sun, while for the planet Neptune he finds a mass equal to 19 Toth of the sun, agreeing with the value previously found by him from the perturbations of Uranus within o th of its amount.
    0
    0
  • Sovereign princes - an Oliver, a Clovis and a Pepin - start out in every page, till the writer finds it necessary to apologize for the number of his kings and his own blunders.
    0
    0
  • The salt finds application in the preparation of oxygen, in the manufacture of matches, for pyrotechnic purposes, and in medicine.
    0
    0
  • The study of the prehistoric population of Finland - Neolithic (no Palaeolithic finds have yet been made) - of the Age of Bronze and the Iron Age has been carried on with great zeal.
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  • Moreover, it is in sympathy that he finds the obligation and sanction of morality.
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  • 35) which finds an echo in a famous story related, not without some confusion of essential facts, by Herodotus (ii.
    0
    0
  • It finds a place in the northern boundaries of Israel under David, Solomon and Jeroboam II.
    0
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  • Another important tract is the De Principiis atque Originibus secundum Fabulas Cupidinis et Caeli, where, under the disguise of two old mythological stories, he (in the manner of the Sapientia Veterum) finds the deepest truths concealed.
    0
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  • Bacon himself, as may be seen from the passage quoted above, finds great difficulty in giving an adequate and exact definition of what he means by a form.
    0
    0
  • Excavation is permitted under government supervision, and the finds are apportioned in thirds, between the excavator, the landowner (who is usually bought out by the former), and the government.
    0
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  • The popularity of the parable as a form of didactic teaching finds many examples in the Rabbinical writings, and some have noteworthy parallels in the New testament.
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  • 24 finds a close parallel in " the Testament of Zebulun," viii.
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  • But the expert, confining his attention to the known savage, finds him already religious, nay, encumbered with religious survivals of all kinds; for him, then, it suffices to describe things as they now are, or as they were in the comparatively recent fore-time.
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  • The savage who finds himself encompassed by taboos which he dare not break, lives up to his religion with a faithfulness which many professing Christians fail to reach.
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  • As the result of research in the diplomatic correspondence at the Record Office in London 4 Mr Lang finds a clue in the affairs of the French Huguenot, Roux de Marsilly, the secret agent for a Protestant league against France between Sweden, Holland, England and the Protestant cantons of Switzerland, who in February 1669 left London, where he had been negotiating with Arlington (apparently with Charles II.'s knowledge), for Switzerland, his confidential valet Martin remaining behind.
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  • But at this point he parts company with the theocratists, and in this very revelation of language finds a germ of progress.
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  • The Welsh method finds adherents only in Wales and Chile.
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  • It is not used in the treatment of ores, but finds application in the case of calcined argentiferous lead and copper mattes.
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  • It oxidizes carbon compounds to carbon dioxide and water, and therefore finds extensive application in analytical organic chemistry.
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  • Its solution in hydrochloric acid readily absorbs carbon monoxide and acetylene; hence it finds application in gas analysis.
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  • The anhydrous salt is very hygroscopic, and hence finds application as a desiccating agent.
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  • Copper sulphate finds application in calico printing and in the preparation of the pigment Scheele's green.
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  • The farmer breeds from such of his stock as he finds to thrive best with him, and gets rid of those which suffer from cold, damp or disease.
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  • The tradition thus finds an analogy in the Israelite "judges" before the time of Saul and David.
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  • The regular "man-eater" is generally an old tiger whose vigour is past, and whose teeth are worn and defective; it takes up its abode in the neighbourhood of a village, the population of which it finds an easier prey than wild animals.
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  • The remark finds ample application in the case of Schopenhauer.
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  • So Schopenhauer, but in a way all his own, finds the truth of things in a will which is indeed unaffected by conscious motives and yet cannot be separated from.
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  • The principal finds are sarcophagi, and next to these sculptures and paintings.
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  • From the scenic standpoint the relatively small elevation of these mountains finds compensation in the low snow-line, which ranges from about 3000 ft.
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  • The discovery a few weeks later of the much richer mines at Bultfontein and Du Toits Pan, followed by the great finds at De Beers and Colesberg Kop (Kimberley) caused Jagersfontein to be neglected for several years.
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  • In visiting the most famous wateringplaces, it is curious to note how one finds, in the various waters, here some chloride, there some sulphate, here some potash, there some magnesium, but in all of them we find water.
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  • This new interpretation finds expression in Matt.
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  • Of the exports the United Kingdom took some 95%; a considerable quantity of South African produce, especially wool, shipped to England ultimately, however finds its way to other countries.
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  • In that year, following smaller finds of diamonds on the banks of the Vaal and Orange rivers, the diamond mines of Du Toits Pan and Bultfontein were opened up. In.
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  • The fruit is smaller than that of the Morea, and has a peculiar flavour; it finds a market mainly in Holland, Belgium and Germany.
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  • This fungus finds conditions suitable for growth when the potatoes are stored in a damp condition; rotting from this cause rarely occurs when they are dried before being placed in heaps.
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  • Bellew finds in the Gadara the Garuda (eagles) of Sanskrit, who were ever in opposition to the Naga (snakes) of Scythic origin.
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  • It is true that he finds the most typical examples of lust, cruelty, levity and weakness in the emperors and their wives - in Domitian, Otho, Nero, Claudius and Messalina.
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  • Reinach (reviewing P. Mazan's L'Orestie d'Eschyle, 1902) defends the theory of Bachofen, who finds in the legend of Orestes an indication of the decay of matriarchal ideas.
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  • This finds most marked expression in the doctrines of submission to Providence and universal philanthropy.
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  • The classical expression of these results Trendelenburg finds mainly in the Platonico-Aristotelian system.
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  • Here Trendelenburg finds the dividing line between philosophical systems. On the one side stand those which acknowledge none but efficient causes - which make force prior to thought, and explain the universe, as it were, a tergo.
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  • The latter view, which receives its first support in the facts of life, or organic nature as such, finds its culmination and ultimate verification in the ethical world, which essentially consists in the realization of ends.
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  • After two years of painful search and much buffeting by demons he finds Barlaam.
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  • Lippmann, who has made a careful investigation of the subject, finds that exceedingly small variations of the electromotive force produce sensible changes in the surfacetension.
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  • Reasoning from some observations of Savart, Plateau finds in this way 4.38 as the ratio of the length of a division to the diameter of the jet.
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  • If K is the height of the flat surface of the drop, and k that of the point where its tangent plane is vertical, then T = 1(K - k) 2gp. Quincke finds that for several series of substances the surfacetension is nearly proportional to the density, so that if we call Surface-Tensions of Liquids at their Point of Solidification.
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  • The second half of the 19th century witnessed several great finds; first, of gold placers on the lower Gila and Colorado (1858-1869); later, of lodes at Tombstone, which flourished from 1879-1886, then decayed, but in 1905 had again become the centre of important mining interests; and still later the development of copper mines at Jerome and around Bisbee.
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  • His excavations round Rushmore resulted in valuable "finds"; he founded a local museum and published several illustrated volumes.
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  • Browne finds that after smoking " chandoo," containing 8.98% of morphine, 7.63% was left in the dross, so that only 1.35% of morphia was carried over in the smoke or decomposed by the heat.
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  • About three-quarters of the opium prepared in Turkey is produced in Anatolia, and is exported by way of Smyrna, and the remainder is produced in the hilly districts of the provinces near the southern coast of the Black Sea, and finds its way into Constantinople, the commercial varieties bearing the name of the district where they are produced.
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  • About half of the total produce finds its way to the Chinese market, chiefly by sea to Hongkong and the Federated Malay States, although some is carried overland through Bokhara, Khokand and Kashgar; a small quantity is exported by way of Trebizond and Samsun to Constantinople, and about 2000 piculs to Great Britain.
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  • The "finds" of stone and bronze, of bronze and iron, and even of stone and iron implements together in tumuli and sepulchral mounds, suggest that in many countries the three stages in man's progress overlapped.
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  • But when it is admitted that the ages must have overlapped, it is fairly easy to undertand the mixed "finds."
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  • Among all the "finds" examined in Europe there is a most remarkable absence of copper implements.
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  • Copper would thus have been but seldom used unalloyed; and the relatively synchronous appearance of bronze in Europe, and the scanty "finds" of copper implements, are explained.
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  • The Kwei-kiang, on the other hand, takes a southerly course, and passes the cities of Kwei-lin, Yang-so Hien, ring-le Fu, Chao-Ong Hien, and so finds its way to Wu-chow Fu, where it joins the waters of the Si-kiang.
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  • (iv.) In astrology we have a method which still finds believers among people of good education.
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  • He finds fault with those who are non exornatores rerum sed tantum narratores.
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  • In the narrative of Acts Schmiedel finds much to surprise him.
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  • As the brains of the vertebrate animals form an ascending scale, more and more approaching man's in their arrangement, the fact here finds its explanation, that lower animals perform mental processes corresponding in their nature to our own, though of generally less power and complexity.
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  • On surmounting this rocky barrier the traveller finds that the encircling rampart rises little above the normal level of the plateau.
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  • The minuteness of his narrative detracts from its interest; though his arrangement is generally good, here and there the reader finds the thread of a subject broken by the intrusion of incidents not immediately connected with it, and does not pick it up again without an effort.
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  • Jules Lemaitre, a less sympathetic critic, finds in the extraordinary crimes of his heroes and heroines, his reactionary views, his dandyism and snobbery, an exaggerated Byronism.
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  • Relics of the Mousterian age have been also found in Belgium, southern Germany, Bohemia and southern England, some of the "finds" including human remains.
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  • It may be that the interpretation of the female cone of the Abietineae as an inflorescence, which finds favour with many botanists, cannot be applied to the cones of Agathis and Araucaria.
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  • It would be hard, however, to persuade the mass of occupiers in England that they do not pay the rates, so that the expedient of dividing the rates between owner and occupier, though it cannot affect their real incidence to a substantial extent, constantly finds favour.
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  • Thus while Clemen finds eleven separate sources, Beer finds fifteen.
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  • (1906), who finds the prototype of Dionysus in Egypt.
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  • From the days of Diocletian one finds occasionally two emperors, but not, at any rate in theory, two Empires; the two emperors are the dual sovereigns of a single realm.
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  • The gipsies, who are mostly converts to the Orthodox Church, still, as a rule, cling to their vagabond existence, though their skill at all handicrafts finds them ready employment in the towns.
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  • Very important finds of old Greek art continue to be made in the neighbourhood, as well as at Taman, on the east side of the Strait of Kerch.
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  • Between the Western and the Central Cordilleras is a longitudinal depression along which the river Cauca finds its way towards the sea.
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