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figuratively

figuratively Sentence Examples

  • I think I'll get back into the saddle a little – figuratively speaking.

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  • neophyte is figuratively bound.

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  • Apart from its scriptural usage, the word is applied to any gigantic marine animal such as the whale, and hence, figuratively, of very large ships, and also of persons of outstanding strength, power, wealth or influence.

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  • Apart from its scriptural usage, the word is applied to any gigantic marine animal such as the whale, and hence, figuratively, of very large ships, and also of persons of outstanding strength, power, wealth or influence.

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  • Apiarium or apiary, a beehouse or hive, is used figuratively by old writers for a place of industry, e.g.

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  • It is thus used figuratively of the lowest depth of a person's spirits or the lowest point in a career.

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  • The word is now generally a synonym for "monkey," but the common verb for both (as transferred figuratively to human beings) is "to ape," i.e.

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  • As a day of judgment it is accompanied by terrible convulsions of nature (not to be taken figuratively, but probably intended literally by the prophets in accordance with their view of the absolute subordination of nature to the divine purpose for man).

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  • About the same time (1747) he finally left the Anglican communion for the Baptist, leaving the church literally as well as figuratively by quitting it as the clergyman began to read the Athanasian creed.

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  • to sound or measure with a fathom-line, is used figuratively, meaning to go into a subject deeply, to penetrate, or to explore thoroughly.

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  • of scrupus, a rough stone, figuratively uneasiness of mind, probably to be connected with the root skar, to cut, cf.

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  • And though passages of the first class must no doubt be explained figuratively - for Philo would not assert the existence of two Divine agents - it remains true that the two conceptions cannot be fused.

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  • absorbere) means literally "sucking up" or "swallowing," and thus a total incorporation in something, literally or figuratively; it is technically used in animal physiology for the function of certain vessels which suck up fluids; and in light and optics absorption spectrum and absorption band are terms used in the discussion of the transformation of rays in various media.

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  • dry," and signifies generally the act of drawing off moisture or liquid from somewhere, and so drinking dry, and (figuratively) exhausting; the substantive "drain" being thus used not only in the direct sense of a channel for carrying off liquid, but also figuratively for a very small amount such as would be left as dregs.

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  • dry," and signifies generally the act of drawing off moisture or liquid from somewhere, and so drinking dry, and (figuratively) exhausting; the substantive "drain" being thus used not only in the direct sense of a channel for carrying off liquid, but also figuratively for a very small amount such as would be left as dregs.

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  • latitudo, latus, broad), a word meaning breadth or width, hence, figuratively, freedom from restriction, but more generally used in the geographical and astronomical sense here treated.

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  • to sound or measure with a fathom-line, is used figuratively, meaning to go into a subject deeply, to penetrate, or to explore thoroughly.

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  • By blow up, do you mean literally or figuratively?

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  • Her thoughts jangled in her head, some desperate for him to continue, others claiming she couldn't go home if she started down this path, and still others saying she was screwed either way, figuratively and literally.

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  • I think I'll get back into the saddle a little – figuratively speaking.

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  • By blow up, do you mean literally or figuratively?

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  • followers of the ultimate cult are whipped into frenzies that leave them figuratively drained -- broke and exhausted.

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  • omniscient view of the paths, both literally and figuratively, that the various characters are following.

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  • Apiarium or apiary, a beehouse or hive, is used figuratively by old writers for a place of industry, e.g.

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  • (1) An adjective meaning soft, either physically or figuratively, derived from Fr.

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  • The word is now generally a synonym for "monkey," but the common verb for both (as transferred figuratively to human beings) is "to ape," i.e.

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  • of scrupus, a rough stone, figuratively uneasiness of mind, probably to be connected with the root skar, to cut, cf.

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  • As a day of judgment it is accompanied by terrible convulsions of nature (not to be taken figuratively, but probably intended literally by the prophets in accordance with their view of the absolute subordination of nature to the divine purpose for man).

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  • STAR, the general term for the luminous bodies seen in the heavens; used also by analogy for star-shaped ornaments (see Medal; Orders and Decorations) or other objects, and figuratively for persons of conspicuous brilliance.

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  • neophyte is figuratively bound.

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  • It is thus used figuratively of the lowest depth of a person's spirits or the lowest point in a career.

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  • About the same time (1747) he finally left the Anglican communion for the Baptist, leaving the church literally as well as figuratively by quitting it as the clergyman began to read the Athanasian creed.

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  • absorbere) means literally "sucking up" or "swallowing," and thus a total incorporation in something, literally or figuratively; it is technically used in animal physiology for the function of certain vessels which suck up fluids; and in light and optics absorption spectrum and absorption band are terms used in the discussion of the transformation of rays in various media.

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  • And though passages of the first class must no doubt be explained figuratively - for Philo would not assert the existence of two Divine agents - it remains true that the two conceptions cannot be fused.

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  • latitudo, latus, broad), a word meaning breadth or width, hence, figuratively, freedom from restriction, but more generally used in the geographical and astronomical sense here treated.

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  • While startups may not be life or death literally, they are exactly that figuratively.

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  • The Microsoft Xbox is the big daddy of the console world, both literally and figuratively.

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  • Wildly guessing at your potential size from a brand you've never worn before or taking a gamble on a style that you're not entirely sure will work, you often end up paying the price in the end - literally and figuratively.

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  • So if you have your hands full both literally and figuratively, these glare-blocking little inventions are your solution.

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  • They're expected to lay down their lives for the game, figuratively - everything goes on hold as they slave away at finding bugs.

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  • Sometimes the most difficult part of stepparenting is battling the presence of the other parent, not literally, but figuratively.

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  • If you want to wear glass prom shoes for your big night, think literally, not figuratively.

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  • A compass is used to guide you literally, while the nautical star tattoo could be used to guide you figuratively through life.

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