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figs

figs Sentence Examples

  • FIGS.

  • The micrometer represented in figs.

  • Dawes, who employed a micrometer of the English type (figs.

  • Yerkes telescope, is shown in figs.

  • The normal form of the apparatus is shown in figs.

  • 21, its principle of construction is shown in figs.

  • The narrow tongues of the silvered surface will now reflect corresponding parts of the star-spectrograph, and will obliterate corresponding parts of the solar spectrograph - as shown in figs.

  • For this purpose manlids must be provided (figs.

  • Indian corn, quinoa, mandioca, possibly the potato, cotton and various fruits, including the strawberry, were already known to the aborigines, but with the conqueror came wheat, barley, oats, flax, many kinds of vegetables, apples, peaches, apricots, pears, grapes, figs, oranges and lemons, together with alfalfa and new grasses for the plains.

  • The hilly regions of Limousin, Prigord and the Cvennes are the home of the chestnut, which in some places is still a staple food; walnuts grow on the lower levels of the central plateau and in lower Dauphin and Provence, figs and almonds in Provence, oranges and citrons on the Mediterranean coast, apricots in central France, the olive in Provcnce and the lower valleys of the Rhneand Durancc. Truffles arc found under Silk Cocoons.

  • The western side consists of stony but fertile plains, which are well cultivated and produce luxuriant crops of grain, with some cotton, vines, almonds and figs.

  • It may be added that the division of these teeth into premolars and molars in figs.

  • From the shape and position of the phagocytic organs it is obvious that they form admirable strainers through which the fluid of the body-cavity filters (figs.

  • A submarine cable (figs.

  • Figs.

  • 11 a meter or counter is shown associated with the subscriber's line, and in both figs.

  • The chief productions are wheat, wine, oil, mastic, figs, raisins, honey, wax, cotton and silk.

  • Almonds are widely cultivated in Sicily, Sardinia and the sor~ithern provinces; walnut trees throughout the peninsula, their wood being more important than their fruit; hazel nuts, figs, prickly pears (used in the south and the islands for hedges, their fruit being a minor consideration), peaches, pears, locust beans and pistachio nuts are among the other fruits.

  • Asparagus, figs, and wine of medium quality are grown in the district; and heavy iron goods, chemical products, clocks and plaster are among the manufactures.

  • figs.

  • 5, A) and Hydractinia (figs.

  • t "1j ' laterally from it; the result is an arborescent, tree-like colony (figs.

  • In the monopodial method (figs.

  • In the sympodial method of budding, on the other hand, the founder-polyp is of limited growth, and forms a bud from its side, which is also of limited growth, and forms a bud in its turn, and so on (figs.

  • Thus in Plumularidae (figs.

  • In Willia, Geryonia, &c., however, the tentacles and radial canals are on the plan of six instead of four (figs.

  • On the other hand, in some cases the tentacles are less in number than the perradii; in Corymorpha (figs.

  • 24); thirdly, in position and origin, being usually implanted on the extreme edge of the umbrella, but in Narcomedusae they become secondarily shifted and are given off high up on the ex-umbrella (figs.

  • 31) and Tiaropsis (figs.

  • We then find the typical otocyst of the Leptomedusae, a vesicle bulging on the ex-umbral side of the velum (figs.

  • In many Leptomedusae the otocysts are very small, inconspicuous and embedded completely in the tissues; hence they may be easily overlooked in badly-preserved material, and perhaps are present in many cases where they :: r simplest condition of the otocyst is a freely projecting club, a so-called (figs.

  • The indirect mode of budding (figs.

  • Hydractinia (figs.

  • Clavidae (including the medusa-family Tiaridae (figs.

  • Gonosome with free medusae or gonophores; the medusae typically with otocysts, sometimes with cordyli or ocelli (figs.

  • Numerous medusae are budded successively within the gonotheca and set free; they swim off and mature in the open sea (Allman [1], p. 48, figs.

  • ix., figs.

  • Eucopidae (figs.

  • families are known: - genus, Millepora (figs.

  • pores may be confluent with the cyclosystem presents itself as a radiating partitions, thus having a superficial resemblance to a madreporarian coral with its radiating septa (figs.

  • 69) and its allies; and (3) Velellidae, represented by the well-known genus Velella (figs.

  • The Physalina comprise the families Physalidae and Epibulidae, of which the types are Physalia (figs.

  • vi., figs.

  • and is characteristic of all roots (figs.

  • The vascular tissue is typically separable into distinct collateral bundles (figs.

  • TROPICAL REGI0N.This is characterized by the presence of gigantic Monocotyledons, palms, Musaceae and bamboos, and of evergreen polypetalous trees and figs.

  • Sequoia and the tulip-tree still remain; figs are abundant; laurels are represented by Sassafras and camphor; herbaceous plants (Ranunculaceae, Cruciferae, Umbelliferae) are present, though, as might be expected, only fragmentarily preserved.

  • Thus in the Mediterranean region the large groups of palms, figs, myrtles and laurels are each only represented by single surviving species.

  • In Malaya and eastward the forests are rich in arborescent figs, laurels, myrtles, nutmegs, oaks and bamboos.

  • Sternum (figs.

  • 6) for cleaning or renewal; the adjustment of the bearings is made by screwing up the cage cap b, locked by a special washer and the two screws a, a (figs.

  • Oil-beetles (figs.

  • The coleopterous pupa (figs.

  • extremes we find various transitional forms: an active larva, as described above, but with four-segmented, single-clawed legs, as among the rove-beetles and their allies; the body well armoured, but slender and worm-like, with very short legs as in wireworms and mealworms (figs.

  • the largest and most typical family of the Adephaga (figs.

  • The Cicindelidae, or tigerbeetles (figs.

  • The Lucanidae or stag beetles (figs.

  • The Chrysomelidae, or leaf-beetles (figs.

  • The American engineer is more fortunately situated than his English brother with regard to the possibility of a solution, as will be seen from the comparative diagrams of construction gauges, figs.

  • The perfect female or " queen " ants (figs.

  • In the common orchids of British meadows, Orchis Mori-o, mascula (Shakespeare's long purples), &c., the general structure of the flower is as we have described it (figs.

  • The chief trees belong to the orders of Terebinthaceae, Sapindaceae, Meliaceae, Clusiaceae, Dipterocarpaceae, Ternstroemiaceae, Leguminosae, laurels, oaks and figs, with Dilleniaceae, Sapotaceae and nutmegs.

  • In figs.

  • Attica was famous for its olives and figs, but general agriculture excelled in Peloponnesus, where, by means of irrigation and drainage, all the available land was utilized.

  • - Average Annual Imports of Cattle, Sheep and Figs, and of Dead Meat, into the United Kingdom over eight 5-yearly Periods.

  • The foot of the limpet is a nearly circular disk of muscular tissue; in front, projecting from and raised above it, are the head and neck (figs.

  • The accompanying dia grams (figs.

  • Letters as in figs.

  • In many Gastropoda the eyes are not thus sessile but raised upon special eye-tentacles (figs.

  • The foot of the Pectinibranchia, unlike the simple muscular disk of the Isopleura and Aspidobranchia, is very often divided into lobes, a fore, middle and hind lobe (pro-, mesoand meta-podium, see figs.

  • Pyrula, Ovula, see figs.

  • It is one of the more typical Opisthobranchs, that is to say, it belongs to the section Tectibranchia, but other members of the suborder, namely, Bulla and Actaeon (figs.

  • Grapes, barley, esparto grass, dry figs, almonds and zinc are exported.

  • The head-capsule of an insect (figs.

  • The crystals of prismatic habit represented in figs.

  • They are the head slits cephalic fissures, " Kopfspalten ") so characteristic of this subdivision (figs.

  • Fruits normally form the principal crop; the total value for 1907-8 of the fruit crops of the state (including oranges, lemons, limes, grape-fruit, bananas, guavas, pears, peaches, grapes, figs, pecans, &c.) was $6,160,299, according to the report of the State Department of Agriculture.

  • Among more eminent Genoese cartographers are Joannes da Carignano 1344), Petrus Vesconte, who worked in 1311 and 1327, and is the draughtsman of the maps illustrating Marino Sanuto's Liber secretorum fidelium crucis, which was to have roused Christendom to engage in another crusade (figs.

  • The cape at the western end of the peninsula is Ras et-Tin (Cape of Figs); the eastern cape is known as Pharos or Kait Bey.

  • (From Seroux d'Agincourt.) dove, the anchor, the olive-branch, or the monogram of Christ (figs.

  • The ground-plans (figs.

  • The plan, it will be seen, is remarkable for its regularity (figs.

  • As a typical example of the Etruscan tombs we give the plan and section (figs.

  • Many of the fruits of warm-temperate and semi-tropical lands, whether native or exotic, including oranges, olives, figs, grape-fruit, kumquats and pomegranates are cultivated.

  • Apart from the arid wastes of the Karst, the soil is well adapted for the growing of cereals, especially Indian corn; olives, vines, mulberries, figs, pomegranates, melons, oranges, lemons, rice and tobacco flourish in Herzegovina and the more sheltered portions of Bosnia.

  • A great portion of the ground within the wall lines is not occupied by buildings, especially in the north-western quarter; and even in the more populous parts of the city, near the river, a considerable space between the houses is occupied by gardens, where pomegr a nates, figs, oranges, lemons and date-palms grow in great abundance, so that the city, when seen at a distance, has the appearance of rising out of the midst of trees.

  • to the north-east, was famous in antiquity for its figs and fuller's earth (KL,ucwXia yi), and contained a considerable city, the remains of which cover the cliff of St Andrews.

  • (6) The Plynteria and Callynteria, at which her ancient image and peplus in the Erechtheum and the temple itself were cleaned, with a procession in which bunches of figs (frequently used in lustrations) were carried.

  • The division of the group into Ecardines (Inarticulata), Figs.

  • In Magellania [Waldheimia] it is elongated and reflected; the hinge-plate large, with four depressions, under which originates a median septum, which extends more or less into the interior of the shell (figs.

  • In Thecidium (figs.

  • Owing to the strong and tight interlocking of the valves by the means of curved teeth FIGS.

  • In a few in figs.

  • The chief arm-nerve traverses the lophophore, being situated between the great arm-sinus and the base of the lip (figs.

  • The under arm-nerve, which lies between the small arm-sinus and the surface, supplies nerves to the muscles of both arm-sinuses (figs.

  • II) or the hysteresis curve (figs.

  • cxxvi.), are given in figs.

  • Specimens of curves showing the relation of induction to magnetic field at various temperatures, and of permeability to temperature with fields of different intensities, are given in figs.

  • The reader is referred to the complete series of figures here given, with their explanatory legends (figs.

  • Following the prosoma is a region consisting of six segments (figs.

  • (From Lankester, loc. cit.) figs.

  • This interpretation, however, of the " metasternites " of Limulus and Scorpio is opposed by the coexistence in Thelyphonus (figs.

  • (For details the reader is referred to Watase (11) and to Lankester and Bourne (5).) The structure of the central eyes of Scorpio and spiders and also of Limulus differs essentially from that of the lateral eyes in having two layers of cells (hence called diplostichous) beneath the lens, separated from one another by a membrane (figs.

  • We have figured here (figs.

  • (After Lankester, loc. cit.) has as many structure of the prosoma, and must play an important part economy of these organisms. In Limulus (figs.

  • In the scorpion (figs.

  • Only the central and horizontal parts of this structure correspond precisely to the entosternite of Limulus: the right and left anterior processes(marked ap in figs.

  • 3 and 4, and RAP, LAP, in figs.

  • These are a ventral arch forming a neural canal through which the great nerve cords pass (figs.

  • 3 and 4, snp), and further a dorsal gastric canal and arterial canal which transmit the alimentary tract and the dorsal artery respectively (figs.

  • In Mygale (figs.

  • There are seven pairs of these venopericardiac vertical muscles in Scorpio, and eight in Limulus (see figs.

  • VPM' is probably represented in Scorpio, though not marked in figs.

  • They are represented at the present day by the single genus Limulus (figs.

  • 44 and 45; also figs.

  • Gigantostraca (figs.

  • Palaeophonidae, Palaeophonus (figs.

  • to and figs.

  • In the Upper Silurian two specimens of a scorpion have been found (figs.

  • Pedipalpi (figs.

  • A narrow prae-genital somite is present between opisthosoma and prosoma (figs.

  • Hubbardiidae (Schizomus, Hubbardia) (figs.

  • Araneae (figs.

  • Mesothelae (see figs.

  • Solifugae = Mycetophorae (see figs.

  • Pseudoscorpiones = Chelonethi, also called Chernetidia (see figs.

  • Cheliferidae (Chelifer (figs.

  • Podogona=Ricinulei (see figs.

  • 6 a and its figs, oil, almonds and grain are also profitable articles of trade.

  • Colchicum illustrates the corm-development which is rare in Liliaceae though common in the allied order Iridaceae; a corm is formed by swelling at the base of the axis (figs.

  • Tangerines, lemons, limes, grapes, guavas, figs, cashews or caws (A nacardium occidentale), mangabas (Hancornia speciosa), joboticabas (Eugenia cauli ora and E.

  • In the southern districts almonds, figs, rice and olives are grown.

  • Other agricultural products are sweet potatoes, cassava (manioc), yuca, yams, white potatoes, maguey, okra, peanuts, pease, all the vegetables of the hot and temperate climates, oranges, lemons, limes, bananas, plantains, figs, grapes, coco-nuts, pine-apples, strawberries, plums, guavas, breadfruit, mangoes and many others.

  • and figs.

  • The term " cirrhosis " or " fibrosis " is usually applied to such a condition of organs (figs.

  • Fatty degeneration is a retrogressive change associated with the deposit of fatty granules or globules in the cytoplasm, and is caused by disorganized cellular activity (figs.

  • In the burntofferings of male kine to Isis, the carcase of the steer, after evisceration, was filled with fine bread, honey, raisins, figs, frankincense, myrrh and other aromatics, and thus stuffed was roasted, being basted all the while by pouring over it large quantities of sweet oil, and then eaten with great festivity.

  • The tools used are extremely primitive - hollow iron blowing-rods, solid rods for holding vessels during manipulation, spring tools, resembling sugar-tongs in shape, with steel or wooden blades for fashioning the viscous glass, callipers, measure-sticks, and a variety of moulds of wood, carbon, cast iron, gun-metal and plaster of Paris (figs.

  • The structure of these organs is seen in figs.

  • Stored tobacco is liable to be attacked and ruined by the " cigarette beetle," a cosmopolitan insect of very varied tastes, feeding not only on dried tobacco of all kinds, including snuff, but also on rhubarb, cayenne pepper, tumeric, ginger, figs and herbarium specimens.

  • Their country was rich in figs, vines and olive trees; the silver mines in the mountain range of Dysorum brought in a talent a day to their conqueror Alexander.

  • The zooids of which the colonies of Ectoprocta are composed consist of two parts: the body-wall and the visceral mass (figs.

  • The free (frontal) wall may remain membranous and uncalcified, or as in Membranipora (figs.

  • In encrusting Ctenostomes and in the Membranipora-like Cheilostomes (figs.

  • The Javan rhinoceros (Rhinoceros sondaicus) is distinguished by its smaller size, and a different arrangement of the skin-folds (as may be seen by comparing figs.

  • Alfalfa and grapes are the principal products, and considerable attention is given to the cultivation of other fruits, such as figs, peaches and melons.

  • Figs, apricots, nectarines and peaches grow to perfection.

  • Apparently this mound had been occupied largely by store houses, in which were stored not only grain, figs, &c., but also vessels, weapons, sculptures and every possible object connected with the use and administration of palace and temple.

  • The " fig-insects," whose presence in ripening figs is believed essential to the proper development of the fruit, belong to Blastophaga and other genera of this family.

  • The Mymaridae or " fairy-flies " are distinguished from the Chalcididae by their narrow fringed wings (figs.

  • The ten thousand known species included in this group agree with the Cynipoidea and Chalcidoidea in the position of the ovipositor and in the jointed trochanters, but are distinguished by the fore-wing possessing a distinct stigma and usually a typical series of nervures and areolets (figs.

  • A few small families such as the Evaniidae and the Stephanidae are included here, but the vast majority of the group fall into two large families, the Ichneumonidae and the Braconidae, the former distinguished by the presence of two median (or discoidal) cells in the fore-wing (figs.

  • 4, 7), while the latter has only one (figs.

  • Taking as our type the head of a cicad, we find a jointed rostrum or beak (figs.

  • The prothorax (figs.

  • The Cimicidae have the feet three-segmented and the forewings greatly reduced; most of the species are parasites on birds and bats, but one - Cimex lectularius (figs.

  • '12' a) have the fore-wings developed and the hind-wings greatly reduced, while in the female wings are totally absent and the body undergoes marked degradation (figs.

  • To remedy drawback (I) Repsolds devised the form of printing micrometer which is shown in figs.

  • In this instrument (figs.

  • They contain a rich abundance of fruit trees, especially vines, oranges, lemons and figs, and in some parts present scenes of almost Alpine grandeur.

  • The surrounding country is very fertile when irrigated, producing oranges, lemons, figs and other semi-tropical fruits.

  • (Figs.

  • Target FIGS.

  • The prin ciple of the modern automatic sight is made clear in figs.

  • He was a shepherd, or perhaps a sheep-breeder, but combined this occupation with that of a tender of sycomore figs.

  • press in use at the Royal Mint since 1882 is shown in figs.

  • Oranges, lemons, grapes, passion fruit, figs, pine-apples, guavas and other fruits grow abundantly; while potatoes, onions, maize and arrowroot can be cultivated.

  • Comparing figs.

  • The relations shown by figs.

  • - The present London Bridge, begun in 1824 and completed in 1831, is as fine an example of a masonry arch structure as can be found (figs.

  • - Figs.

  • In the article GREEK ART, figs.

  • Each outgrowth contains a prolongation of the archenteric cavity (compare figs.

  • dates, figs and other fruits.

  • Most of the agricultural products are sent to the Peninsula; wine, figs, marble, almonds, lemons and rice to Europe and Africa.

  • In Sir Andrew Noble's researches a number of plugs were inserted in the side of the experimental gun, reaching to the bore and carrying crusher-gauges, and also chronographic appliances which registered the passage of the shot in the same manner as the electric screens in Bashforth's experiments; thence the velocity and energy of the shot was inferred, to serve as an independent control of the crusher-gauge records (figs.

  • The result is plotted in figs.

  • The chief exports are sheep and oxen, most of which are raised in Morocco and Tunisia, and horses; animal products, such as wool and skins; wine, cereals (rye, barley, oats), vegetables, fruits (chiefly figs and grapes for the table) and seeds, esparto grass, oils and vegetable extracts (chiefly olive oil), iron ore, zinc, natural phosphates, timber, cork, crin vegetal and tobacco.

  • im Lichte des Alien Orients, 2nd ed., figs.

  • Maize, millet, rye, flax, liquorice and fruits of all sorts - especially nuts, almonds, oranges, figs, walnuts and chestnuts - are produced.

  • The forms of the four primary standards representing the four units of extension and mass are shown in figs.

  • and II.; figs.

  • The soil is fertile, producing wheat, maize, grapes, figs, pomegranates and wine.

  • figs.); and its free portion may be very short or lacking.

  • most cases these granules are, if not confined to, chiefly distributed in the posterior (flagellate) half of the body (figs.

  • In certain Trypanosomes a well-defined, usually oval vacuole is often, though not constantly, to be observed, situated at a varying distance from the anterior end (figs.

  • See figs.

  • lewisi (Kent), the well-known natural Trypanosome of rats (figs.

  • (1904), 57, p. 161, figs; (3) J.

  • p. 105, figs.; (4) W.

  • (1904), 3, p. 367, figs.; (16) idem, " Generationsand Wirthswechsel von trypanoplasma barreli, Lay.

  • 7, p. 1, figs.; (16a) R.

  • (1871), II, p. 387, figs.; (19) "The Sleeping-sickness," Quart.

  • Rev. (July 1904), p. 113, figs.; (20) A.

  • (1904), 57, p. 158, figs.; (23) Laveran and F.

  • (1902), I, P. 475, figs.; (25) idem, Recherches morphologiques et experimentales sur le trypanosome du Nagana ou maladie de la mouche tse-tse," Ann.

  • (1903), 1 37, p. 957, figs,; (28) idem, " Sur la nature bacterienne du pretendu trypanosome des huitres, T.

  • (1902), 54, p. 354, figs.; (30) idem, " Sur la morphologie du trypanoplasma des vairons," C. r.

  • c. p. 856, figs.; (32) idem, " Sur les hemoflagelles du Cobitis barbatula, L.

  • 1252, figs.; (37) idem, " Note on the nature of the parasitic bodies found in tropical splenomegaly," op. cit.

  • p. 35, figs.; (43) G.

  • 1261, 1401, figs.; (50) F.

  • Gesundheitsamte (1904), 20, p. 387, figs.; (51) idem, " Zur Kenntniss der Spirochaete pallida," Deutsch.

  • According to ancient authorities, the word (derived by them from vuKov, " fig," and cbaivecv, " to show") meant one who informed against another for exporting figs (which was forbidden by law) or for stealing the fruit of the sacred fig-trees, whether in time of famine or on any other occasion.

  • Another old explanation was that fines and taxes were at one time paid in figs, wine and oil, and those who collected such payments in kind were called sycophants because they "presented," publicly handed them over to the state.

  • Shadwell suggests that the real meaning is "fig-discoverer," not "fig-informer," referring to the blackmailer who discovers the "figs" (that is, the money) of the rich man and forces him to hand it over by the threat of bringing a criminal accusation against him.

  • high and weighing 32 tons, can be fully opened in seven minutes by two men raising each door from the arched double foot-bridge (figs.

  • Further than this, the part of the mantle-skirt bounding the two holes is frequently drawn out so as to form a pair of tubes which project from the shell (figs.

  • The shell of Anodonta does not present these parts in the most strongly marked condition, and accordingly our figures (figs.

  • Mactra; British (figs.

  • Into the whole length of the urethra mucous glands (glands of Littre) open, and in the roof of 1 Figs.

  • Squirrel Group. - The Sciuroidea, which include the great group of squirrels, sousliks, marmots, &c., all comprised in the single family Sciuridae, differ from the sewellels in having large post-orbital processes to the skull (figs.

  • The Anomaluridae are characterized by having rooted cheek-teeth with shallow transverse enamel-folds, the two halves of the lower jaw movably articulated in front, very small post-orbital processes to the skull, and the presence of two rows of scales on the under surface of the base of the tail (figs.

  • mori is itself an inconspicuous moth (figs.

  • The most important of the species at the present time is the Chinese tussur or tasar worm, Antheraea pernyi (figs.

  • It is connected with Smyrna by a branch of the Aidin railway, and has a trade in cotton, figs, raisins and tobacco.

  • Oranges, lemons, limes, figs, mangoes, grapes and peaches, besides a considerable variety of vegetables, are raised in small quantities for local consumption.

  • The Kew Observatory pattern unifilar magnetometer is shown in figs.

  • Besides these detached forts and their connecting roads, the north of Britain was defended by Hadrian's wall (figs.

  • Aidin is on the SmyrnaDineir railway, has large tanneries and sweetmeat manufactories, and exports figs, cotton and raisins.

  • The committee reported in July 1840, and after minor improvements by the makers the admiralty compass, the card of which is shown in figs.

  • around its peninsula, and bordered by an automobile drive; along the beach are some attractive residences, hotels and boarding houses, and several sanatoriums. The city's principal industries are the canning of oysters, shrimp, fish, figs and vegetables, and the manufacture of fertilizers and flour.

  • The principal agricultural products are wheat, maize, rye, oats and fruit, namely olives, figs and melons.

  • In cases where all the stresses are heavy, that portion of the beam which is under compression is similarly reinforced, though with smaller bars (figs.

  • They are of U shape, and passing round the tension bars extend to the top of the beam (figs.

  • The star, badge and ribbon of the order are illustrated on Plate II., figs.

  • The star, badge and ribbon are illustrated on Plate II., figs.

  • The ribbon and badges of the knights grand cross (civil and military) and the stars are illustrated on Plate II., figs.

  • The badge of the knights grand cross and the ribbon are illustrated on Plate II., figs.

  • The badges, stars and ribbons of the knights grand commanders of the two orders are illustrated on Plate III., figs.

  • The badge, star and ribbon of the knights grand cross are illustrated on Plate III., figs.

  • they are heteromerous (figs.

  • Agyrium), being indicated externally only by a very thin film (figs.

  • The typical heteromerous thallus shows on section a peripheral, thin and therefore transparent, layer, the cortical layer, and centrally a mass of denser tissue the so-called medullary layer, between these two layers is the algal zone or gonidial layer (figs.

  • to, 1880, figs.

  • - Peaches, nectarines, apricots, figs and dessert plums, cherries, apples and pears are commonly cultivated in the orchard-house.

  • Commence or continue the forcing of the various choice fruits, as vines, peaches, figs, cherries, strawberries, &c: Pot roots of mint and place in heat to produce sprigs for mint sauce.

  • Fruit is everywhere grown, and there is a special cultivation of grapes and figs in the Westland of South Holland.

  • In these sporophores (such as the well-known toadstools and mushrooms where the ordinary vegetative mycelium is underground) we have structures specially developed for bearing the basidiospores and protecting them from rain, &c., and for the distribution of the spores - see earlier part of article on distribution of spores (figs.

  • It is at all times full from top to bottom, somewhat as sketched in figs.

  • In their place the regenerative stoves of the Whitwell and Cowper types (figs.

  • - These furnaces are usually stationary, but in that shown in figs.

  • How this is done may be understood more easily if figs.

  • BB (figs.

  • A few examples are illustrated here (figs.

  • The leaves in the bud are either placed simply in apposition, as in the mistletoe, or they are folded or rolled up longitudinally or laterally, giving rise to different kinds of vernation, as delineated in figs.

  • All the commoner sorts of fruitapples, pears, cherries, &c.grow everywhere, but the more delicate kinds, such as figs, apricots and peaches, are confined to the warmer districts.

  • is considerable, the whole of the north and north-east coast from the Bay of Castellammare round to Catania is an endless succession of orchards, in which oranges, citrons and lemons alternate with olives, almonds, pomegranates, figs, carob trees, pistachios, mulberries and vines.

  • The locust bean (used for forage), figs, and peaches are widely grown, while in certain special zones the pistachio and the manna-ash yield rich returns.

  • At the tip of the introvert the mouth opens, and is surrounded in Sipunculus by a funnel-shaped, ciliated lophophore (figs.

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