Fig sentence example

fig
  • above the sea the fig is common.
    55
    32
  • The French artists still retain FIG ' 4.
    34
    18
  • Around the villages are extensive cultivated fields and orchards, containing fig, pomegranate and orange trees.
    17
    13
  • The most striking trees in the forest region are, in the basin of the Cavalla, the giant Funtumia elastica, which grows to an altitude of 200 ft.; various kinds of Parinarium, Oldfieldia and Khaya; the bombax or cotton tree, giant dracaenas, many kinds of fig; Borassus palms, oil palms, the climbing Calamus palms, and on the coast the coconut.
    9
    12
  • FIG 2.
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    Advertisement
  • FIG 6 - A.
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    7
  • The component of T A Q FIG 30.
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  • 39, middle and rubbing it lengthwise FIG with a bit of cloth powdered with resin, till the rod gives a distinct note; the vibrations are communicated to the plate, which consequently vibrates transversely, and causes the sand to heap itself into one or more concentric rings.
    2
    2
  • size.) loam, such as is suitable for the vine and the fig; this should be used in as rough a state as possible, or not broken small and fine.
    2
    4
  • Evergreens predominate in the south, where grow subtropical plants such as the myrtle, arbutus, laurel, holm-oak, olive and fig; varieties of the same kind are also found on the Atlantic coast (as far north as the Cotentin), where the humidity and mildness of the climate favor their growth.
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    Advertisement
  • (From publications of the Duke of Loubat.) FIG.; pule lay Urn, with beast mask and rich head ornament.
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    2
  • Timber trees are almost confined to the river valleys, where willows, yellow wood, iron wood, red wood, mimosas and, in deep gorges, the wild fig are found.
    1
    2
  • The fruit trees commonly cultivated are the peach, apricot, apple, orange, lemon, pear, fig and plum.
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    2
  • Pressure In A Closed Vessel Observed And Calculated Gravimetric Volume Fig 9.
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    2
  • England, and Spalacotherium (fig.
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    Advertisement
  • The sugar-cane flourishes, the cotton-plant ripens to perfection, date-trees are seen in the gardens, the rocks are clothed with the prickly-pear or Indian fig, the enclosures of the fields are formed by aloes and sometimes pomegranates, the liquorice-root grows wild, and the mastic, the myrtle and many varieties of oleander and cistus form the underwood of the natural forests of arbutus and evergreen oak.
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  • This coelom is lined by peritoneal cells and is divided into a series of metameres by septa which correspond to the segmentation of the FIG 15.
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  • The Attic plain, notwithstanding the lightness of the soil, furnished an adequate supply of cereals; olive and fig groves and vineyards were cultivated from the earliest times in the valley of the Cephisus, and pasturage for sheep and goats was abundant.
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  • In the higher regions the principal trees are various species of fig, tamarind, carob and numerous kinds of cactiform Euphorbia, of which one, the Euphorbia arborea, grows to a height of 20 ft.
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  • Among fruit trees the vine, apricot, peach, apple, quince, fig and banana are cultivated in the highlands, and in the lower country the date palm flourishes, particularly throughout the central zone of Arabia, in Hejaz, Nejd and El Hasa, where it is the prime article of food.
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    Advertisement
  • Opuntia, the prickly pear, or Indian fig cactus, is a large typical group, comprising some 150 species, found in North America, the West Indies, and warmer parts of South America, extending as far as Chile.
    1
    3
  • While Gelocus exhibits a marked approximation to the Tragulidae, Prodremotherium comes nearer to the FIG 2.
    1
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  • It may be added that there are some marsupials, such as the wombat, koala, marsupial ant-eater and the dasyures, FIG.
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  • Soc. FIG.
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  • Deciduous FIG.
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    Advertisement
  • The limbs are five-toed, with the third and fourth toes of the front pair armed with enormous digging claws; FIG.
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  • The first upper FIG.
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  • As the first example of the group may be taken the elegant little long-snouted phalanger (Tarsipes rostratus, fig.
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  • To the same family FIG.
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  • By one authority Amphilestes (fig.
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    Advertisement
  • in FIG.
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  • castaneaefolia, represented in fig.
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  • 1 2 a FIG.
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  • The male has a different life-history (fig.
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  • The male next casts his cuticle, and by means of his spine bores FIG.
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    Advertisement
  • tritici, causing the FIG.
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  • There are three Li ting - typical methods: (I) A direct pull may be applied to the hook, either by screws, or by a cylinder fitted with is piston and rod and actuated by direct hydraulic or other pressure, as shown diagrammatically in fig.
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  • These methods are used in exceptional cases, but present the obvious difficulty of giving FIG.
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  • Various arrangements are adopted; the one indicated in fig.
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  • Three-phase motors are also much used for FIG.
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    Advertisement
  • The FIG.
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  • This horizontal movement of the lower end of the back leg allows the whole arrangement to assume the position shown in fig.
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  • Another type of fixed crane is the " Fairbairn " crane, shown in fig.
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  • Here the jib, superstructure and post are all united in one piece, which revolves in a foundation well, being supported at the bottom by a toe-step and near the ground level by horizontal FIG.
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  • With portable cranes means must be provided to ensure the requisite stability against overturning; this is done by weighting the tail of the revolving part with heavy weights, and in steam cranes the FIG.
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    Advertisement
  • In connexion with the stability of portable cranes, it may be mentioned that accidents more often arise from FIG.
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  • The hydraulic lifting cylinders are placed inside the revolving steel mast or post, and the cabin for the driver FIG.
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  • As types of non-revolving cranes, fig.
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  • 15 shows an overhead traveller worked by hand, and fig.
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  • running wheels which enable the end carriages to travel on the longitudinal gantry girders or runway, and the crab or jenny, which carries the hoisting mechanism, and moves across the span on FIG.
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    Advertisement
  • One variation is illustrated in fig.
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  • Of other variations and combinations of types, fig.
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  • 18 shows a modern design of crane intended to command the maximum of yard space, and having some of the characteristics both of the Goliath and of the revolving jib crane, and fig.
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  • A transporter of the first class is shown in fig.
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  • In the other class of transporter the load is not usually moved; FIG.
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  • The latter form consists (fig.
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  • Between a shoulder, a, in the iron bolt and a shoulder in the porcelain cup, c, is placed an indiarubber ring, which forms a yielding washer and enables the cup to be screwed firmly to the bolt, while preventing FIG.
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  • - Varley's Double FIG.
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  • In practice the resistances r, r' are 9 Earth FIG.
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  • in., with an elongation of at least 5 per cent.), the separate wires being first covered with a firm coating of tape and Chatterton's compound (a FIG.
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  • The tanks are nearly cylindrical in form and have a truncated cone fixed in the centre, as shown at C, fig.
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  • If both FIG.
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  • A simple, but important, addition to enable the reading from the instrument to be effected by sound is shown in fig.
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  • 15 shows the modern pattern of " sounder " as used by the - == IIB I FIG.
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  • The arrangement on the " open-circuit " system for single-current working is shown in fig.
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  • The connexions for single-current working on the " closed-circuit " system are shown in fig.
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  • The arrangement at a station worked by relay on the " single-current " system is shown in fig.
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  • The local 1_ E I battery B 1 then sends a current through the in FIG.
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  • The Siemens polarized relay, shown in fig.
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  • This form of relay is largely used, but in Great Britain it has been entirely .flisplaced by the form shown in fig.
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  • In this instrument FIG.
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  • - Siemens FIG.
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  • to C Down 4/ne o?E 1 FIG.
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  • the working of several instruments from one set of batteries or accumulators, is adopted, the positive and negative currents have to be sent from independent batteries, as shown by fig.
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  • If the positive is called the signalling current, the line will be charged positively each time a signal is sent; but as soon as the signal is completed a negative charge is communicated FIG.
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  • Line 'R ' IC Earth FIG.
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  • In the " bridge " method (fig.
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  • The P Line Receiving Instrument R FIG.
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  • The arrangement is shown in fig.
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  • R 1 and R2 are relays for receiving the FIG.
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  • In practice the number of segments actually employed is much greater than that indicated on the figure, and the segments are arranged in a number of groups, as shown by fig.
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  • To each group is connected a set of apparatus; hence during a complete revolution of the arms a pair of instruments (at station A and station B) will be in communication four times, and the intervals during which any particular set of instruments at the two stations are not in connexion with each other become much smaller than in the case of fig.
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  • 14, FIG.
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  • /3  ?¢rZ FIG.
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  • The punches are arranged as shown in fig.
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  • The arrangement of the apparatus for working some of the most recent cables is shown in Fig.
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  • 33 shows a facsimile of part of a message received and recorded by a siphon recorder, such as that of fig.
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  • t o FIG.
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  • In conjunction with the above receiver he employed a transmitter, which consisted of a large induction or spark coil S having its spark balls placed a few millimetres apart; one of these balls was connected to an earth FIG.
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  • P: M FIG.
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  • a a FIG.
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  • He inserts in the primary circuit of the alternating FIG.
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  • adjust the frequency so that it has the value of the normal time period of the circuit formed of the condenser and transformer secondary circuit, and thus it is possible to obtain condenser oscillatory discharges free from any admixture with alternating current arc. In this manner the condenser discharge can be started or stopped at pleasure, and long and short discharges made in accordance with the signals of the Morse FIG.
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  • A radiator of this last class can be constructed by connecting inductively or directly FIG.
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  • C FIG.
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  • The secondary circuit of this transformer is cut in the middle and has a condenser inserted in it, and its ends are connected to the sensitive metallic filings tube or coherer as shown in fig.
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  • One of the latest forms of FIG.
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  • receiver, known as the double pole, is shown in fig.
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  • To a frame F (fig.
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  • It was soon found that it could only be used to advantage in this way when the total resistance of the circuit, exclusive of the microphone, was small compared with the resistance of the microphone - that is, on very short lines worked with FIG.
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  • The transmitter on long and high resistance lines worked better by joining, in the manner shown in fig.
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  • The Stone system (fig.
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  • Dean's method (fig.
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  • A cord circuit, similar in many respects, including the method .y.^9 Jr '' of operation, but equipped with condensers and impedance coils, in place of the repeating coil, is shown in fig.
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  • The short straight or curved process from the back of the pitcher behind the lid represents the organic apex of the leaf (A in fig.
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  • The colour also varies considerably, even in different pitchers of the same individual, FIG.
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  • The lid and mouth of the pitcher are brighter coloured than the rest of the leaf, which FIG.
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  • Then come the glandular surface (C), which is formed of smooth polished epidermis with numerous glands that secrete the fluid contents of the pitcher, and finally the detentive surface (D), of which the cells are produced into long and strong bristles which point A FIG.
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  • The lid is especially attractive to insects from its bright colour and honey secretion; three wings lead up to the mouth of the pitcher, on the inside of which a row of sharp spines points downwards, and below this a circular ridge (r, fig.
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  • G (From Vines's Text Book of Botany, by permission.) FIG.
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  • The Hydropolyp (fig.
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  • i FIG.
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  • p. 380, fig.
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  • In the curious polyp Myriothela the body of the polyp is differ FIG.
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  • The sub-epithelial layer thus primarily constituted may be recruited by immigration from without of other FIG.
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  • opening closed by a plug of protoplasm (x, fig.
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  • 5 a .qon FIG.
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  • upon the polyps FIG.
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  • After a time the polyps, or certain of them, produce by budding medusa-individuals, which sooner or later develop sexual elements; in some cases, however, the founder_ polyp remains solitary, that is to say, does not produce polypbuds, but only medusa-buds, from the first (Corymorpha, fig.
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  • Hence it is necessary to distin guishbetween,first,the"zooids," FIG.
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  • In this manner the food absorbed by one individual contributes to the welfare of the whole colony, and the coenosarc has the 6 C FIG.
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  • tubes of the basal perisarc do not remain FIG.
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  • forming a felt-work; the result is a massive colony, such as is seen in the so-called Hydrocorallines (fig.
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  • In the formation of arbores cent colonies, two sharply FIG.
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  • Each bud produced FIG.
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  • Hence, in a colony of gymnoblastic hydroids, the oldest polyp of each system, that is to say, of the main stem or of a branch, is the topmost polyp; II  ?a ` FIG.
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  • Or a polyp on the main stem, after having budded a second time to form a pinnule, may give rise to a third bud, which starts a new biserial FIG.
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  • One class g g of polyps, the dactylozoids of branching in the Plumularia-type; (dz), lose their mouth and compare with fig.
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  • - In the Hydromedusae the medusa-individual occurs, as already stated, in one of two conditions, either as an independent organism leading a true life c2 a2 in the open seas, or as a subordinate individuality in the hydroid c colony, from which it is never set free; it then becomes a mere reproductive appendage or gono- phore, losing suc FIG.
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  • As regards habit of life the vast majority of Hydromedusae arc 6 FIG.
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  • 20) and Clavatella (fig.
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  • No other instances FIG.
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  • 67) and Aeginopsis hensenii (fig.
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  • Maas in Results of In its arrangement the muscular tissue the "Albatross " Expedition, forms two s stems: the one composed Museum of Comparative Y P Zoology, Cambridge, Masse, of striated fibres arranged circularly, that U.S.A. is to say, concentrically round the central FIG.
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  • for t he sense of FIG.
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  • a', e, h, FIG.
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  • Two stages in the development of the otocyst can be recognized, the first that of an open pit FIG.
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  • The ocelli are seen in FIG.
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  • organs of Hydro FIG.
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  • From the bionomical point of view, the medusa is to be considered as a means of spreading the species, supplementing the deficiencies of the :" Ca sessile polyp. It may be, however, that increased reproductiveness becomes of greater importance to the species than wide diffu sion; such a condition FIG.
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  • sub, c.c, v, tentaculo FIG.
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  • 41, H); in Eudendrium (fig.
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  • diverticula from the FIG.
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  • 44, A B D FIG.
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  • the future D, E); the cavity A between the two B C walls of the cup FIG.
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  • - Modifications of the method of becomes reduced budding shown in fig.
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  • Next tentacles (t, fig.
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  • Nb Va Vb FIG.
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  • F S.C. G / FIG.
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  • When blastostyles are present, however, they are never enclosed FIG.
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  • 4), Corymorpha (fig.
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  • The type-genus Cladonema (fig.
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  • Clavatella (fig.
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  • Stauridium (fig.
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  • Corymorpha (fig.
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  • Clava (fig.
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  • branched, scattered or verticillate; FIG.
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  • Pteronema (fig.
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  • An apparent, but not real, exception is Halecium halecinum, in which the blastostyle is produced from the side of a nutritive polyp, and both are enclosed in a common theca without a partition between them (Allman [1] p. 50, fig.
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  • Medusae, so-called " meconidia," are budded but not liberated; each in turn, when it reaches sexual maturity, is protruded from the gonotheca by elongation of the stalk, and sets free the embryos, after which it withers and is replaced by another (Allman [1], p. 57, fig.
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  • 7, 8.) h FIG.
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  • Letters a to h same as in fig.
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  • (After Allman.) FIG.
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  • Each corbula contains a central row of blastostyles enclosed and protected by lateral rows of branches representing stunted buds (Allman [1], p. 60, fig.
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  • Besides the wider vertical pore-canals and the narrower, FIG.
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  • 60), in which a central gastrozoid is surrounded FIG.
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  • b, In fig.
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  • In Cryptohelia the FIG.
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  • In Astylus (fig.
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  • Olindias millleri (fig.
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  • Aglaura, Aglantha (fig.
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  • Cunina (fig.
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  • Both these medusae have sense-organs of a peculiar type, which are said to contain an endodermal axis like the sense-organs of Trachylinae, but the fact has recently been called in question for FIG.
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  • forming a float which FIG.
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  • name; never absent and usually present in great numbers (fig.
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  • Palpons (fig.
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  • Haeckel, Lankester's FIG.
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  • He FIG.
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  • ~ ct FIG.
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  • Protosiphon (fig.
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  • ph/i ~ Ce ..----.- FIG.
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  • s.Amphiphloic haplostele of -trace and leaf-gap. FIG.
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  • FiG.
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  • fusing cells, the male cell FIG.
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  • Even in those cases where the cilia band, which is the product of the centrosome-like body or blepharoplast, enters the ovum, as in Zamia (c in fig.
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  • pit-threads whIch traverse the closing membrane of the pits in the FIG.
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  • 9.Continuity of protoplasm of cellsof Tamus cell-walls (fig.
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  • Often the bones, teeth and scales of fishes are to FIG.
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  • The basisphenoids are ventrally overlaid, and FIG.
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  • The schizognathous formation is doubtless the most primitive, and its representatives form a tolerably natural FIG.
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  • Desmognathae (fig.
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  • 5) were supposed to have the maxillopalatines united across the middle line, either directly or by the inter FIG.
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  • Parker and Ftirbringer have demonstrated that desmo FIG.
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  • The os articulare bears on its inner side the inner mandibular process which serves for the insertion of part of the digastric muscle or opener of the mouth; another portion of this muscle is attached to the os angulare, which frequently forms a FIG.
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  • (4) Heterocoelous (fig.
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  • The median and posterior extension of the body of the sternum is a direct outgrowth of the latter, therefore FIG.
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  • The modifications of the hind-limbs are in fact many times greater (such as extremely long legs, with four, three or only two toes; very short legs, almost incapable of walking, with all four toes directed forwards, or two or one backwards, and two or more connected and therefore bound to act together, in various FIG.
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  • 14), mainly from a taxonomic FIG.
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  • He was, indeed, the first to show clearly the relationship of the heron-like birds with the Steganopodes; of storklike birds with the American vultures; the great difference between the latter and the other birds of prey; the connexion of the gulls and auks with the plovers, and that of the sand-grouse with the From Newton's FIG.
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  • Cope's Diatryma of New Mexico, based upon a gigantic FIG.
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  • 17, 18); the edges of the jaws were serrated FIG.
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  • In the Mare aux Songes have been found the bones of another FIG.
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  • Very interesting is Aphanapteryx (fig.
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  • The great auk, once common on the British coasts, those of Denmark, the east coast of North America, then restricted to those of Newfoundland, Greenland and Iceland, has been killed by man, and the same fate has overtaken the Labrador duck, the Phillip Island parrot, Nestor productus, and the large cormorant of FIG.
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  • Of other peculiar genera it FIG.
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  • Some of the Malagasy avifauna is certainly ancient, aboriginal, and even points to India; other forms indicate clearly their African FIG.
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  • Airy's writings during this time are divided between mathematical FIG.
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  • To meet this requirement, Walker in 1878 introduced the Cherub FIG.
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  • -r.y WO-4V FIG.
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  • log (fig.
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  • Owing to the increased friction produced by a rotator making approximately 900 revolutions per mile, towed at the end of a line varying from 40 fathoms for a 12 -knot FIG.
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  • Case A contains the wheelwork, and case E the spindle and steel ball FIG.
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  • Constant use, increased friction (m o r e especially at high speeds), and damage to the rotator will alter an ascertained log error; head or following seas, strong winds, currents and tidal streams also FIG.
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  • Under the heading "Remarks" are noted (for vessels with sail power) making, shortening and trimming sails; and (for all ships) employment of crew, times of passing prominent landmarks, altering of course, and any subject of interest and FIG.
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  • 2 8 D Mamm))?: :4 ` 4 `; FIG.
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  • 1 FIG.
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  • In steam vessels a rough and fair engine room register are kept, FIG.
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  • A mate's log FIG.
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  • - Portion of a pinna FIG.
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  • The legs themselves (fig.
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  • 1, Lucanus cervus) and the great water-beetle (Hydrophilus piceus, fig.
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  • In the wingless female glow-worm (Lampyris, fig.
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  • In the ovarian FIG.
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  • Two very small families of aquatic beetles seem to stand at the base of the series, the Amphizoidae, whose larvae are broad and well armoured with FIG.
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  • The Dyticidae (fig.
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  • The Carabidae, or ground-beetles, comprising 13,000 species, form FIG.
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  • habit, their sharp toothed FIG.
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  • - Silpha quadri- FIG.
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  • 12) with very hard cuticle and somewhat abbreviated elytra, with over 2000 species, most of which live on decaying matter, and FIG.
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  • 16), (fig.
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  • - A, Wireworm; B, pupa of Click Beetle; C, adult Click Beetle (A griotes lineatum), b c a FIG.
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  • The downwardly directed head is covered by the pronotum, and J the three terminal FIG.
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  • Some members of this family - the large black Hydrophilus piceus (fig.
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  • When Hydrophilus dives it carries a supply of air between the elytra and the dorsal surface of the abdomen, while air is FIG.
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  • Some of the bestknown members of the group belong to the Tenebrionidae, a large a FIG.
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  • - (a) Tenebrio molitor FIG.
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  • The latter are the oil beetles (fig.
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  • 24), insects with rather soft cuticle, the elytra (often abbreviated) not fitting closely to the sides of the abdomen, the head constricted behind the eyes to form FIG.
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  • - Meloe proscarabaeus FIG.
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  • Several of the Meloidae (such as the, "Spanish fly," fig.
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  • The heavy grubs of Geotrupes, their c b FIG.
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  • - Melolontha fullo FIG.
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  • During summer the insects rest in their underground retreats, then in autumn FIG.
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  • - Scarabaeus FIG.
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  • Such are the habits of the cockchafer (Melolontha vulgaris) and other species that often cause great injury to farm and a FIG.
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  • Many of these insects, such as the species of Phanaeus (fig.
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    0
  • 29) and Cetonia (fig.
    0
    0
  • Such larvae, and also many with soft cuticle and swollen abdomen - those of the notorious "Colorado beetle," for example - feed openly FIG.
    0
    0
  • The Endomychidae (fig.
    0
    0
  • 34, 35), are a very large family, with "tetramerous" tarsi; there seem to be only four FIG.
    0
    0
  • - Bren- FIG.
    0
    0
  • Of the four families included in this group, the Anthribidae (fig.
    0
    0
  • This type of rail (fig.
    0
    0
  • This line was originally designed as a " plateway " on the Outram system, but objections were raised to rails with upstanding ledges or flanges FIG.
    0
    0
  • The chairs were FIG.
    0
    0
  • The bridge-rail (fig.
    0
    0
  • 4) - so called because it was FIG.
    0
    0
  • In the double-headed rail (fig.
    0
    0
  • In consequence the bull-headed rail (fig.
    0
    0
  • 6) FIG.
    0
    0
  • Bridges Adams, the intention being by " fishing " the joints to convert the rails into continuous beams. In the original design two chairs were placed, one under each rail, a few inches apart, as in fig.
    0
    0
  • The iron tramway or railway had been known for half a century and had come into considerable use in connexion with collieries and quarries before it was realized that for the carriage FIG.
    0
    0
  • 8), and a rather larger distance in America k FIG.
    0
    0
  • The intervals between the sleepers are filled in level with ballast, 12'2' FIG.
    0
    0
  • There are two main ways of attaching the rails to the sleepers, corresponding to two main types of rails - the bull-headed rail A B FIG.
    0
    0
  • This method of construction is more FIG.
    0
    0
  • They serve two principal FIG.
    0
    0
  • At the place where the four rails come together, the two inner ones (one of the main line and the other of the siding), known as " switch rails " (b, fig.
    0
    0
  • At many intermediate stations the same arrangements, on a smaller scale, are made; in all of them there is at least accommodation for the passenger and the goods traffic. The stations for F - FIG.
    0
    0
  • 15): A may be supposed to be a junction outside a large FIG.
    0
    0
  • The fundamental relation between the applied torque and the tractive force F will be understood from fig.
    0
    0
  • If a larger FIG.
    0
    0
  • The curves corresponding to the above expressions are plotted in fig.
    0
    0
  • Barbier's formula is plotted in fig.
    0
    0
  • The extension of the Barbier curve beyond the above limits in fig.
    0
    0
  • 70 FIG.
    0
    0
  • Rate at which work is done against the resistances given by the curves fig.
    0
    0
  • As given by the Barbier curves in fig.
    0
    0
  • Whale for the London & North-Western Railway Company in 1904, and fig.
    0
    0
  • Holden for the FIG.
    0
    0
  • In the case of the London & North-Western engine (fig.
    0
    0
  • The torque;?i H ti l ' --- L-- - -Tt FIG.
    0
    0
  • Using the curves of fig.
    0
    0
  • The way the thermal efficiency of the ideal engine increases with the pressure is exhibited in fig.
    0
    0
  • cross marked 3 in fig.
    0
    0
  • gauge for the London & North-Western railway, fig.
    0
    0
  • 24 that for the Great Western' railway, fig.
    0
    0
  • 25 that for the Great Eastern railway, whilst fig.
    0
    0
  • A common form is illustrated in fig.
    0
    0
  • 'The socket that received the link is replaced by a hook, shown at A in fig.
    0
    0
  • This hook swings on the pivot B, and has an arm which extends backwards, practically at right angles with the working face of the hook, FIG.
    0
    0
  • The knuckle stands open until the coupling is pushed against another coupling, when the two hooks turn on their pivots to the position shown in fig.
    0
    0
  • The method of constructing the working faces of this coupler is shown in fig.
    0
    0
  • Automatic couplers resembling the Janney are adopted in a few special cases in Great Britain and other European countries, FIG.
    0
    0
  • h - - 2 FIG.
    0
    0
  • One (fig.
    0
    0
  • The other type (fig.
    0
    0
  • 9 in.; this he lined with cast-iron segments bolted together, giving a sr 2 / FIG.
    0
    0
  • `,I FIG.
    0
    0
  • resting directly on the roof thus formed (fig.
    0
    0
  • - Single-Column Elevated Structure Z9' 1'7 5-3 " FIG.
    0
    0
  • The New York underground railway (fig.
    0
    0
  • P.) FIG.
    0
    0
  • \ FIG.
    0
    0
  • Eriophorum (fig.
    0
    0
  • The article Greek Art, fig.
    0
    0
  • The town was traversed by a well-paved street with a stone sewer, and contained several important private houses and a larger one which seems to have been FIG.
    0
    0
  • has a helmet-like mitre, the origin of which H FIG.
    0
    0
  • Further, while among wasps and bees we find some solitary and some social genera, the ants as a family are social, though some FIG.
    0
    0
  • 1, 1, 3, a) often cast their wings (fig.
    0
    0
  • The wood ant (Formica rufa, fig.
    0
    0
  • These driver ants shelter in temporary nests made in FIG.
    0
    0
  • - Diagram of the flower FIG.
    0
    0
  • In Cypripedium all three stigmas are functional, but in the great majority of orchids only the lateral pair form receptive surfaces (st, fig.
    0
    0
  • p-- st--- FIG.
    0
    0
  • Cross fertilization, or the impregnation of any given flower by pollen from another flower of the same species on the same or on another plant, has been proved to be of great - g advantage to the plant by securing a more FIG.
    0
    0
  • n 1, Commissure uniting this with ventral ganglion (not shown in fig.).
    0
    0
  • The former, however, is frequently FIG.
    0
    0
  • Glycera, see fig.
    0
    0
  • But before this separates off a number of other FIG.
    0
    0
  • Here, however, the buds are lateral, though produced from a budding may be defective upon one or other of the noto a b FIG.
    0
    0
  • In some Syllids, such as Pionosyllis gestans, the ova are attached to the body A FIG.
    0
    0
  • The genital ducts are limited to one segment (the 8th in Capitella capitata), and there are genital setae on this and the next FIG.
    0
    0
  • (After Oersted.) FIG.
    0
    0
  • The setae, which are always absent from the peristomial segment, are also sometimes absent from a greater number of the FIG.
    0
    0
  • The varying forms of the setae are illustrated in fig.
    0
    0
  • In Typhoeus and Megascolex there are com FIG.
    0
    0
  • These septa are, however, rather incomplete and are not fastened to the gut; and, as in Acanthobdella, the nephridia are embedded vv FIG.
    0
    0
  • Identical letters as in fig.
    0
    0
  • A complex FIG.
    0
    0
  • Most crops are C FIG.
    0
    0
  • bovis) are the most important (see fig.
    0
    0
  • These parasites damage the hide, B FIG.
    0
    0
  • 29 Fig.
    0
    0
  • An example of the latter is seen in the hop aphis FIG.
    0
    0
  • Less abundant on the western side of the fjelds, it again forms woods in Nordland, extending FIG.
    0
    0
  • A FIG.
    0
    0
  • 9 'Ci ' a n' .B FIG.
    0
    0
  • - These are the most primitive Gastropods, retaining to a great degree the original symmetry of the FIG.
    0
    0
  • i, Interspaces between the muscular bundles of the root of the foot, causing the separate areae seen in fig.
    0
    0
  • 5, c. ecr k FIG.
    0
    0
  • It will be remembered that, according to Spengel, the osphradium of mollusca is definitely and intimately related to the gill-plume or ctenidium, being always placed near the base of that organ; further, Spengel has shown that the nerve-supply of this olfactory organ is always derived from the visceral loop. Accord ingly, the nerve-supply FIG.
    0
    0
  • 4, f), which form a series extending completely round the inner face of the depending mantle FIG.
    0
    0
  • The larger renal sac (remarkably enough, that which is aborted in other FIG.
    0
    0
  • It also bends round the liver as shown FIG.
    0
    0
  • ks4 ks:L FIG.
    0
    0
  • 1, in fig.
    0
    0
  • valve) FIG.
    0
    0
  • They are found one on each cephalic tentacle, and are simply minute open pits or depressions of the epidermis, the epidermic cells lining them being pigmented and connected with nerves (compare fig.
    0
    0
  • Pectinibranchia.-In this order there is no longer any trace of bilateral symmetry in the circulatory, respiratory and excretory organs, the topographically right half of the pallial complex having completely disappeared, except the right kidney, which is FIG.
    0
    0
  • b FIG.
    0
    0
  • The former case we call "pleurecbolic " (fig.
    0
    0
  • The introverted rostrum of the Pectinibranch Gastropods presents in contrast to these a limited range of FIG.
    0
    0
  • 'a ' - al- FIG.
    0
    0
  • Probably its use is to enable FIG.
    0
    0
  • The very large assemblage of forms coming under this order comprises the most highly developed predaceous sea-snails, numerous vegetarian species, a considerable number of freshwater and some terrestrial forms. The partial dissection of a male specimen of the common periwinkle, Littorina littoralis, drawn in fig.
    0
    0
  • The nerve to this organ is given off from the superior (original right, see fig.
    0
    0
  • As an excellent general type of the nervous system, attention may be directed to that of Paludina drawn in fig.
    0
    0
  • Salivary glands are present, and in some carnivorous forms (Dolium) these secrete free sulphuric acid (as much as 2% is present in the secretion), which assists the animal in boring holes by means of its FIG.
    0
    0
  • P, A, FIG.
    0
    0
  • It is most commonly found in sessile FIG.
    0
    0
  • Consequently FIG.
    0
    0
  • When FIG.
    0
    0
  • Three steps of this modification may be FIG.
    0
    0
  • Such adaptations are the transparency and colourlessness of the tissues, and the modifications of the foot, which still shows in Atlanta the form common in Pectin:branchia (compare fig.
    0
    0
  • 27 and fig.
    0
    0
  • Leydig, that the otocysts of Pectinibranchia even when lying close upon the pedal ganglion (as in fig.
    0
    0
  • penis I' 0 FIG.
    0
    0
  • Shell conical, not FIG.
    0
    0
  • Radula with a median tooth and a single FIG.
    0
    0
  • Foot large and broad; eyes at base of tAt6touti/iot FIG.
    0
    0
  • The gill-plume,which in A plysia is the typicalMolluscan ctenidium, is seen in fig.
    0
    0
  • 9 C FIG.
    0
    0
  • The relation of the delicate shell to the mantle is peculiar, since it occupies an oval area upon the visceral hump, the extent of which is indicated in fig.
    0
    0
  • 38, C, but may be better understood by a glance at the figures of the allied genus Umbrella (fig.
    0
    0
  • When the shell of an A plysia enclosed in its mantle is pushed well to the left, the sub-pallial space is fully exposed as in fig.
    0
    0
  • One is quite black in colour, and measures when FIG.
    0
    0
  • The free edge of the mantle is seen just below the margin of the shell (compare with Aplysia, fig.
    0
    0
  • The liver opens by two ducts into the digestive FIG.
    0
    0
  • When dissected out they appear as represented in fig.
    0
    0
  • After an interval FIG.
    0
    0
  • Many of these have peculiar processes developed on the dorsal surface (fig.
    0
    0
  • 46, A, B), or retain purely negative characters (fig.
    0
    0
  • a, oraI hood (compare with Tethys, fig.
    0
    0
  • Spengel's observation of the osphradium and its nervesupply in these forms; the nerve to that organ, which is placed somewhat anteriorly - on the dorsal surface - being given off from the hinder part (visceral) of the right compound ganglion - the fellow to that marked A in fig.
    0
    0
  • With FIG.
    0
    0
  • d FIG.
    0
    0
  • h, shell; b, oral hood; d, foot; the exception of the Aplustridae, Lophocercidae and Thecosomata, the head is devoid of tentacles, and its dorsal surface forms a digging FIG.
    0
    0
  • Posteriorly the mantle forms a large pallial lobe FIG.
    0
    0
  • 17 a FIG.
    0
    0
  • e C' FIG.
    0
    0
  • Amphisphyra, g, FIG.
    0
    0
  • No branchia FIG.
    0
    0
  • The terrestrial Streptoneura (represented in England by the common genus Cyclostoma) FIG.
    0
    0
  • The figure (fig.
    0
    0
  • In most other Mollusca (Anisopleurous Gastropods, Pteropods and Conchifera) there is a want of such continuity; the primitive shell-sac contributes no factor to the permanent shell, or only a very minute FIG.
    0
    0
  • (After Spengel.) being formed afresh on the surface of the visceral hump. It is, then, in this sense that we may speak of primary, secondary and tertiary shells in Mollusca, recognizing the fact that they may be merely phases fused by continuity of growth so as to form but one shell, or that in other cases they may be presented to us as separate individual things, in virtue of the non-development of the later phases, or in virtue of sudden changes in the activity of the mantle-surface causing the shedding FIG.
    0
    0
  • The chief features in the development of Limnaeus are exhibited in fig.
    0
    0
  • The blastopore now closes along the middle part of its course, which coincides z s FIG.
    0
    0
  • elongated blastopore of fig.
    0
    0
  • Whilst the Pulmonata are essentially a terrestrial and fresh-water group, there is one genus of slug-like °:ti FIG.
    0
    0
  • Pulmonates which frequent the sea-coast (Oncidium, fig.
    0
    0
  • - The great Cretan palaces and the fortified citadels of Mycenae, Tiryns and Hissarlik, each FIG.
    0
    0
  • 3.-[[Coloured Bas-Relief In Gesso Fig.
    0
    0
  • 17, Fig.
    0
    0
  • The Cnossian palace was re-occupied in its northern part by chieftains who have left numerous rich graves; and general commercial intercourse must have been resumed, for the uniformity of the FIG.
    0
    0
  • 29, Fig.
    0
    0
  • 163, Fig.
    0
    0
  • 10�, Fig.
    0
    0
  • 570, Fig.
    0
    0
  • 193, Fig.
    0
    0
  • i.-Tesserae Of Porcelain Mosaic In Form Of Houses Fig.
    0
    0
  • t;, Fig.
    0
    0
  • 57, Fig.
    0
    0
  • 77, Fig.
    0
    0
  • In their typical state of development, the first maxillae offer a striking contrast to the mandibles, being composed of a two-segmented basal piece (cardo and stipes, fig.
    0
    0
  • I, C, ca, st) bearing a distinct inner and outer lobe (lacinia and galea, fig.
    0
    0
  • The fused cardines form a broad basal plate (sub-mentum) and the stipites a smaller plate (mentum) - see fig.
    0
    0
  • Paired erectile plates (patagia) are borne on the prothorax in moths, while in moths, sawflies, wasps, bees and other insects there are small plates (tegulae) - see Fig.
    0
    0
  • After bathing the FIG.
    0
    0
  • peated branching into all parts of FIG.
    0
    0
  • layers (fig.
    0
    0
  • 15, E) is FIG.
    0
    0
  • layer (endoblast of some authors, fig.
    0
    0
  • of the head-capsule in the imago, it appears that the clypeus and FIG.
    0
    0
  • A (later than fig.
    0
    0
  • p YP, gg FIG.
    0
    0
  • - Camof the house-fly (fig.
    0
    0
  • 2 and 3 are bounded by the domes d and f and the basal pinacoid c; fig.
    0
    0
  • 4 is a plan of a still FIG.
    0
    0
  • Special notes of the style are the central grouping of the windows, leaving comparatively solid spaces on each side, which gives the effect of FIG.
    0
    0
  • The males are usually more brilliantly coloured than the females, and guard the eggs, which are often placed in a sort of nest made of the shell of some bivalve or of the carapace of a crab, with the convexity turned upwards and FIG.
    0
    0
  • Close allies of the gobies are the walking (Periophthalmus), of which various species FIG.
    0
    0
  • The curve (fig.
    0
    0
  • The pedal equation is r 3 =a 2 p, which shows FIG.
    0
    0
  • If a be greater than b the curve resembles fig.
    0
    0
  • 2 and is sometimes termed the fishtail-lemniscate; if a be less than b, the curve resembles fig.
    0
    0
  • The centre is a conjugate point (or acnode) and the curve resembles fig.
    0
    0
  • In this case the centre is a crunode and the curve resembles fig.
    0
    0
  • 4 retracted; fig.
    0
    0
  • - The layers of the body-wall in Carinella (fig.
    0
    0
  • 7), the Metanemertini (fig.
    0
    0
  • 8) and the Heteronemertini (fig.
    0
    0
  • the external and" the internal one, there being a strong circular layer between them (fig.
    0
    0
  • The fibrous nervetissue is more dense in the higher differentiated, more loose and spongy in the lower organized 1P L forms; the cellular nerve-tissue is FIG.
    0
    0
  • IO FIG.
    0
    0
  • To) and a Hoplooccur in the course of the longinemertine (fig.
    0
    0
  • - Lateral views of head of a Heteronemertine (fig.
    0
    0
  • Whereas in the Metanemertines an arrangement prevails as represented in fig.
    0
    0
  • Its function is less that of respiration than of FIG.
    0
    0
  • In the Nemertines the sexes are separate, with only very FIG.
    0
    0
  • I?u FIG.
    0
    0
  • - Diagrammatic sections to show disposition of internal organs in Carinella (Protonemertini), fig.
    0
    0
  • 15, Heteronemertini, fig.
    0
    0
  • 16, and Metanemertini, fig.
    0
    0
  • 25 24 i 2' z9 § FIG.
    0
    0
  • It is found most convenient to make use of the sag of the wire produced when it is stretched between two fixed points (K 1 K 2, fig.
    0
    0
  • The expansion of the working wire when it is heated will then increase or create a sag in it owing to its increase in FIG.
    0
    0
  • Such an instrument is called a shunted movable coil ammeter, and is represented by a type of instrument shown in fig.
    0
    0
  • ?IIIIIIIillll!.il'ii 4 t Inches FIG.
    0
    0
  • If then the torsion head is twisted, the suspended coil experiences a torque and is displaced through FIG.
    0
    0
  • The difficulty which has generally presented itself to those who have tried to design instruments on the FIG.
    0
    0
  • Above and below these movable coils, which form as it were the two scalepans of a balance, are fixed other stationary coils, and the connexions of all these six coils (shown in fig.
    0
    0
  • The appearance of the complete instrument is shown by fig.
    0
    0
  • obtained approximately by observing the position of the weight on the scale, or it may be obtained more accurately in the follow FIG.
    0
    0
  • In the case of an instrument with gravity control, the FIG.
    0
    0
  • and C. Black.) FIG.
    0
    0
  • There are now n-, y varieties of the cultivated oat included under two principr races - common FIG.
    0
    0
  • masjid, sajada, to adore), the house of prayer in the FIG.
    0
    0
  • Thus special parts are reserved for natives of the various provinces of Egypt, of Morocco,Syria, Arabia, India, Turkey, &c. Each student can, FIG.
    0
    0
  • The procedure for a combustion is as follows: - FIG.
    0
    0
  • in diameter is thoroughly cleansed and packed as shown in fig.
    0
    0
  • Various forms of potash bulbs are employed; fig.
    0
    0
  • 2 is Liebig's, fig.
    0
    0
  • 3 Mohr's or Geissler's, fig.
    0
    0
  • 4 is a more recent form, of which special variations have been FIG.
    0
    0
  • In this method the operation is carried out in a hard glass tube sealed at one end and packed as shown in fig.
    0
    0
  • 1 7, p. 1 347), who has also suggested the use of manganese carbonate instead of magnesite, since the change of colour enables one to follow the decomposi 411=ThEIZ P; FIG.
    0
    0
  • 3 a FIG.
    0
    0
  • The second case is illustrated in fig.
    0
    0
  • Jacobson, Lehrbuch der organischen Chemie; Richter-Anschutz, Organische Chemie (I I th ed., K 2 S04 K2 S04 (NH 4) 2 SO 4 =o% SO 4 = coo FIG.
    0
    0
  • K A1um=z00% K Alum= o/, Tl Alum= o% Tl Alum_ zoo FIG.
    0
    0
  • K PO 4 = z00% NI-4112P04= x00% FIG.
    0
    0
  • Little progress in the delineation of 0 upon his chart of the FIG.
    0
    0
  • The light is supposed to descend vertically upon the country represented, and in a true scale of shade the intensity increases with the inclination from o° to 90°; but as such a scale does not sufficiently differentiate the lesser inclinations which are the most important, the author adopted a conventional scale, representing a slope of 45° or more, supposed to be inaccessible, as absolutely black, the level surfaces, which reflect all the light which falls upon them, as perfectly white, and the intervening slopes by a proportion between black and white, as in fig.
    0
    0
  • The main principles of this system have been maintained, Slope Degrees 80 75 ' '70 FIG.
    0
    0
  • On this globe an equatorial and a meridional ocean divide our earth FIG.
    0
    0
  • He was he deals with the principles of mathematical geography, map projections, and sources of information with special reference FIG.
    0
    0
  • The extent to which the more correct proportion would have affected the delineation of the Mediterranean is illustrated by fig.
    0
    0
  • Of its character the reduced copy of one of its 12 sections (fig.
    0
    0
  • The map, apparently of the 3rd century, was copied by a monk at Colmar, in 1265, who fortunately contented himself with adding a few scriptural names, and having been acquired by the learned Conrad Peutinger of FIG.
    0
    0
  • an oblong rectangular, a circular and an oval type, the latter being either FIG.
    0
    0
  • Map and Periegesis are FIG.
    0
    0
  • A diagram of this description will be found in Isidor of Seville's Origines (630), see fig.
    0
    0
  • T maps of more elaborate design illustrate the MS. copies of Sallust's Bellum jugurthinum; one of these taken from a codex of the 11th century in the Leipzig town library is shown in fig.
    0
    0
  • This source by some o«,acns FIG.
    0
    0
  • (6 in.), and consequently Our little map (fig.
    0
    0
  • On the maps illustrating the encyclopaedic Liber floridus by Lambert, Lambert Liber flori dus 1120 FIG.
    0
    0