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fig

fig

fig Sentence Examples

  • above the sea the fig is common.

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  • The French artists still retain FIG ' 4.

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  • Around the villages are extensive cultivated fields and orchards, containing fig, pomegranate and orange trees.

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  • the vine, fig, mulberry, cherry, apricot, walnut; pulses, e.g.

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  • The most striking trees in the forest region are, in the basin of the Cavalla, the giant Funtumia elastica, which grows to an altitude of 200 ft.; various kinds of Parinarium, Oldfieldia and Khaya; the bombax or cotton tree, giant dracaenas, many kinds of fig; Borassus palms, oil palms, the climbing Calamus palms, and on the coast the coconut.

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  • The most striking trees in the forest region are, in the basin of the Cavalla, the giant Funtumia elastica, which grows to an altitude of 200 ft.; various kinds of Parinarium, Oldfieldia and Khaya; the bombax or cotton tree, giant dracaenas, many kinds of fig; Borassus palms, oil palms, the climbing Calamus palms, and on the coast the coconut.

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  • FIG 2.

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  • FIG 6 - A.

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  • FIG 6 - A.

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  • The component of T A Q FIG 30.

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  • Evergreens predominate in the south, where grow subtropical plants such as the myrtle, arbutus, laurel, holm-oak, olive and fig; varieties of the same kind are also found on the Atlantic coast (as far north as the Cotentin), where the humidity and mildness of the climate favor their growth.

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  • size.) loam, such as is suitable for the vine and the fig; this should be used in as rough a state as possible, or not broken small and fine.

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  • 39, middle and rubbing it lengthwise FIG with a bit of cloth powdered with resin, till the rod gives a distinct note; the vibrations are communicated to the plate, which consequently vibrates transversely, and causes the sand to heap itself into one or more concentric rings.

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  • Timber trees are almost confined to the river valleys, where willows, yellow wood, iron wood, red wood, mimosas and, in deep gorges, the wild fig are found.

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  • The fruit trees commonly cultivated are the peach, apricot, apple, orange, lemon, pear, fig and plum.

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  • Pressure In A Closed Vessel Observed And Calculated Gravimetric Volume Fig 9.

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  • The fruit trees commonly cultivated are the peach, apricot, apple, orange, lemon, pear, fig and plum.

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  • The sugar-cane flourishes, the cotton-plant ripens to perfection, date-trees are seen in the gardens, the rocks are clothed with the prickly-pear or Indian fig, the enclosures of the fields are formed by aloes and sometimes pomegranates, the liquorice-root grows wild, and the mastic, the myrtle and many varieties of oleander and cistus form the underwood of the natural forests of arbutus and evergreen oak.

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  • In the higher regions the principal trees are various species of fig, tamarind, carob and numerous kinds of cactiform Euphorbia, of which one, the Euphorbia arborea, grows to a height of 20 ft.

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  • Among fruit trees the vine, apricot, peach, apple, quince, fig and banana are cultivated in the highlands, and in the lower country the date palm flourishes, particularly throughout the central zone of Arabia, in Hejaz, Nejd and El Hasa, where it is the prime article of food.

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  • Opuntia, the prickly pear, or Indian fig cactus, is a large typical group, comprising some 150 species, found in North America, the West Indies, and warmer parts of South America, extending as far as Chile.

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  • While Gelocus exhibits a marked approximation to the Tragulidae, Prodremotherium comes nearer to the FIG 2.

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  • (From publications of the Duke of Loubat.) FIG.; pule lay Urn, with beast mask and rich head ornament.

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  • This coelom is lined by peritoneal cells and is divided into a series of metameres by septa which correspond to the segmentation of the FIG 15.

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  • The Attic plain, notwithstanding the lightness of the soil, furnished an adequate supply of cereals; olive and fig groves and vineyards were cultivated from the earliest times in the valley of the Cephisus, and pasturage for sheep and goats was abundant.

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  • A very important distinction is to be found in the conformation of the trunk, which, as shown in fig.

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  • (After Harmer.) FIG.

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  • They resemble FIG.

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  • longirostris (fig.

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  • turicensis (fig.

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  • arvernensis, fig.

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  • Uzel.) FIG.

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  • (fig.

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  • close together (fig.

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  • The labrum (fig,.

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  • The narrow, delicate, FIG.

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  • They possess a long, tubular FIG.

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  • The diurnal variation in summer at the latter station is shown graphically in the top curve of fig.

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  • Fig.

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  • FIG.

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  • cervinus; it has a tall, solid, white, ringless stem and somewhat thin brown cap, furnished underneath with beautiful rose-coloured gills, which are free from the stem as in the mushroom, and which FIG.

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  • In the first place, it FIG.

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  • These slides are shown in fig.

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  • The micrometer represented in fig.

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  • 5 is the original Merz micrometer of the Cape Observatory, made FIG.

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  • To avoid such error Dawes used double wires, not spider webs, placing the image of the star symmetrically between these wires, as in fig.

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  • The micrometer shown in fig.

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  • This index is shown in fig.

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  • 9, but only its mode of attachment (X, fig.

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  • 9) in fig.

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  • The drum d and FIG.

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  • It is FIG.

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  • Repsolds' more recent form of the spider-line micrometer (since 1 The marks of varnish so applied will he seen in fig.

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  • 1893) for large telescopes is shown in fig.

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  • The micrometer is clamped in FIG.

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  • The end-plane of this cylinder receives the pressure of the micrometer screw, so that by turning the small drum-head the coincidence-reading of the movable web with the fixed web can be changed, and thus any given angle can be measured with different FIG.

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  • In fig.

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  • In all modern reading micrometers the cross webs of fig.

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  • Repsolds employ for the micrometers of their reading microscopes the form of construction shown in fig.

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  • One double web, fixed in the box, is pointed symmetrically, as in fig.

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  • reseau-square by means of a spider-line micrometer, a glass scale, on the plan shown in fig.

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  • These FIG.

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  • A general idea of the construction of the machine can be gathered from fig.

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  • Now, if CD is pressed by its weight or by a spring on the surface AB, the effect of wear will be to produce a symmetrical grinding away of both surfaces, which may be represented thus, fig.

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  • That is to say, the screw-errors will be c{ FIG.

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  • In determining the errors of the screw of the Potsdam form FIG.

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  • of machine it is necessary to have regard to the fact that the screw is placed at one side of the slide, as in fig.

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  • The apparatus for this purpose is shown in fig.

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  • condition (3) can be accurately FIG.

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  • These three adjustments having been made, the prisms P3 and P4 are removed and replaced by another prism in which the silvering is arranged as in fig.

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  • fitr Instrumentenkunde, by permission of Julius Springer, Berlin, FIG.

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  • 92, fig.

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  • 97, fig.

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  • p. up, fig.

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  • In the Spanish plains, however, the young are often produced in nests built in trees, or among tall bamboos in FIG.

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  • 5 on Plate II.) FIG.

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  • 4 on Plate II.) FIG.

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  • In drawing (fig.

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  • In driving (fig.

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  • The method in Great Britain is almost entirely confined to places of public assembly, but in Warm air FIG.

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  • The water after being heated passes into a circulating FIG.

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  • empty system FIG.

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  • p pe to water house cistern FIG.

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  • On one end also a right-handed, and on the other a left-handed, screw FIG.

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  • With wrought iron pipes bends may be arranged, as shown in fig.

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  • It will be observed that in fig.

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  • first mentioned are affixed FIG.

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  • A boiler with horizontal sections is shown in fig.

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  • The arrangement of the numbers on the rods will be evident from fig.

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  • The set of ten rods is thus equivalent to four sets of slips as described above, and by their means we may multiply every number less than II,irr, and also any number (consisting of course FIG.

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  • fig.

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  • It may be added that there are some marsupials, such as the wombat, koala, marsupial ant-eater and the dasyures, FIG.

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  • Soc. FIG.

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  • Deciduous FIG.

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  • The limbs are five-toed, with the third and fourth toes of the front pair armed with enormous digging claws; FIG.

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  • The first upper FIG.

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  • As the first example of the group may be taken the elegant little long-snouted phalanger (Tarsipes rostratus, fig.

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  • To the same family FIG.

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  • England, and Spalacotherium (fig.

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  • By one authority Amphilestes (fig.

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  • in FIG.

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  • castaneaefolia, represented in fig.

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  • 1 2 a FIG.

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  • The male has a different life-history (fig.

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  • The male next casts his cuticle, and by means of his spine bores FIG.

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  • tritici, causing the FIG.

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  • There are three Li ting - typical methods: (I) A direct pull may be applied to the hook, either by screws, or by a cylinder fitted with is piston and rod and actuated by direct hydraulic or other pressure, as shown diagrammatically in fig.

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  • These methods are used in exceptional cases, but present the obvious difficulty of giving FIG.

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  • Various arrangements are adopted; the one indicated in fig.

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  • Three-phase motors are also much used for FIG.

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  • The FIG.

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  • This horizontal movement of the lower end of the back leg allows the whole arrangement to assume the position shown in fig.

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  • Another type of fixed crane is the " Fairbairn " crane, shown in fig.

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  • Here the jib, superstructure and post are all united in one piece, which revolves in a foundation well, being supported at the bottom by a toe-step and near the ground level by horizontal FIG.

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  • It has the horizontal racking motion mentioned FIG.

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  • With portable cranes means must be provided to ensure the requisite stability against overturning; this is done by weighting the tail of the revolving part with heavy weights, and in steam cranes the FIG.

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  • In connexion with the stability of portable cranes, it may be mentioned that accidents more often arise from FIG.

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  • The hydraulic lifting cylinders are placed inside the revolving steel mast or post, and the cabin for the driver FIG.

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  • As types of non-revolving cranes, fig.

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  • 15 shows an overhead traveller worked by hand, and fig.

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  • running wheels which enable the end carriages to travel on the longitudinal gantry girders or runway, and the crab or jenny, which carries the hoisting mechanism, and moves across the span on FIG.

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  • One variation is illustrated in fig.

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  • Of other variations and combinations of types, fig.

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  • 18 shows a modern design of crane intended to command the maximum of yard space, and having some of the characteristics both of the Goliath and of the revolving jib crane, and fig.

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  • A transporter of the first class is shown in fig.

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  • In the other class of transporter the load is not usually moved; FIG.

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  • The latter form consists (fig.

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  • Between a shoulder, a, in the iron bolt and a shoulder in the porcelain cup, c, is placed an indiarubber ring, which forms a yielding washer and enables the cup to be screwed firmly to the bolt, while preventing FIG.

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  • - Varley's Double FIG.

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  • In practice the resistances r, r' are 9 Earth FIG.

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  • in., with an elongation of at least 5 per cent.), the separate wires being first covered with a firm coating of tape and Chatterton's compound (a FIG.

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  • The tanks are nearly cylindrical in form and have a truncated cone fixed in the centre, as shown at C, fig.

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  • If both FIG.

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  • A simple, but important, addition to enable the reading from the instrument to be effected by sound is shown in fig.

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  • 15 shows the modern pattern of " sounder " as used by the - == IIB I FIG.

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  • The arrangement on the " open-circuit " system for single-current working is shown in fig.

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  • The connexions for single-current working on the " closed-circuit " system are shown in fig.

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  • The arrangement at a station worked by relay on the " single-current " system is shown in fig.

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  • The local 1_ E I battery B 1 then sends a current through the in FIG.

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  • The Siemens polarized relay, shown in fig.

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  • This form of relay is largely used, but in Great Britain it has been entirely .flisplaced by the form shown in fig.

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  • In this instrument FIG.

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  • - Siemens FIG.

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  • to C Down 4/ne o?E 1 FIG.

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  • the working of several instruments from one set of batteries or accumulators, is adopted, the positive and negative currents have to be sent from independent batteries, as shown by fig.

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  • If the positive is called the signalling current, the line will be charged positively each time a signal is sent; but as soon as the signal is completed a negative charge is communicated FIG.

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  • Line 'R ' IC Earth FIG.

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  • In the " bridge " method (fig.

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  • The P Line Receiving Instrument R FIG.

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  • The arrangement is shown in fig.

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  • R 1 and R2 are relays for receiving the FIG.

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  • In practice the number of segments actually employed is much greater than that indicated on the figure, and the segments are arranged in a number of groups, as shown by fig.

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  • To each group is connected a set of apparatus; hence during a complete revolution of the arms a pair of instruments (at station A and station B) will be in communication four times, and the intervals during which any particular set of instruments at the two stations are not in connexion with each other become much smaller than in the case of fig.

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  • 14, FIG.

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  • /3  ?¢rZ FIG.

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  • The punches are arranged as shown in fig.

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  • An ebonite beam B is rocked up and down rapidly by a train of mechanism, and moves the cranks FIG.

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  • Should, however, a row of holes, like group I, fig.

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  • The arrangement of the apparatus for working some of the most recent cables is shown in Fig.

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  • 33 shows a facsimile of part of a message received and recorded by a siphon recorder, such as that of fig.

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  • t o FIG.

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  • In conjunction with the above receiver he employed a transmitter, which consisted of a large induction or spark coil S having its spark balls placed a few millimetres apart; one of these balls was connected to an earth FIG.

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  • P: M FIG.

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  • a a FIG.

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  • He inserts in the primary circuit of the alternating FIG.

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  • adjust the frequency so that it has the value of the normal time period of the circuit formed of the condenser and transformer secondary circuit, and thus it is possible to obtain condenser oscillatory discharges free from any admixture with alternating current arc. In this manner the condenser discharge can be started or stopped at pleasure, and long and short discharges made in accordance with the signals of the Morse FIG.

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  • A radiator of this last class can be constructed by connecting inductively or directly FIG.

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  • C FIG.

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  • The secondary circuit of this transformer is cut in the middle and has a condenser inserted in it, and its ends are connected to the sensitive metallic filings tube or coherer as shown in fig.

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  • One of the latest forms of FIG.

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  • receiver, known as the double pole, is shown in fig.

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  • To a frame F (fig.

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  • It was soon found that it could only be used to advantage in this way when the total resistance of the circuit, exclusive of the microphone, was small compared with the resistance of the microphone - that is, on very short lines worked with FIG.

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  • The transmitter on long and high resistance lines worked better by joining, in the manner shown in fig.

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  • The Stone system (fig.

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  • Dean's method (fig.

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  • A cord circuit, similar in many respects, including the method .y.^9 Jr '' of operation, but equipped with condensers and impedance coils, in place of the repeating coil, is shown in fig.

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  • The short straight or curved process from the back of the pitcher behind the lid represents the organic apex of the leaf (A in fig.

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  • The colour also varies considerably, even in different pitchers of the same individual, FIG.

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  • The lid and mouth of the pitcher are brighter coloured than the rest of the leaf, which FIG.

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  • Then come the glandular surface (C), which is formed of smooth polished epidermis with numerous glands that secrete the fluid contents of the pitcher, and finally the detentive surface (D), of which the cells are produced into long and strong bristles which point A FIG.

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  • The lid is especially attractive to insects from its bright colour and honey secretion; three wings lead up to the mouth of the pitcher, on the inside of which a row of sharp spines points downwards, and below this a circular ridge (r, fig.

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  • G (From Vines's Text Book of Botany, by permission.) FIG.

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  • The Hydropolyp (fig.

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  • i FIG.

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  • p. 380, fig.

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  • In the curious polyp Myriothela the body of the polyp is differ FIG.

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  • The sub-epithelial layer thus primarily constituted may be recruited by immigration from without of other FIG.

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  • opening closed by a plug of protoplasm (x, fig.

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  • 5 a .qon FIG.

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  • upon the polyps FIG.

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  • After a time the polyps, or certain of them, produce by budding medusa-individuals, which sooner or later develop sexual elements; in some cases, however, the founder_ polyp remains solitary, that is to say, does not produce polypbuds, but only medusa-buds, from the first (Corymorpha, fig.

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  • Hence it is necessary to distin guishbetween,first,the"zooids," FIG.

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  • In this manner the food absorbed by one individual contributes to the welfare of the whole colony, and the coenosarc has the 6 C FIG.

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  • tubes of the basal perisarc do not remain FIG.

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  • forming a felt-work; the result is a massive colony, such as is seen in the so-called Hydrocorallines (fig.

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  • In the formation of arbores cent colonies, two sharply FIG.

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  • Each bud produced FIG.

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  • Hence, in a colony of gymnoblastic hydroids, the oldest polyp of each system, that is to say, of the main stem or of a branch, is the topmost polyp; II  ?a ` FIG.

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  • Or a polyp on the main stem, after having budded a second time to form a pinnule, may give rise to a third bud, which starts a new biserial FIG.

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  • One class g g of polyps, the dactylozoids of branching in the Plumularia-type; (dz), lose their mouth and compare with fig.

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  • - In the Hydromedusae the medusa-individual occurs, as already stated, in one of two conditions, either as an independent organism leading a true life c2 a2 in the open seas, or as a subordinate individuality in the hydroid c colony, from which it is never set free; it then becomes a mere reproductive appendage or gono- phore, losing suc FIG.

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  • As regards habit of life the vast majority of Hydromedusae arc 6 FIG.

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  • 20) and Clavatella (fig.

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  • No other instances FIG.

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  • 67) and Aeginopsis hensenii (fig.

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  • Maas in Results of In its arrangement the muscular tissue the "Albatross " Expedition, forms two s stems: the one composed Museum of Comparative Y P Zoology, Cambridge, Masse, of striated fibres arranged circularly, that U.S.A. is to say, concentrically round the central FIG.

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  • for t he sense of FIG.

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  • a', e, h, FIG.

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  • Two stages in the development of the otocyst can be recognized, the first that of an open pit FIG.

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  • The ocelli are seen in FIG.

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  • organs of Hydro FIG.

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  • From the bionomical point of view, the medusa is to be considered as a means of spreading the species, supplementing the deficiencies of the :" Ca sessile polyp. It may be, however, that increased reproductiveness becomes of greater importance to the species than wide diffu sion; such a condition FIG.

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  • sub, c.c, v, tentaculo FIG.

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  • 41, H); in Eudendrium (fig.

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  • diverticula from the FIG.

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  • 44, A B D FIG.

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  • the future D, E); the cavity A between the two B C walls of the cup FIG.

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  • - Modifications of the method of becomes reduced budding shown in fig.

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  • Next tentacles (t, fig.

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  • Nb Va Vb FIG.

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  • F S.C. G / FIG.

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  • When blastostyles are present, however, they are never enclosed FIG.

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  • 4), Corymorpha (fig.

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  • The type-genus Cladonema (fig.

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  • Clavatella (fig.

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  • Stauridium (fig.

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  • Corymorpha (fig.

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  • Clava (fig.

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  • branched, scattered or verticillate; FIG.

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  • Pteronema (fig.

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  • An apparent, but not real, exception is Halecium halecinum, in which the blastostyle is produced from the side of a nutritive polyp, and both are enclosed in a common theca without a partition between them (Allman [1] p. 50, fig.

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  • Medusae, so-called " meconidia," are budded but not liberated; each in turn, when it reaches sexual maturity, is protruded from the gonotheca by elongation of the stalk, and sets free the embryos, after which it withers and is replaced by another (Allman [1], p. 57, fig.

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  • 7, 8.) h FIG.

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  • Letters a to h same as in fig.

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  • (After Allman.) FIG.

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  • Each corbula contains a central row of blastostyles enclosed and protected by lateral rows of branches representing stunted buds (Allman [1], p. 60, fig.

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  • Besides the wider vertical pore-canals and the narrower, FIG.

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  • 60), in which a central gastrozoid is surrounded FIG.

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  • b, In fig.

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  • In Cryptohelia the FIG.

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  • In Astylus (fig.

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  • Olindias millleri (fig.

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  • Aglaura, Aglantha (fig.

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  • Cunina (fig.

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  • Both these medusae have sense-organs of a peculiar type, which are said to contain an endodermal axis like the sense-organs of Trachylinae, but the fact has recently been called in question for FIG.

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  • forming a float which FIG.

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  • name; never absent and usually present in great numbers (fig.

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  • Palpons (fig.

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  • Haeckel, Lankester's FIG.

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