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fife

fife

fife Sentence Examples

  • It dates from 1817 and bears the name of its founder, James Duff, 4th earl of Fife.

  • The new castle, an uninteresting building, was erected in 1724 by the earl of Fife, and though untenanted is maintained in repair.

  • 1883), married in 1913 Princess Alexandra, Duchess of Fife, daughter of the Princess Royal, who had succeeded in 1912 to her father's dukedom by special remainder.

  • JOHN DOUGLAS (1721-1807), Scottish man of letters and Anglican bishop, was the son of a small shopkeeper at Pittenweem, Fife, where he was born on the 14th of July 1721.

  • He was chosen as one of the lords of the congregation in 1557, and commanded the contingents sent by Forfar and Fife against the queen regent in 1559.

  • Two days later Isabella, countess of Buchan, claimed the right of her family, the Macduffs, earls of Fife, to place the Scottish king on his throne, and the ceremony was repeated with an addition flattering to the Celtic race.

  • Mary entered Edinburgh and conducted a campaign in Fife.

  • JOHN PHILIP (1775-1851), British missionary in South Africa, was born on the 14th of April 1775, at Kirkcaldy, Fife, the son of a schoolmaster in that town.

  • It belongs to the earl of Moray (Murray), who derives from it his title of Lord Doune, and was the home of James Stewart, the "bonnie earl" of Moray, murdered at Donibristle in Fife by the earl of Huntly (1592).

  • JOHN CAMPBELL CAMPBELL, Baron (1779-1861), lord chancellor of England, the second son of the Rev. George Campbell, D.D., was born on the 17th of September 1779 at Cupar, Fife, where his father was for fifty years parish minister.

  • Next year, as the Melbourne administration was near its close, Plunkett, the venerable chancellor of Ireland, was forced by discreditable pressure to resign, and the Whig attorney-general, who had never practised in equity, became chancellor of Ireland, and was raised to the peerage with the title of Baron Campbell of St Andrews, in the county of Fife.

  • In 1559 it was the headquarters of the Lords of the Congregation, and in 1607 the scene of the meetings of the synod of Fife known as the Three Synods of Dysart.

  • JOHN GLAS (1695-1773), Scottish divine, was born at Auchtermuchty, Fife, where his father was parish minister, on the 5th of October 1695.

  • Duff House, immediately adjoining the town, is a seat of the duke of Fife.

  • The house, together with that portion of the park immediately surrounding it (about 140 acres), was presented to the towns of Banff and Macduff by the duke of Fife in November 1906.

  • Moronobu was a consummate artist, with all the delicacy and calligraphic force of the best of the Tosa masters, whom he undoubtedly strove to emulate in style; and his pictures are not only the most beautiful but also the most trustworthy records of the Fife of his time.

  • Spottiswoode married Rachel, daughter of David Lindsay, bishop of Ross, and besides a daughter left two sons, Sir John Spottiswoode of Dairsie in Fife, and Sir Robert, president of ' To each of his comrades in this journey Spotswood presented a small golden horseshoe, lettered "Sic juvat transcendere montes."

  • The length of the cantilever bridge is 5330 ft., made up thus: central tower on Inchgarvie 260 ft.; Fife and Queensferry piers each 145 ft.; two central girders between cantilevers each 350 ft.; and six cantilevers each 680 ft.

  • After being minister of Ceres in Fife for three years, in 1566 he set out for Paris as tutor to the eldest son of Sir James Macgill, the clerk-general.

  • In 1895 the queen lost her faithful and most efficient private secretary, General Sir Henry Ponsonby, who for many years on the other, informing the house of the intended marriage of the prince of Wales's daughter, the Princess Louise, to the earl (afterwards duke) of Fife.

  • These seven mormaorships, or original "earldoms" of Scotland, as they were afterwards called, were: Angus, Athole with Gowry, Caithness with Sutherland, Fife, Mar with Buchan, Moray with Ross, and Stratherne with Menteith.

  • In 1471 James bestowed the castle and lands of Ravenscraig in Fife on William, earl of Orkney, in exchange for all his rights to the earldom of Orkney, which, by act of parliament passed on the 20th of February of the same year, was annexed to the Scottish crown.

  • On the death of the "Wolf of Badenoch" the earldom of Buchan passed to his brother Robert, duke of Albany, also earl of Fife and earl of Menteith, but these earldoms were forfeited on the execution of his son Murdoch in 1425, the earldom of Buchan again, however, coming to the house of Stewart in the person of James, second son of Sir James Stewart, the black knight of Lorn, by Joan or Joanna, widow of King James I.

  • In his twenty-first year he took orders in the Scottish Episcopal Church, and was ordained to the pastoral charge of a congregation at Pittenweem, Fife, whence he removed in 1790 to Stirling.

  • "WILLIAM ADAMSON (1863-), British Labour politician, was born at Halbeath, Fife, April 2 1863.

  • In 1902 he became assistant secretary of the Fife and Kinross Miners' Association, and in 1908 its general secretary.

  • 1910, but in Dec. was elected for West Fife.

  • He had taken a prominent part in politics as a Liberal since his university days, especially in work for the Eighty Club, and in 1886 was elected member of parliament for East Fife, a seat which he retained in subsequent elections.

  • Between the parishes of Collessie and Monimail the boundary line takes the form of a crescent known as the Bow of Fife.

  • Almost all the eminences in the Lowlands consist of hard igneous rocks, forming not only chains of hills such as those just mentioned and others in Ayrshire and Lanarkshire, but isolated crags and hills like those on which stand the castles of Edinburgh and Stirling, and others conspicuous in the scenery of Fife and the Lothians.

  • Elsewhere in central Scotland such a wide depression is known as a howe, as in the Howe of Fife between the Ochil and Lomond Hills.

  • The breakdown of the watershed between the Firths of Clyde and Forth exposes southern Perthshire, the counties of Clackmannan and Kinross, and nearly the whole of Fife to the clouds and rains of the west, and their climates are consequently wetter than those of any others of the eastern slopes of the country.

  • In Perth, Fife, Forfar and Aberdeen the average was 30%; but in nearly all the counties, towards the end at least of the period of depression, the coexistent demand and competition for farms were observable.

  • The ironproducing counties in the order of their output are Ayr, Lanark, Renfrew, Linlithgow, Dumbarton, Fife, Midlothian and Stirling, the first three being the most productive.

  • With the exception of the counties of Orkney, Shetland, Caithness, Sutherland and Inverness, granite is quarried in every shire in Scotland, but the industry predominates in Aberdeenshire, and is of considerable importance in Kirkcudbrightshire; limestone is quarried in half of the counties, but especially in Midlothian and Fife; large quantities of paving-stones are exported from Caithness and Forfarshire, and there are extensive slate quarries at Ballachulish and other places in Argyllshire, which furnishes three-fourths of the total supply.

  • All the great iron foundries and engineering works are situated in the Central Plain or Lowlands, in close proximity to the shipbuilding yards and coalfields, especially in the lower and part of the middle wards of Lanarkshire, in certain districts of Ayrshire and Renfrewshire, at and near Dumbarton, in south Stirlingshire and in some parts of East and Mid Lothian and Fife.

  • The counties in which the manufacture is now most largely carried on are Forfar, Perth, Fife and Aberdeen, but Renfrew, Lanark, Edinburgh and Ayr are also extensively associated with it.

  • It was the English-speaking south-east part of Scotland, gradually extended so as to comprise Fife and the south-west (Lanarkshire, Dumfriesshire, Stirlingshire, Dumbartonshire, Ayrshire and Renfrewshire), which learned to adopt the ideas of western Europe in matters political, municipal and ecclesiastical, while it never would submit to the domination of the English crown.

  • We observe that the chief peers of Alexander, who signed the charter of his monastery at Scone, are Celts - Heth, earl of Moray (husband of the daughter of Lulach), Ma]ise of Strathearn, Dufagan of Fife, and Rory.

  • The new prince of Scotland, John (an unlucky name, later changed to Robert), was a faineant: the king's second son, Robert, earl of Fife (later first duke of Albany), was a man of energy and ambition, while the character of the third, Alexander, is expressed in his sobriquet, " The Wolf of Badenoch."

  • James and his leaders, Atholl and Huntly, with their Stewarts and Gordons, and the levies of burgesses, and the mounted gentry of Fife, encountered the wild border spearmen of Hepburn and Home and the Galloway men, the whole being led by Angus and the rebel prince at Sauchie burn, near Bannockburn.

  • Middleton, with Archbishop Sharp, misgoverned the country, established a high court of commission, exiled the fiercest preachers to Holland, whence they worked endless mischief by agitation and a war of pamphlets; irritated the Covenanting shires, Fife and the south-west, by quartering troops on them to exact fines for Nonconformity, and so caused, during a war with Holland, the Pentland Rising (November 1666).

  • As age and infirmity were telling upon him, the estates in 1389 appointed his second surviving son Robert, earl of Fife, afterwards duke of Albany, guardian of the kingdom.

  • BURNTISLAND, a royal, municipal and police burgh of Fife, Scotland, on the shore of the Firth of Forth, 54 m.

  • In Scotland by a recent statute it was death even to argue against it; and Knox after Wishart's execution was fleeing from place to place, when, hearing that certain gentlemen of Fife had slain the cardinal and were in possession of his castle of St Andrews, he gladly joined himself to them.

  • Much influenced by Knox's preaching, he joined the reformers and in April 1560 was admitted minister of Kennoway in Fife, and in July of the same year minister of the Old or Middle Church at Perth.

  • Their chief support seems to have been found in Fife.

  • from Fife Ness, the most easterly point of the county, and 11 m.

  • East Neuk is a term applied more particularly to the country round Fife Ness, and more generally to all of the peninsula.

  • established what appears to be a new precedent, by conferring the titles of "princess" and "highness" upon the daughters of the princess Louise, duchess of Fife, created " princess royal.

  • Cromwell in his Scottish campaign built the Citadel in 1650 and the mounds on the links, known as "Giant's Brae" and "Lady Fife's Brae," were thrown up by the Protector as batteries.

  • Yet even under such conditions Bruce had to retire to the mountains, and to allow the invaders to range unopposed through Lothian and Fife, and even beyond the Tay.

  • It had desired (I) to follow up the reform of English corLord fife!- porations by a corresponding reform of Irish munibournes cipalities; (2) to convert the tithes, payable to the dlffl Irish Church, into a rent charge, and to appropriate cullies.

  • Robert Bruce gave the town its charter in 1322, though in his Fife: Pictorial and Historical (ii.

  • Millar's Fife: Pictorial and Historical (2 vols., 18 95); and Sheriff fEneas Mackay's History of Fife and Kinross (1896).

  • It is situated on the left bank of the Eden, in the middle of the Howe (Hollow) of Fife, and is sometimes written Cupar-Fife to distinguish it from Coupar-Angus in Perthshire.

  • Among the chief buildings are the town hall, county buildings, corn exchange, Fife and Kinross asylum, Duncan Institute, Adamson Institute (a holiday home for poor children from Leith), cottage hospital, Union Street Hall and the Bell-Baxter school.

  • This last stands on a hill to the east of the town, occupying the site of the 12thcentury castle which was one of the strongholds of the Macduffs, thanes or earls of Fife.

  • To the north-east is the parish of Dairsie, where one of the few parliaments that ever met in Fife assembled in 1335.

  • It was probably in consequence of this accident that his brother Robert, earl of Fife, and not the crown prince himself, was made guardian of the kingdom in 1389; but the latter succeeded to the throne on his father's death in May 1390.

  • Although he probably attended several parliaments the new king was only the nominal ruler of Scotland, the real power being in the hands of his brother, the earl of Fife.

  • In 1700 he was ordained minister of the parish of Ceres, and in 1710 he was recommended by the synod of Fife for the chair of theology in St Leonard's College, St Andrews, to which accordingly he was appointed by Queen Anne.

  • airman typical wartime Secret Memorandum was intended to safeguard allied airmen descending by parachute over Fife.

  • allied airmen descending by parachute over Fife.

  • ancestral lands of Fife.

  • Duff House, the Fife Gates Pair of polished ashlar octagonal gatepiers with molded stepped caps supporting fine carved stone urns.

  • This turned out to be vague aspirations to grow the Fife economy.

  • Balmoral castle They rented Balmoral castle They rented Balmoral Castle, which stands in the shadow of Lochnagar, from its then owner, the Duke of Fife.

  • christened on 14 Apr 1782 in Dunbog, Fife, Scotland.

  • Fife DAY NINETEEN A relaxing day as we explore the charming coastline of the Kingdom of Fife.

  • The Fife network development plan includes work in four areas: data collation program for consumer advice queries.

  • descending by parachute over Fife.

  • Power while he was king actually rested in the hands of his brother Robert, earl of Fife, later duke of Albany.

  • euphonium solo ' Wee Cooper of Fife ' .

  • fife band.

  • Disability cash-value fife to a messy extra cents per page.

  • What from the sounds Of organ, fife or lute To him redounds, Who doth no sin forbear?

  • frontispiece bears legend: 'Lord Pevensey sacrificing the Thane of Fife in his jealous rage ' .

  • You may be able to find further references to Fife in the descriptive gazetteers by doing a full-text search here.

  • glaucoma blindness in Fife between 1990 to 1999.

  • hear from anyone who has information about Fife coastal names.

  • West Fife Planning Committee - Keith Mason can see nothing improper in the apparent anomalies of above planning decisions.

  • malting barley in the Bow of Fife for over 60 years.

  • He was appointed moderator of Kirkcaldy Presbytery in May 1981 and also held the post of Moderator of the Provisional Synod of Fife.

  • nursery nurses from Falkirk, Stirling, Dundee, Perth & Kinross, Fife, all start two days of strike action today.

  • The energy boost you get from coconut oil is not like the kick you get from caffeine, says Fife.

  • In 1992, the former Fife Regional Council installed 6 mm screens at the town's combined sewer overflows.

  • Having served as MEP for Mid Scotland and Fife from 1979 to 1984 he is one of Scotland's most experienced European parliamentarians.

  • The ecclesiastical affairs are directed by the presbytery of Alford and synod of Aberdeen; the Earl of Fife is patron.

  • produce incredible results, says Fife.

  • Psychic Fife - Fife psychic Fife - Fife Psychic medium & Clairvoyant Psychics and psychic readings, come and find a psychic in the psychic directory.

  • situated on the outskirts of Cardenden woods near Kirkcaldy, Fife.

  • Down by the shore we look to Fife, see the first black streamers of snow drifting between cloud and sea.

  • swop deal that saw Elliott Smith move to East Fife.

  • toponymic evidence that Gaelic endured longer in this region than in Fife to the east.

  • undertaken on behalf of Fife Council the results of which will further inform the Local Plan.

  • This aligns the Local Plan with the Fife Structure Plan which sets the strategic planning vision.

  • vivarium members are currently exploring possible sites in North East Fife.

  • whooper swan found in Fife in Scotland.

  • Earlier this month, restrictions imposed after a wild whooper swan with the H5N1 strain was discovered on the Fife coast were lifted.

  • In 1886 Asquith was elected as the Liberal MP for East Fife, despite the constraints of being a young widower with five children.

  • If he ca n't woo them in Fife, what are his prospects of swinging it in southern England?

  • It dates from 1817 and bears the name of its founder, James Duff, 4th earl of Fife.

  • The new castle, an uninteresting building, was erected in 1724 by the earl of Fife, and though untenanted is maintained in repair.

  • no equal); and calling Donald into his presence commanded him, in regard to his worthy service, and in augmentation of his honour, to change his name from Lennox to Napier, and gave him the lands of Gosford, and lands in Fife, and made him his own servant, which discourse is confirmed by evidences of mine, wherein we are called Lennox alias Napier."

  • 1883), married in 1913 Princess Alexandra, Duchess of Fife, daughter of the Princess Royal, who had succeeded in 1912 to her father's dukedom by special remainder.

  • JOHN DOUGLAS (1721-1807), Scottish man of letters and Anglican bishop, was the son of a small shopkeeper at Pittenweem, Fife, where he was born on the 14th of July 1721.

  • He was chosen as one of the lords of the congregation in 1557, and commanded the contingents sent by Forfar and Fife against the queen regent in 1559.

  • Two days later Isabella, countess of Buchan, claimed the right of her family, the Macduffs, earls of Fife, to place the Scottish king on his throne, and the ceremony was repeated with an addition flattering to the Celtic race.

  • Mary entered Edinburgh and conducted a campaign in Fife.

  • JOHN PHILIP (1775-1851), British missionary in South Africa, was born on the 14th of April 1775, at Kirkcaldy, Fife, the son of a schoolmaster in that town.

  • BEATON (or [[Bethune), David]], (c. 1 494-1546), Scottish cardinal and archbishop of St Andrews, was a younger son of John Beaton of Balfour in the county of Fife, and is said to have been born in the year 1494.

  • The place derived its name from its use by the earls of Fife as a ferry to the opposite shore of Haddington, 8 m.

  • It belongs to the earl of Moray (Murray), who derives from it his title of Lord Doune, and was the home of James Stewart, the "bonnie earl" of Moray, murdered at Donibristle in Fife by the earl of Huntly (1592).

  • JOHN CAMPBELL CAMPBELL, Baron (1779-1861), lord chancellor of England, the second son of the Rev. George Campbell, D.D., was born on the 17th of September 1779 at Cupar, Fife, where his father was for fifty years parish minister.

  • Next year, as the Melbourne administration was near its close, Plunkett, the venerable chancellor of Ireland, was forced by discreditable pressure to resign, and the Whig attorney-general, who had never practised in equity, became chancellor of Ireland, and was raised to the peerage with the title of Baron Campbell of St Andrews, in the county of Fife.

  • In 1559 it was the headquarters of the Lords of the Congregation, and in 1607 the scene of the meetings of the synod of Fife known as the Three Synods of Dysart.

  • JOHN GLAS (1695-1773), Scottish divine, was born at Auchtermuchty, Fife, where his father was parish minister, on the 5th of October 1695.

  • Duff House, immediately adjoining the town, is a seat of the duke of Fife.

  • The house, together with that portion of the park immediately surrounding it (about 140 acres), was presented to the towns of Banff and Macduff by the duke of Fife in November 1906.

  • Moronobu was a consummate artist, with all the delicacy and calligraphic force of the best of the Tosa masters, whom he undoubtedly strove to emulate in style; and his pictures are not only the most beautiful but also the most trustworthy records of the Fife of his time.

  • Having explored the coasts of Fife and Forfar, he gained a decisive victory over the Caledonians under Galgacus at the Graupian hill (see Britain, Roman).

  • Spottiswoode married Rachel, daughter of David Lindsay, bishop of Ross, and besides a daughter left two sons, Sir John Spottiswoode of Dairsie in Fife, and Sir Robert, president of ' To each of his comrades in this journey Spotswood presented a small golden horseshoe, lettered "Sic juvat transcendere montes."

  • The length of the cantilever bridge is 5330 ft., made up thus: central tower on Inchgarvie 260 ft.; Fife and Queensferry piers each 145 ft.; two central girders between cantilevers each 350 ft.; and six cantilevers each 680 ft.

  • After being minister of Ceres in Fife for three years, in 1566 he set out for Paris as tutor to the eldest son of Sir James Macgill, the clerk-general.

  • In 1895 the queen lost her faithful and most efficient private secretary, General Sir Henry Ponsonby, who for many years on the other, informing the house of the intended marriage of the prince of Wales's daughter, the Princess Louise, to the earl (afterwards duke) of Fife.

  • These seven mormaorships, or original "earldoms" of Scotland, as they were afterwards called, were: Angus, Athole with Gowry, Caithness with Sutherland, Fife, Mar with Buchan, Moray with Ross, and Stratherne with Menteith.

  • In 1471 James bestowed the castle and lands of Ravenscraig in Fife on William, earl of Orkney, in exchange for all his rights to the earldom of Orkney, which, by act of parliament passed on the 20th of February of the same year, was annexed to the Scottish crown.

  • On the death of the "Wolf of Badenoch" the earldom of Buchan passed to his brother Robert, duke of Albany, also earl of Fife and earl of Menteith, but these earldoms were forfeited on the execution of his son Murdoch in 1425, the earldom of Buchan again, however, coming to the house of Stewart in the person of James, second son of Sir James Stewart, the black knight of Lorn, by Joan or Joanna, widow of King James I.

  • In his twenty-first year he took orders in the Scottish Episcopal Church, and was ordained to the pastoral charge of a congregation at Pittenweem, Fife, whence he removed in 1790 to Stirling.

  • "WILLIAM ADAMSON (1863-), British Labour politician, was born at Halbeath, Fife, April 2 1863.

  • In 1902 he became assistant secretary of the Fife and Kinross Miners' Association, and in 1908 its general secretary.

  • 1910, but in Dec. was elected for West Fife.

  • The Valet's Tragedy (1903), which takes its title from an essay on the" Man with the Iron Mask," (see Iron Mask), collects twelve papers on historical mysteries, and A Monk of Fife (1896) is a fictitious narrative purporting to be written by a young Scot in France in 1429-1431.

  • He had taken a prominent part in politics as a Liberal since his university days, especially in work for the Eighty Club, and in 1886 was elected member of parliament for East Fife, a seat which he retained in subsequent elections.

  • Between the parishes of Collessie and Monimail the boundary line takes the form of a crescent known as the Bow of Fife.

  • Almost all the eminences in the Lowlands consist of hard igneous rocks, forming not only chains of hills such as those just mentioned and others in Ayrshire and Lanarkshire, but isolated crags and hills like those on which stand the castles of Edinburgh and Stirling, and others conspicuous in the scenery of Fife and the Lothians.

  • Elsewhere in central Scotland such a wide depression is known as a howe, as in the Howe of Fife between the Ochil and Lomond Hills.

  • The breakdown of the watershed between the Firths of Clyde and Forth exposes southern Perthshire, the counties of Clackmannan and Kinross, and nearly the whole of Fife to the clouds and rains of the west, and their climates are consequently wetter than those of any others of the eastern slopes of the country.

  • In Perth, Fife, Forfar and Aberdeen the average was 30%; but in nearly all the counties, towards the end at least of the period of depression, the coexistent demand and competition for farms were observable.

  • The ironproducing counties in the order of their output are Ayr, Lanark, Renfrew, Linlithgow, Dumbarton, Fife, Midlothian and Stirling, the first three being the most productive.

  • With the exception of the counties of Orkney, Shetland, Caithness, Sutherland and Inverness, granite is quarried in every shire in Scotland, but the industry predominates in Aberdeenshire, and is of considerable importance in Kirkcudbrightshire; limestone is quarried in half of the counties, but especially in Midlothian and Fife; large quantities of paving-stones are exported from Caithness and Forfarshire, and there are extensive slate quarries at Ballachulish and other places in Argyllshire, which furnishes three-fourths of the total supply.

  • All the great iron foundries and engineering works are situated in the Central Plain or Lowlands, in close proximity to the shipbuilding yards and coalfields, especially in the lower and part of the middle wards of Lanarkshire, in certain districts of Ayrshire and Renfrewshire, at and near Dumbarton, in south Stirlingshire and in some parts of East and Mid Lothian and Fife.

  • The counties in which the manufacture is now most largely carried on are Forfar, Perth, Fife and Aberdeen, but Renfrew, Lanark, Edinburgh and Ayr are also extensively associated with it.

  • It was the English-speaking south-east part of Scotland, gradually extended so as to comprise Fife and the south-west (Lanarkshire, Dumfriesshire, Stirlingshire, Dumbartonshire, Ayrshire and Renfrewshire), which learned to adopt the ideas of western Europe in matters political, municipal and ecclesiastical, while it never would submit to the domination of the English crown.

  • We observe that the chief peers of Alexander, who signed the charter of his monastery at Scone, are Celts - Heth, earl of Moray (husband of the daughter of Lulach), Ma]ise of Strathearn, Dufagan of Fife, and Rory.

  • The new prince of Scotland, John (an unlucky name, later changed to Robert), was a faineant: the king's second son, Robert, earl of Fife (later first duke of Albany), was a man of energy and ambition, while the character of the third, Alexander, is expressed in his sobriquet, " The Wolf of Badenoch."

  • James and his leaders, Atholl and Huntly, with their Stewarts and Gordons, and the levies of burgesses, and the mounted gentry of Fife, encountered the wild border spearmen of Hepburn and Home and the Galloway men, the whole being led by Angus and the rebel prince at Sauchie burn, near Bannockburn.

  • Middleton, with Archbishop Sharp, misgoverned the country, established a high court of commission, exiled the fiercest preachers to Holland, whence they worked endless mischief by agitation and a war of pamphlets; irritated the Covenanting shires, Fife and the south-west, by quartering troops on them to exact fines for Nonconformity, and so caused, during a war with Holland, the Pentland Rising (November 1666).

  • As age and infirmity were telling upon him, the estates in 1389 appointed his second surviving son Robert, earl of Fife, afterwards duke of Albany, guardian of the kingdom.

  • BURNTISLAND, a royal, municipal and police burgh of Fife, Scotland, on the shore of the Firth of Forth, 54 m.

  • In Scotland by a recent statute it was death even to argue against it; and Knox after Wishart's execution was fleeing from place to place, when, hearing that certain gentlemen of Fife had slain the cardinal and were in possession of his castle of St Andrews, he gladly joined himself to them.

  • Much influenced by Knox's preaching, he joined the reformers and in April 1560 was admitted minister of Kennoway in Fife, and in July of the same year minister of the Old or Middle Church at Perth.

  • Their chief support seems to have been found in Fife.

  • from Fife Ness, the most easterly point of the county, and 11 m.

  • East Neuk is a term applied more particularly to the country round Fife Ness, and more generally to all of the peninsula.

  • established what appears to be a new precedent, by conferring the titles of "princess" and "highness" upon the daughters of the princess Louise, duchess of Fife, created " princess royal.

  • Cromwell in his Scottish campaign built the Citadel in 1650 and the mounds on the links, known as "Giant's Brae" and "Lady Fife's Brae," were thrown up by the Protector as batteries.

  • Yet even under such conditions Bruce had to retire to the mountains, and to allow the invaders to range unopposed through Lothian and Fife, and even beyond the Tay.

  • It had desired (I) to follow up the reform of English corLord fife!- porations by a corresponding reform of Irish munibournes cipalities; (2) to convert the tithes, payable to the dlffl Irish Church, into a rent charge, and to appropriate cullies.

  • Robert Bruce gave the town its charter in 1322, though in his Fife: Pictorial and Historical (ii.

  • Millar's Fife: Pictorial and Historical (2 vols., 18 95); and Sheriff fEneas Mackay's History of Fife and Kinross (1896).

  • It is situated on the left bank of the Eden, in the middle of the Howe (Hollow) of Fife, and is sometimes written Cupar-Fife to distinguish it from Coupar-Angus in Perthshire.

  • Among the chief buildings are the town hall, county buildings, corn exchange, Fife and Kinross asylum, Duncan Institute, Adamson Institute (a holiday home for poor children from Leith), cottage hospital, Union Street Hall and the Bell-Baxter school.

  • This last stands on a hill to the east of the town, occupying the site of the 12thcentury castle which was one of the strongholds of the Macduffs, thanes or earls of Fife.

  • To the north-east is the parish of Dairsie, where one of the few parliaments that ever met in Fife assembled in 1335.

  • It was probably in consequence of this accident that his brother Robert, earl of Fife, and not the crown prince himself, was made guardian of the kingdom in 1389; but the latter succeeded to the throne on his father's death in May 1390.

  • Although he probably attended several parliaments the new king was only the nominal ruler of Scotland, the real power being in the hands of his brother, the earl of Fife.

  • In 1700 he was ordained minister of the parish of Ceres, and in 1710 he was recommended by the synod of Fife for the chair of theology in St Leonard's College, St Andrews, to which accordingly he was appointed by Queen Anne.

  • The Fife Coastal Path offers an ideal way to sample the area's rich heritage.

  • Situated on the outskirts of Cardenden woods near Kirkcaldy, Fife.

  • Down by the shore we look to Fife, see the first black streamers of snow drifting between cloud and sea.

  • Kris joined Montrose in the middle of January in a swop deal that saw Elliott Smith move to East Fife.

  • There is some toponymic evidence that Gaelic endured longer in this region than in Fife to the east.

  • A housing needs assessment is currently being undertaken on behalf of Fife Council the results of which will further inform the Local Plan.

  • Fife is visible in the far distance, behind the Firth of Forth.

  • This aligns the Local Plan with the Fife Structure Plan which sets the strategic planning vision.

  • Vivarium members are currently exploring possible sites in North East Fife.

  • The presence of the H5N1 virus has been confirmed in a whooper swan found in Fife in Scotland.

  • Earlier this month, restrictions imposed after a wild whooper swan with the H5N1 strain was discovered on the Fife coast were lifted.

  • In 1886 Asquith was elected as the Liberal MP for East Fife, despite the constraints of being a young widower with five children.

  • If he ca n't woo them in Fife, what are his prospects of swinging it in southern England?

  • The only native of Britain is the common English kind, which extends from Cornwall to Fife, and is specially plentiful in the south-eastern counties.

  • Drumbeats accompanied by the fife helped the soldiers march.

  • The fife is a shrill instrument and could be heard even above the roaring cannons.

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