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fez

fez

fez Sentence Examples

  • The fez is worn by both races,.

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  • After a journey into Spain he set out once more for Central Africa in 1352, and reached Timbuktu and the Niger, returning to Fez in 1353.

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  • After the death of `Abd ul `Aziz he resided at Fez, enjoying the patronage and confidence of the regent.

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  • high, to the south of Fez, Taza and Tlemcen.

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  • "The Country of the Filali," as its inhabitants are called, because descended from the Arabian tribe of Hilal, settled here in the ttth century), the most important oasis of the Moroccan Sahara, ten days' journey south of Fez, across the Atlas.

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  • Ibn Batuta made the voyage through the Malay Archipelago to China, and on his return he proceeded from Malabar to Bagdad and Damascus, ultimately reaching Fez, the capital of his native country, in November 1349.

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  • The communities of Fez, Kairawan and N.

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  • The introduction is an elaborate treatise on the science of history and the development of society, and the autobiography contains the history, not only of the author himself, but of his family and of the dynasties which ruled in Fez, Tunis and Tlemcen during his lifetime.

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  • The lower portion of the Moroccan Atlas (sometimes called the Middle Atlas), extending north - east and east from an undefined point to the north of the Great Atlas to near the frontier of Algeria, is crossed by the pass from Fez to Tafilalt.

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  • be accompanied with the relatively modern fez (tarbush) and a woollen cloth.

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  • In its best days the empire of the Hafsites extended from Tlemcen to Tripoli, and they received homage from the Merinids of Fez; they held their own against repeated Frankish invasions, of which the most notable were that which cost St Louis of France his life (1270), and that of the duke of Bourbon (1390), when English troops took part in the unsuccessful siege of Mandia.

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  • Idris, founder of the Idrisite dynasty of Fez, left his brother Suleiman in possession of Agadir, and the city was ruled by the Beni-Suleiman until 931, when it fell into the hands of the Fatimites.

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  • Finally he retired to the Almoravid court at Fez, where he was poisoned in 1138.

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  • Rabat trades with Fez and the interior of Morocco, with the neighbouring coast towns and Gibraltar, and with Marseilles, Manchester and London, and is the greatest industrial centre in Morocco.

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  • The Arabs would pillage which divided Africa Minor between them - the Marinides at Fez, the Abd-el-Wahid at Tlemcen, and the Haf sides at Tunis - were without strength and without authority.

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  • MARRAKESH (erroneously MoRocco or Marocco City), one of the quasi-capitals of the sultanate of Morocco, Fez and Mequinez being the other two.

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  • It was held by Vandals, Byzantines and Arabs, and when Mulai Idris passed from Tlemcen to Fez in 788, Tangier was "the oldest and most beautiful city" of the Maghrib.

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  • Meanwhile pressure was being put upon France to admit the German claim to a voice in the affairs of North Africa, a claim fortified by the mission of Count von Tattenbach, German minister at Lisbon, to Fez for the purpose of securing from the sherifian government special privileges for Germany.

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  • In its best days the empire of the Hafsites extended from Tlemcen to Tripoli, and they received homage from the Merinids of Fez; they held their own against repeated Frankish invasions, of which the most notable were that which cost St Louis of France his life (1270), and that of the duke of Bourbon (1390), when English troops took part in the unsuccessful siege of Mandia.

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  • The Arabs would pillage which divided Africa Minor between them - the Marinides at Fez, the Abd-el-Wahid at Tlemcen, and the Haf sides at Tunis - were without strength and without authority.

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  • Africa were in close relation with those of Spain, and as early as the beginning of the 9th century Judah ben Quraish of Tahort had composed his Risalah (letter) to the Jews of Fez on grammatical subjects from a comparative point of view, and a dictionary now lost.

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  • He was born at Cordova in 1135, fled with his parents from persecution in 1148, settled at Fez in i 160, passing P g there for a Moslem, fled again to Jerusalem in 1165, and finally went to Cairo where he died in 1204.

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  • He was born at Cordova in 1135, fled with his parents from persecution in 1148, settled at Fez in i 160, passing P g there for a Moslem, fled again to Jerusalem in 1165, and finally went to Cairo where he died in 1204.

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  • At first she heard only Metivier's voice, then her father's, then both voices began speaking at the same time, the door was flung open, and on the threshold appeared the handsome figure of the terrified Metivier with his shock of black hair, and the prince in his dressing gown and fez, his face distorted with fury and the pupils of his eyes rolled downwards.

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  • In 1352 he obtained employment under the Marinid sultan Abu Inan (Faris I.) at Fez.

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  • They have the same love for poetry, music and romance; the same intense pride in their race and history; many of the same superstitions and customs. The Christians retain the Servian costume, modified in detail, as by the occasional use of the turban or fez.

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  • of Fez.

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  • By the good offices of the theologians of Kairawan, one of whom was from Fez, Yahya was provided with a missionary, `Abd-Allah ibn Yazin, a zealous partisan of the Malekis, one of the four orthodox sects of Islam.

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  • See Budgett Meakin, The Moorish Empire (London, 1899); the anonymous Raj(' el Kartas (Fez.

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  • The head-dress is the red cloth fez or tarbush round which a turban is usually worn.

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  • It must not be confused with the Moorish " fez," which is skull-shaped.

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  • When Hindus wear caps or topis they resemble those worn by Mahommedans, but they never wear the fez, tarbush or irani topi.

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  • No`man as governor, in a short time carried his conquests as far as Fez, Tangier and Ceuta, and one of his captains even made a descent on Sicily and plundered Syracuse.

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  • Revisiting Jerusalem and Cairo he made the haj a fourth time, and finally reappeared at Fez (visiting Sardinia en route) on the 8th of November 1349, after twenty-four years' absence.

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  • Being then recalled by his own king, he returned to Fez (early in 1354) via Takadda, Haggar and Tuat.

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  • Seyyid el-Bedawi, who lived in the 13th century A.D., was a native of Fez who, after a pilgrimage to Mecca, settled in Tanta.

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  • at Fez, 1885-1887, and in io vols.

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  • of Fez, on the road to Rabat, in 33° 56' N., 5° 50' W.

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  • When British engineers were employed to survey the route for a railway between Mequinez and Fez, this was reported as indicating an absolute sale of the country.

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  • In September Abd-el-Aziz arrived at Rabat from Fez and endeavoured to secure the support of the European powers against his brother.

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  • His leaning to Christians aroused further opposition to his rule, and in January 1908 he was declared deposed by the ulema of Fez, who offered the throne to Hafid.

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  • Subsequently he crossed to Africa, and is said to have been killed in battle fighting for his kinsman, the ruler of Fez.

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  • The kings of Northumbria and Sussex, the kings of the Basques and of Galicia, Arab amirs of Spain and Fez, and even the caliph of Bagdad came to visit him in person or sent gifts by the hands of ambassadors.

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  • He was born at Saragossa, and died comparatively young at Fez in 1138.

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  • Part went to people the town of Fez, newly founded in the Morocco, by the Idrisites.

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  • Marshal Cainpos was sent n Fez to make a treaty, in which he obtained ample redress and the promise of an indemnity of 800,ooo, which Morocco punctually paid.

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  • exotic dancerby the exotic belly Dancers to the uniquely atmospheric Fez Bar.

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  • Recruiting posted by fez / / 18 Apr 2006 We are currently recruiting one or two members due to a recent patch of inactivity.

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  • A dark skinned man wearing a green fez tells a remarkable story to a young barrister in his rooms.

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  • He had a fez upon his head and (what nobody counted on) a dagger in his pocket.

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  • For your first course I suggest the red fez.

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  • This post has been edited by Ouriço: Feb 21 2006, 02:57 AM -------------------- " Menino quem te fez?

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  • On one occasion he was offered the governorship of Fez, but he refused.

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  • No holiday to Morocco would be complete without visiting a medina in one of the cities like Fez or Marrakech.

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  • nightclubs There are a few small nightclubs in town including Po Na Na, The Fez, Cindies, and Life.

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  • He even went so far as to assault the sister of the Murabti (Almoravide) amir`Ali III., in the streets of Fez, because she was going about unveiled after the manner of Berber women.

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  • The fanaticism of the Muwahhadis did not prevent them from encouraging the establishment of Christians even in Fez, and after the battle of Las Navas de Tolosa they occasionally entered into alliances with the kings of Castile.

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  • The fez is worn by both races,.

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  • Ibn Batuta made the voyage through the Malay Archipelago to China, and on his return he proceeded from Malabar to Bagdad and Damascus, ultimately reaching Fez, the capital of his native country, in November 1349.

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  • After a journey into Spain he set out once more for Central Africa in 1352, and reached Timbuktu and the Niger, returning to Fez in 1353.

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  • of Fez) in the 11th century, often cited in the Jewish manner as Rif; and that by Asher ben Yehiel (d.

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  • The communities of Fez, Kairawan and N.

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  • Africa were in close relation with those of Spain, and as early as the beginning of the 9th century Judah ben Quraish of Tahort had composed his Risalah (letter) to the Jews of Fez on grammatical subjects from a comparative point of view, and a dictionary now lost.

    0
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  • In 1352 he obtained employment under the Marinid sultan Abu Inan (Faris I.) at Fez.

    0
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  • After the death of `Abd ul `Aziz he resided at Fez, enjoying the patronage and confidence of the regent.

    0
    0
  • The introduction is an elaborate treatise on the science of history and the development of society, and the autobiography contains the history, not only of the author himself, but of his family and of the dynasties which ruled in Fez, Tunis and Tlemcen during his lifetime.

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  • The slaves were forwarded thence in gangs to different towns, especially to Marrakesh, Fez and Mequinez.

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  • They have the same love for poetry, music and romance; the same intense pride in their race and history; many of the same superstitions and customs. The Christians retain the Servian costume, modified in detail, as by the occasional use of the turban or fez.

    0
    0
  • The lower portion of the Moroccan Atlas (sometimes called the Middle Atlas), extending north - east and east from an undefined point to the north of the Great Atlas to near the frontier of Algeria, is crossed by the pass from Fez to Tafilalt.

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  • high, to the south of Fez, Taza and Tlemcen.

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  • be accompanied with the relatively modern fez (tarbush) and a woollen cloth.

    0
    0
  • Idris, founder of the Idrisite dynasty of Fez, left his brother Suleiman in possession of Agadir, and the city was ruled by the Beni-Suleiman until 931, when it fell into the hands of the Fatimites.

    0
    0
  • "The Country of the Filali," as its inhabitants are called, because descended from the Arabian tribe of Hilal, settled here in the ttth century), the most important oasis of the Moroccan Sahara, ten days' journey south of Fez, across the Atlas.

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  • Finally he retired to the Almoravid court at Fez, where he was poisoned in 1138.

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  • Rabat trades with Fez and the interior of Morocco, with the neighbouring coast towns and Gibraltar, and with Marseilles, Manchester and London, and is the greatest industrial centre in Morocco.

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  • MARRAKESH (erroneously MoRocco or Marocco City), one of the quasi-capitals of the sultanate of Morocco, Fez and Mequinez being the other two.

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  • of Fez.

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  • It was held by Vandals, Byzantines and Arabs, and when Mulai Idris passed from Tlemcen to Fez in 788, Tangier was "the oldest and most beautiful city" of the Maghrib.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile pressure was being put upon France to admit the German claim to a voice in the affairs of North Africa, a claim fortified by the mission of Count von Tattenbach, German minister at Lisbon, to Fez for the purpose of securing from the sherifian government special privileges for Germany.

    0
    0
  • By the good offices of the theologians of Kairawan, one of whom was from Fez, Yahya was provided with a missionary, `Abd-Allah ibn Yazin, a zealous partisan of the Malekis, one of the four orthodox sects of Islam.

    0
    0
  • See Budgett Meakin, The Moorish Empire (London, 1899); the anonymous Raj(' el Kartas (Fez.

    0
    0
  • The head-dress is the red cloth fez or tarbush round which a turban is usually worn.

    0
    0
  • It must not be confused with the Moorish " fez," which is skull-shaped.

    0
    0
  • When Hindus wear caps or topis they resemble those worn by Mahommedans, but they never wear the fez, tarbush or irani topi.

    0
    0
  • No`man as governor, in a short time carried his conquests as far as Fez, Tangier and Ceuta, and one of his captains even made a descent on Sicily and plundered Syracuse.

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  • Abdallah, a brother of Mahommed and Ibrahim, the rivals of Mansur, succeeded in escaping, and fled to Egypt, whence by the help of the postmaster, himself a secret partisan of the Shiites, he passed into West Africa, where at a later period his son founded the Idrisite dynasty in Fez (see Morocco).

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  • Revisiting Jerusalem and Cairo he made the haj a fourth time, and finally reappeared at Fez (visiting Sardinia en route) on the 8th of November 1349, after twenty-four years' absence.

    0
    0
  • Being then recalled by his own king, he returned to Fez (early in 1354) via Takadda, Haggar and Tuat.

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    0
  • Seyyid el-Bedawi, who lived in the 13th century A.D., was a native of Fez who, after a pilgrimage to Mecca, settled in Tanta.

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  • Leo Africanus, who in 1526 gave an account of the Alchemists of Fez in Africa (see the English translation of his Africae descriptio by John Pory, A Geographical History of Africa, London, 1600, p. 155), states that their principal authority was Geber, a Greek who had apostatized to Mahommedanism and lived a century after Mahomet.

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  • at Fez, 1885-1887, and in io vols.

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  • of Fez, on the road to Rabat, in 33° 56' N., 5° 50' W.

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  • When British engineers were employed to survey the route for a railway between Mequinez and Fez, this was reported as indicating an absolute sale of the country.

    0
    0
  • In September Abd-el-Aziz arrived at Rabat from Fez and endeavoured to secure the support of the European powers against his brother.

    0
    0
  • His leaning to Christians aroused further opposition to his rule, and in January 1908 he was declared deposed by the ulema of Fez, who offered the throne to Hafid.

    0
    0
  • Subsequently he crossed to Africa, and is said to have been killed in battle fighting for his kinsman, the ruler of Fez.

    0
    0
  • The kings of Northumbria and Sussex, the kings of the Basques and of Galicia, Arab amirs of Spain and Fez, and even the caliph of Bagdad came to visit him in person or sent gifts by the hands of ambassadors.

    0
    0
  • He was born at Saragossa, and died comparatively young at Fez in 1138.

    0
    0
  • Part went to people the town of Fez, newly founded in the Morocco, by the Idrisites.

    0
    0
  • Marshal Cainpos was sent n Fez to make a treaty, in which he obtained ample redress and the promise of an indemnity of 800,ooo, which Morocco punctually paid.

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  • to the 1st in strong perfects (houve, pude, quiz, fez), while Castilian has hube and hubo; (2) the imperfects pun/ia, tin/ia, vinha (from por, ter and vir), which are accented on the radical in order to avoid the loss of the ii (ponIa would have made p0/a), and which substitute u and i for o and e in order to distinguish from the present subjunctive (ponha, tenha, yen/ia).

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