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fevers

fevers Sentence Examples

  • It is subject, however, to extreme and rapid variations in temperature, to alternations of dry and humid winds (the latter, called catias, being irritating and oppressive), to chilling night mists brought up from the coast by the westerly winds, and to other influences productive of malaria, catarrh, fevers, bilious disorders and rheumatism.

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  • The valley regions are tropical, and malarial fevers are common.

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  • From the time of Hippocrates onwards the malarial or periodical fevers have engaged the attention of innumerable observers, who have suggested various theories of causation, and have sometimes anticipated - vaguely, indeed, but with surprising accuracy - the results of modern research; but the true nature of the disease remained in doubt until the closing years of the 19th century.

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  • But while the province in many parts presents a landscape of luxuriant beauty, it is a prey to the ravages of disease, principally malarial fevers due to the extensive swamps formed by waters stagnating in the forests, and to the frequent incursions of the Goklan and Yomut Turkomans, who have their camping-grounds in the northern part of the province, and until about 1890 plundered caravans sometimes at the very gates of Astarabad city, and carried people off into slavery and bondage.

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  • On the whole the climate of Syria - if the Jordan valley and the moister districts are excepted - is not unhealthy, though intermittent fevers are not uncommon in some places.

    0
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  • There are the usual malarial, bilious and intermittent fevers, and liver, stomach and intestinal complaints prevalent in tropical countries; but unhygienic living is, in Cuba as elsewhere, mainly responsible for their existence.

    0
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  • Formerly used in every fever, and even in the septic states that constantly followed surgical operations in the pre-Listerian epoch, aconite is now employed only in the earliest stage of the less serious fevers, such as acute tonsilitis, bronchitis and, notably, laryngitis.

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  • The toxic actions produced in continued fevers, in certain chronic diseases, and by intestinal parasites largely aid in producing degeneration, emaciation and atrophy.

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  • overnutrition with lack of muscular energy, beer-drinking, castration, lactation, disturbed metabolism, some forms of insanity, and may follow on some fevers.

    0
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  • Alexander of Aphrodisias, who lived and wrote at Athens in the time of Septimius Severus, is best known by his commentaries on Aristotle, but also wrote a treatise on fevers, still extant.

    0
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  • Chemical disturbances of these processes, called acridities, &c., were the cause of fevers and other diseases.

    0
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  • He introduced a milder and better way of treating fevers - especially small-pox, and gave strong support to the use of specific medicines - especially Peruvian bark.

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  • His countryman and pupil, George Cheyne (1671-1743), who lived some years at Bath, published a new theory of fevers on the mechanical system, which had a great reputation.

    0
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  • One recommendation of the system was that it favoured a milder system of treatment than was at that time in vogue; Brown may be said to have been the first advocate of the modern stimulant or feeding treatment of fevers.

    0
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  • A physician of Plymouth, John Huxham (1694-1768), made researches on epidemic fevers, in the spirit of Sydenham and Hippocrates, which are of the highest importance.

    0
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  • The name of John Pringle (1707-1782) should also be mentioned as one of the first to study epidemics of fevers occurring in prisons and camps.

    0
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  • Broussais's chief aim was to find an anatomical basis for all diseases, but he is especially known for his attempt to explain all fevers as a consequence of irritation or inflammation of the intestinal canal (gastroenterite).

    0
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  • Cohnheim (1839-1884) and of Iliya Metchnikoff on the dynamical side of his- Fevers tology.

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  • de Haen, and, in the United Kingdom, George Cleghorn (1716-1789) of Dublin and James Currie (1756-1805), carried on the use of the thermometer in fevers; and on the continent of Europe in later years F.

    0
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  • In particular the fluctuations of the pulse in fevers and inflammations were better understood, and accurately registered; and we can scarcely realize now that before Harvey the time of the pulse seems not to have been counted by the watch.

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  • Medicine and surgery are but two aspects of one art; Pasteur shed light on both surgery and medicine, and when Lister, his disciple, penetrated into the secrets of wound fevers and septicaemia, he illuminated surgery and medicine alike.

    0
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  • It follows that the drug is an antipyretic, and it is hence largely used in fevers as a means of reducing the temperature.

    0
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  • The succulent fruits are not only edible but agreeable, and in fevers are freely administered as a cooling drink.

    0
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  • The death-rate is high, especially among children, owing to the prevalence of cholera, smallpox and fevers during the dry weather.

    0
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  • The climate of the coastal zone and deeper valleys is hot, humid and unhealthy, malarial fevers being prevalent.

    0
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  • Texcoco is now connected with the new drainage works of the capital and is no longer a menace to its population through inundations and pestilential fevers.

    0
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  • These lowland districts are densely forested in the south, except Yucatan, and large areas are covered with streams, swamps and lagoons, the abode of noxious insects, pestilential fevers and dysentery.

    0
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  • Among the mosquitoes, which are extraordinarily numerous in some of the hot lowland districts, are the species credited with the spread of malarial and yellow fevers.

    0
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  • Rogers," On the development of flagellated organisms (Trypanosomes) from the spleen Protozoic parasites of cachexial fevers and Kala-azar," Quart.

    0
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  • Malarial fevers are also common, and diseases of the digestive organs, in great part easily preventible, figure among the principal causes of death.

    0
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  • Upper Egypt is healthier than Lower Egypt, where, especially near the coast, malarial fevers and diseases of the respiratory organs are not uncommon.

    0
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  • The mean annual temperature is about 82° to 83° F.; malarial and bilious fevers are common, the latter being known as "Guayaquil fever," and epidemics of yellow fever are frequent.

    0
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  • Intermittent and remittent fevers are very prevalent; bowel complaints are common, and often fatal in the autumn.

    0
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  • In this zone malarial fevers prevail in winter.

    0
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  • Smallpox, dysentery and fevers, frequently of a bilious character, are endemic and occasionally epidemic. Cholera breaks out from time to time and works great havoc, as was the case in 1903 when one of the raja of Sarawak's punitive expeditions was stricken while ascending the Limbang river by boat, and lost many hundreds of its numbers before the coast could be regained.

    0
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  • The army diseases of the Civil Wars were chiefly typhus and malarial fevers, but plague was not unknown among them, as at Wallingford Castle (Willis, " Of Feavers," Works, ed.

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  • In the hot months intermittent fevers are prevalent in the Guadiana valley.

    0
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  • In 1680 he was the constant victim of severe fevers, from which he recovered for a time through the use of quinine prescribed by an English physician.

    0
    0
  • Mitchill (1764-1831) pointed out in America the resemblance which exists between symptoms of Anti- poisoning by snake venom and infective fevers.'

    0
    0
  • In the tropical yungas the ground is covered with decaying vegetation, and malaria and fevers are common.

    0
    0
  • Yellow and other fevers often attack the, - .

    0
    0
  • In the deep valleys of the Takazze and Abai, and generally in places below 4000 ft., the conditions are tropical and fevers are prevalent.

    0
    0
  • The public health is good, and fevers and plague are unknown.

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  • Fevers are hardly known.

    0
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  • The climate is hot and humid, and fevers are prevalent in the hot season.

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  • p. 161, Lovanii, 1658, fol.) recommends it for tumours, ulcers of the head and ears, affections of the breast, vomiting, dysentery and fevers.

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  • In the body, Aries rules the head, partially explaining why they can be so headstrong and subject to high fevers.

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  • The group includes epidemic and endemic typhus fevers, tick-borne typhus, scrub typhus and Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    0
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  • Fevers and agues are prevalent owing to bad drainage and the overflowing of the river; and the death-rate is higher than the birth-rate.

    0
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  • It is subject, however, to extreme and rapid variations in temperature, to alternations of dry and humid winds (the latter, called catias, being irritating and oppressive), to chilling night mists brought up from the coast by the westerly winds, and to other influences productive of malaria, catarrh, fevers, bilious disorders and rheumatism.

    0
    0
  • Malarial fevers make their appearance in places where the forest has been recently felled, or where the surface earth has been disturbed.

    0
    0
  • The valley regions are tropical, and malarial fevers are common.

    0
    0
  • Remittent fevers (as well as intermittents) vary considerably in intensity; some cases are intense from the outset, or pernicious, with aggrava tion of all the symptoms - leading to stupor, delirium, collapse, intense jaundice, blood in the stools, blood and albumen in the urine, and, it may be, suppression of urine followed by convulsions.

    0
    0
  • From the time of Hippocrates onwards the malarial or periodical fevers have engaged the attention of innumerable observers, who have suggested various theories of causation, and have sometimes anticipated - vaguely, indeed, but with surprising accuracy - the results of modern research; but the true nature of the disease remained in doubt until the closing years of the 19th century.

    0
    0
  • But while the province in many parts presents a landscape of luxuriant beauty, it is a prey to the ravages of disease, principally malarial fevers due to the extensive swamps formed by waters stagnating in the forests, and to the frequent incursions of the Goklan and Yomut Turkomans, who have their camping-grounds in the northern part of the province, and until about 1890 plundered caravans sometimes at the very gates of Astarabad city, and carried people off into slavery and bondage.

    0
    0
  • On the whole the climate of Syria - if the Jordan valley and the moister districts are excepted - is not unhealthy, though intermittent fevers are not uncommon in some places.

    0
    0
  • There are the usual malarial, bilious and intermittent fevers, and liver, stomach and intestinal complaints prevalent in tropical countries; but unhygienic living is, in Cuba as elsewhere, mainly responsible for their existence.

    0
    0
  • The climate is good and the coast is swept by cool ocean breezes, the average temperatures ranging from 65° to 77° F., but notwithstanding this, Callao has a bad reputation for fevers and contagious diseases, chiefly because of its insanitary condition.

    0
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  • Formerly used in every fever, and even in the septic states that constantly followed surgical operations in the pre-Listerian epoch, aconite is now employed only in the earliest stage of the less serious fevers, such as acute tonsilitis, bronchitis and, notably, laryngitis.

    0
    0
  • Sheltered places in the lowlands, especially near streams and lagoons, are malarial and enervating, and at some points on the coast are subject to dangerous fevers.

    0
    0
  • The toxic actions produced in continued fevers, in certain chronic diseases, and by intestinal parasites largely aid in producing degeneration, emaciation and atrophy.

    0
    0
  • Its character is readily changed by the abnormal activities which take place in these glands during some of the acute fevers; the semi-solid consistence may become mucoid or even fluid.

    0
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  • overnutrition with lack of muscular energy, beer-drinking, castration, lactation, disturbed metabolism, some forms of insanity, and may follow on some fevers.

    0
    0
  • Alexander of Aphrodisias, who lived and wrote at Athens in the time of Septimius Severus, is best known by his commentaries on Aristotle, but also wrote a treatise on fevers, still extant.

    0
    0
  • Chemical disturbances of these processes, called acridities, &c., were the cause of fevers and other diseases.

    0
    0
  • He introduced a milder and better way of treating fevers - especially small-pox, and gave strong support to the use of specific medicines - especially Peruvian bark.

    0
    0
  • His countryman and pupil, George Cheyne (1671-1743), who lived some years at Bath, published a new theory of fevers on the mechanical system, which had a great reputation.

    0
    0
  • Cole (1635-1716) (see above) published mechanical hypotheses concerning the causation of fevers which closely agree with those of the Italian iatro-mechanical school.

    0
    0
  • One recommendation of the system was that it favoured a milder system of treatment than was at that time in vogue; Brown may be said to have been the first advocate of the modern stimulant or feeding treatment of fevers.

    0
    0
  • A physician of Plymouth, John Huxham (1694-1768), made researches on epidemic fevers, in the spirit of Sydenham and Hippocrates, which are of the highest importance.

    0
    0
  • The name of John Pringle (1707-1782) should also be mentioned as one of the first to study epidemics of fevers occurring in prisons and camps.

    0
    0
  • Broussais's chief aim was to find an anatomical basis for all diseases, but he is especially known for his attempt to explain all fevers as a consequence of irritation or inflammation of the intestinal canal (gastroenterite).

    0
    0
  • Cohnheim (1839-1884) and of Iliya Metchnikoff on the dynamical side of his- Fevers tology.

    0
    0
  • Yet, although, as Andral and other French physicians proved, it was extravagant to say that all fevers take their origin from some local inflammation, it was true and most useful to insist, as Broussais vehemently insisted, that "fever" is no substance, but a generalization drawn from symptoms common to many and various diseases springing from many various and often local causes; from causes agreeing perhaps only in the factor of elevation of the temperature of the body.

    0
    0
  • de Haen, and, in the United Kingdom, George Cleghorn (1716-1789) of Dublin and James Currie (1756-1805), carried on the use of the thermometer in fevers; and on the continent of Europe in later years F.

    0
    0
  • In particular the fluctuations of the pulse in fevers and inflammations were better understood, and accurately registered; and we can scarcely realize now that before Harvey the time of the pulse seems not to have been counted by the watch.

    0
    0
  • Medicine and surgery are but two aspects of one art; Pasteur shed light on both surgery and medicine, and when Lister, his disciple, penetrated into the secrets of wound fevers and septicaemia, he illuminated surgery and medicine alike, and, in the one sphere as in the other, co-operated in the destruction of the idea of "essential fevers" and of inflammation as an "entity."

    0
    0
  • It follows that the drug is an antipyretic, and it is hence largely used in fevers as a means of reducing the temperature.

    0
    0
  • The succulent fruits are not only edible but agreeable, and in fevers are freely administered as a cooling drink.

    0
    0
  • The death-rate is high, especially among children, owing to the prevalence of cholera, smallpox and fevers during the dry weather.

    0
    0
  • The climate of the coastal zone and deeper valleys is hot, humid and unhealthy, malarial fevers being prevalent.

    0
    0
  • Texcoco is now connected with the new drainage works of the capital and is no longer a menace to its population through inundations and pestilential fevers.

    0
    0
  • These lowland districts are densely forested in the south, except Yucatan, and large areas are covered with streams, swamps and lagoons, the abode of noxious insects, pestilential fevers and dysentery.

    0
    0
  • Among the mosquitoes, which are extraordinarily numerous in some of the hot lowland districts, are the species credited with the spread of malarial and yellow fevers.

    0
    0
  • These bodies are constantly Fright found in certain tropical fevers (e.g.

    0
    0
  • Rogers," On the development of flagellated organisms (Trypanosomes) from the spleen Protozoic parasites of cachexial fevers and Kala-azar," Quart.

    0
    0
  • Malarial fevers are also common, and diseases of the digestive organs, in great part easily preventible, figure among the principal causes of death.

    0
    0
  • Upper Egypt is healthier than Lower Egypt, where, especially near the coast, malarial fevers and diseases of the respiratory organs are not uncommon.

    0
    0
  • The mean annual temperature is about 82° to 83° F.; malarial and bilious fevers are common, the latter being known as "Guayaquil fever," and epidemics of yellow fever are frequent.

    0
    0
  • Intermittent and remittent fevers are very prevalent; bowel complaints are common, and often fatal in the autumn.

    0
    0
  • In this zone malarial fevers prevail in winter.

    0
    0
  • Smallpox, dysentery and fevers, frequently of a bilious character, are endemic and occasionally epidemic. Cholera breaks out from time to time and works great havoc, as was the case in 1903 when one of the raja of Sarawak's punitive expeditions was stricken while ascending the Limbang river by boat, and lost many hundreds of its numbers before the coast could be regained.

    0
    0
  • The army diseases of the Civil Wars were chiefly typhus and malarial fevers, but plague was not unknown among them, as at Wallingford Castle (Willis, " Of Feavers," Works, ed.

    0
    0
  • In the hot months intermittent fevers are prevalent in the Guadiana valley.

    0
    0
  • In 1680 he was the constant victim of severe fevers, from which he recovered for a time through the use of quinine prescribed by an English physician.

    0
    0
  • Mitchill (1764-1831) pointed out in America the resemblance which exists between symptoms of Anti- poisoning by snake venom and infective fevers.'

    0
    0
  • In the tropical yungas the ground is covered with decaying vegetation, and malaria and fevers are common.

    0
    0
  • Yellow and other fevers often attack the, - .

    0
    0
  • In the deep valleys of the Takazze and Abai, and generally in places below 4000 ft., the conditions are tropical and fevers are prevalent.

    0
    0
  • The public health is good, and fevers and plague are unknown.

    0
    0
  • Fevers are hardly known.

    0
    0
  • The climate is hot and humid, and fevers are prevalent in the hot season.

    0
    0
  • p. 161, Lovanii, 1658, fol.) recommends it for tumours, ulcers of the head and ears, affections of the breast, vomiting, dysentery and fevers.

    0
    0
  • The group includes epidemic and endemic typhus fevers, tick-borne typhus, scrub typhus and Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    0
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  • Herbs for basic colds or fevers: Brew sorrel and borage together to bring down a fever.

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  • When a person sweats, the body cools, which is how burdock root helps reduce fevers.

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  • It is used to treat mild fevers and as a pain reducer.

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  • Fevers are caused in most cases by viral or bacterial infections, such as otitis media (ear infection), upper respiratory infection, pharyngitis (throat infection), pneumonia, chickenpox, and urinary tract infection.

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  • Most fevers and associated conditions can be managed on an outpatient basis.

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  • Low-grade fevers often do not need to be treated in otherwise healthy children.

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  • Children with viral croup usually have a low-grade temperature, but a few may have fevers up to 104°F (40°C).

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  • Parents may also give acetaminophen to reduce fevers and increase the child's comfort level.

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  • If a patient with a history of fevers and febrile convulsions is to be given DTP, the patient should receive acetaminophen at the time of the injection and for the following 24 hours.

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  • Fevers are components of many disease entities.

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  • Virtually all persons experience fevers at some time in their lives.

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  • Thus, accurate data regarding the prevalence of fevers are not available.

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  • Fevers are primarily caused by viral or bacterial infections, such as pneumonia or influenza.

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  • Most fevers caused by infections are acute, appearing suddenly and then dissipating as the immune system defeats the infectious agent.

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  • Most fevers caused by infection end as soon as the immune system rids the body of the pathogen, and these fevers do not produce lasting effects.

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  • The prognosis for fevers associated with more chronic conditions, such as autoimmune disease, depends upon the overall outcome of the disorder.

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  • Fevers may be prevented by avoiding the various diseases that cause them.

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  • Adequate nutrition via a well-balanced diet and sufficient intake of liquid help to reduce many fevers.

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  • In another 10 percent, "factitious fevers" (either self induced or no fever at all) are identified.

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  • FMF is sometimes grouped together with other periodic fevers in a category called autoinflammatory disorders.

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  • Fevers are typically 100 to 104°F (38-40°C).

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  • Unexplained recurrent fevers, polyserositis, skin rash, and/or joint pain; abnormal blood studies (see below); and kidney or other disease associated with amyloidosis.

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  • Fevers occur for many reasons, and nonspecific pains in the abdomen, chest, and joints are also frequent ailments.

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  • Some common complaints include fevers, rashes, abscesses, bleeding, and vomiting.

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  • Instead, these children have high fevers; a rash; decreased appetite and weight loss; severe joint and muscle pain; swollen lymph nodes, spleen, and liver; and serious anemia.

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  • Parents should pay attention to unexplained fevers; night sweats; or tender, swollen lymph nodes.

    0
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  • Low grade fevers may also accompany bites.

    0
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  • Extremely high fevers may make little ones lethargic and sleepy.

    0
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  • Malarial fevers make their appearance in places where the forest has been recently felled, or where the surface earth has been disturbed.

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    1
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