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fever

fever

fever Sentence Examples

  • She'd felt it last night, too, before … before the fever dream about them having sex.

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  • The strange fever remained, making her feel as if she'd been sitting in a sauna for hours.

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  • Then fever set in, but the doctor had said the fever was not very serious.

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  • Her fever goes down, but then comes back up again.

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  • "Nothing but a fever dream," Jule said.

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  • If he could shake his fever and take care of himself, he'd be okay alone.

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  • The climate is healthy in the uplands, though subject to violent changes; in the valleys fever is very prevalent, especially in the basins of the Boyana, the lower Drin and the Simen.

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  • She was fighting a fever, one that made it hard for her to focus.

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  • A patient with remittent may get well in a week under treatment, but the fever may go on for several weeks; the return to health is often announced by the fever assuming the intermittent type, or, in other words, by the remissions touching the level of absolute apyrexia.

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  • Most of the charitable institutions - for instance, the convalescent home, fever hospital, home for girls and Red House home - are situated at Inveresk, about 12 m.

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  • Today she was absent, home nursing child number five, down with a spring fever, or just plain Spring Fever.

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  • The fever had left him, and while he looked pale beneath his cocoa skin, he was alert and his speech coherent.

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  • It is noticed that labourers employed in deep mines worked by shafts suffer less from fever than do those who are engaged in stripping the alluvial deposits.

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  • Louis, who was sick with fever, withdrew to his ancestral home, Dillenburg, to recruit his health, and then once more to devote his energies to the raising of money and troops for another invasion of the Netherlands.

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  • Louis, who was sick with fever, withdrew to his ancestral home, Dillenburg, to recruit his health, and then once more to devote his energies to the raising of money and troops for another invasion of the Netherlands.

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  • In 1935, a vaccine for yellow fever was created.

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  • The absence or extreme paucity of mosquitoes no doubt accounts for the infrequency of malarial fever in the interior.

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  • Thus we get a complete scientific demonstration of the causation of malaria in three stages: (1) the discovery of the parasite by Laveran; (2) its life-history in the human host and connexion with the fever demonstrated by the Italian observers; (3) its life-history in the alternate host, and the identification of the latter with a particular species of mosquito by Ross and Manson.

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  • One afternoon noticing Natasha shivering with fever, Princess Mary took her to her own room and made her lie down on the bed.

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  • It helped wake her up without completely lifting the fog of a fever that had been present since yesterday.

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  • That sounds like her fever finally broke.

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  • On the 8th of December 1864, in the full vigour of his intellectual powers, he died of an attack of fever, ending in suffusion on the lungs.

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  • The Chinese immigrants suffer chiefly from fever of a malarial type, from beri-beri, a species of tropical dropsy, and from dysentery.

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  • Shortly afterwards he fell ill of an intermittent fever, but seemed to recover.

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  • Here, however, fever made its appearance; and a removal to London (January 6, 1794) was considered imperative.

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  • If the first paroxysm should not cease within the twenty-four hours, the fever is not reckoned as an intermittent, but as a remittent.

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  • But the fever grew and flamed in my eyes, and for several days my kind physician thought I would die.

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  • Ill with fever he went to Smolensk with twenty thousand men to defend the town against Napoleon's whole army.

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  • In Smolensk, at the Malakhov Gate, he had hardly dozed off in a paroxysm of fever before he was awakened by the bombardment of the town--and Smolensk held out all day long.

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  • Charles came to Naples with a new fleet from Provence, and was preparing to invade Sicily again, when he contracted a fever and died at Foggia on the 7th of January 1285.

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  • She had got up at eight that morning and had been in a fever of excitement and activity all day.

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  • In the hospitals, death was so certain that soldiers suffering from fever, or the swelling that came from bad food, preferred to remain on duty, and hardly able to drag their legs went to the front rather than to the hospitals.

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  • It was already past midnight, the hour when Karataev was usually free of his fever and particularly lively.

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  • The now well-known fact that small doses of poisonous substances may act as stimuli to living protoplasm, and that respiratory activity and growth may be accelerated by chloroform, ether and even powerful mineral poisons, such as mercuric chloride, in minimal doses, offers some explanation of these phenomena of hypertrophy, wound fever, and other responses to the presence of irritating agents.

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  • The now well-known fact that small doses of poisonous substances may act as stimuli to living protoplasm, and that respiratory activity and growth may be accelerated by chloroform, ether and even powerful mineral poisons, such as mercuric chloride, in minimal doses, offers some explanation of these phenomena of hypertrophy, wound fever, and other responses to the presence of irritating agents.

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  • His passage through Cilicia was marked by a violent fever that arrested him for a while in Tarsus, and meantime a great Persian army was waiting for him in northern Syria under the command of Darius himself.

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  • Milder cases of malarial fever are apt to become dangerous from the complications of dysentery, bronchitis or pneumonia.

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  • Of the mortality due to malarial disease a small part only is referable to the direct attack of intermittent, and chiefly to the fever in its pernicious form.

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  • Early one morning, however, the fever left me as suddenly and mysteriously as it had come.

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  • At the age of twenty-six months scarlet fever left her without sight or hearing.

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  • But early one morning the fever left me as mysteriously and unexpectedly as it had come, and I fell into a quiet sleep.

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  • They did not know for some time after my recovery that the cruel fever had taken my sight and hearing; taken all the light and music and gladness out of my little life.

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  • in a crusade to north Africa, where the French king died of fever, and Charles, after defeating the soldan of Tunis, returned to Sicily.

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  • The paroxysm is followed by a definite interval in which there is not only no fever, but even a fair degree of bodily comfort and fitness; this is the intermission of the fever.

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  • A certain abatement or remission of the fever takes place, with or without sweating, but there is no true intermission or interval of absolute apyrexia.

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  • The periodicity shows itself in the form of an exacerbation of the still continuing fever, and that exacerbation may take place twentyfour hours after the first onset, or the interval may be only half that period, or it may be double.

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  • in a crusade to north Africa, where the French king died of fever, and Charles, after defeating the soldan of Tunis, returned to Sicily.

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  • On the third day after leaving Moscow Karataev again fell ill with the fever he had suffered from in the hospital in Moscow, and as he grew gradually weaker Pierre kept away from him.

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  • The fever had taken her out of her mind and into the alternate reality of a dream.

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  • From there, the night was a blurry fever dream.

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  • If your fever stays down, I'll let you go home tomorrow.

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  • The greater development of railway construction between 1885 and 1891 was due, principally, to the dubious concessions of interest guarantees by the Celman administration, and also to the fever of speculation.

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  • Other institutions include the Woolwich polytechnic and the Brook fever hospital, Shooter's Hill.

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  • The city of Panama was formerly a stronghold of yellow fever and malaria, which American sanitary measures have practically eradicated.

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  • It was her fever dream without the heaviness of illness to blur it.

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  • The Spaniards laid siege to Leiden, and though stricken down by a fever at Delft the prince spared no exertion to save the town.

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  • Maybe that was why he was the first to notice when she developed a fever.

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  • Carmen, how long has she had this fever?

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  • I've got a black and blue mark on my ribs from his version of Saturday night fever.

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  • Jule's shaking had stopped, and he looked pale rather than flushed from a fever.

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  • The thought came from nowhere, and Jule thought again of the vamp from his fever dream.

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  • Her lips were red and her features flushed from the fever.

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  • He wondered if she had a fever.

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  • I must have a fever.

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  • Darian's golden eyes pulsed and swirled with battle fever.

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  • In 1872 he was promoted commander at what was an exceptionally early age, but he died on the 17th of December 1874 of brain fever.

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  • His health had broken down, and he visited the West Indies, where his wife died of yellow fever.

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  • In 1855 it suffered severely from yellow fever.

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  • They are poverty-stricken, and easily fall victim to fever.

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  • He was gathering troops for a new expedition in central Italy in the summer, when both he and his father were simultaneously seized with fever.

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  • He started in July, crossed the Muchenja Mountains, and reached the capital of the Cazembe, where he died of fever.

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  • After five months' voyage the ship reached Mozambique, where the captain resolved to winter, and Xavier was prostrated with a severe attack of fever.

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  • who were not treated, all had fever.

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  • Blackwater fever >>

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  • That Diptera of the type of the common house-fly are often in large measure responsible for the spread of such diseases as cholera and enteric fever is undeniable, and as regards blood-sucking forms, in addition to those to which reference has already been made, it is sufficient to mention the vast army of pests constituted by the midges, sand-flies, horseflies, &c., from the attacks of which domestic animals suffer equally with man, in addition to being frequently infested with the larvae of the bot and warble flies (Gastrophilus, Oestrus and Hypoderma).

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  • Yellow fever epidemics are common on the Campeche coast, and sometimes appear at Progreso and Merida.

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  • from Jassy, in consequence of eating a whole goose while in a high state of fever.

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  • The day after his son's funeral Taylor caught fever from a patient whom he visited, and, after a ten days' illness, he died at Lisburn on the 13th of August 1667, in the fifty-fifth year of his life and the seventh of his episcopate, and was buried in the cathedral of Dromore.

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  • The prevailing diseases are cholera, fever, small-pox, ophthalmia, dysentery and those of the skin among the lower classes.

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  • Between 1879 and 1892 inclusive, administration with regard to swine fever was entrusted to local authorities.

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  • The exhibition of pigs at agricultural shows has to be abandoned, in consequence of swine fever regulations.

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  • In that year he was ordered to the west coast of Africa, where he visited Dahomey, and contracted fever, which told severely on his constitution.

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  • On his return in 1847, he exchanged the naval for the military service, and was sent to join the U.S. army in Mexico, where he had some extraordinary adventures, and where he was again stricken with fever.

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  • But these plans were cut short by a fever which carried him off just at the time when Charles VIII.

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  • Scarcely, however, had he sailed from Brindisi when he fell sick of a fever which had been raging for some time among the ranks of his army, while they waited for the crossing.

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  • In 1089 he was stricken with fever and he died on the 24th of May amidst universal lamentations.

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  • Fever laid hold of him, and he died somewhat suddenly on the 31st of July 1556, without receiving or asking for the last sacraments.

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  • In the autumn months malarial fever is prevalent in all thickly forested tracts and also in the rice country; but on the whole the province is considered to be healthy, and as the rains break fairly regularly in June and produce an immediate fall in the temperature, severe heat is only experienced for a period of from two to three months.

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  • It used to be stated that these drugs are marked cardiac depressants; and the heart being invariably implicated in rheumatic fever, it is supposed that these drugs must be given with great caution.

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  • These drugs are specific for acute rheumatism (rheumatic fever).

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  • The drug is not a true specific, as quinine is for malaria, since it rarely, if ever, prevents the cardiac damage usually done by rheumatic fever; but it entirely removes the agonizing pain, shortly after its administration, and, an hour or two later, brings down the temperature to normal.

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  • In acute gonorrhoeal arthritis, simulating rheumatic fever, salicylates are useless.

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  • The mode of their administration in rheumatic fever is of the utmost importance.

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  • Thomson Paton; the county and municipal buildings; handsome public baths and gymnasium, presented to the town by Mr David Thomson; the accident hospital; the fever hospital; the museum of the Natural Science and Archaeological Society; the academy, the burgh school and a secondary school with the finest technical equipment in Scotland, given by Mr A.

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  • About Cardinal Ferrari's death there is more doubt; he probably died of fever, but the pope immediately confiscated his goods.

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  • Cesare was preparing for another expedition into central Italy in July 1503, when, in the midst of all these projects and negotiations, both he and his father were taken ill with fever.

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  • He gained great credit when the yellow fever devastated Philadelphia, in 1793, by his assiduity in visiting the sick, and by his bold and apparently successful treatment of the disease by bloodletting.

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  • He died in Philadelphia on the 19th of April 1813, after a five days' illness from typhus fever.

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  • His part in the yellow fever controversies is indicated by La Roche (Yellow Fever in Philadelphia from 1699 to 1854, 2 vols., Philadelphia, 1855) and by Bancroft (Essay on the Yellow Fever, London, 1811).

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  • Dairying interests are not largely developed, and in Texas and the adjoining states the " Texas fever " and " charbon " have done great damage to cattle.

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  • The Stegomyia mosquito is the agent of yellow fever inoculation.

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  • Yellow fever (which first appeared in Cuba in 1647) was long the only epidemic disease, Havana being an endemic focus.

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  • Since then yellow fever has ceased to be a scourge in Cuba.

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  • Small-pox was the cause of a greater mortality than yellow fever even before the means of combating the latter had been ascertained.

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  • In connexion with the university is a botanical garden; with the national sanitary service, a biological laboratory, and special services for small-pox, glanders and yellow fever.

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  • Most notable of all, yellow fever was eradicated where it had been endemic for centuries.

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  • The news of the affair of Sinope, rather wanton slaughter than a battle, Crimean raised excitement in England to fever heat; while War.

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  • He suffered from infancy from great fragility of health, and nearly died in 1858 of gastric fever, which left much constitutional weakness behind it.

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  • Aconite is indicated for internal administration whenever it is desirable to depress the action of the heart in the course of a fever.

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  • Formerly used in every fever, and even in the septic states that constantly followed surgical operations in the pre-Listerian epoch, aconite is now employed only in the earliest stage of the less serious fevers, such as acute tonsilitis, bronchitis and, notably, laryngitis.

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  • Malarial fever is not prevalent, and it is interesting to note that there are no swamps or standing waters on the island.

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  • His wife eloped with a student, and Dempster, pursuing the fugitives in the heat of summer, caught a fever, and died at Bologna on the 6th of September 1625.

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  • The appearance of yellow fever in 1849, until then unknown in Brazil, was attributed to the importation of slaves.

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  • In September of the same year, while visiting in Louisiana to escape the fever, his wife died of it and Davis himself was dangerously ill.

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  • He proceeded as far as Aix-la-Chapelle, where he fell sick of a fever, and suffered so much from weakness and poverty, that he made his way on foot to Amsterdam, and came back to Norway.

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  • On the last-mentioned voyage he caught a fever, and nearly died in that city.

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  • The valleys and coast belt, though practically free from malarial fever, are hot and humid, and fires in dwelling houses are seldom required even in the coolest months; the lower plateaus are cool and the air dry; the uplands are bracing and often very cold, with snow on the ground in winter.

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  • Horsesickness, a kind of malarial fever, which takes an epidemic form in very wet seasons, causes considerable loss.

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  • The farmers soon began to recover from their losses, but in1908-1909another serious loss of stock resulted from the ravages of East Coast fever.

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  • The government maintains experimental farms and forestry plantations and a veterinary department to cope with lung sickness, rinderpest, East Coast fever and such like diseases.

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  • On the whole Hungary is a healthy country, excepting in the marshy tracts, where intermittent fever and diphtheria sometimes occur with great virulence.

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  • The banken veld district is also generally healthy though hotter than the plateaus, and malarial fever prevails in the lower valleys.

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  • Malarial fever is also prevalent throughout the low veld, but above 3000 ft.

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  • Fever carried off several of their number, and it was not until 1838 that the survivors reached the coast.

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  • For the special pathological details of various diseases, see the separate articles on Parasitic Diseases; Neuro-Pathology; Digestive Organs; Respiratory System; Blood: Circulation; Metabolic Diseases; Fever; Bladder; Kidneys; Skin Diseases; EYE Diseases; Heart Disease; EAR, &c.; and the articles on different diseases and ailments under the headings of their common names.

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  • Mechanical theories were introduced into pathology, in explanation of the processes of fever and the like, but had little or no influence on therapeutics.

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  • Louis, by his researches on pulmonary consumption and typhoid fever, had the chief merit of refuting the doctrines of Broussais.

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  • Of the older ontological notions of disease the strongest were those of the essence of fever and of the essence of inflammation.

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  • Broussais had done much to destroy the notion of fever as an entity, but by extravagances in other directions he had discredited the value of his main propositions.

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  • By his almost exhaustive comparison of febrile movements as symptomatic processes Wunderlich dealt the last blow to the expiring doctrine of the "entity" of "fever"; while on the clinical side Bretonneau and Louis, in 1862-1872, by their careful clinical and pathological studies of forms of fever, relieved the new doctrine of the extravagances of Broussais, and prepared the way for the important distinction of enteric from typhus fever by A.

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  • Meanwhile Cohnheim and Metchnikoff were engaged in destroying the ontological conception not of fever only, but also of inflammation, of which, as a local event, an ontological conception was no less strongly implanted.

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  • Discovery in these various directions then led physicians to regard fever and inflammation not as separable entities, but as fluctuating symptomgroups, due to swervings of function from the normal balance under contingent forces.

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  • For some of these, as redwater (pyrosoma), antidotes are already found; for others, as for Texas fever - of which the parasite is unknown, but the mode of its transmission, by the mosquito, discovered (Finlay-Reed) - preventive measures are reducing the prevalence.

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  • Some plagues, such as typhus fever, have been dispelled; others, such as enteric fever, have been almost banished from large areas; and there is much reason to hope that cholera and plague, if introduced, could not get a footing in western Europe, or in any case could be combated on scientific principles, and greatly reduced.

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  • Cholera (Haffkine) and yellow fever are yielding up their secrets, and falling under some control.

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  • It is on clinical grounds that beriberi, scarlet fever, measles, &c., are recognized as belonging to the same class, and evolving in phases which differ not in intimate nature but in the more superficial and inessential characters of time, rate and polymorphism; and the impression is gaining strength that acute rheumatism belongs to the group of the infections, certain sore throats, chorea and other apparently distinct maladies being terms of this series.

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  • Subsequently he entered holy orders, and in c. 1120, being stricken with fever while on a pilgrimage to Rome, vowed that he would found a hospital in London.

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  • Hospitals.-The Metropolitan Asylums Board, though established in 1867 purely as a poor-law authority for the relief of the sick, insane Metro- and infirm paupers, has become a central hospital authority for infectious diseases, with power to receive into politan its hospitals persons, who are not paupers, suffering from Asylums fever, smallpox or diphtheria.

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  • There are twelve fever hospitals, including northern and southern convalescent hospitals.

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  • London Fever Hospital; Islington (1802).

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  • Considerable additions to the knowledge of the region were made by this expedition, five out of the nine white members of which died from blackwater fever.'

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  • Other public buildings include the municipal buildings, the sheriff court and county buildings, Balfour hospital, and the fever hospital.

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  • Again, many facts in the occurrence and diffusion of enteric fever point to an intimate connexion between its origin and certain conditions of locality.

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  • The public buildings comprise the town hall, county buildings, mechanics' institute, academy, two fever hospitals and free library, the burgh having been the first town in Scotland to adopt the Free Library Act.

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  • Fever is unknown.

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  • At last, through Fouche and Talleyrand, he got the appointment of consul at Alicante, and remained there until he lost the sight of one eye from yellow fever.

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  • These magnificent waterworks were opened in 1873, and their sanitary influence was soon felt, in the almost complete disappearance of typhoid fever, which had numerous victims before.

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  • Although it had long been suspected that these insects were in some way connected with malaria and other diseases, while that the species now called Stegomyia calopus was the carrier of yellow fever had been asserted by Finlay as early as 1881, it was not until the closing years of the 19th century that the brilliant researches of Ross in India, and of Grassi and others in Italy, directed the attention of the whole civilized world to mosquitoes as the exclusive agents in the dissemination of malarial fever.

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  • Stegomyia calopus, on the other hand, a very widely distributed species and the almost certain carrier of yellow fever, belongs to the Culicinae.

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  • There is reason to believe that malaria, yellow fever and filariasis are not the only diseases disseminated by mosquitoes.

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  • During the dry season the climate is healthy, but dysentery and intermittent fever are not uncommon.

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  • Bilious remittent fever occurs in the summer months, and smallpox prevails from November to March.

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  • When barely two years old she was deprived of sight, smell and hearing, by an attack of scarlet fever.

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  • deal with medicine both in practice and in theory: they contain practical rules for the preservation of health according to the four seasons of the year, and treat of various diseases from fever to gout.

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  • He takes the frost that winter inflicts and the fever that summer brings as unavoidable visitors.

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  • Paez, who is said to have been the first European to visit the source of the Blue Nile, died of fever in 1622.

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  • In fever the case is different.

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  • It follows that alcohol is a food in fever, and its value in this regard is greatly increased by the fact that it requires no primary digestion, but passes without changes, and without needing change, to the tissues which are to use it.

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  • The state of the pulse is the best criterion of the action of alcohol in any given case of fever.

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  • The climate is unhealthy - fever, smallpox, dysentery and rheumatism being the prevailing diseases.

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  • Innocentius died of a fever, and Jerome was dangerously ill.

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  • Mediterranean (sometimes called " Malta ") fever has been traced by Colonel David Bruce to a Micrococcus melitensis.

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  • Malta Fever >>

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  • The revolution in Milan and Vienna aroused a fever of patriotic enthusiasm in Tuscany, where war against Austria was demanded; Leopold, giving way to popular pressure, sent a force of regulars and volunteers to co-operate with Piedmont in the Lombard campaign.

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  • Intense application brought on infirmities and a slow fever, of which he died on the 16th of August 1705.

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  • He died on the 26th of July 17 26 of a lingering fever.

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  • Mangrove swamps surround the town and epidemics of cholera, yellow fever and other tropical diseases have been frequent; but the unhealthiness of the climate is mitigated to some extent by the high tides which cover the marshes, and the invigorating breezes which blow in from the sea.

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  • But the premature death of his young wife, who fell a victim to yellow fever, drove him again to Europe.

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  • The city is built in a bowllike depression of the great central plateau, and the drainage from the surrounding hillsides has produced a dangerously insanitary condition, from which one or two virulent fever epidemics have resulted.

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  • An attack of scarlatina led to brain fever, and he had scarcely recovered when he fell a victim to cholera, of which he died in Paris on the 24th of August 1832.

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  • had died suddenly of fever.

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  • Among the most devoted in her exertions was Fichte's wife, who, in January 1814, was attacked with a virulent hospital fever.

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  • In order to justify his newly-won laurels, Luynes undertook an expedition against the Protestants, but died of a fever in the midst of the campaign, at Longueville in Guienne, on the 15th of December 1621.

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  • Travellers and strangers who venture into these jungles run the risk of fever of a severe type at almost all seasons of the year.

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  • Fever is very prevalent on the coasts, and even in the interior at 2000 ft.

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  • But on the way he was seized with fever at Kerrera, and died there on the 8th of July 1249.

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  • The annual deathrate per 1000 was 54 per 1000 for the Federal District in 1901, 50 ill 1902, 48 in 1903, 46 in 1904, and 56 in 1905; the increase for the last-mentioned year being due to an epidemic of typhus fever.

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  • The difference in level between the city and the lake being less than six feet and the lake having no natural outlet, typhus fever became a common epidemic in its lower and poorer sections.

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  • The climate is mild and healthy, although serious epidemics of yellow fever and typhus have occurred.

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  • In 1888 there was an epidemic of yellow fever.

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  • His chief works were First Lines of the Practice of Physic (1774); Institutions of Medicine (1770); and Synopsis Nosologicae Medicae (1785), which contained his classification of diseases into four great classes - (t) Pyrexiae, or febrile diseases, as typhus fever; (2) Neuroses, or nervous diseases, as epilepsy; (3) Cachexiae, or diseases resulting from bad habit of body, as scurvy; L and (4) Locales, or local diseases, as cancer.

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  • N., commemorates the deliverance of the town from a severe epidemic of fever in 1612.

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  • The cyanide process of gold extraction, and the returns obtained by its means from the great Waihi mine in the Upper Thames, caused an outbreak of gold fever, which led to the opening up of a few good and a great many worthless quartz-mines in the Auckland fields.

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  • It is notoriously unhealthy; yellow fever is endemic. Little Bassam, renamed by the French Port Bouet, possesses an advantage over the other ports on the coast, as at this point there is no bar.

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  • At his own urgent request Prince Henry of Battenberg, the queen's son-in-law, was permitted to join the Ashanti expedition, and early in January the prince was struck down with fever.

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  • Then Prince Christian Victor, the queen's grandson, fell a victim to enteric fever at Pretoria; and during the autumn it came to be known that the empress Frederick, the queen's eldest daughter, was very seriously ill.

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  • Regular training on the same plan as in general hospitals is provided in London at the fever hospitals of the Metropolitan Asylums Board (12 in number, with from 360 to 760 beds each), and at a considerable number of provincial institutions.

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  • Less than three weeks afterwards he died of fever, on the 13th of January 86.

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  • At seventeen years of age she 5 married General Leclerc, a staff officer of Napoleon, and accompanied him to St Domingo, where he died of yellow fever in 1802.

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  • Among its institutions are the Great Northern Central Hospital, Holloway, the London Fever Hospital, the Northern Polytechnic, and the London School of Divinity, St John's Hall,;,Highbury.

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  • He offered himself to the Church Missionary Society and sailed on the 17th of May 1882, at the head of a party of six, for Zanzibar, and thence set out for Uganda; but, prostrated by fever and dysentery, he was obliged to return to England in 1883.

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  • Of these 32,000 perished during the Serbian retreat or died of fever or cholera.

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  • 116, we have this allopathic remedy for fever.

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  • Let the medicine man or magician pray that the fever may pass into the frog, and the frog be forthwith released, and the cure will be effected.

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  • It is related that Zobeideh, the wife of Harun-al-Rashid, founded the town in 791 after recovering there from fever, but the earlier chronicles give no support to this statement, and it is nowhere recorded that Zobeideh ever visited Azerbaijan, and the name Tabriz was known many centuries before her time.

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  • He died in London of typhoid fever on the 27th of June 1883, and was buried in Westminster Abbey.

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  • The cockle is liable to the same suspicion as the oyster of conveying the contamination of typhoid fever where the shores are polluted, but as it is boiled before being eaten it is probably less dangerous.

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  • On both coasts yellow fever epidemics appear at frequent intervals.

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  • Their numbers were several times seriously reduced by the matlazhuatl, apparently analogous to yellow fever, but not attacking the whites, and unknown before the conquest.

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  • The climate is healthy and bracing, except in the lower valleys along the river banks and in the marsh land, where malarial fever is prevalent.

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  • in Senegambia in 1901, in a European suffering from intermitterit fever.

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  • dum-dum fever, kala-azar) particularly prevalent throughout Indo-Burma, of which they are generally held to be the cause.

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  • obermeieri of relapsing fever) were also only phases in the 1 R.

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  • Shaken by the journey, which he had performed entirely on horseback, he was attacked with fever, and died at Ratisbon, on the 15th of November (N.S.), 1630, in the fifty-ninth year of his age.

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  • The dilute acid, or vinegar, may be used to bathe the skin in fever, acting as a pleasant refrigerant.

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  • He visited England in 1842 and again in 1845, sat to D'Orsay for his portrait, and, dying of fever in London in 1846, was buried at Kensal Green.

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  • Another was projected against China, but the old warrior was attacked by fever and ague when encamped on the farther side of the Sihon (Syr-Daria) and died at Atrar (Otrar) on the 17th of February 1405.

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  • The climate is healthy, except on the coasts, where malarial fever is prevalent.

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  • Fever.

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  • Hog cholera or swine fever has been almost eradicated.

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  • During an attack of fever he made observations on himself with reference to the action of quickened circulation upon thought, which led him to the conclusion that psychical phenomena were to be accounted for as the effects of organic changes in the brain and nervous system.

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  • There was a disastrous fire in 1829, an epidemic of yellow fever in 1839, and a flood in 1840, but the growth of the city was not seriously checked; the cotton receipts of 1846 were 212,019 bales, and in 1847 a cotton factory was built.

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  • Hay fever >>

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  • While on another journey in South Arabia (1896-1897), Bent was seized with malarial fever, and died in London on the 5th of May 1897, a few days after his return.

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  • But at Bombay Wellesley was attacked by fever, and prevented from going on.

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  • Yellow fever, whose first recorded appearance was in December 1849, was for many years almost a regular yearly visitant, and the mortality from it has been terrible.

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  • After a furious battle at Castelja.loux, and suffering from fever from his wounds, he wrote his Tragiques (1571).

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  • Plants of a single year's growth reached the ridiculous price of $1 each at the height of the fever, which, however, did not last long, for in 1839 the speculation collapsed; the famous M.

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  • Fever and ague prevail on the coast.

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  • It has, however, an evil name for malarial fever.

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  • Antoninus died of fever at Lorium in Etruria, about 12 m.

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  • But she only enjoyed one year of happiness, for in 1473 her husband died of fever, leaving his kingdom to his queen and their child as yet unborn.

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  • He died of yellow fever at Beaufort, South Carolina, on the 30th of October 1862.

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  • Hampstead has numerous charitable institutions, amongst which are the North London consumptive hospital, the Orphan Working School, Haverstock Hill (1758), the general hospital and the north-western fever hospital.

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  • There he was struck down by fever; and on the 15th of August 1464 death had released him from all his afflictions - a tragic close which has thrown a halo round his memory.

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  • His soaring plans were destroyed by the death of Alexander VI., who met his end on the 18th of August 1503 by the Roman fever - not by poison.

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  • took the field in aid of Richard; but the young king and Geoffrey had no scruples about withstanding their father, and continued to aid the Aquitanian rising until the young king fell ill of a fever which proved fatal to him (June II, 1183).

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  • It is frequently flooded in winter and in consequence fever is prevalent.

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  • high, a town-hall, corn exchange, public libraries, assembly rooms, fever hospital, sheriff court buildings, people's club and institute, high school (1894) - on the site of the ancient burgh school (1582) - the Beveridge hall and free library, and the Adam Smith memorial hall.

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  • Relapsing Fever >>

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  • The result of this daring ride was a ten days' fever, after which she removed by short stages to Craigmillar, where a proposal for her divorce from Darnley was laid before her by Bothwell, Murray, Huntly, Argyle and Lethington, who was chosen spokesman for the rest.

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  • the summer is propagated by the mosquito (Anopheles claviger) marks a new epoch; the most diverse theories as to its origin had hitherto been propounded, but it is now possible to combat it on a definite plan, by draining the marshes, protecting the houses by fine mosquito-proof wire netting (for Anopheles is not active by day), improving the water supply, &c., while for those who have fever, quinine (now sold cheaply by the state) is a great specific. A great improvement is already apparent; and a law carried in 1903 for the Bonifica dell' Agro Romano compels the proprietors within a radius of some 6 m.

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  • On landing (October 2) at Cape Coast, Wolseley found the Ashanti, who had been decimated by smallpox and fever, preparing to return home.

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  • Besides coloured troops, there were employed in this campaign about 2400 Europeans, who suffered severely from fever and otherwise, though the mortality among the men was slight.

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  • Although no fighting occurred, a heavy strain was thrown upon all ranks, and fever claimed many victims, among whom was Prince Henry of Battenberg, who had volunteered for the post of military secretary to Colonel Sir F.

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  • Other institutions are the Goldsmiths' Polytechnic Institute, New Cross; and the South-eastern fever hospital.

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  • He died soon after, probably of fever, and his body was buried under the river-bed of the Busento, the stream being temporarily turned aside from its course while the grave was dug wherein the Gothic chief and some of his most precious spoils were interred.

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  • Among charitable institutions are the Royal Alexandra Infirmary, the Victoria Eye Infirmary (presented by Provost Mackenzie in 1899), the burgh asylum at Riccartsbar, the Abbey Poorhouse (including hospital and lunatic wards), the fever hospital and reception house, the Infectious Diseases Hospital and the Gleniffer Home for Incurables.

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  • In general the climate is healthy except in the rainy season, when large tracts are converted into swamps and fever is very prevalent.

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  • of Aleppo, he was prostrated by fever, and finally died at Aleppo on the 19th of August.

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  • The country was roadless and uninhabited save by wild beasts, and fever and cholera made sad havoc of the working parties; but it was successfully accomplished.

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  • Other hospitals are the Royal, for children and women, Waterloo Road, the Lying-in Hospital, York Road, and the South-western fever hospital in Stockwell.

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  • He died of a fever on the 21st of February 1513, and was succeeded by Leo X.

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  • French patriotic feeling, suspicious, angry and alarmed, needed only a slight provocation to cause it to blaze up into an uncontrollable fever for war.

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  • He was seized with an intermittent fever, and died at Milan on the 4th of November 1584.

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  • above the level of the river, Poti is extremely unhealthy, fever and ague prevailing in summer and autumn.

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  • Malarial fever is frequent, and even the Africans, especially those coming from other countries, suffer from it.

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  • The city has a monument (1900) to John Gorrie (1803-1855), a physician who discovered the cold-air process of refrigeration in 1849 (and patented an ice-machine in 1850), as the result of experiments to lower the temperatures of fever patients.

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  • The climate of the coast-lands is moist and hot, and extremely unhealthy, malarial fever being prevalent and deadly.

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  • The natives of the northern regions do not suffer to any extent from fever unless they move to a part of the country some distance from their home.

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  • The principal buildings are the parish church, well-placed on a hill overlooking the pier, convalescent homes, Cottage and Victoria fever hospitals, and the town house.

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  • Cholera and fever were busy both with the North Staffordshire regiment at Gemai, whither they had been moved on its approach, and with the Egyptian troops at the front, and carried off many officers and men.

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  • Whether effected entirely by action on the nerve terminals, or by an additional influence upon the vaso-motor centre in the medulla oblongata, atropine certainly causes extreme dilatation of the blood-vessels, so much so that the skin becomes flushed and there may appear, after large doses, an erythematous rash, which must be carefully distinguished, in cases of supposed belladonna poisoning, from that of scarlet fever: more especially as the temperature may be elevated and the pulse is very rapid in both conditions.

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  • Cerebro-Spinal Fever >>

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  • In the canals of the Low Countries he had caught a fever, of which he never shook off the effects.

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  • Besides these there is a fever hospital, erected by Lord John George Beresford; a college, which Primate Robinson was anxious to raise to the rank of a university; a public library founded by him, an observatory, which has become famous from the efficiency of its astronomers; a number of churches and schools, and barracks.

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  • The acid and its salts are antipyretic and were used in Germany instead of salicylates in rheumatic fever.

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  • Internally hydrogen peroxide is used in various diseased conditions of the gastro-intestinal tract, such as dyspepsia, diarrhoea and enteric fever.

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  • The mean annual temperature is about 82° to 83° F.; malarial and bilious fevers are common, the latter being known as "Guayaquil fever," and epidemics of yellow fever are frequent.

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  • The dampness and miasma, to which so many of the early settlers' fatal "chills and fever" were due, have practically disappeared before modern methods of sanitary drainage.

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  • If a white person suffers in the hot months from any disease causing fever, e.g.

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  • Thus malaria and sand-fly fever, dysentery, typhoid and paratyphoid fever, cholera, smallpox, and occasionally typhus fever, eye diseases, oriental sores and indeed any disease conveyed by impure water, flies, contaminated dust or the contagion of sufferers from infectious diseases, are prevalent in the inhabited places along the Persian Gulf, and precautions must always be taken to guard against them.

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  • After staying there eleven days, he set out for Europe by Beyrout, but at Nazareth he was attacked by fever; and he died at Damascus on the 29th of May 1862.

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  • A garrison of imperial troops was maintained until 1871, when the troops were withdrawn after many deaths from fever and dysentery had occurred among them.

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  • Owing to this, as well as to the entire lack of proper sanitary customs among the people, the horrible condition of sewerage and the prevalence of yellow fever (first brought to Havana, it is thought, in 1761, from Vera Cruz), the reputation of the city as regards health was long very bad.

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  • The practical extermination of yellow fever during the U.S. military occupation following 1899 was a remarkable achievement.

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  • In 1895-1899, owing to the war, there were few non-immune persons in the city, and there was no trouble with the fever, but from the autumn of 1899 a heavy immigration from Spain began, and a fever epidemic was raging in 1900.

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  • The number of subsequent deaths from yellow fever has depended solely on the degree to which the necessary precautionary measures were taken.

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  • In the course of the 17th century the port became the great 1 Dr Carlos Finlay of Havana, arguing from the coincidence between the climatic limitation of yellow fever and the geographical limitation of the mosquito, urged (1881 sqq.) that there was some relation between the disease and the insect.

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  • Kelly, Walter Reed and Yellow Fever (New York, 1907).

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  • 2 The average number of deaths from yellow fever annually from 1885 (when reliable registration began) to 1898 was 455; maximum 1282 in 1896 (supposed average for 4 years, 1856-1859, being 1489.8 and for 7 years, 18 7318 79, 1395.1), minimum 136, in 1898; average deaths of military, 1885-1898, 2784 (in 1896-1897 constituting 1966 out of a total of 2140); deaths of American soldiers, 1899-1900, 18 out of 431.

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  • The principal structures include the burgh and county buildings, town hall, the Dollar free library and Camelon fever hospital.

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  • He had married Catharine Spooner at Rugby in 1843; in the spring of 1856, within five weeks, five of their children were carried off by virulent scarlet fever.

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  • In the low grounds fever of an acute and hematuric form is very prevalent.

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  • The universal custom of sleeping on the house-top in summer promotes rheumatic and neuralgic affections; and in the Koh Daman of Kabul, which the natives regard as having the finest of climates, the mortality from fever and bowel complaint, between July and October, is great, the immoderate use of fruit predisposing to such ailments.

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  • The rue and wormwood are in general use as domestic medicines - the former for rheumatism and neuralgia; the latter in fever, debility and dyspepsia, as well as for a vermifuge.

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  • The worst part of the year is at the close of the rains in September and October, during which months few of the natives escape fever.

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  • The climate is now less healthy than it was, severe epidemics of malarial fever having frequently occurred, so that malaria now appears to be endemic among the non-European population.

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  • In 1854 cholera caused the death of 17,000 persons; in 1867 over 30,000 people died of malarial fever; in 1892 a hurricane of terrific violence caused immense destruction of property and serious loss of life; in 1893 great part of Port Louis was destroyed by fire.

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  • In December 1861, while preparations were being made for the marriage, the prince consort was struck down with typhoid fever, and died on the 14th.

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  • Having sent before him his son Abbas to make Tyana a strong fortress, he set out for Asia Minor to put himself at the head of the army, but died of a fever brought on by bathing in the chill river, Pedendon, 40 m.

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  • He was attacked by intermittent fever, of which he died at Athens on the 1st of August 1840.

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  • At Ceneda in Venetia he died of a raging fever.

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  • By the month of June the opposition of Vergniaud (whose voice still commanded the country); to the king rose to fever heat.

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  • There has been more than one horticultural excitement in California, but especially in orange culture, which was for a time almost as epidemic a fever as gold seeking once was.

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  • Just at this time came the highest point and the sudden fall of the second great mining fever of the state.

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  • This Comstock fever belongs to Californian rather than to Nevadan history, and is one of the most extraordinary in mining annals.

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  • Such were the Kern River fever of 1855 and the greater " Fraser River rush " of 1858, the latter, which took perhaps 20,000 men out of the state, causing a terrible amount of suffering.

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  • The whole press was clamorous for war; Thiers declared that the alliance with Great Britain was shattered, and pressed on warlike preparations; even Louis Philippe was carried away by the fever.

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  • In Seagrave Road is the Western fever hospital.

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  • In 1918 a severe attack of fever compelled Stefansson to hand over the command for the last season's work to S.

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  • pestis, pestilentia), in medicine, a term given to any epidemic disease causing a great mortality, and used in this sense by Galen and the a ncient medical writers, but now confined to a special disease, otherwise called Oriental, Levantine, or Bubonic Plague, which may be shortly defined a specific infectious fever, one variety being characterized by buboes (glandular swellings) and carbuncles.

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  • "Plague" was formerly divided into two chief varieties: (1) mild plague, pestis minor, larval plague (Radcliffe), peste fruste, in which the special symptoms are accompanied by little fever or general disturbance; and (2) ordinary epidemic or severe plague, pestis major, in which the general disturbance is very severe.

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  • Some of the epidemics of this period in Italy and Germany are known by the accounts of eminent physicians, as Vochs, Fracastor, Mercurialis, Borgarucci, Ingrassia, Massaria, Amici, &c., (3) whose writings are important because the question of contagion first began to be raised, and also plague had to be distinguished from typhus fever, which began in this century to appear in Europe.

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  • This number is likely to be rather too low than too high, since of the 6432 deaths from spotted fever many were probably really from plague, though not declared so to avoid painful restrictions.

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  • Epidemic outbreaks of other diseases - for instance, cholera, diphtheria and typhoid fever - are often preceded and followed by the prevalence of mild illness of an allied type; and t he true significance of this fact is one of the most important problems in epidemiology.

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  • The word " plague " - or " pest," which is the name used in other languages - had originally a general meaning, and may have required qualifications when applied to this particular fever; but it has now become a specific label, and the prefix "bubonic" should be dropped.

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  • It may be taken at first for almost any fever, particularly typhoid, or for venereal disease or lymphangitis.

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  • In plague countries the diseases with which it is most liable to be confounded are malaria, relapsing fever and typhus, or broncho-pneumonia in pneumonic cases.

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  • In the autumn the revolutionary fever, which had swept through all Europe earlier in the year, spread to Rome.

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  • The decrease of population between 1870 and 1880 was due to the ravages of yellow fever in 1873, 1878 and 1879.

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  • At the return of the fever in 1879 better care and strict quarantine arrangements prevailed, but there were 497 deaths.

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  • During the epidemics of 1878 and 1879 fully two-thirds of the population fled from the city, many of whom died of the fever at other places, and a still larger number did not return.

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  • In the marshy localities malarial fever occurs but is rarely (in modern times) of a severe type.

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  • For a time Miss Nightingale was herself prostrated with fever, but she refused to leave her post, and remained at Scutari till Turkey was evacuated by the British in July 1856.

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  • part of the state, on the Galena (formerly the Fever) river, near its junction with the Mississippi, about 165 m.

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  • Galena was originally a trading post, called by the French "La Pointe" and by the English "Fever River," the river having been named after le Fevre, a French trader who settled near its mouth.

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  • In 1809 risings took place in Venezuela, in Ecuador, in Upper Peru and in the Argentine; the revolutionary fever spread to Chile, and on the 18th of September 1810 the cabildo of Santiago secured the resignation of the governor and vested his powers in an elected Junta (board) of seven members.

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  • Abu Said died of fever in 1335, and with him the first Mongol or Ilkhan dynasty of Persia practically came to an end.

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  • His death (29th of August 886) was due to a fever contracted in consequence of a serious accident in hunting.

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  • Moreover, the products of microbic secretion tend to produce fever.

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  • The high temperature characteristic of this condition is no doubt injurious to the body itself, but it is frequently more so to the microbe which has invaded the organism; and thus fever, instead of now being regarded as a morbid condition to be suppressed by every means in our power, is considered to be a reaction of the organism tending to protect it by destroying the infection.

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  • Fever is not to be looked upon as an unmitigated evil, to be removed if possible, but rather as a defensive mechanism by which the organism may prevent invasion from noxicus microbes.

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  • Thus too great a rise of temperature in fever may kill the patient; and the aim of therapeutics is to restrain the temperature within proper limits, neither allowing it to rise too high nor to fall too low.

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  • The introduction of the clinical thermometer, which allows us to ascertain exactly the amount to which the temperature rises in fever or to which it is reduced by antipyretic measures, is to the physician like the compass to the sailor, and allows him to steer safely between two extremes.

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  • Every one has noticed after prolonged fever how thin and weak the patient is, and both the muscular and nervous power throughout the whole body are sadly in want of repair.

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  • Both inflammation and fever are protective processes calculated to defend the organism against the attacks of microbes.

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  • Two very old remedies for fever are acetate of ammonia and nitrous ether.

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  • These probably lessen fever by their action upon the nerve centres which regulate the temperature of the body, and partly by their peripheral action in causing the secretion of sweat.

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  • Very high fever in itself will cause death, the fatal temperature in rabbits being 114.6°.

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  • But the delirium which is common in fever, although it may be partly due to rise of temperature, is very often due to poisons in the blood, for in some cases it occurs with quite a low temperature, 101° or 102°, whereas in others the temperature rises to zoo° and 105° with no delirium whatever.

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  • This was tried largely in the case of smallpox, and once at least by Dr Erasmus Darwin in the case of scarlet fever.

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  • In the same way sterilized cultures of typhoid bacilli have been used to protect against attacks of typhoid fever, and an anti-typhoid serum has been employed with intent to cure.

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  • Colonel Denham, after administering the colony for five weeks, died at Freetown of fever on the 9th of June 1828.

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  • At the end of 1898 the feelings of the Uitlanders were wrought up to fever pitch.

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  • His health was shattered in 1825, but he continued his lectures until attacked by fever on the 14th of June 1827.

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  • Among its public buildings are the municipal chambers, combination fever hospital, Samaritan hospital and reception houses for the poor.

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  • The climate of British Baluchistan is dry and bracing - even exhilarating - but the extremes of temperature lead to the development of fever in very severe forms. On the whole it is favourable to European existence.

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  • Rayer in 1850 and Davaine had observed the bacilli in the blood of animals dead of anthrax (splenic fever), and Pollender discovered them anew in 1855 In 1863, imbued with ideas derived from Pasteur's researches on fermentation, Davaine reinvestigated the matter, and put forth the opinion that the anthrax bacilli caused the splenic fever; this was proved to result from inoculation.

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  • Koch in 1876 published his observations on Davaine's bacilli, placed beyond doubt their causal relation to splenic fever, discovered the spores and the saprophytic phase in the life-history of the organism, and cleared up important points in the whole question (figs.

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  • Thus the organisms of suppuration, tubercle, glanders, diphtheria, typhoid fever, cholera, tetanus, and others were identified, and their relationship to the individual diseases established.

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  • Haffkine in the case of cholera (1893) and plague (1896), and more recently by Wright and Semple in the case of typhoid fever.

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  • the agglutinative action of the serum of a patient suffering from a bacterial disease, first described in the case of typhoid fever independently by Widal and by Griinbaum in 1896, though led up to by the work of Pfeiffer, Gruber and Durham and others.

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  • Maltafeverand relapsing fever, monkeys have been used with success, but in others, e.g.

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  • The action of these intracellular toxins has in many instances nothing characteristic, but is merely in the direction of producing fever and interfering with the vital processes of the body generally, these disturbances often going on to a fatal result.

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  • Many of them, probably also of proteid nature, are much more resistant to heat; thus the intracellular toxins of the tubercle bacillus retain certain of their effects even after exposure to ioo° C. Like the extracellular toxins they may be of remarkable potency; for example, fever is produced in the human subject by the injection into the blood of an extremely minute quantity of dead typhoid bacilli.

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  • In this way secondary abscesses, secondary tubercle glanders and nodules, &c., result; in typhoid fever there is secondary invasion of the mesenteric glands, and clumps of bacilli are also found in internal organs, especially the spleen, though there may be little tissue change around them.

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  • Shortly afterwards Widal and also Griinbaum showed that the serum of patients suffering from typhoid fever, even at an early stage of the disease, agglutinated the typhoid bacillus - a fact which laid the foundation of serum diagnosis.

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  • A similar phenomenon has been demonstrated in the case of Malta fever, cholera, plague, infection with B.

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  • The public buildings include the Burgh Hall, the academy (with a graceful steeple), the county buildings, the Denny Memorial, a Literary and a Mechanics' institute, Masonic hall, two cottage hospitals, a fever hospital, a public library and the combination poorhouse.

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  • A 2% solution used as a spray has been used with marked effect in hay fever and in whooping-cough.

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  • Only in a few isolated cases has any contamination been traced to fever or other zymotic germs. In this connexion it is worth noting that the infectious diseases hospital has a separate system of drainage which is carefully disinfected, and not allowed to be employed for the purposes of manure.

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  • Among the institutions of Wandsworth are the Royal Hospital for Incurables, Putney; the Fountain and the Grove fever hospitals, Lower Tooting; the Clapham School of Art, Wandsworth Technical Institute; the Roman Catholic Training College for Women, West Hill; and Wandsworth Prison, Heathfield Road.

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  • The diseases for which it was chiefly taken were malarial fever, dysentery, diarrhoea, spitting of blood, rheumatism and elephantiasis.

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  • The prosperity of the residency was further affected by a cattle plague in 1879, followed by a fever epidemic which carried off 50,000 people, and except in the rice season there is a considerable emigration of natives.

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  • Finally, in February 1858, when he was lying muffled in blankets in the cold fit of a severe attack of intermittent fever at Ternate, in the Moluccas, he began to think of Malthus's Essay on Population, and, to use his own words, "there suddenly flashed upon me the idea of the survival of the fittest."

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  • The charitable institutions include the infirmary; the cholera hospital; the eye infirmary; the fever reception house; Sir Gabriel Wood's mariners' asylum, an Elizabethan building erected in 1851 for the accommodation of aged merchant seamen; and the Smithson poorhouse and lunatic asylum, built beyond the southern boundary in 1879.

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  • The diseases to which the act applies are smallpox, cholera, membranous croup, erysipelas, scarlatina or scarlet fever, typhus, typhoid, enteric, relapsing, continued or puerperal fever, and any other infectious disease to which the act has been applied by the local authority of the district in the prescribed manner.

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  • Externally it is antiparasitic, and is used in certain stages of eczema and psoriasis, and the alcoholic solution has been used in ringworm; internally it has been employed as an intestinal antiseptic in typhoid fever.

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  • The seasons of greatest heat and of the heavy rains are thus coincident on the lower river, where fever is much more prevalent than on the higher plateau lands nearer the centre of the continent.

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  • This disaster, though partly retrieved in the campaign of the following year, had a serious effect upon his vitality; henceforth he declined in health and in 1180 succumbed to a slow fever.

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  • Dissensions broke out among the Shoans, and after a desperate and futile attack on Theodore at Debra-Berhan, Haeli Melicoth died of exhaustion and fever, nominating with his last breath his eleven-year-old son Menelek 2 as successor (November 1855).

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  • In treating malaria (including ague, remittent fever, intermittent fever, and all its other forms) with this drug certain important facts are to be observed.

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  • His health suffered from the fever which carried off an immense proportion of the soldiers and sailors, but the X 25,000 of prize money which he received freed him from the unpleasant position of younger son of a family ruined by the extravagance of his father.

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  • at 1 i o'clock at night Partridge the almanac maker should infallibly die of a raging fever.

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  • He had a serious love affair about this time, which was broken off on the very eve of marriage by his catching a tertian fever which defied all attempts at cure for some two years.

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  • He came drenched to his lodgings on Snow Hill, was seized with a violent fever, and died in a few days (August 31).

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  • Undermined by fever, at the age of twenty he had the appearance of an old man, and night and day he was haunted with nightmares.

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  • In 1735 a problem proposed by the academy, for the solution of which several eminent mathematicians had demanded the space of some months, was solvecdby Euler in three days,but the effort threw him into a fever which endangered his life and deprived him of the use of his right eye.

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  • beyond the lake, this time in company with his wife and children, but again got no farther than the lake, as the children were seized with fever.

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  • On the 4th of April the Kwango was crossed, and on the 31st of May the town of Loanda was entered, Livingstone, however, being all but dead from fever, semi-starvation and dysentery.

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  • Fever came upon him, and for a time was his almost constant companion; this, with other serious ailments which subsequently attacked him, and which he had no medicine to counteract, told on even his iron frame.

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  • Malarial fever is practically non-existent in Cape Colony, and diseases of the chest are rare.

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  • When, in the summer of 1803, the city was visited with yellow fever, Livingston displayed courage and energy in his endeavours to prevent the spread of the disease and relieve distress.

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  • the fever, during which the people gave many proofs of their attachment to him.

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  • Urotropin is very valuable in sterilizing the urine of patients who have suffered from typhoid fever and thus preventing the spread of the disease by what are known as "typhoid carriers."

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  • It was first recorded as poisonous by Livingstone and is now known to be the carrier of the Spirochaete of relapsing fever in man, known as tick fever.

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  • The most important of these are the following: Dermacentor reticulatus, a species widely distributed in Europe, Asia and America, infects dogs in Europe with the Haematozoon causing the disease known as "biliary fever," and has been asserted to be answerable for the so-called spotted or tick fever in man in the Rocky Mountains.

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  • The socalled "coast fever" in cattle in South Africa is conveyed by two distinct species of the genus Rhipicephalus, namely by R.

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  • Finally Margaropus annulatus, of which there are several geographical races, is the carrier of the germ causing the de tructive cattle-disease variously known as "Texas" or "red water" fever in America, South Africa and Australia.

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  • It grew gradually worse, and developed into what his contemporaries called leprosya loathsome skin disease accompanied by bouts of fever, which sometimes kept him bedridden for months at a time.

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  • Richard never published any statement as to their end, though some easy tale of a fever, a conflagration, or an accident might have served him better than the mere silence that he employed.

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  • The climate of Bhandara is unhealthy, - the prevailing diseases being fever, small-pox and cholera.

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  • This decrease was due partly to the famines of 1896-1897 and 1900-1901, partly to the epidemics of cholera and fever which accompanied them, and partly to the plague which attacked the state in as great measure as the surrounding presidency.

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  • Robert, returning to restore them, occupied Corfu and Kephalonia, but died of fever in the latter on the 15th of July 1085, in his 70th year.

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  • Having made an unsuccessful journey to Tabriz to present the shah with his translation of the New Testament, he was seized with fever, and after a temporary recovery, had to seek a change of climate.

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  • In this gathering the provincial deputations caught the revolutionary fever of Paris.

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  • In houses or hospitals where cases of the disease are under treatment, disinfectants should be freely employed, and the evacuations of the patients removed as speedily as possible, having previously been sterilized in much the same manner as is employed in typhoid fever.

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  • The town itself is unhealthy and strangers especially are apt to be attacked by fever.

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  • Cholera occurs in the native city every summer, malarial fever exists and dysentery is apt to become chronic in spring and autumn on account of the sudden changes of temperature - a fall of 20° to 30° taking place in a few hours - and the moisture-laden atmosphere.

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  • Amid many sufferings, however, and frequent attacks of sickness, he manfully pursued his course; nor was it till his frail body, torn by many and painful diseases - fever, asthma, stone, and gout, the fruits for the most part of his sedentary habits and unceasing activity - had, as it were, fallen to pieces around him, that his indomitable spirit relinquished the conflict.

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  • But the coasts are much hotter, especially on the western side, as is also the interior west of the highland region; and from the large amount of marsh and lagoon on the coasts, malarial fever is common and frequently fatal, both to Europeans and to natives from the interior.

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  • Epidemics of influenza and fever have been very prevalent of late years in the central provinces.

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  • Owing to the necessity of making a road for the passage of artillery and military stores, many months were spent on the march into the interior, and there was considerable loss of life by fever and other disease among the invading troops.

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  • symptoms, such as diarrhoea, anaemia, intermittent fever, restlessness, irritability and convulsions are attributed to these worms. The treatment is the administration of santonin, followed by a purgative.

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  • This is especially the case in the lower and moister regions, such as the west coast, where malarial fever is very prevalent and deadly; the most unfavourable factors being humidity with absence of climatic variation (daily or seasonal).

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  • Districts which had been notoriously deadly to Europeans were rendered comparatively healthy after the discovery, in 1899, of the species of mosquito which propagates malarial fever, and the measures thereafter taken for its destruction and the filling up of swamps.

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  • The military The return rule of the marquis de Sgur eliminated the plebeians of feud.2!from the army; while the great lords, drones in the Isin tothe hive, worked with a kind of fever at the enforcement offensive.

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  • MIlft~- an impulse had been given tothespiritof conquest which achieve- had gradually succeeded to the disinterested fever of ments,of propaganda and overheated patriotism.

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  • On her departure the pope, whose venality and nepotism had made him very unpopular with the citizens, died of fever before the arrival of Otto III., who elevated his own kinsman Bruno to the papal dignity under the name of Gregory V.

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  • A civil war would probably have broken out between them; but Philip, who had only been in Spain long enough to prove his incapacity, died suddenly at Burgos, apparently of typhoid fever, on the 25th of September 1506.

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  • 1 Captain Claud Alexander died of fever in northern Nigeria on the 30th of November 1904.

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  • in the shade; the necessaryprecautions for shade; y p swarm prevention must therefore be taken in advance, for when what is known as the " swarming fever " once starts it is most difficult to overcome.

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  • He died from swamp fever on the 22nd of August 1607.

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  • damp and fever is endemic.

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  • I have consulted the star of his nativity by my own rules, and find he will infallibly die upon the 29th of March next about eleven at night of a raging fever.

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  • From Rome Newman returned to Sicily alone, and was dangerously ill with fever at Leonforte, recovering from it with the conviction that he had a work to do in England.

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  • Its northern and southern extremities have been named Cape Costigan and Cape Molyneux, in memory of two explorers who were among the first in modern times to navigate the sea and succumbed to the consequent fever and exhaustion.

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  • Owing largely to the folly of his Greek servant, who, without his master's knowledge, threw overboard the drinking-water to lighten the boat, the explorer after circumnavigating the sea reached Jericho in an exhausted condition, and was there attacked by a severe fever.

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  • Fever, dysentery and ophthalmia, chiefly due to exposure to heavy dews and cold nights, are prevalent.

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  • The climate of Port Sudan is very hot and damp and fever is common.

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  • At Amshit, near Byblos, Henriette Renan died of intermittent fever on the 24th of September 1861.

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  • avTi, against, xvp€r6, fever) either increase the heat loss or diminish its production; e.g.

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  • On the 9th of January 1878, Victor Emmanuel died of fever in Rome, and was buried in the Pantheon.

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  • Each man contributes to a medical fund which maintains the fever, accident and general hospitals, providing also laundries and baths.

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  • Maury introduced the cultivation of cinchona in Mexico so that quinine could be produced to fight yellow fever.

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  • Among institutions are the Horniman Museum, Forest Hill (1901); Morden's College, on the south of Blackheath, founded at the close of the 17th century by Sir John Morden for Turkey merchants who were received as pensioners, and subsequently extended in scope; numerous schools in the same locality; and the Park Fever Hospital, Hither Green.

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  • Towards the end of the same year Isotta died also, apparently of a slow fever, but really, it was believed, by poison.

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  • Maybe that was why he was the first to notice when she developed a fever.

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  • Carmen, how long has she had this fever?

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  • Her fever goes down, but then comes back up again.

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  • A while ago she woke up coughing and crying, and her fever was up.

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  • That sounds like her fever finally broke.

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  • He said Destiny's fever had broken and if she continued to improve, they would take the tent off her bed in a few days.

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  • I've got a black and blue mark on my ribs from his version of Saturday night fever.

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  • If he could shake his fever and take care of himself, he'd be okay alone.

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  • Jule's shaking had stopped, and he looked pale rather than flushed from a fever.

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  • The fever had left him, and while he looked pale beneath his cocoa skin, he was alert and his speech coherent.

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  • The thought came from nowhere, and Jule thought again of the vamp from his fever dream.

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  • "Nothing but a fever dream," Jule said.

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  • She was fighting a fever, one that made it hard for her to focus.

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  • The fever had taken her out of her mind and into the alternate reality of a dream.

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  • The dream of Darkyn was no doubt a fever dream, one that caused distant alarm despite her illness.

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  • The night was a blur in her mind, a combination of strange, fuzzy dreams about blood and tossing and turning from the horrible fever.

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  • From there, the night was a blurry fever dream.

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  • It helped wake her up without completely lifting the fog of a fever that had been present since yesterday.

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  • Her lips were red and her features flushed from the fever.

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  • She'd felt it last night, too, before … before the fever dream about them having sex.

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  • It was her fever dream without the heaviness of illness to blur it.

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  • The strange fever remained, making her feel as if she'd been sitting in a sauna for hours.

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  • He wondered if she had a fever.

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  • I must have a fever.

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  • If your fever stays down, I'll let you go home tomorrow.

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  • Today she was absent, home nursing child number five, down with a spring fever, or just plain Spring Fever.

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  • Darian's golden eyes pulsed and swirled with battle fever.

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  • It made his blood hum with impending battle fever, but he ignored the silent challenge.

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  • Her breathing was regulated but heavy, her scent and heated nearness aiding battle fever in agitating his blood.

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  • The onset of the flu was abrupt with fever followed by vomiting, abdominal pain and profuse diarrhea.

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  • She lost her fever and slept, becoming quite lucid and reaching the crisis.

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  • ache, fever, aching limbs.

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  • causes Most commonly sore throats are caused by viruses eg adenoviruses, influenza, and sometimes glandular fever (infectious mononucleosis ).

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  • They both contracted ague and fever on the survey from which he died.

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  • allergy people include those with atopic allergies (asthma, eczema and hay fever which run in the family) and those with diabetics.

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  • pulmonary anthrax starts like the ' flu ' with fever, muscle aches and cough.

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  • To find out if your child has a fever, place a thermometer under your child's armpit or use a special ear thermometer.

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  • The most commonly reported flu like symptoms are myalgia, fever, chills, sweating, asthenia, headache and nausea.

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  • In both generations, the prevalence of asthma was higher in those who reported hay fever (atopic asthma ).

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  • Only a small percentage of people with hay fever develop pollen asthma as well.

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  • bilious fever ' .

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  • cabin fever.

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  • Missing my independence and getting cabin fever to boot, I started to trawl the net for a solution.

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  • The most common conditions were hay fever, cold and flu, cough, head lice and vaginal candidiasis.

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  • characterized by fever and respiratory symptoms which advance to a life-threatening pneumonia in some cases.

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  • He was never without a cold, except once for nine weeks while he had scarlet fever; and he always had chilblains.

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  • childbed fever once they had given birth.

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  • These include plague, cholera, diphtheria, yellow fever, dengue and TB.

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  • clostridium chauvoei, leading to fever and swelling of infected muscles.

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  • Pit has been very wet for some time, which had caused me to have cold sweats and fever.

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  • pollen counts are taken during the summer months to warn hay fever sufferers of high levels.

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  • Symptoms include fever, headache, nausea, vomiting diarrhea and abdominal cramps.

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  • A lifesize cutout of Kylie in Fever pose danced about above the audience throughout Basement Jaxx's set.

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  • Chirac can claim with some justice to have somewhat dampened America's war fever.

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  • She will always be remembered for her absolutely definitive version of Fever.

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  • delirious with fever get out of bed to say his prayers five times a day.

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  • delirium caused by a high fever.

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  • delirium of fever.

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  • Infection with the dengue virus is not normally life-threatening, but in a minority of cases the potentially deadly dengue haemorrhagic fever ensues.

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  • dengue fever for more than 200 years.

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  • And health was also not improved e.g. diphtheria and scarlet fever increased.

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  • Affected cattle have a fever, rapid breathing and a nasal discharge.

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  • Humans - often severe with abdominal discomfort, diarrhea, vomiting, fever.

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  • ear discomfort, red tympanic membranes, or fever alone are NOT specific diagnostic criteria.

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  • Ebola (virus) about foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in Japan, ebola fever, BSE and E-coli is available.

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  • More critical was the fever from the viral encephalitis raging in her brain.

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  • enteric fever.

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  • Hay fever is another reaction of the immune system to proteins, sometimes fatal like asthma.

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  • I just wondered how you're coping with new fatherhood at the moment with all the Rings fever?

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  • febrile seizures occur during the first day or two of a child's fever.

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  • Tick-borne relapsing fever in west USA and west Canada.

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  • He was actively involved in the running of the colony but died of swamp fever later the same year.

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  • Next morning the poor man was smitten with a raging fever.

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  • The hospital laboratory can diagnose glandular fever by testing a blood sample from a patient.

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  • The Prince is believed to have died of typhoid fever.

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  • A young boy of six, I was recovering from scarlet fever.

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  • He died suddenly of rheumatic fever at the age of 45.

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  • Dengue fever NEW March 2003 Covers the effects of supportive treatments for dengue haemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome in children.

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  • Disease accounted for 127 men of the 1st Battalion, with a predominant cause being enteric fever (typhoid ).

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  • fever vaccination.

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  • fever sufferers of high levels.

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  • fever pitch for a few years.

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  • fever grips UK newspaper readers Guardian Unlimited Web.

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  • fever epidemic in the south enabled homeopaths to cure many more.

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  • The hay fever season is a common time for asthma to get worse.

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  • Health experts have known about dengue fever for more than 200 years.

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  • What should you do if you suspect swine fever?

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  • The workhouse was greatly overcrowded, food was short, sanitation was poor, and diseases such as typhus fever and dysentery were widespread.

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  • Freddie de Young (Lazar Rodic) A very taxing role - the corpse of the lassa fever contact (393 ).

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  • No fever, or only low-grade fever may be present.

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  • flinty ledges, but the fever drove him on.

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  • flowstone formations to the head of Fever Pitch.

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