Ferns sentence example

ferns
  • Tree ferns are found on the mountains above 4000 ft.
    45
    14
  • the soil to the depth of many feet, and from it springs the most marvellous tangle of huge trees, shrubs, bushes, underwood, creepers, climbing plants and trailing vines, the whole hung with ferns, mosses, and parasitic growths, and bound together by rattans and huge rope-like trailers.
    9
    4
  • We played games and ate dinner under the trees, and we found ferns and wild flowers.
    20
    15
  • The evolution of the vascular structure of the petiole in the higher ferns is strikingly parallel with that of the stem, except in some few special cases.
    6
    3
  • Of the herbaceous vegetation of the more rainy regions may be noted the Orchidaceae, Orontiaceae, Scitamineae, with ferns and other II.
    5
    2
    Advertisement
  • The ferns are most common in the midland zone and in the heavy timber forests.
    6
    3
  • The relationship with Aepyornis of Madagascar is still problematic. Whilst the moas seem to have been entirely herbivorous, feeding not unlikely upon the shoots of ferns, the kiwis have become highly specialized wormeaters.
    14
    11
  • The vegetation is almost tropically luxuriant - palms, wild pineapples, and ferns growing profusely, and the valleys being filled with wild beans and patches of taro.
    13
    11
  • The more common plants in the most characteristic part of this region in southern Arabia are Capparidaceae, Euphorbiaceae, and a few Leguminosae, a Reseda and Dipterygium; palms, Polygonaceae, ferns, and other cryptogams, are rare.
    4
    3
  • It has been surmised (by Bickell) that the sheets of the original codex became disarranged and were rearranged incorrectly; 4 by other critics portions of the book are transferred 3 This is the Talmudic understanding of the Hebrew expression (ferns.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In nonflowering plants the works usually followed are for ferns, Hooker and Baker's Synopsis filicum; for mosses, Muller's Synopsis muscorum frondosorum, Jaeger & Sauerbeck's Genera et species muscorum, and Engler & Prantl's Pflanzenfamilien; for algae, de Toni's Sylloge algarum; for hepaticae, Gottsche, Lindenberg and Nees ab Esenbeck's Synopsis hepaticarum, supplemented by Stephani's Species hepaticarum; for fungi, Saccardo's Sylloge fungorum, and for mycetozoa Lister's monograph of the group. For the members of large genera, e.g.
    0
    0
  • The flora consists of 129 species of angiosperms, i Cycas, 22 ferns, and a few mosses, lichens and fungi, 17 of which are endemic, while a considerable number - not specifically distinct - form local varieties nearly all presenting Indo-Malayan affinities, as do the single Cycas, the ferns and the cryptogams. As to its fauna, the island contains 319 species of animals-54 only being vertebrates-145 of which are endemic. A very remarkable distributional fact in regard to them, and one not yet fully explained, is that a large number show affinity with species in the Austro-Malayan rather than in the Indo-Malayan, their nearer, region.
    0
    0
  • Hooker enumerated twenty-one species of flowering plants, and seven of ferns, lycopods, and Characeae; at least seventyfour species of mosses, twenty-five of Hepaticae, and sixty-one of lichens are known, and there are probably many more.
    0
    0
  • Cowslips, violets, anemones, buttercups and blood-roots are conspicuous in early spring, the white pond lily and the yellow pond lily in summer, asters and golden-rod in autumn, and besides these there are about 1500 other flowering plants in the state and more than 50 species of ferns.
    0
    0
  • Ferns and other cryptogamic plants are in great variety and abundance.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The early colonists found quite half the surface of the archipelago covered with dense, evergreen forest, a luxuriant growth of pines and beeches, tangled and intertwined with palms, ferns of all sizes, wild vines and other parasites, and a rank, bushy, mossed undergrowth.
    0
    0
  • In moist regions ferns and mosses, the arum and other broad flat-leaved plants are found.
    0
    0
  • There are many species of forest trees and more than 1300 species of flowering plants and ferns.
    0
    0
  • de Bary's Comparative Anatomy of the Phanerogams and Ferns (1877) supplied an admirable presentation of the facts so far known.
    0
    0
  • But almost everywhere the vegetation serves to smooth the contours of the rugged hills, ferns, mosses and shrubs growing wherever their roots can cling, and leaving only the steepest crags uncovered to form, as in Tahiti, a striking contrast.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The flora is estimated to include 15% of ferns, but they form only the most important group among many plants of beautiful foliage, such as draceanas and crotons.
    0
    0
  • The southern part of the island has an undulating surface, and is covered either with an open forest or with high ferns.
    0
    0
  • ACOTYLEDONES, the name given by Antoine Laurent de Jussieu in 1789 to the lowest class in his Natural System of Botany, embracing flowerless plants, such as ferns, lycopods, horse-tails, mosses, liverworts, sea-weeds, lichens and fungi.
    0
    0
  • The Pacific coast Transition zone is noted for its forests of giant conifers, principally Douglas fir, Sitka spruce, Pacific cedar and Western hemlock, Here, too, mosses and ferns grow in profusion, and the sadal (Gaultheria shailon), thimble berry (Rubus nootkamus), salmon berry (Rubus spectabilis) and devils club, (Fatsia horr-ida) are characteristic shrubs.
    0
    0
  • NICHOLAS FRENCH (1604-1678), bishop of Ferns, was an Irish political pamphleteer, who was born at Wexford.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • He was educated at Louvain, and returning to Ireland became a priest at Wexford, and before 1646 was appointed bishop of Ferns.
    0
    0
  • The island has extensive forests of conifers with an undergrowth of ferns and flowering plants, and bears are numerous.
    0
    0
  • in height, is predominant, and on account of the dense undergrowth chiefly of ferns and climbing vines, forms the most impenetrable of the forests; its hard wood is used chiefly for fuel.
    0
    0
  • Ferns, of which there are about 130 species varying from a few inches to 30 ft.
    0
    0
  • For stove and greenhouse plants, orchids, ferns, &c., labels made of xylonite, zinc and other materials are also used.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Not unlike the runner, though growing in a very different way, are the bud-plants formed on the fronds of several kinds of ferns belonging to the genera Asplenium, Woodwardia, Polystichum, Lastrea, Adiantum, Cystopteris, &c. In some of these (Adiantum caudatusn, Polystichum lepidocaulon) the rachis of the frond is lengthened out much like the string of the strawberry runner, and bears a plant at its apex.
    0
    0
  • These conditions of orchid-growing have undergone great changes of late years, and the plants are grown much as other stove and greenhouse plants in ordinary pots with composts not only of peat but of leaf-mould, and fibres from osmunda and polypodium ferns.
    0
    0
  • The following is a select list of genera of miscellaneous decorative plants (orchids, palms and ferns excluded; climbers are denoted by *; bulbous and tuberous plants by f) Stove Plants.
    0
    0
  • At one time it was thought the plants themselves were better for being associated with such objects as ferns and palms, but they are best grown by themselves.
    0
    0
  • The following genera are among those most commonly cultivated: Acanthophoenix Chamaerops Martinezia Acanthorhiza Cocos Oreodoxa Areca Corypha Phoenix Bactris Geonoma Pritchardia Brahea Hyophorbe Rhapis Calamus Kentia Sabal Caryota Latania Stevensonia Ceroxylon Livistonia Thrinax Chamaedorea Ferns.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The best time for a general repotting of ferns is in spring, just before growth commences.
    0
    0
  • The stove ferns require a day temperature of 65° to 75°, but do not thrive in an excessively high or close dry atmosphere.
    0
    0
  • Ferns should not be allowed to become quite dry at the root, and the water used should always be at or near the., temperature of the house in which the plants are growing.
    0
    0
  • Some ferns, as the different kinds of Gymnogramme and Cheilanthes, prefer a drier atmosphere than others, and the former do not well bear a lower winter temperature than about 60° by night.
    0
    0
  • Most other stove ferns, if dormant, will bear a temperature as low as 55° by night and 60° by day from November to February.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Such ferns as Gymnogrammes, which have their surface covered with golden or silver powder, and certain species of scaly-surfaced Cheilanthes and Nothochlaena, as they cannot bear to have their fronds wetted, should never be syringed; but most other ferns may have a moderate sprinkling occasionally (not necessarily daily), and as the season advances, sufficient air and light must be admitted to solidify the tissues.
    0
    0
  • Hardy British ferns belonging to such genera as Asplenium, Nephrodium, Aspidium, Scolopendrium, have become fairly popular of late years, and many charming varieties are now used in borders and rockeries.
    0
    0
  • It should be well shaded, and fine specimens of fancy caladiums, dracaenas, coleus, crotons, palms, ferns and such plants as are grown for the beauty of their foliage, will make a very attractive show.
    0
    0
  • Schneider, Book of Choice Ferns (3 vols.); W.
    0
    0
  • the Equisetales (Horse-tails), the Lycopodiales (Club mosses), the Filicales (Ferns) and Cycadofilices, the Sphenophyllales and Cordaitales.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The fronds of some of these Carboniferous ferns are almost identical with those of living species.
    0
    0
  • Probably many of the ferns were epiphytic. Pecopteris, Cyclopteris, Neuropteris, Alethopteris, Sphenopteris are common genera; Megaphyton and Caulopteris were tree ferns.
    0
    0
  • Ericaceae, Pyrolaceae, Gentianaceae, Orchidaceae, ferns, &c. Recent experiments have shown that the difficulties of getting orchid seeds to germinate are due to the absence of the necessary fungus, which must be in readiness to infect the young seedling immediately it emerges from the seed.
    0
    0
  • Ferns are abundant, and the mimosa rises to heights of from 30 to 60 ft.
    0
    0
  • In some ferns, however, there seems to be a provision for indefinite terminal growth, while in others this, growth is periodically interrupted.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • This is well seen in many ferns.
    0
    0
  • Some species of saxifrage and of ferns also produce buds on their leaves and fronds.
    0
    0
  • The different divisions of a cut leaf may be folded or rolled up separately, as in ferns, while the entire leaf may have either the same or a different kind of vernation.
    0
    0
  • This is especially the case where there is also shade to protect them from the midday sun, as in some of the narrow ravines in the eastern desert and in the palm groves of the oases, where various ferns and flowers grow luxuriantly round the springs.
    0
    0
  • Above this belt the firs gradually disappear and are succeeded by the shortleaved Pinus montezumae, or Mexican " ocote " - one of the largest species of pine in the republic. These continue to the upper tree-line, accompanied by red and purple Pentstemon and light blue lupins in the open spaces, some ferns, and occasional masses of alpine flowers.
    0
    0
  • The development of the microsporangia and the contained spores (pollen -grains) P (P g is closely comparable with that of the microsporangia in Gymnosperms or heterosporous ferns.
    0
    0
  • The last-mentioned case has been regarded as representing an apogamous development of the sporophyte from the gametophyte comparable to the cases of apogamy described in Ferns.
    0
    0
  • Formerly the island appears to have been wooded, but it now presents only a few bushes (Edwardsia, Broussonetia, &c.), ferns, grasses, sedges, &c. The natives grow bananas in the shelter of artificial pits, also sugar-canes and sweet potatoes, and keep a few goats and a large stock of domestic fowls, and a Tahitian commercial house breeds cattle and sheep on the island.
    0
    0
  • Mosses (Grimmia) were found on Chimborazo at 16,660 ft., ferns (Polypodium pycnolepis, Kze.) at 14,900, and specimens of Gentiana rupicola, H.
    0
    0
  • The clouds rest on this region during the day, and by their humidity support a vegetation amongst the trees, partly of shrubs, and partly of ferns.
    0
    0
  • Ferns and mosses are almost confined to the higher ranges.
    0
    0
  • The plants of the Lower Gondwanas consist chiefly of acrogens(Equisetaceae and ferns)and gymnogens (cycads and conifers), the former being the more abundant.
    0
    0
  • The same classes of plants occur in the Upper Gondwanas; but there the proportions are reversed, the conifers, and still more the cycads, being more numerous than the ferns, whilst the Equisetaceae are but sparingly found.
    0
    0
  • some famous none flowering plants are ferns an horse tails
    0
    0
  • Ferns are abundant, but not so varied as in Java.
    0
    0
  • To enlarge the area, or raise the surface-level where that was necessary, layers of logs, brushwood, heather and ferns were piled on the shallow, and consolidated with gravel and stones.
    0
    0
  • It consists partly of sandstones with impressions of plants (cycads, ferns, &c.), and partly of clay-beds with coal.
    0
    0
  • antarctica), 2 and Winter's bark (Drimys Winteri), intermingled with a dense undergrowth composed of a great variety of shrubs and plants, among which are Maytenus magellanica, Arbutus rigida, Myrtus memmolaria, two or three species of Berberis, wild currant (Ribes antarctica), a trailing blackberry, tree ferns, reed-like grasses and innumerable parasites.
    0
    0
  • Ferns are abundant in the marshes.
    0
    0
  • Other ferns, Scitamineae, orchids and climbing Aroideae are very numerous, the last named profusely adorning the forests with their splendid dark-green foliage.
    0
    0
  • Ferns are more rare, and the tree-ferns have disappeared.
    0
    0
  • The timber resources of Alaska are untouched 2 280 species of mosses proper, of which 46 were new to science, and 16 varieties of peat moss (Sphagnum) were listed by the Harriman expedition; and 74 species or varieties of ferns.
    0
    0
  • Fossils are extremely rare in these beds; Buthotrephis has long been known, and doubtful traces of Calamites and ferns have been found, but it was not until 1897 that undoubted Palaeozoic fossils were obtained.
    0
    0
  • There are innumerable kinds of moss and lichens and ferns with leaves 12 ft.
    0
    0
  • In Ceratozamia the broad petiole-base is characterized by the presence of two lateral spinous processes, suggesting stipular appendages, comparable, on a reduced scale, with the large stipules of the Marattiaceae among Ferns.
    0
    0
  • A feature of interest in connexion with the phylogeny of cycads is the presence of long hairs clothing the scale-leaves, and forming a cap on the summit of the stem-apex or attached to the bases of petioles; on some fossil cycadean plants these outgrowths have the form of scales, and are identical in structure with the ramenta (paleae) of the majority of ferns.
    0
    0
  • The sporangia (pollen-sacs), which occur on the under-side of the stamens, are often arranged in more or less definite groups or sori, interspersed with hairs (paraphyses); dehiscence takes place along a line marked out by the occurrence of smaller and thinner-walled cells bounded by larger and thickerwalled elements, which form a fairly prominent cap-like " annulus " near the apex of the sporangium, not unlike the annulus characteristic of the Schizaeaceae among ferns.
    0
    0
  • In structure a cycadean sporangium recalls those of certain ferns (Marattiaceae, Osmundaceae and Schizaeaceae), but in the development of the spores there are certain peculiarities not met with among the Vascular Cryptogams. With the exception of Cycas, the female flowers are also in the form of cones, bearing numerous carpellary scales.
    0
    0
  • The venation is like that of many ferns, e.g.
    0
    0
  • The leaves at once invite a comparison with ferns; the numerous long hairs which form a delicate woolly covering on young leaves recall the hairs of certain ferns, but agree more closely with the long filamentous hairs of recent cycads.
    0
    0
  • The spermatozoids constitute the most striking link with both cycads and ferns.
    0
    0
  • The flora includes purslane, rock roses and several species of ferns and mosses.
    0
    0
  • The forests of the granitic land, of which typical patches remain, had the characteristics of a tropical moist region, palms, shrubs, climbing and tree ferns growing luxuriantly, the trees on the mountain sides, such as the Pandanus sechellarum sending down roots over the rocks and boulders from 70 to 100 ft.
    0
    0
  • The Ferns form the great majority of existing Pteridophytes; the importance and interest of the other groups, of which the Club-mosses and Horsetails are the most familiar examples, depend largely on the fact that they are the surviving representatives of large families of plants which flourished in earlier geological periods.
    0
    0
  • (All except d represent vertical sections of sporangiophore or sorus.) canal the spermatozoid, which in the Ferns has been shown to be attracted by reason of its positive irritability to malic acid, passes and fuses with the ovum.
    0
    0
  • Psilotum lives epiphytically or in soil rich in humus, while Tmesipteris is epiphytic (and, it has been suggested, partially parasitic) upon stems of tree ferns: the former has small scale-like leaves; those of the latter are of considerable size.
    0
    0
  • The Ferns exhibit a wide range in size from the minute epiphytic Hymenophyllaceae, with leaves barely a centimetre in length, to gigantic tree-ferns 80 ft.
    0
    0
  • Some ferns have a longer or shorter erect stem often clothed by the persistent bases of the leaves; in others the stem creeps on the surface of the substratum or is subterranean.
    0
    0
  • The phenomena of apogamy and apospory which have now been observed in a number of Ferns, may be mentioned here.
    0
    0
  • In some apogamous Ferns sporangia may occur on the prothallus and the vegetative organs of the sporophyte may also occur singly.
    0
    0
  • Thus there are a few 3 Ferns which climb, others are .8 water plants, while many, especially those which live as epiphytes, are more or less xerophytic. Some of the epiphytic forms (Polypodium quercifolium, Platycerium) have strongly dimorphic leaves, the sterile leaves serving in some cases to catch falling debris, and thus to provide the plant with soil.
    0
    0
  • Lastly, the symbiotic relation between the plant and ants is found in Ferns, the rhizome of Polypodium carnosum containing cavities inhabited by these insects.
    0
    0
  • The existence of these myrmecophilous Ferns suggests a possible explanation of the nectaries on the leaves of some other species, such as the Common Bracken.
    0
    0
  • These are ferns of considerable size, the large leaves of which are borne on a short, erect, swollen stem (Angiopteris, Marattia), or arise from a more or less horizontal rhizome (Danaea, Kaulfussia).
    0
    0
  • This group, which contains the remaining ferns, includes a number of distinct lines of descent and will doubtless require subdivision as our knowledge of the morphology of the genera classed in it becomes extended.
    0
    0
  • There is, however, abundant evidence that the Ferns were represented in the most ancient floras known, though they were not such a dominant group as has hitherto been supposed.
    0
    0
  • When the survey is extended to the extinct Ferns of which the fructification is known, many of those from the more ancient rocks are found to group themselves with the existing sub-orders with large sporangia, such as the Marattiaceae, Gleicheniaceae and Schizaeaceae; the Polypodiaceae, on the other hand, do not appear until much later.
    0
    0
  • The extinct forms cannot be dealt with in detail here; but it may be pointed out that their order of appearance affords a certain amount of direct evidence that the existing Ferns with a single circle of large sporangia in the sorus are relatively primitive.
    0
    0
  • A more detailed investigation of all the characters of the Ferns will be needed before the course of evolution thus broadly indicated can be traced, but the results obtained afford a deeper insight into the general method of progression and the selective factors in the process.
    0
    0
  • Though on this account and because the subdivisions Simplices, Gradatae and Mixtae do not correspond to definite phylogenetic groups, they have not been used in classifying the Ferns above; they are of great importance as an advance towards a natural classification.
    0
    0
  • Hydropterideae.-Two very distinct orders of heterosporous Filicales, the Salviniaceae and the Marsiliaceae, are included in this group. The difficulty of determining their exact relationship to the other orders of Ferns is increased by the more or less completely aquatic habit of the plants and the modifications and reductions in structure associated with this.
    0
    0
  • The absence of an annulus from their indehiscent sporangia makes it impossible to compare them with the other Ferns in respect of this important character.
    0
    0
  • In the absence of direct evidence from Palaeobotany, and bearing in mind the modifications associated with adaptation to an aquatic life in other plants, the recognition of any more definite affinity for these heterosporous ferns than that indicated above appears to be inadvisable.
    0
    0
  • The most important positive evidence on this point indicates that the most ancient Gymnosperms were derived from the Filicales rather than from any other phylum of the Vascular Cryptogams. Extinct forms are known intermediate between the Ferns and the Cycads, and a number of these have been shown to bear seeds and must be classed as Pteridospermae.
    0
    0
  • Numerous species of ferns, both temperate and tropical, are cultivated as valued ornamental plants.
    0
    0
  • While a number of ferns can be multiplied vegetatively, by buds formed on the leaves and in other ways, the regular mode of propagation is by sowing the spores shed from the ripe sporangia.
    0
    0
  • Some ferns, as the different kinds of Gymnogrammae and Cheilanthes, prefer a drier atmosphere than others, and the former do not well bear a lower winter temperature than about 60° by night.
    0
    0
  • Such ferns as Gymnogrammas, which have their surface covered with golden or silver powder, and certain species of scalysurfaced Cheilanthes and Nothochlaena, as they cannot bear to have their fronds wetted, should never be syringed; but most other ferns may have a moderate sprinkling occasionally (not necessarily daily) and as the season advances sufficient air and light must be admitted.
    0
    0
  • - Scott, Structural Botany: Flowerless Plants (London, 1896), Studies in Fossil Botany (Edinburgh, 1900);* Campbell, Mosses and Ferns (London, 1895); * Engler and Prantl, Die naturlichen Pflanzenfamilien (Theil i.
    0
    0
  • Claytoniana, are known as handsome greenhouse ferns (see also Ferns).
    0
    0
  • The lee sides of the larger islands, however, have grassy plains suitable for grazing, with scattered trees, chiefly Pandanus, and ferns.
    0
    0
  • Among the plants used as pot-herbs are several ferns, and two or three Solanums, one of which, S.
    0
    0
  • In 681 St Moling of Ferns prevailed upon the ardri Finnachta (674-690) to renounce for ever the boroma, tribute, which had always been a source of friction between the supreme king and the ruler of Leinster.
    0
    0
  • On learning that O'Rourke was leading an army against him with the support of Ruadri, he burnt his castle of Ferns and went to Henry II.
    0
    0
  • The vegetation of the forests, the abundant epiphytes, the treemosses, the filmy ferns and the viviparous character of many of the ferns, show clearly how abundant the rainfall is in the eastern forest region.
    0
    0
  • Independently of introduced plants, fifty-five species have been collected in the group, twenty-nine being flowering plants and twenty-six ferns and lycopods.
    0
    0
  • The extraordinary abundance of ferns (as in western France) is likewise characteristic.
    0
    0
  • If sporangia and spores are present they also may persist in a perfectly recognizable form, and in fact much of our knowledge of the fructification of fossil Ferns and similar plants has been derived from specimens of this kind.
    0
    0
  • In the Wealden of Belgium, for example, specimens of Ferns and Coniferae occur, in the form of lignite, which can be sectioned, like recent plants, with a razor, and exhibit an almost unaltered structure.
    0
    0
  • In addition to the three classes, Equisetales, Lycopodiales and Filicales, under which recent Pteridophytes naturally group themselves, a fourth class, Sphenophyllales, existed in Palaeozoic times, clearly related to the Horsetails and more remotely to the Ferns and perhaps the Club-mosses, but with peculiarities of its own demanding an independent position.
    0
    0
  • We further find that, whereas the Ferns of the present day form a well-defined and even isolated class, this was not the case at the time when the primary rocks were deposited.
    0
    0
  • A great group of Palaeozoic fossils, showing evident affinity to Ferns, has proved to consist of seed-bearing plants allied to Gymnosperms, especially Cycads.
    0
    0
  • The Sphenophyllales as a whole are best regarded as a synthetic group, combining certain characters of the Ferns and Lycopods with those of the Equisetales, while showing marked peculiarities of their own.
    0
    0
  • - Of all Vascular Cryptogams the Ferns have best maintained their position down to the present day.
    0
    0
  • Scott, Studies.) Ferns are now commonly regarded as more probably seed-bearing plants, a conclusion for which, in certain cases, there is already convincing evidence.
    0
    0
  • The fructifications by themselves are not necessarily decisive, for in certain cases the supposed sporangia of Marattiaceous Ferns have turned out to be in reality the microsporangia or pollen-sacs of seed-bearing plants (Pteridosperms).
    0
    0
  • It is, however, probable that a considerable group of true Ferns, allied to Marattiaceae, existed in Palaeozoic times, side by side with simpler forms. In one respect the fronds of many Palaeozoic Ferns and Pteridosperms were peculiar, namely, in the presence on their rachis, and at the base of their pinnae, of anomalous leaflets, often totally different in form and venation from the ordinary pinnules.
    0
    0
  • The reference of these ferns to the family Marattiaceae, so restricted in the recent flora, rests, of course, primarily on evidence drawn from the fructifications.
    0
    0
  • The genus Asterotheca includes a number of Ferns, chiefly of Coal Measure age, with fronds of the Pecopteris type.
    0
    0
  • - Group of Palaeozoic fructifications of Ferns or Pteridosperms.
    0
    0
  • Of the above, A, D, E, G and H, probably belong to true Ferns; F is the male fructification of a Pteridosperm (Lyginodendron); the rest are of doubtful nature.
    0
    0
  • In all these cases there is reason to suspect that the plants may have been Pteridosperms, rather than Ferns.
    0
    0
  • The Marattiaceae are the only recent family of Ferns which can be supposed to have existed in anything like its present form in Palaeozoic times.
    0
    0
  • Of other recent orders the indications are meagre and dubious, and there can be no doubt that a large proportion of Ferns from the older rocks (in so far as they were Ferns at all) belonged to families quite distinct from any which we recognize in the flora of our own day.
    0
    0
  • 15, G), Hymenophyllaceae and Osmundaceae, and on good grounds, so far as the external characters of the sporangia are concerned; our knowledge of most of the Ferns in question is, however, far too incomplete to justify us in asserting that they actually belonged to the families indicated.
    0
    0
  • The family Botryopterideae, first discovered by Renault, stands out with striking clearness among the Palaeozoic Ferns, and differs widely from any group now in existence.
    0
    0
  • This fact strongly confirms the conclusion, drawn from morphological and anatomical characters, that the Botryopterideae were true Ferns.
    0
    0
  • The same holds good of the Pecopteroid Ferns included under Callipteris and Callipteridium.
    0
    0
  • In such cases, as will be explained below, there is a strong presumption that the fronds were not those of Ferns, but of seed-bearing plants of the new class Pteridospermeae.
    0
    0
  • The simpler Ferns (Primofilices) of the period are for the most part referred to the remarkable family Botryopterideae, a group very distinct from A - C D (From a drawing by Mr L.
    0
    0
  • Although doubts have lately been cast on the authenticity of Palaeozoic Marattiaceae owing to the difficulty in distinguishing between their fructifications and the pollenbearing organs of Pteridosperms, the anatomical evidence (stem of Psaronius) strongly confirms the opinion that a considerable group of these Ferns existed.
    0
    0
  • We will begin with the Lyginodendreae, a group in which the anatomical characters indicated a systematic position between Ferns and Cycads, long before the reproductive organs were discovered.
    0
    0
  • Of the genus Heterangium, which still stands very near the true Ferns, several species are known, the oldest.
    0
    0
  • The single vascular bundle which traversed the petiole and its branches was concentric, the leaves resembling those of Ferns in structure as well as in habit.
    0
    0
  • There is reason to believe that Lyginodendron oldhamium was a climbing plant comparable in some respects to such recent Ferns as Davallia aculeata.
    0
    0
  • have had a habit not unlike (X 5.) that of tree-ferns, with compound leaves of enormous dimensions, belonging to various frondgenera - especially, as has now been proved, to Alethopteris and Neuropteris; these are among the most abundant of the Carboniferous fronds commonly attributed to Ferns, and extend back to the Devonian.
    0
    0
  • There is reason to believe that other species of Pecopteris and similar genera, (Callipteris and Mariopteris) bore seeds, though the artificial group Pecopterideae probably also includes the fronds of true Marattiaceous Ferns.
    0
    0
  • The genus Aneimites, resembling the Maidenhair Ferns in habit, has now been transferred to the Pteridosperms, the seeds having been discovered in 1904 by David White.
    0
    0
  • In a large majority of the Fern-like fossils of that period the evidence is in favour of reproduction by seeds, rather than by the cryptogamic methods of the true Ferns.
    0
    0
  • The class, though clearly allied to the typical Gymnosperms, may be kept distinct for the present on account of the relatively primitive characters shown in the anatomy and morphology, and may be provisionally defined as follows: plants resembling Ferns in habit and in many anatomical characters, but bearing seeds of a Cycadean type; seeds and microsporangia borne on fronds only slightly modified as compared with the vegetative leaves.
    0
    0
  • Anatomically the connexion of the family with the Pteridosperms (and through them, presumably, with some primitive group of Ferns) seems clear, but we have as yet no indications of the stages in the evolution of their reproductive organs.
    0
    0
  • Even in the Lower Devonian, Ferns and Lepidodendreae have been recognized; the Middle and Upper Devonian beds contain a flora in which all the chief groups of Carboniferous plants are already represented.
    0
    0
  • Fern-like plants such as Sphenopterideae, Archaeopteris and Aneimites, with occasional arborescent Pecopterideae, are frequent; many of the genera, including Alethopteris, Neuropteris and Megalopteris, probably belonged, not to true Ferns, but to Pteridosperms; although our knowledge of internal structure is still comparatively scanty, there is evidence to prove that such plants were already present, as for example, the genus Calamopitys.
    0
    0
  • The heterogeneous " Ferns " grouped under Spheno pterideae are especially abundant.
    0
    0
  • Ferns of the genera referred to Marattiaceae are common, but arborescent stems of the Psaronius type are still comparatively rare.
    0
    0
  • " Ferns " and Pteridosperms are even more strongly represented than before, and this is the age in which the supposed Marattiaceous tree-ferns reached their maximum development.
    0
    0
  • the change in the character of the vegetation was con which have generally been regarded as the fronds of ferns characterized by a central midrib giving off lateral veins which repeatedly anastomose and form a network, like that in the leaves of Antrophyum, an existing member of the Polypodiaceae.
    0
    0
  • In view of recent discoveries which have demonstrated the Pteridosperm nature of many supposed ferns of Palaeozoic age, we must admit the possibility that the term fern as applied to Glossopteris and Gangamopteris may be incorrect.
    0
    0
  • In 1895 Professor Zeiller described several plants from the province of Rio Grande do Sul in South America (Map A, including a few typical members of the Glossopteris flora associated with a European species, Lepidophloios laricinus, one of the characteristic types of the Coal period, and with certain ferns resembling some species from European Permian rocks.
    0
    0
  • Amalitzky found in beds of Upper Permian age in the province of Vologda (Russia) (Map A, V.) species of Glossopteris and Naeggerathiopsis typical members of the Glossopteris flora, associated with species of the ferns Taeniopteris, Callipteris and Sphenopteris, a striking instance of a commingling in the far north of the northern hemisphere Permian species with migrants from " Gondwana Land."
    0
    0
  • Passing over the few known species of plants from the middle Trias (Muschelkalk) to the more abundant and more widely spread Upper Triassic species as recorded from Germany, Austria, Switzerland, North America and elsewhere, we find a vegetation characterized chiefly by an abundance of Ferns and Cycads, exhibiting the same general facies as that of the succeeding Rhaetic and Lower Jurassic floras.
    0
    0
  • P. Jaegeri), represented by large pinnate fronds not unlike those of existing species of Zamia, some Equisetaceous plants and numerous Ferns which may be referred to such families as Gleicheniaceae, Dipteridinae and Matonineae.
    0
    0
  • The Palaeozoic types are barely represented; the arborescent Vascular Cryptogams have been replaced by Cycads, Ginkgoales and Conifers as the dominant classes, while Ferns continue to hold their own.
    0
    0
  • Among the large number of Mesozoic Ferns there are several species founded on sterile fronds which possess but little interest Filicales, from a botanical standpoint.
    0
    0
  • Some plants, again, have been referred by certain authors to Ferns, while others have relegated them to the Cycads.
    0
    0
  • Plants referred to Schimper's genus Lomatopteris and to Cycadopteris of Zigno afford instances of the difficulty of distinguishing between the foliage of Ferns and Cycads.
    0
    0
  • The difficulty of distinguishing between Ferns and Cycads is a necessary consequence of the common origin of these two classes; in Palaeozoic times the Cycado filicies and Pteridospermae (see section I., FIG.
    0
    0
  • and even among recent Cycads and Ferns B, 0.
    0
    0
  • relationship. There is reason to believe that compound or generalized types - partly Ferns and partly Cycads - persisted into the Mesozoic era; but without more anatomical knowledge than we at present possess, it is impossible to do more than to point to a few indications afforded by external, and to a slight extent by internal structure, of the survival of Cycadofilicinean types.
    0
    0
  • Without a fuller knowledge of internal structure and of the reproductive organs, we are compelled to speak of some of the Mesozoic plants as possibly Ferns or possibly Cycads, and not referable with certainty to one or other class.
    0
    0
  • It has been found useful in some cases to examine microscopically the thin film of coal that often covers the pinnae of fossil fronds, in order to determine the form of the epidermal cells which may be preserved in the carbonized cuticle; rectilinear epidermal cell-walls are usually considered characteristic of Cycads, while cells with undulating walls are more likely to belong to Ferns.
    0
    0
  • This distinction does not, however, afford a safe guide; the epidermal cells of some ferns, e.g.
    0
    0
  • Leaving out of account the numerous sterile fronds which cannot be certainly referred to particular families of Ferns, there are several genera which bear evidence in their sori, and to some extent in the form of the leaf, of their relationship to existing types.
    0
    0
  • The abundance of Palaeozoic plants with sporangia and sori of the Marattiaceous type is in striking contrast to the scarcity of Mesozoic ferns which can be reasonably included in the Marattiaceae.
    0
    0
  • It would appear that the eusporangiate Ferns suddenly sank to very subordinate position after the Palaeozoic era.
    0
    0
  • nebbense, Asplenites Roes- serti,&c.,have been given to bipinnate fronds of a type frequently met with in different genera and families of recent Ferns, e.g.
    0
    0
  • Onoclea Struthiopteris, species of Cyathea, Asplenium, Gymnogramme, &c. In most cases the Rhaetic, Jurassic andWealden Ferns included FIG.
    0
    0
  • 8) may be cited as the two most important types, both as regards geographical and geological range, of this Mesozoic family; these ferns are recorded from England, France, Belgium, Germany, Austria, Portugal, Poland and Italy (Map B, M 1), also from Greenland (Map B, M2), Spitsbergen (Map B, M3), and Persia (Map B, M 4).
    0
    0
  • The Cyatheaceae constitute another family of leptosporangiate Ferns which had several representatives in Mesozoic floras.
    0
    0
  • On the other hand, there are several fossil Ferns of Jurassic age possessing cup-like sori like those of Thyrsopteris and other Cyatheaceous Ferns, which indicate a wide Mesozoic distribution for this family.
    0
    0
  • It is by no means easy in dealing with fossil ferns to distinguish between certain Polypodiaceae - such as species of Davallia - and members of the Cyatheaceae.
    0
    0
  • It is a striking fact that among the numerous Mesozoic Ferns there are comparatively few that can with good reason be referred to the Polypodiaceae, a family which plays so dominant a role at the present day.
    0
    0
  • The frequent occurrence of such names as Asplenium, Adiantum, Davallia, and other Polypodiaceous genera in lists of fossil ferns is thoroughly misleading.
    0
    0
  • There are, indeed, a certain number of species which show traces of sori like those of modern species of Asplenium and other genera, but in most cases the names of recent ferns have been used on insufficient grounds.
    0
    0
  • Other Jurassic Ferns described by Raciborski from Poland suggest a comparison with Davallia.
    0
    0
  • Ctenis has been incorrectly placed among the ferns by some authors, on account of the occurrence of supposed sporangia on its pinnae; but there is reason to believe that these so-called sporangia are probably nothing more than prominent papillose cells of the epidermis.
    0
    0
  • Cycads, but the ramenta, instead of having the form of long unicellular hairs like those on the petioles and bud-scales of existing species are exactly like the paleae or ramental scales characteristic of the majority of ferns.
    0
    0
  • This fern-like character affords an interesting survival of the close relationship between Cycads and Ferns.
    0
    0
  • discovery is the very close correspondence of the male organs of the Bennettites flower with the sporophylls and synangia of Marattiaceous ferns - a further relic of the common origin of Cycads and Ferns.
    0
    0
  • This change is most strikingly illustrated by the inrush of Angiosperms, in the equally marked decrease in the Cycads, and in the altered character of the ferns.
    0
    0
  • 2 of Meek and Hayden) contains Gymnosperms and Ferns of Neocomian types, or even of Neocomian species; but mingled with these occur a few dicotyledonous leaves belonging to four genera.
    0
    0
  • Lester Ward records no fewer than 737 distinct forms, consisting chiefly of Ferns, Cycads, Conifers and Dicotyledons, the Ferns and Cycads being con fined mainly to the Older Potomac, FIG.
    0
    0
  • The Cenomanian strata have yielded already 177 species, the different groups being represented in these proportions: Cryptogams, 37, 30 of which are Ferns; Cycads, 8; Conifers, 27; Monocotyledons, 8; Apetalous Dicotyledons, 31; other Dicotyledons, 66.
    0
    0
  • Sezanne yields Ferns in profusion, mingled with other shade-loving plants such as would grow under the trees in a moist ravine; its vegetation is comparable to that of an island in the tropical seas.
    0
    0
  • The most abundant species of this forest were the oaks and chestnuts, of which a dozen have been collected; laurels, Viburnum, ivy, several Aralias, Dewalquea, a Thuja and several Ferns may be added.
    0
    0
  • The British Eocene and Oligocene strata yield so large a flora, and contain plant-beds belonging to so many different stages, that it is unfortunate we have still no monograph on the subject, the one commenced by Ettingshausen and Gardner in 1879 having reached no farther than gocene 79 g Oli of Great the Ferns and Gymnosperms. This deficiency makes it impossible to deal adequately with the British Eocene plants, most of the material being either unpublished or needing re-examination.
    0
    0
  • Ferns are scarce, Ettingshausen and Gardner recording only Aneimia subcretacea and Pteris (?) Prestwichii.
    0
    0
  • Among the 200 plants of the London Clay are no Ferns, but 6 genera of Gymnosperms - viz.
    0
    0
  • Other beds yield principally palms, willows, laurels, Eucalyptus or Ferns; but there are no Cycads.
    0
    0
  • As showing the richness of this flora, we may mention that in the only orders which have yet been monographed, Ferns are represented by 17 species and Gymnosperms by 10, though these are not the groups best represented.
    0
    0
  • The Irish strata yield two ferns; 7 Gymnosperms, Cupressus, Cryptomeria, Taxus, Podocarpus, Pinus (2 species), Tsuga; and leaves of about 25 Dicotyledons.
    0
    0
  • Ferns are repreFrG.
    0
    0
  • The number of Ferns is just equal to that now found in Switzerland.
    0
    0
  • Some parts have an understorey dominated by cherry laurel, but elsewhere there is a varied ground flora with many ferns.
    0
    0
  • Unfortunately, car exhaust fumes have given the formerly abundant ferns a hard life.
    0
    0
  • At the back of the garden there will be modern woodland planting including angelica, ferns, Libertia and blueberry bushes.
    0
    0
  • asparagus ferns emerge with a few spindly spears.
    0
    0
  • bracken ferns but couldn't find them.
    0
    0
  • To the south, Logan Botanic Garden is an important attraction, and features a collection of plants including cabbage palms and tree ferns.
    0
    0
  • Exotic and jungle plants including cannas, gingers, bananas, tree ferns, palms, bamboos and aroids.
    0
    0
  • cascade are towering peaks, cascading waterfalls and lush forests carpeted with ferns.
    0
    0
  • casuarina trees, giant palms and ferns the size of elephants ' ears.
    0
    0
  • The glasshouses contain collections of palms, rare cycads, tropical ferns, cacti and alpines.
    0
    0
  • How important are the ferns in the ecology of degraded ecosystems, such as logged forest and oil-palm plantations?
    0
    0
  • Afterward he succeeded St Aidan as bishop of Ferns, which included the entirety of Leinster.
    0
    0
  • Ferns survived the mass extinction which wiped out the dinosaurs, 65 million years ago.
    0
    0
  • Prepare a potting media mix suitable for growing ferns in.
    0
    0
  • Tiny mosses, hardy ferns or miniature bulbs will add extra interest.
    0
    0
  • If you have evergreen ferns you will need to trim off all the brown dead leaves to allow the fresh to grow through.
    0
    0
  • The giant tree ferns are a wonder to behold.
    0
    0
  • It was established in 1893 with the objective of fostering interest in ferns and fern allies.
    0
    0
  • I did want a couple of bracken ferns but couldn't find them.
    0
    0
  • flag iris, ferns.
    0
    0
  • fronds of ferns to the giant leaves of gunnera species.
    0
    0
  • The light arching fronds of ferns are a lovely addition to baskets hung in shadier positions.
    0
    0
  • Small plants & hardy perennials, many bulbs & ferns, hardy perennials, many bulbs & ferns, hardy orchids & dwarf trees & shrubs.
    0
    0
  • hardy ferns or miniature bulbs will add extra interest.
    0
    0
  • Look out for orchids, yellow flag iris, ferns.
    0
    0
  • Here we visit the forest full of ferns and epiphytes and hope to find the crowned lemur.
    0
    0
  • To date three volumes have been published covering ferns and fern allies, orchids and gymnosperms and non-orchid monocotyledon.
    0
    0
  • Asplenium nidus is one of about 700 evergreen and semi-evergreen ferns belonging to a genus whose species are found everywhere except Antarctica.
    0
    0
  • Small plants & hardy perennials, many bulbs & ferns, hardy orchids & dwarf trees & shrubs.
    0
    0
  • There'll be palms, sweet oranges and pomegranates emerging from ferns, with a delicate perfume of jasmine and wax flowers.
    0
    0
  • Every cranny was filled with rare and delicate Ferns and all shade-loving Alpine plants, while double white and blue periwinkles streamed down everywhere.
    0
    0
  • soil Most popular ferns are either lime lovers or indifferent to all but extreme soil pH levels.
    0
    0
  • There is an abundance of ferns on the boulder screes within the site.
    0
    0
  • Other components of the ground flora such as grasses, dwarf shrubs and ferns are common.
    0
    0
  • shuttlecock ferns.
    0
    0
  • sibilant whisper of the wind through the ferns.
    0
    0
  • In the woodland this gave Nick a large area for ferns, hellebores, woodland bulbs, camellia and more snowdrops.
    0
    0
  • spongy texture, some are like ferns, some form huge luscious quill feather shapes.
    0
    0
  • sporangiumt majority of ferns have sporangia that are stalked capsules with walls only one cell thick.
    0
    0
  • tree ferns, palms, bamboos and aroids.
    0
    0
  • These steps are especially important if you are planting tree ferns.
    0
    0
  • It is one of the hardiest tree ferns and in the wild it is tolerant of fire and re-shoots readily afterward.
    0
    0
  • Wealth of exotic plants, Australian tree ferns - Chinese rhododendrons - S African bulbs.
    0
    0
  • As with some other tree ferns, once trunk height reaches 2 ' or more it seems to become much hardier.
    0
    0
  • It is particularly suited to garden planting and landscaping purposes and is one of the most popular tree ferns in the world.
    0
    0
  • Alpine and oblong woodsia are small tufted montane ferns found in open rocky habitats, mainly on cliffs and scree slopes.
    0
    0
  • The Ferns and fern-like plants (see PTERIDOP1IYTA) have on the other hand a well developed independent sporophyte which is differentiated into stem, leaf and root with highly organized internal structure including true vascular bundles.
    0
    0
  • The scalariform hydroids of Ferns (fig.
    0
    0
  • In most ferns internal p/deem appears instead of a ~arenchymatous pith (fig.
    0
    0
  • The solenostele of the ferns is broken by the departure of each leaf-bundle, the outer and inner endodermis joining so that the stele becomes horseshoe-shaped and the cortex continuous with the pith (fig.
    0
    0
  • In dictyostelic ferns similar internal (dictyostehc) cylinders are found in some forms, and occasionally a large series of such concentric cylinders is developed (Marattiaceae) (fig.
    0
    0
  • During recent years a number of fossil (Carboniferous and Permian) plants have been very thoroughly investigated in the light of modern anatomical knowledge, and as a result it has become st i s clear that in those times a large series of plants etisted ear ys intermediate in structure between the modern ferns tern of Cycaand the modern Gymnosperms (especially Cycads), dofiices.
    0
    0
  • Since about 1895 this branch has been most actively pursued in England, where the work of Boodle and of Gwynne-Vaughan especially on Ferns) has been the most important, leading to a coherent theory of the evolution of the vascular system in these plants (Tansley, Evolution of the Filicinean Vascular System, Cambridge, 1908); and in America, where Jeffrey has published important papers on the morphology of the vascular tissues of the various groups of Pteridophytes and Phanerogams and has sought to express his conclusions in a general morphological theory with appropriate terminology.
    0
    0
  • xxi.; On the Cytological Features exhibited by certain Varietal and Hybrid Ferns, Ann.
    0
    0
  • Goebel (Organograp/zy) gives several instances of the conversion of the root into a shoot in ferns, and a few in phanerogams (Lislera ovata, Neottia nidusavis, Anthurium longifolium).
    0
    0
  • ACROGENAE (" growing at the apex"), an obsolete botanical term, originally applied to the higher Cryptogams (mosses and ferns), which were erroneously distinguished from the lower (Algae and Fungi) by apical growth of the stem.
    0
    0
  • 7rrepOv, feather, 7rrepis, fern), a name often used to denote the whole botanical class of Pteridophytes, including both the true ferns, Filicales, by far the largest group of this class in the existing flora, and the fern-like plants,.
    0
    0
  • Observed originally by Engelmann in bacteria, by Stahl in myxomycetes, and by Pfeffer in ferns, mosses, &c., it has now become recognized as a widespread phenomenon.
    0
    0
  • The edges of the leaves of Bryophyllum calycinum and of Cardamine pratensis, and the growths in the axils of the leaves of Lilium bulbiferum, as well as the fronds of certain ferns (e.g.
    0
    0
  • The stove ferns require a day temperature of 65° to 75°, but do not thrive in an excessively high or close dry atmosphere.
    0
    0
  • Some ferns, as the different kinds of Gymnogramme and Cheilanthes, prefer a drier atmosphere than others, and the former do not well bear a lower winter temperature than about 60° by night.
    0
    0
  • Most other stove ferns, if dormant, will bear a temperature as low as 55° by night and 60° by day from November to February.
    0
    0
  • The true ferns, including tree ferns with a height of upwards of 60 ft., were associated with many plants possessing a fern-like habit (Cycadofilices) and others whose affinities have not yet been definitely determined.
    0
    0
  • The leaf taken individually is either folded longitudinally from apex to base, as in the tulip-tree, and called reclinate or replicate; or rolled up in a circular manner from apex to base, as in ferns (fig.
    0
    0
  • Here again forests of Coniferae predominate, especially on the northern and eastern slopes; and the other distinguishing features of the flora are gigantic male ferns (Aspidium filix-mas), Paris incompleta (a member of the Trilliaceae), Usnea or tree-moss, box, holly (Ilex aquifolium), Lilium monadelphum and many of the familiar herbaceous plants which flower in English gardens, though here they grow to an altogether extraordinary size - " monkshoods, Cephalaria, Mulgedia and groundsels, among which men on horseback might play at hide and seek without stooping " (E.
    0
    0
  • Tree ferns have a remarkable growth in many localities, their stems being used in southern Cundinamarca to make corduroy roads.
    0
    0
  • The best known of these ancient Ferns belong to the Botryopterideae; the characters of this group point to its having been the starting-point of several series of existing Ferns (see Palaeobotany: Palaeozoic).
    0
    0
  • Some ferns, as the different kinds of Gymnogrammae and Cheilanthes, prefer a drier atmosphere than others, and the former do not well bear a lower winter temperature than about 60° by night.
    0
    0
  • The majority of these fronds have now fallen under suspicion and .can no longer be accepted as those of Ferns; the indications often point to their having belonged to fern-like Spermophyta, as will be shown below.
    0
    0
  • The spores in the sporangia have been found in a germinating condition; the stages of germination correspond closely with those observed in recent homosporous ferns (fig.
    0
    0
  • Of the rocks of this southern continent those of the Indian Gondwana system are the richest in fossil plants; the most prominent types recorded from these Permo-Carboniferous strata are Glossopteris, Gangamopteris, species referred to Sphenopteris, Pecopteris, Macrotaeniopteris and other Ferns; Schizoneura (fig.
    0
    0
  • The living Maidenhair-tree (Ginkgo biloba) (see Gymnosperms) remains, like Matonia and Dipteris, among the ferns, as an isolated relic in the midst of recent vegetation.
    0
    0
  • So before you despair, check out Svenâs suggestions for plants that love soggy soil, from arum lilies to shuttlecock ferns.
    0
    0
  • The gold and bronze of the wild moor, gray blond of the granite and the sibilant whisper of the wind through the ferns.
    0
    0
  • Ferns include green spleenwort Asplenium viride and Wilson 's filmy-fern Hymenophyllum wilsonii.
    0
    0
  • Some colonies are soft with a spongy texture, some are like ferns, some form huge luscious quill feather shapes.
    0
    0
  • The great majority of ferns have sporangia that are stalked capsules with walls only one cell thick.
    0
    0
  • They will grow in heavier soils than many ferns, but do not thrive where moisture is denied them.
    0
    0
  • Or for that matter, does your cat attack some of your houseplants (i.e. spider plants, ferns, palms, dracaena, to name a few)?
    0
    0
  • Design a mural of a misty pond including frogs and large goldfish, majestic trees, sunshine, clouds, big lily pads and ferns growing along the water's edge.
    0
    0
  • For some greenery, try adding some tropical plants such as palms and ferns.
    0
    0
  • For instance, in the summer, bowls filled with limes, apples and green grapes plus small glasses filled with short ferns create a classic white and green theme that is unfussy but refined.
    0
    0
  • Instead of ferns, baby's breath or other greens, accent with fallen leaves.
    0
    0
  • Use palm leaves, ferns, and other tropical greenery as inexpensive and beautiful fillers for bouquets and table centerpieces.
    0
    0
  • If you have a bathroom window that lets in natural light, real plants that thrive in humid climates such as ferns, palms or bamboo would do well in the bathroom.
    0
    0
  • It is the hardiest of Tree Ferns, and the most suitable for the open air, in sheltered shady dells.
    0
    0
  • The cultivated kinds of this native group are small elegant Ferns of delicate fragile texture.
    0
    0
  • Although these tiny Filmy Ferns are hardy and beautiful, yet the conditions for their successful culture occur so seldom that in a general sense they cannot be used with effect in the open air.
    0
    0
  • One of the most valuable is F. tingitana; it takes several years to form strong plants that look like massive plumes of filmy Ferns.
    0
    0
  • S. vulgare is one of the best known of hardy evergreen British Ferns, and broken into numberless interesting forms and varieties, some being very beautiful.
    0
    0
  • A few of the characteristic forms of each group might be used where collections of hardy Ferns are being formed, being evergreen and diversified in form.
    0
    0
  • Lady Fern (Athyrium) - Beautiful hardy Ferns, which A.
    0
    0
  • Among many fine hardy evergreen and herbaceous plants Lady Ferns might be planted with advantage; they will thrive in a little shade where protected from drying winds.
    0
    0
  • Ferns, for the most part tropical, and requiring artificial heat; but in mild parts two or three thrive in the open air.
    0
    0
  • These Ferns should be placed in the snuggest quarters of the hardy fernery, and care should be taken to protect them during severe cold.
    0
    0
  • A few of the smaller species rival in delicacy of form and color some of the charming Maidenhair Ferns, and may be associated with flowering plants, or those of fine foliage.
    0
    0
  • N. American Ferns, some hardy and very handsome, and these thrive under the same conditions as our native Ferns.
    0
    0
  • This large family of Ferns contains several good hardy kinds, the principal being the common P. vulgare, which has about a score of cultivated varieties differing more or less widely from each other.
    0
    0
  • It may with advantage be grouped with Lady Ferns, as it flourishes under similar treatment.
    0
    0
  • The border Ferns of this group give fine cool effects in rightly chosen spots in and near the flower garden.
    0
    0
  • At Glasnevin, where it was originally planted in a small bog, it spread up a bank on one side and established itself among the roots of ferns growing there; it appears to like rather drier conditions than C. plantaginea.
    0
    0
  • These pretty deciduous hardy Ferns are admirably suited for a northern position in the alpine or rock garden.
    0
    0
  • Allow it to form ferns; do not cut them back this first season.
    0
    0
  • During the second season and each successive season you will want to first remove the ferns that died the previous year.
    0
    0
  • Allow the other spears to turn to ferns.
    0
    0
  • Leave some each year to turn to ferns to allow your patch to get stronger and produce more each year.
    0
    0
  • Try plants like bamboo, English ivy, peace lily and Boston ferns.
    0
    0
  • A boat ride to the Fern Grotto where large ferns drape the landscape, can be very romantic.
    0
    0
  • Special gardens around town showcase ferns, camellias, topiary, and water features.
    0
    0
  • ferns, horse-tails, club mosses, &c., and Phanerogams or Flowering Plants) the main plant-body, that which we speak of in ordinary language as the plant, is called the sporophyte because it bears the asexual reproductive cells or spores.
    4
    4
  • In a second type they are situated at the ends of tracheal strands and consist of groups of richly protoplasmic cells belonging to the epidermis (as in the leaves of many ferns), or to the subjacent tissue (the commonest type in flowering plants); in this last case the cells in question are known as epithem.
    4
    4
  • In the majority of ferns, at a higher level, after the stele has increased greatly in diameter, a large-celled true pith or medulla, resembling the cortex in its characters, and quite distinct from conjunctive, from which it is separated by an internal endodernlis, appears in the centre.
    0
    1
  • The type of siphonostele characteristic of many ferns, in which are found internal phloem, and an internal endodermis separating the vascular conjunctive from the pith is known as a solenostele.
    0
    1
  • In the megaphyllous forms, on the other hand, (Ferns) whose leaves are large relatively to the stem, the departure of the correspondingly large trace causes a gap (leaf-gap) in the vascular cylinder, as already described.
    0
    1
  • In the haplostelic ferns the leaf-trace appears as a single strand with a tendency to assume the shape of a horseshoe on cross-section, and this type is also found in the more primitive solenostelic types.
    3
    4
  • Lyallii) a polycyclic solenostele is found exactly parallel with that of the rhizome of ferns.
    0
    1
  • The gaps in the outer tubular stele, however, are formed by the departure of aerial branch-traces, instead of leaf-traces as in the ferns.
    0
    1
  • the Stele In But, unlike the ferns, there is in the seed-plants no in- s d I ~ ternal phloem (except as a special development in ee pan $~$~ certain families) and no internal endodermis.
    0
    1
  • confined to the stem) such as are found in the dictyosteles of ferns are rare in the flowering plants.
    3
    3
  • Leaf-gaps are formed in essentially the same way as in the ferns, but when in the case of a plurifascicular trace the bundles are distributed at intervals round the cylinder it is obvious that several gaps must be formed as the different bundles leave the stele.
    0
    1
  • In some cases both the nucleus and the chromatophores may be carried along in the rotating stream, but in others, such as T.Titeila, the chloroplasts may remain motionless iii a non-motile layer of the cytoplasm in direct contact with the cell wall.i Desmids, Diatoms and Oscillaria show creeping movements probably due to the secretion of slime by the cells; the swarmspores and plasmodium of the Myxomycetes exhibit amoehoid movements; and the motile spores of Fungi and Algae, the spermatozoids of mosses, ferns, &c., move by means of delicate prolongations, cilia or flagella cf the protoplast.
    2
    3
  • The union of the germ nuclei has now been observed in all the main groups of Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, Ferns, Mosses, Algae and Fungi, and presents a striking resemblance in all.
    0
    1
  • xlviii.; Farmer and Digby, Studies in Apospory and Apogamy in Ferns, Ann.
    1
    2
  • Dvina, Glossopteris, Noeggerathiopsis and other ferns characteristic of the Indian Gondwana beds have been found; and with these are numerous remains of reptiles similar to those which occur in the Indian deposits.
    0
    1
  • place, it appears so if the space occupied by Russia be taken into account, only 3300 species of phanerogams and ferns 2 Bibliography of Meteorology: Memoirs of the Central Physical Observatory; Repertorium fiir Meteorologie and Meteorological Sbornik, published by the same body; Veselovsky, Climate of Russia (Russian); H.
    0
    1
  • Ferns abound, some of them peculiar, and tree ferns on the higher islands, and all the usual fruit trees and cultivated plants of the Pacific are found.
    0
    1
  • The forests throughout most of the state have a luxuriant undergrowth consisting of a great variety of shrubs, flowering plants, grasses, ferns and mosses, and the display of magnolias, azaleas, kalmias, golden rod, asters, jessamines, smilax, ferns and mosses is often one of unusual beauty.
    1
    2
  • Compositae are comparatively rare; so also Gramineae and Cyperaceae are in some places deficient, and Labiatae, Leguminosae and ferns in others.
    0
    1
  • Buttercups, violets, anemones, spring beauties, trilliums, arbutus, orchids, columbine, laurel, honeysuckle, golden rod and asters are common wild flowers, and of ferns there are many varieties.
    1
    2
  • An ascent made by Dr Honda of the imperial university of Japan showed that, up to a height of 6000 ft., the mountain is clothed with primeval forests of palms, banyans, cork trees, camphor trees, tree ferns, interlacing creepers and dense thickets of rattan or stretches of grass higher than a man's stature.
    0
    1
  • There are several species of palms, flowering trees, trees with beautifully coloured foliage, tree ferns, resinous trees and trees bearing tropical fruits.
    0
    1
  • broad, that at the British Museum is slightly larger; the palms and their allies, however, and some ferns, require a larger size.
    1
    2
  • A large part of the surface is covered with virgin forest, consisting of screw-pines, palm trees, tree ferns, canariums, &c. The fauna is altogether Papuan.
    0
    1
  • The opening was filled with ferns which completely covered the beds of limestone and in places hid the streams.
    8
    8
  • We always returned to the cottage with armfuls of laurel, goldenrod, ferns and gorgeous swamp-flowers such as grow only in the South.
    0
    1
  • Many years ago, before people came to live on the earth, great trees and tall grasses and huge ferns and all the beautiful flowers cover the earth.
    0
    1
  • A vine on fence or a metal statue hidden amongst some ferns allows the natural to blend with the unnatural features.
    2
    2
  • Conversely, although full sun throughout the yard sounds like paradise, other gardeners may want to add raised beds in shady areas to grow ferns, astilbe, impatiens and other flowers that love shade.
    2
    2
  • In 1733 George Stone was made dean of Ferns, and in the following year he exchanged this deanery for that of Derry; in 1740 he became bishop of Ferns, in 1743 bishop of Kildare, in 1745 bishop of Derry, and in 1747 archbishop of Armagh.
    1
    3
  • Ferns are prominent among the flora, about one-third of which consists of endemic species.
    1
    3
  • The spores differ from those of ferns in their outer coat (exospore) being split up into four club-shaped hygroscopic threads (elaters) which are curled when moist, but become straightened when dry.
    1
    3
  • In some solenostelic ferns, and in many dictyostelic ones additional vascular strands are present which do not form part of the primary vascular tube.
    1
    3
  • This type of stern is therefore often spoken of as protoslelic. In the Ferns there is clear evidence that the amphiphloic haplostele or protostele succeeded the simple (ectophloic) protostele in evolution, and that this in its turn gave rise to the solenostele, which was again succeeded by the dictyostele.
    1
    3
  • The typical structure of the vascular cylinder of the adult primary stem in the Gyrnnosperms and Dicotyledons is, like that of the higher ferns, a hollow cylinder of vas- Structure of cular tissue enclosing a central parenchymatous pith.
    3
    5
  • The leaf-bundles are always collateral (the phloem being turned downwards and the xylem upwards), even in Ferns, where the petiolar strands are concentric, and they have the ordinary mesodesm and peridesm of the collateral bundle.
    3
    5
  • trans., Comparative A-natomy of the Vegetative Organs of the Phanerogams and Ferns, Oxford, 1882).
    3
    5
  • The plants showing it are not all forest trees, hut include also some Pteridophytes and some of the prothallia of the Ferns, Club-mosses, Liverworts and Horsetails.
    3
    5
  • Yet in 1886 Treub found that it was beginning to cover itself again with plants, including eleven species of ferns; but the nearest source of supply was 10 m.
    3
    5
  • POLYPODIUM, in botany, a large genus of true ferns (q.v.), widely distributed throughout the world, but specially developed in the tropics.
    0
    2
  • The anemone, the wild violet, the hepatica, and the funny little curled-up ferns all peeped out at us from beneath the brown leaves.
    11
    15