This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

fens

fens

fens Sentence Examples

  • He constructed "Morton's Dyke" across the fens from Wisbech to Peterborough, repaired the episcopal palace at Hatfield and the school of canon law and St Mary's Church at Oxford.

    0
    0
  • He also defended the rights of the commoners of Ely threatened by the "adventurers" who had drained the Great Level, and he was nicknamed afterwards by a royalist newspaper "Lord of the Fens."

    0
    0
  • Obviously no more than this is possible until physiologists are able to state much more precisely than at present what is the influence of common salt on the plants of salt-marshes, of the action of calcium carbonate on plants of calcareous soils, and of the action of humous compounds on plants of fens and peat moors.

    0
    0
  • ~rphytes, grow in soils which contain an abundance of free imous compounds, and include plants which grow on fens and le .oors.

    0
    0
  • he latter are mixed associations, such as fens, where different :cies are produced by the varying abundance of characteristic ants, such as Cladium Mariscus, Phragmites communis, Molinia~ erulea, Calamagrostis lanceolata, and Juncus obtusiftorus.

    0
    0
  • Physically wet but physiologically dry ha bit ats,f with the accompanying plant communities of fens, moors, and salt marshes.

    0
    0
  • Bog Xerophytes live in the peaty soil of fens and moors which are physically wet, but which are said to be physiologically dry.

    0
    0
  • In the fens of East Anglia have been found two humeri, one of them immature, of a true Pelecanus, a bird now no longer inhabiting middle Europe.

    0
    0
  • CALARASHI (Caldrasi), the capital of the Jalomitza department, Rumania, situated on the left bank of the Borcea branch of the Danube, amid wide fens, north of which extends the desolate Baragan Steppe.

    0
    0
  • With regard to the western boundary we have no accurate information, but it was probably formed by the fens of Cambridgeshire.

    0
    0
  • deep. The drainage of the Great Level of the Fens was prosecuted during the 17th century, but lack of engineering skill and the opposition of the fen-men hindered the reclamation of a now fertile region.

    0
    0
  • In Huntington Avenue, at its junction with Massachusetts Avenue, is another group of handsome new buildings, including Horticultural Hall, Symphony Hall (1900) and the New England Conservatory of Music. In the Back Bay Fens, reclaimed swamps laid out by F.

    0
    0
  • Throughout the Fens excellently effective use is being made of monumental buildings grouped in ample grounds.

    0
    0
  • wide, with four rows of trees shading the parking of its central mall, and is a link through the Back Bay Fens with the beautiful outer park system.

    0
    0
  • The so-called Whittlesey Wash, in the neighbourhood of the town, is among several tracts in the fens which are perennially flooded.

    0
    0
  • In 1071 a local rising in the fens caused some trouble.

    0
    0
  • Two specimens of the humerus have been found in the English fens (Ibis, 1868, p. 363; Proc. Zool.

    0
    0
  • The castle is alleged to have been built by William I., and was converted from a fortress in the fens into an episcopal palace between 1471 and 1473.

    0
    0
  • Others regard him as a wind-hero, who disperses the pestilential vapours of the fens.

    0
    0
  • GODWIT, a word of unknown origin, the name commonly applied to a marsh-bird in great repute, when fattened, for the table, and formerly abundant in the fens of Norfolk, the Isle of Ely and Lincolnshire.

    0
    0
  • The practice of netting this bird in large numbers during the spring and summer, coupled with the gradual reclamation of the fens, to which it resorted, has now rendered it but a visitor in England; and it probably ceased from breeding regularly in England in 1824 or thereabouts, though under favourable conditions it may have occasionally laid its eggs for some thirty years later or more (Stevenson, Birds of Norfolk, ii.

    0
    0
  • This species swarms in some years in prodigious numbers; in Pennant's time amazing shoals appeared in the fens of Lincolnshire every seven or eight years, No instance of a similar increase of this fish has been observed in our time, and this possibly may be due to the diminished number of suitable breeding-places in consequence of the introduction of artificial drainage.

    0
    0
  • Dictionary), who seems to have been struck by the peculiarities of the species, and, to investigate them, visited the fens of Lincolnshire, possibly excited thereto by the example of T.

    0
    0
  • The next year he took part in the desperate stand against the Conqueror's rule made in the isle of Ely, and, on its capture by the Normans, escaped with his followers through the fens.

    0
    0
  • The road from Soham to Ely was constructed as a causeway across the fens by Hervey le Breton, first bishop of Ely (1109-1131).

    0
    0
  • Fens >>

    0
    0
  • There are extensive fens in the N.

    0
    0
  • Andalusia consists of a great plain, the valley of the Guadalquivir, shut in by mountain ranges on every side except the S.W., where it descends to the Atlantic. This lowland, which is known as Andalucia Baja, or Lower Andalusia, resembles the valley of the Ebro in its slight elevation above sea-level (300-400 ft.), and in the number of brackish lakes or fens, and waste lands (despoblados) impregnated with salt, which seem to indicate that the whole surface was covered by the sea at no distant geological date.

    0
    0
  • There are three natural divisions - foreshore and sand-dunes, inner dunes and the geest grounds, and low fens and clay lands.

    0
    0
  • On the east a natural geographical boundary was formed by the long line of marshy fens extending along the borders of Overysel, Drente and Groningen.

    0
    0
  • Except where they rise in the fens they call into life a strip of fertile grassland in the midst of the barren sand, and are responsible for the existence of many villages along their banks.

    0
    0
  • The prevalence of south-west winds during nine months of the year and of north-west during three (April - June) has a strong influence on the temperature and rainfall, tides, river mouths and outlets, and also, geologically, on dunes and sand drifts, and on fens and the accumulation of clay on the coast.

    0
    0
  • Again, a totally different character belongs to the canals in North Brabant, and the east and north-east of Holland where, in the absence of great rivers, they form the only waterways which render possible the drainage of the fens and the export of peat; and unite the lesser streams with each other.

    0
    0
  • Thus in Overysel, in addition to the canals already mentioned, the Dedemsvaart connects the Vecht with the Zwarte Water near Hasselt; in Drente the Smildervaart and Drentsche Hoofdvaart unites Assen with Meppel, and receives on the eastern side the drainage canals of the Drente fens, namely, the Orange canal and the Hoogeveen Vaart (1850-1860; 1880-1893).

    0
    0
  • It lies near the river Don, in a low, flat district, which was formerly a marshy waste, resembling the fens of the eastern counties.

    0
    0
  • Two industries have for centuries been associated with the barren heaths and sodden fens so usually found together on the sand-grounds, namely, the cultivation of buckwheat and peatdigging.

    0
    0
  • Hence the ancient saying which, grouping with these the commercial facilities afforded by the bridge over the Ilmenau, ascribes the prosperity of Luneburg to its mons, fens, pons.

    0
    0
  • Its height is from 3000 to 4000 ft., and it is clothed with tropical high fens.

    0
    0
  • The town lies in the midst of orchards and water-meadows, reclaimed from the fens which encircled Glastonbury Tor, a conical height once an island, but now, with the surrounding flats, a peninsula washed on three sides by the river Brue.

    0
    0
  • The Fens, the flat open levels in the lower basins of the Witham, Welland, Nene and Great Ouse, only kept from their former marshy conditions by an extensive system of artificial drainage, and the similar levels round the head of the Humber estuary, differ completely in appearance from the higher and firmer parts of the plain.

    0
    0
  • There is some traffic on the navigable drainage cuts and rivers of the Fens, but beyond these, in a broad consideration of the waterways of England from the point of view of their commercial importance, it is unnecessary to go.

    0
    0
  • Except in open lands like the Fens, the peculiarly rich appearance of the country is due to the closely-divided Wood- fields with their high, luxuriant hedges, and especially lands.

    0
    0
  • Cambridgeshire, lying almost wholly within the area of the Fens, has the smallest proportional area of woodland of any English county.

    0
    0
  • By the treaty of Berlin, in 1878, the Russians rewarded their Rumanian allies with this land of mountains, fens and barren steppes, peopled by Turks, Bulgarians, Tatars, Jews and other aliens; while, to add to the indignation of Rumania, they annexed instead the fertile country of Bessarabia, largely inhabited by Rumans.

    0
    0
  • The surface is dotted with small lakes and ponds, and there are many broad fens and marshes.

    0
    0
  • The Karst and the fens are of least agricultural value.

    0
    0
  • The south-east parts are perfectly flat; and about one-third of the county consists of fens and marshes, intersected in all directions by artificial drains, called locally dykes, delphs, drains, becks, learns and eaux.

    0
    0
  • The Fens (q.v.), the soil of which has been formed partly by tidal action and partly by the decay of forests, occupy the Isle of Axholme on the north-west, the vale of Ancholme on the north, and most of the country south-east of Lincoln.

    0
    0
  • The chief of these are the Holland, Wildmore, West and East Fens draining into the Witham; and the Deeping, Bourn, Great Porsand, and Whaplode Fens draining into the Welland.

    0
    0
  • A good sandy loam is common in the Heath division; a sandy loam with chalk, or a flinty loam on chalk marl, abounds on portions of the Wolds; an argillaceous sand, merging into rich loam, lies on other portions of the Wolds; a black loam and a rich vegetable mould cover most of the Isle of Axholme on the north-west; a well-reclaimed marine marsh, a rich brown loam, and a stiff cold clay variously occupy the low tracts along the Humber, and between the north Wolds and the sea; a peat earth, a deep sandy loam, and a rich soapy blue clay occupy most of the east and south Fens; and an artificial soil, obtained by "warping," occupies considerable low strips of land along the tidal reaches of the rivers.

    0
    0
  • Large flocks of geese were formerly kept in the Fens, but their number has been diminished since the drainage of these parts.

    0
    0
  • Decoys were once numerous in the undrained state of the Fens.

    0
    0
  • there were upwards of one hundred religious houses; and among the Fens rose some of the finest abbeys held by the Benedictines.

    0
    0
  • The county is rather bare of timber, which is owing to the very great demand for it in the fens.

    0
    0
  • Fens around lough margins may have common reed or reed canary grass.

    0
    0
  • Along with adjacent fens, these grasslands are home to waders, including curlew.

    0
    0
  • Young Luke, seven years old was out in the Fens with his Dad on his first Winter Pike fishing expedition.

    0
    0
  • Mortlach Moss Aberdeenshire This small base-rich basin fen, lying upon igneous rock, is representative of Alkaline fens in northeast Scotland.

    0
    0
  • The fens are home to the nationally rare crested buckler fern.

    0
    0
  • Fens around lough margins may have common reed or reed canary grass.

    0
    0
  • Both bogs and fens can benefit from carefully targeted and designed agri-environment incentives.

    0
    0
  • Dromius sigma is found on muddy or peaty soils near standing water in fens, lowland marshes, flooded quarries and gravel pits.

    0
    0
  • misty mornings the fens can almost look like a sea of water.

    0
    0
  • re-create fenland habitat adjacent to two nature reserves in the fens of Lincolnshire.

    0
    0
  • Fens around lough margins may have common reed or reed canary grass.

    0
    0
  • There are complex zonations present and many differences exist between the individual fens that comprise the site.

    0
    0
  • He constructed "Morton's Dyke" across the fens from Wisbech to Peterborough, repaired the episcopal palace at Hatfield and the school of canon law and St Mary's Church at Oxford.

    0
    0
  • He also defended the rights of the commoners of Ely threatened by the "adventurers" who had drained the Great Level, and he was nicknamed afterwards by a royalist newspaper "Lord of the Fens."

    0
    0
  • Obviously no more than this is possible until physiologists are able to state much more precisely than at present what is the influence of common salt on the plants of salt-marshes, of the action of calcium carbonate on plants of calcareous soils, and of the action of humous compounds on plants of fens and peat moors.

    0
    0
  • ~rphytes, grow in soils which contain an abundance of free imous compounds, and include plants which grow on fens and le .oors.

    0
    0
  • he latter are mixed associations, such as fens, where different :cies are produced by the varying abundance of characteristic ants, such as Cladium Mariscus, Phragmites communis, Molinia~ erulea, Calamagrostis lanceolata, and Juncus obtusiftorus.

    0
    0
  • Physically wet but physiologically dry ha bit ats,f with the accompanying plant communities of fens, moors, and salt marshes.

    0
    0
  • Bog Xerophytes live in the peaty soil of fens and moors which are physically wet, but which are said to be physiologically dry.

    0
    0
  • In the fens of East Anglia have been found two humeri, one of them immature, of a true Pelecanus, a bird now no longer inhabiting middle Europe.

    0
    0
  • CALARASHI (Caldrasi), the capital of the Jalomitza department, Rumania, situated on the left bank of the Borcea branch of the Danube, amid wide fens, north of which extends the desolate Baragan Steppe.

    0
    0
  • With regard to the western boundary we have no accurate information, but it was probably formed by the fens of Cambridgeshire.

    0
    0
  • deep. The drainage of the Great Level of the Fens was prosecuted during the 17th century, but lack of engineering skill and the opposition of the fen-men hindered the reclamation of a now fertile region.

    0
    0
  • In Huntington Avenue, at its junction with Massachusetts Avenue, is another group of handsome new buildings, including Horticultural Hall, Symphony Hall (1900) and the New England Conservatory of Music. In the Back Bay Fens, reclaimed swamps laid out by F.

    0
    0
  • Throughout the Fens excellently effective use is being made of monumental buildings grouped in ample grounds.

    0
    0
  • wide, with four rows of trees shading the parking of its central mall, and is a link through the Back Bay Fens with the beautiful outer park system.

    0
    0
  • The so-called Whittlesey Wash, in the neighbourhood of the town, is among several tracts in the fens which are perennially flooded.

    0
    0
  • In 1071 a local rising in the fens caused some trouble.

    0
    0
  • Two specimens of the humerus have been found in the English fens (Ibis, 1868, p. 363; Proc. Zool.

    0
    0
  • The castle is alleged to have been built by William I., and was converted from a fortress in the fens into an episcopal palace between 1471 and 1473.

    0
    0
  • The practice is confined to poorer types of land, such as heaths covered with furze and bracken or fens and clay areas smothered with rank grasses and sedges.

    0
    0
  • Others regard him as a wind-hero, who disperses the pestilential vapours of the fens.

    0
    0
  • GODWIT, a word of unknown origin, the name commonly applied to a marsh-bird in great repute, when fattened, for the table, and formerly abundant in the fens of Norfolk, the Isle of Ely and Lincolnshire.

    0
    0
  • The practice of netting this bird in large numbers during the spring and summer, coupled with the gradual reclamation of the fens, to which it resorted, has now rendered it but a visitor in England; and it probably ceased from breeding regularly in England in 1824 or thereabouts, though under favourable conditions it may have occasionally laid its eggs for some thirty years later or more (Stevenson, Birds of Norfolk, ii.

    0
    0
  • This species swarms in some years in prodigious numbers; in Pennant's time amazing shoals appeared in the fens of Lincolnshire every seven or eight years, No instance of a similar increase of this fish has been observed in our time, and this possibly may be due to the diminished number of suitable breeding-places in consequence of the introduction of artificial drainage.

    0
    0
  • Dictionary), who seems to have been struck by the peculiarities of the species, and, to investigate them, visited the fens of Lincolnshire, possibly excited thereto by the example of T.

    0
    0
  • The next year he took part in the desperate stand against the Conqueror's rule made in the isle of Ely, and, on its capture by the Normans, escaped with his followers through the fens.

    0
    0
  • The road from Soham to Ely was constructed as a causeway across the fens by Hervey le Breton, first bishop of Ely (1109-1131).

    0
    0
  • There are extensive fens in the N.

    0
    0
  • Andalusia consists of a great plain, the valley of the Guadalquivir, shut in by mountain ranges on every side except the S.W., where it descends to the Atlantic. This lowland, which is known as Andalucia Baja, or Lower Andalusia, resembles the valley of the Ebro in its slight elevation above sea-level (300-400 ft.), and in the number of brackish lakes or fens, and waste lands (despoblados) impregnated with salt, which seem to indicate that the whole surface was covered by the sea at no distant geological date.

    0
    0
  • There are three natural divisions - foreshore and sand-dunes, inner dunes and the geest grounds, and low fens and clay lands.

    0
    0
  • On the east a natural geographical boundary was formed by the long line of marshy fens extending along the borders of Overysel, Drente and Groningen.

    0
    0
  • Except where they rise in the fens they call into life a strip of fertile grassland in the midst of the barren sand, and are responsible for the existence of many villages along their banks.

    0
    0
  • The prevalence of south-west winds during nine months of the year and of north-west during three (April - June) has a strong influence on the temperature and rainfall, tides, river mouths and outlets, and also, geologically, on dunes and sand drifts, and on fens and the accumulation of clay on the coast.

    0
    0
  • Again, a totally different character belongs to the canals in North Brabant, and the east and north-east of Holland where, in the absence of great rivers, they form the only waterways which render possible the drainage of the fens and the export of peat; and unite the lesser streams with each other.

    0
    0
  • Thus in Overysel, in addition to the canals already mentioned, the Dedemsvaart connects the Vecht with the Zwarte Water near Hasselt; in Drente the Smildervaart and Drentsche Hoofdvaart unites Assen with Meppel, and receives on the eastern side the drainage canals of the Drente fens, namely, the Orange canal and the Hoogeveen Vaart (1850-1860; 1880-1893).

    0
    0
  • It lies near the river Don, in a low, flat district, which was formerly a marshy waste, resembling the fens of the eastern counties.

    0
    0
  • Two industries have for centuries been associated with the barren heaths and sodden fens so usually found together on the sand-grounds, namely, the cultivation of buckwheat and peatdigging.

    0
    0
  • Hence the ancient saying which, grouping with these the commercial facilities afforded by the bridge over the Ilmenau, ascribes the prosperity of Luneburg to its mons, fens, pons.

    0
    0
  • Its height is from 3000 to 4000 ft., and it is clothed with tropical high fens.

    0
    0
  • The town lies in the midst of orchards and water-meadows, reclaimed from the fens which encircled Glastonbury Tor, a conical height once an island, but now, with the surrounding flats, a peninsula washed on three sides by the river Brue.

    0
    0
  • The Fens, the flat open levels in the lower basins of the Witham, Welland, Nene and Great Ouse, only kept from their former marshy conditions by an extensive system of artificial drainage, and the similar levels round the head of the Humber estuary, differ completely in appearance from the higher and firmer parts of the plain.

    0
    0
  • There is some traffic on the navigable drainage cuts and rivers of the Fens, but beyond these, in a broad consideration of the waterways of England from the point of view of their commercial importance, it is unnecessary to go.

    0
    0
  • Except in open lands like the Fens, the peculiarly rich appearance of the country is due to the closely-divided Wood- fields with their high, luxuriant hedges, and especially lands.

    0
    0
  • Cambridgeshire, lying almost wholly within the area of the Fens, has the smallest proportional area of woodland of any English county.

    0
    0
  • The Wash is the remnant of a much larger bay, which covered a large part of the Fens which now border it; it is gradually filling with the deposits of the rivers, and from time to time small portions are reclaimed (see Fens).

    0
    0
  • It may be distinguished from the draining of land on a large scale which is exemplified in the reclamation of the English Fens (see Fens).

    0
    0
  • By the treaty of Berlin, in 1878, the Russians rewarded their Rumanian allies with this land of mountains, fens and barren steppes, peopled by Turks, Bulgarians, Tatars, Jews and other aliens; while, to add to the indignation of Rumania, they annexed instead the fertile country of Bessarabia, largely inhabited by Rumans.

    0
    0
  • The surface is dotted with small lakes and ponds, and there are many broad fens and marshes.

    0
    0
  • The Karst and the fens are of least agricultural value.

    0
    0
  • The south-east parts are perfectly flat; and about one-third of the county consists of fens and marshes, intersected in all directions by artificial drains, called locally dykes, delphs, drains, becks, learns and eaux.

    0
    0
  • The Fens (q.v.), the soil of which has been formed partly by tidal action and partly by the decay of forests, occupy the Isle of Axholme on the north-west, the vale of Ancholme on the north, and most of the country south-east of Lincoln.

    0
    0
  • The chief of these are the Holland, Wildmore, West and East Fens draining into the Witham; and the Deeping, Bourn, Great Porsand, and Whaplode Fens draining into the Welland.

    0
    0
  • A good sandy loam is common in the Heath division; a sandy loam with chalk, or a flinty loam on chalk marl, abounds on portions of the Wolds; an argillaceous sand, merging into rich loam, lies on other portions of the Wolds; a black loam and a rich vegetable mould cover most of the Isle of Axholme on the north-west; a well-reclaimed marine marsh, a rich brown loam, and a stiff cold clay variously occupy the low tracts along the Humber, and between the north Wolds and the sea; a peat earth, a deep sandy loam, and a rich soapy blue clay occupy most of the east and south Fens; and an artificial soil, obtained by "warping," occupies considerable low strips of land along the tidal reaches of the rivers.

    0
    0
  • Large flocks of geese were formerly kept in the Fens, but their number has been diminished since the drainage of these parts.

    0
    0
  • Decoys were once numerous in the undrained state of the Fens.

    0
    0
  • there were upwards of one hundred religious houses; and among the Fens rose some of the finest abbeys held by the Benedictines.

    0
    0
  • This exciting project aims to re-create fenland habitat adjacent to two nature reserves in the fens of Lincolnshire.

    0
    0
  • The edges of fens may merge into wet rushy grassland grazed by cattle.

    0
    0
  • Common in fens in northern Britain but extremely local in southern England in vernal pools with sedge or rush litter and mud.

    0
    0
  • There are complex zonations present and many differences exist between the individual fens that comprise the site.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →