This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

felony

felony

felony Sentence Examples

  • All this was abolished by the Felony Act 1870, which provided for the appointment of an administrator to the property of the convict.

    56
    10
  • Bigamy (in its modern sense) was thus made felony (i Jac. I.

    29
    16
  • It was applied to treason felony in 1848.

    28
    19
  • An assistant District Attorney had called about prosecuting a felony drug possession, but the second note was upsetting.

    24
    8
  • (5) No inhabitant of England (except persons contracting, or, after conviction for felony, electing to be transported) shall be sent prisoner to Scotland, Ireland, Jersey, &c., or any place beyond the seas.

    23
    11
  • In protest, the Georgia House of Representatives, holding that the United States Supreme Court had no constitutional power to try suits against a sovereign state, resolved that any Federal marshal who should attempt to execute the court's decision would be " guilty of felony, and shall suffer death, without benefit of clergy, by being hanged."

    9
    5
  • These courts are competent to try cases of felony punishable with a term of imprisonment not exceeding five years.

    9
    6
  • These courts are competent to try cases of felony punishable with a term of imprisonment not exceeding five years.

    9
    6
  • In the 13th century it was recognized that a " clerk " for felony was subject only to ecclesiastical trial and punishment; punishment which might involve lifelong imprisonment.

    8
    2
  • enacted that all persons invoking an evil spirit or consulting, covenanting with, entertaining, employing, feeding or rewarding any evil spirit should be guilty of felony and suffer death.

    8
    4
  • enacted that all persons invoking an evil spirit or consulting, covenanting with, entertaining, employing, feeding or rewarding any evil spirit should be guilty of felony and suffer death.

    8
    4
  • The principal grounds for divorce are impotence, bigamy, adultery, conviction of felony or other infamous crime subsequent to the marriage or before the marriage if unknown to the other party, desertion or habitual drunkenness for one year, such cruel or barbarous treatment as to endanger the life of the other, such conduct as to render the condition of the other intolerable, and vagrancy of the husband; but before applying for a divorce the plaintiff must reside in the state for one year immediately preceding, unless the cause of action was given within the state or while the plaintiff was a resident of the state.

    7
    5
  • The principal grounds for divorce are impotence, bigamy, adultery, conviction of felony or other infamous crime subsequent to the marriage or before the marriage if unknown to the other party, desertion or habitual drunkenness for one year, such cruel or barbarous treatment as to endanger the life of the other, such conduct as to render the condition of the other intolerable, and vagrancy of the husband; but before applying for a divorce the plaintiff must reside in the state for one year immediately preceding, unless the cause of action was given within the state or while the plaintiff was a resident of the state.

    7
    5
  • Paupers, insane, and those convicted of treason, felony or bribery in an election are barred, " while the disability continues," and no person in the military, naval or marine service of the United States is deemed.

    7
    8
  • The desertion of a wife or of children under fifteen years of age is a felony punishable with imprisonment for not more than three years nor less than one year.

    5
    2
  • But if the prisoner has been imprisoned on a charge of, or under sentence for, high treason, felony or misdemeanour, the rescue is high treason, felony or misdemeanour.

    5
    5
  • One year's residence is necessary to secure a divorce, for which the causes recognized are a conviction of felony, habitual drunkenness for one year, physical incapacity, desertion for one year and cruelty or personal indignities.

    4
    4
  • Justices of the peace, one of whom is elected biennially in each precinct, have jurisdiction in civil actions in which the amount in controversy does not exceed $200 and the title to or boundary of real estate is not involved, and in criminal actions less than a felony and in which the punishment prescribed by law does not exceed a fine of $100 and imprisonment for six months.

    4
    5
  • Accordingly, in 1811, Brougham carried through parliament a bill declaring the traffic to be a felony punishable with transportation.

    3
    0
  • Accordingly, in 1811, Brougham carried through parliament a bill declaring the traffic to be a felony punishable with transportation.

    3
    0
  • At this time also he exerted himself for the reform of justice in the ecclesiastical courts, for the uniformity of the law of marriage (which he held should be a purely civil contract) and for giving prisoners charged with felony the benefit of counsel.

    3
    1
  • At some indeterminate later period, the " clerk " was tried for felony by a jury in the king's court and then "pleaded his clergy," after conviction there, and was remitted to the ordinary for ecclesiastical punishment.

    3
    2
  • Under this act powers are given to the secretary of state to make an order requiring an alien to leave the United Kingdom within a time fixed by the order and thereafter to remain outside the United Kingdom, subject to certain conditions, provided it is certified to him that the alien has been convicted of any felony or misdemeanour or other offence for which the court has power to impose imprisonment without the option of a fine, &c., or that he has been sentenced in a foreign country with which there is an extradition treaty, for a crime not being an offence of a political character.

    3
    2
  • c. 32, § 3, the endurance of a punishment on conviction of a felony not capital has the same effect as a pardon under the great seal.

    3
    4
  • After receiving the opinion of the law officers the cabinet decided to introduce a bill into parliament increasing in England the punishment for a conspiracy to commit a felony either within or without the United Kingdom.

    3
    18
  • making it felony " to sell, exchange or deliver within Scotland, or to the use of any Scottishman, any horse "; this, however, was very naturally repealed by James I.

    2
    3
  • It is well known that this became one of the most violently disputed questions at the Reformation, and that for eight years it was felony in England to defend sacerdotal marriage as permissible by the law of God (Statute of the Six Articles, 31 Hen.

    1
    1
  • the writ de odio et acid, used as early as the 12th century to prevent imprisonment on vexatious appeals of felony, and the writ of mainprise (de manucaptione), long obsolete if not abolished in England but which it was attempted to use in India so late as 1870.

    1
    1
  • (4) A person committed to prison for treason or felony shall, if he requires it, in the first week of the next term or the first day of the next session of oyer and terminer, be indicted in that term or session or else admitted to bail, unless it appears on affidavit that the witnesses for the crown are not ready; and if he is not indicted and tried in the second term or session after commitment, or if after trial he is acquitted, he shall be discharged from imprisonment.

    1
    1
  • Divorces may be obtained after residence of six months on the ground of adultery, cruelty, desertion or neglect for one year, habitual drunkenness for the same period, felony or insanity.

    1
    1
  • The district courts have exclusive jurisdiction in divorce, which may be granted because of impotency at time of marriage, adultery, wilful desertion for more than one year, wilful neglect to provide the necessities of life, habitual drunkenness, conviction for felony, intolerable cruelty, and permanent insanity which has existed for at least five years.

    1
    1
  • The land, therefore, escheated to the next heir, subject to the superior right of the crown to the forfeiture of the lands, - in the case of treason for ever, in the case of felony for a year and a day.

    1
    1
  • It is well known that this became one of the most violently disputed questions at the Reformation, and that for eight years it was felony in England to defend sacerdotal marriage as permissible by the law of God (Statute of the Six Articles, 31 Hen.

    1
    1
  • Persons guilty of treason or felony in any state or Territory and not restored to civil rights, idiots and insane persons, are excluded from the suffrage.

    1
    2
  • These courts have original jurisdiction in cases at law and in equity in which the value in controversy exceeds $50, in criminal cases amounting to felony, in all matters of probate, in actions for divorce, &c., and appellate jurisdiction in cases arising in the inferior courts.

    1
    2
  • Recognized causes for divorce are adultery, extreme cruelty, wilful desertion, wilful neglect, habitual intemperance or conviction for felony, The homestead of a head of a family consisting either of a farm not exceeding 160 acres or $2500 in value, or of a house and lot - the lot not exceeding 4 acre, and the house and lot not exceeding $2500 in value - is secured against debtors except in case of judgments obtained before the homestead was recorded as such, in case of labourers', mechanics' or vendors' liens, and in case of a debt secured by mortgage; if the owner is a married person the homestead cannot be mortgaged without the consent of both husband and wife.

    1
    2
  • " Lobbying " was made a felony; provisions were inserted against lotteries and stock-exchange gambling, to tax and control common carriers and great corporations, and to regulate telegraph, telephone, storage and wharfage charges.

    1
    2
  • In cases of treason the king had a right to the forfeited lands, but he was not allowed to establish a similar right in cases of felony.

    0
    0
  • A divorce may be granted only to one who has lived for at least one year in the state; among the recognized causes for divorce are desertion for two years, cruelty, insanity or physical incapacity at time of marriage, habitual drunkenness or excessive use of opium or other drugs, and the conviction of either party of felony.

    0
    0
  • The judicial system, revised by a constitutional amendment of 1891, consists of a supreme court of three members, elected for a term of six years, with civil jurisdiction only, largely appellate; a court of criminal appeals, of three members, elected for six years, with appellate jurisdiction in criminal cases; courts of civil appeals (number determined by the legislature) of three members each, elected for six years; district courts, each with one judge, elected for four years, with original jurisdiction in the more important civil and criminal (felony) cases and a limited appellate jurisdiction; county and justice of the peace courts with original jurisdiction in misdemeanours and petty civil cases.

    0
    0
  • The court has original jurisdiction in probate cases, in civil cases involving $1000 or less, and in criminal cases below the grade of felony.

    0
    0
  • This court has exclusive original jurisdiction in probate matters, and in counties with over 2000 inhabitants its jurisdiction may be extended by popular vote to include concurrent jurisdiction with the district courts in civil matters involving amounts less than $2000, and in criminal actions below the grade of felony.

    0
    0
  • By law, in Georgia, lobbying is a felony.

    0
    0
  • Formerly, a man was said to be dead in law (I) when he entered a monastery and became professed in religion; (2) when he abjured the realm; (3) when he was attainted of treason or felony.

    0
    0
  • The act abolishing sanctuaries (1623) did away with civil death by abjuration; and the Forfeiture Act 1870, that on attainder for treason or felony.

    0
    0
  • If a woman administers to herself any poison or other noxious thing, or unlawfully uses any instrument or other means to procure her own miscarriage, she is guilty of felony.

    0
    0
  • The governor was chosen by the joint vote of the council and assembly; he was president of the council, with a casting vote; he was chancellor, captain-general and commander-in-chief of the militia; he had three members of the legislature to act as a privy-council; and he, with the council (of which seven formed a quorum), constituted " the Court of Appeals in the last resort in all causes of law, as heretofore," which, in addition, had " the power of granting pardons to criminals, after condemnation, in all cases of treason, felony or other offences."

    0
    0
  • Lord Derby's second administration of 1858 lasted but a single year, Palmerston having casually been defeated on a measure for removing conspiracies to murder abroad from the class of misdemeanour to that of felony, which was introduced in consequence of Orsini's attempt on the life of the emperor of the French.

    0
    0
  • The resultant legislature (at Pawnee, later at Shawnee Mission) adopted the laws of Missouri almost en bloc, made it a felony to utter a word against slavery, made extreme pro-slavery views a qualification for office, declared death the penalty for aiding a slave to escape, and in general repudiated liberty for its opponents., The radical free-state men thereupon began the importation of rifles.

    0
    0
  • The secretary of state is exofficio auditor; and he acts as governor if the regularly elected ' Excepting persons under guardianship, those weak-minded or insane, those convicted (without restoration to civil rights) of treason or felony, and those who have engaged (directly or indirectly) in a duel.

    0
    0
  • Among the grounds for a divorce are adultery, extreme cruelty, habitual drunkenness, gross neglect of duty and imprisonment for felony.

    0
    0
  • By a statute of 1604 the offence was made a felony.

    0
    0
  • In the United States the law in regard to bigamy is practically founded on the English statute of 1604, with the exception that imprisonment and a fine, varying in the different states, were substituted instead of making the offence a felony.

    0
    0
  • Besides escheat for defect of heirs, there was formerly also escheat propter delictum tenentis, or by the corruption of the blood of the tenant through attainder consequent on conviction and sentence for treason or felony.

    0
    0
  • All male persons who are citizens of the United States or have declared their intention to become such at least thirty days before an election have the right of suffrage provided they have attained the age of twenty-one years, have resided in the state six months, are not of unsound mind, and have not been convicted of treason or felony.

    0
    0
  • An assistant District Attorney had called about prosecuting a felony drug possession, but the second note was upsetting.

    0
    0
  • convicted of a third felony in his or her lifetime will be sentenced to life imprisonment for the third felony.

    0
    0
  • In most states, it is perfectly legal to bust a cap in someone who is involved in committing a violent felony.

    0
    0
  • To compound the felony, Tommy Mooney was sent off for apparently stamping on Tony Grant.

    0
    0
  • felony offenses business m m of the pay.

    0
    0
  • felony violations of federal laws, it said.

    0
    0
  • felony conviction in such an animal shooting case.

    0
    0
  • felony counts, now including conspiracy with persons unknown.

    0
    0
  • felony charges, for ` ` allegedly trying to destroy ' ' the system.

    0
    0
  • felony trials which will be made available in 35mm microfilm format with approximately 57,000 page sides.

    0
    0
  • Tables, pictures etc: Tables: tabular details relating to treason felony prisoners (offense, sentence, age, medical records etc.

    0
    0
  • At the spring assizes of 5833, a true bill was found by the grand jury of the boro for a capital felony.

    0
    0
  • Killing by forethought felony was unnatural, against the law of nature.

    0
    0
  • felony times as comp felonies and elected in this.

    0
    0
  • forethought felony was unnatural, against the law of nature.

    0
    0
  • Of the tops the felony offenses business m m of the pay.

    0
    0
  • treason felony prisoners (offense, sentence, age, medical records etc.

    0
    0
  • unseat an unstable dictator armed with nuclear weapons would be a felony.

    0
    0
  • Paupers, insane, and those convicted of treason, felony or bribery in an election are barred, " while the disability continues," and no person in the military, naval or marine service of the United States is deemed.

    0
    0
  • It has original jurisdiction in cases of habeas corpus, mandamus and prohibition, and appellate jurisdiction in cases involving a greater amount than one hundred dollars; concerning title or boundary of lands, probate of wills; the appointment or qualification of personal representatives, guardians, curators, committees, &c.; concerning a mill, roadway, ferry or landing; the right of a corporation or county to levy tolls or taxes; in cases of quo warranto, habeas corpus, mandamus, certiorari and prohibition, and all others involving freedom or the constitutionalit y of a law; in criminal cases where there has been a conviction for felony or misdemeanour in a circuit, criminal or intermediate court; and in cases relating to the public revenues.

    0
    0
  • In cases of treason the king had a right to the forfeited lands, but he was not allowed to establish a similar right in cases of felony.

    0
    0
  • In the 13th century it was recognized that a " clerk " for felony was subject only to ecclesiastical trial and punishment; punishment which might involve lifelong imprisonment.

    0
    0
  • At some indeterminate later period, the " clerk " was tried for felony by a jury in the king's court and then "pleaded his clergy," after conviction there, and was remitted to the ordinary for ecclesiastical punishment.

    0
    0
  • Bigamy (in its modern sense) was thus made felony (i Jac. I.

    0
    0
  • Persons guilty of treason or felony in any state or Territory and not restored to civil rights, idiots and insane persons, are excluded from the suffrage.

    0
    0
  • For divorce a residence in the state of six months is necessary; the grounds for divorce are desertion or neglect to provide for one year, conviction of felony, habitual drunkenness, cruelty or physical incapacity.

    0
    0
  • A divorce may be granted only to one who has lived for at least one year in the state; among the recognized causes for divorce are desertion for two years, cruelty, insanity or physical incapacity at time of marriage, habitual drunkenness or excessive use of opium or other drugs, and the conviction of either party of felony.

    0
    0
  • This exception remained in force until the ist of December 1908, after which time all who were on the list became (unless disqualified because convicted of felony) life voters, but new applicants had to stand the educational test.

    0
    0
  • At this time also he exerted himself for the reform of justice in the ecclesiastical courts, for the uniformity of the law of marriage (which he held should be a purely civil contract) and for giving prisoners charged with felony the benefit of counsel.

    0
    0
  • To the astonishment of everybody, Lord Cardigan escaped from a capital charge of felony because the full name of his antagonist (Harvey Garnett Phipps Tuckett) was not legally proved.

    0
    0
  • c. 32, § 3, the endurance of a punishment on conviction of a felony not capital has the same effect as a pardon under the great seal.

    0
    0
  • The judicial system, revised by a constitutional amendment of 1891, consists of a supreme court of three members, elected for a term of six years, with civil jurisdiction only, largely appellate; a court of criminal appeals, of three members, elected for six years, with appellate jurisdiction in criminal cases; courts of civil appeals (number determined by the legislature) of three members each, elected for six years; district courts, each with one judge, elected for four years, with original jurisdiction in the more important civil and criminal (felony) cases and a limited appellate jurisdiction; county and justice of the peace courts with original jurisdiction in misdemeanours and petty civil cases.

    0
    0
  • The causes for a divorce are cruelty, adultery, desertion for three years, or conviction after marriage of a felony and imprisonment in the state prison without being pardoned within one year after conviction; the plaintiff must reside in the county six months before beginning suit.

    0
    0
  • A petition for a divorce may be presented after a residence within the state of one year immediately preceding, and a decree may be granted against the defendant if judged guilty of adultery, desertion for two years without reasonable cause, habitual drunkenness, such inhuman treatment as to endanger the life of the plaintiff, or if convicted of felony after marriage.

    0
    0
  • These courts have original jurisdiction in cases at law and in equity in which the value in controversy exceeds $50, in criminal cases amounting to felony, in all matters of probate, in actions for divorce, &c., and appellate jurisdiction in cases arising in the inferior courts.

    0
    0
  • Recognized causes for divorce are adultery, extreme cruelty, wilful desertion, wilful neglect, habitual intemperance or conviction for felony, The homestead of a head of a family consisting either of a farm not exceeding 160 acres or $2500 in value, or of a house and lot - the lot not exceeding 4 acre, and the house and lot not exceeding $2500 in value - is secured against debtors except in case of judgments obtained before the homestead was recorded as such, in case of labourers', mechanics' or vendors' liens, and in case of a debt secured by mortgage; if the owner is a married person the homestead cannot be mortgaged without the consent of both husband and wife.

    0
    0
  • The suffrage is granted to all males resident in an election precinct for ten days, in the county for thirty days, in the state for six months, in the United States for one year, and 21 years of age, except those under guardianship or insane, and those convicted of treason or felony, unless restored to civil rights.

    0
    0
  • The court has original jurisdiction in probate cases, in civil cases involving $1000 or less, and in criminal cases below the grade of felony.

    0
    0
  • This court has exclusive original jurisdiction in probate matters, and in counties with over 2000 inhabitants its jurisdiction may be extended by popular vote to include concurrent jurisdiction with the district courts in civil matters involving amounts less than $2000, and in criminal actions below the grade of felony.

    0
    0
  • The grounds for absolute divorce are adultery, cruelty, desertion (one year), neglect (one year), habitual drunkenness (one year) and conviction for felony; residence in the state for one year is required before application for divorce.

    0
    0
  • 4), for loss of property caused by felony, or - under the Riot (Damages) Act 1886 - to persons whose property has been stolen, destroyed or injured by rioters (see Riot).

    0
    0
  • By law, in Georgia, lobbying is a felony.

    0
    0
  • In protest, the Georgia House of Representatives, holding that the United States Supreme Court had no constitutional power to try suits against a sovereign state, resolved that any Federal marshal who should attempt to execute the court's decision would be " guilty of felony, and shall suffer death, without benefit of clergy, by being hanged."

    0
    0
  • Formerly, a man was said to be dead in law (I) when he entered a monastery and became professed in religion; (2) when he abjured the realm; (3) when he was attainted of treason or felony.

    0
    0
  • The act abolishing sanctuaries (1623) did away with civil death by abjuration; and the Forfeiture Act 1870, that on attainder for treason or felony.

    0
    0
  • Whatever may have been the exact view taken by the common law, the offence was made statutory by an act of 1803, making the attempt to cause the miscarriage of a woman, not being, or not being proved, to be quick with child, a felony, punishable with fine, imprisonment, whipping or transportation for any term not exceeding fourteen years.

    0
    0
  • The English law on the subject is now governed by the Offences against the Person Act 1861, which makes the attempting to cause miscarriage by administering poison or other noxious thing, or unlawfully using any instrument equally a felony, whether the woman be, or be not, with child.

    0
    0
  • If a woman administers to herself any poison or other noxious thing, or unlawfully uses any instrument or other means to procure her own miscarriage, she is guilty of felony.

    0
    0
  • One scribbler abused Johnson for being blear-eyed, another for being a pensioner; a third informed the world that one of the doctor's uncles had been convicted of felony in Scotland, and had found that there was in that country one tree capable of supportin the weight of an Englishman.

    0
    0
  • Under this act powers are given to the secretary of state to make an order requiring an alien to leave the United Kingdom within a time fixed by the order and thereafter to remain outside the United Kingdom, subject to certain conditions, provided it is certified to him that the alien has been convicted of any felony or misdemeanour or other offence for which the court has power to impose imprisonment without the option of a fine, &c., or that he has been sentenced in a foreign country with which there is an extradition treaty, for a crime not being an offence of a political character.

    0
    0
  • Disfranchisement is brought about by conviction for bribery, felony or infamous crime, and an attempt to vote after such conviction is a felony.

    0
    0
  • Grounds for divorce are impotence of either party at time of marriage, previous marriage, adultery, wilful desertion for two years, habitual drunkenness, attempt on life, extreme and repeated cruelty, and conviction of felony or other infamous crime.

    0
    0
  • " Lobbying " was made a felony; provisions were inserted against lotteries and stock-exchange gambling, to tax and control common carriers and great corporations, and to regulate telegraph, telephone, storage and wharfage charges.

    0
    0
  • Justices of the peace, one of whom is elected biennially in each precinct, have jurisdiction in civil actions in which the amount in controversy does not exceed $200 and the title to or boundary of real estate is not involved, and in criminal actions less than a felony and in which the punishment prescribed by law does not exceed a fine of $100 and imprisonment for six months.

    0
    0
  • The causes for a divorce are adultery, incompetency, conviction of a felony and sentence to imprisonment therefor after marriage, conviction of a felony or infamous crime before marriage provided it was unknown to the other party, habitual drunkenness, extreme cruelty, intolerable indignities, neglect of the husband to provide the common necessaries of life, vagrancy of the husband and pregnancy of the wife before marriage by another man than her husband and without his knowledge.

    0
    0
  • The desertion of a wife or of children under fifteen years of age is a felony punishable with imprisonment for not more than three years nor less than one year.

    0
    0
  • But if the prisoner has been imprisoned on a charge of, or under sentence for, high treason, felony or misdemeanour, the rescue is high treason, felony or misdemeanour.

    0
    0
  • the writ de odio et acid, used as early as the 12th century to prevent imprisonment on vexatious appeals of felony, and the writ of mainprise (de manucaptione), long obsolete if not abolished in England but which it was attempted to use in India so late as 1870.

    0
    0
  • It recites that great delays have been used by sheriffs and gaolers in making returns of writs of habeas corpus directed to them; and for the prevention thereof, and the more speedy relief of all persons imprisoned for criminal or supposed criminal matters, it enacts in substance as follows: (r) When a writ of habeas corpus is directed to a sheriff or other person in charge of a prisoner, he must within 3, 10 or 20 days, according to the distance of the place of commitment, bring the body of his prisoner to the court, with the true cause of his detainer or imprisonment - unless the commitment was for treason or felony plainly expressed in the warrant of commitment.

    0
    0
  • (2) If any person be committed for any crime - unless for treason or felony plainly expressed in the warrant - it shall be lawful for such person or persons (other than persons convicted or in execution by legal process) in time of vacation, to appeal to the lord chancellor as a judge, who shall issue a habeas corpus returnable immediately, and on the return thereof shall discharge the prisoner on giving security for his appearance before the proper court - unless the party so committed is detained upon a legal process or under a justice's warrant for a non-bailable offence.

    0
    0
  • (4) A person committed to prison for treason or felony shall, if he requires it, in the first week of the next term or the first day of the next session of oyer and terminer, be indicted in that term or session or else admitted to bail, unless it appears on affidavit that the witnesses for the crown are not ready; and if he is not indicted and tried in the second term or session after commitment, or if after trial he is acquitted, he shall be discharged from imprisonment.

    0
    0
  • (5) No inhabitant of England (except persons contracting, or, after conviction for felony, electing to be transported) shall be sent prisoner to Scotland, Ireland, Jersey, &c., or any place beyond the seas.

    0
    0
  • It was applied to treason felony in 1848.

    0
    0
  • Divorces may be obtained after residence of six months on the ground of adultery, cruelty, desertion or neglect for one year, habitual drunkenness for the same period, felony or insanity.

    0
    0
  • The governor was chosen by the joint vote of the council and assembly; he was president of the council, with a casting vote; he was chancellor, captain-general and commander-in-chief of the militia; he had three members of the legislature to act as a privy-council; and he, with the council (of which seven formed a quorum), constituted " the Court of Appeals in the last resort in all causes of law, as heretofore," which, in addition, had " the power of granting pardons to criminals, after condemnation, in all cases of treason, felony or other offences."

    0
    0
  • Lord Derby's second administration of 1858 lasted but a single year, Palmerston having casually been defeated on a measure for removing conspiracies to murder abroad from the class of misdemeanour to that of felony, which was introduced in consequence of Orsini's attempt on the life of the emperor of the French.

    0
    0
  • A person so qualified is entitled to be enrolled as a burgess, or registered as a county elector (as the case may be), unless he is alien, has during the qualifying period received union or parochial relief or other alms, or is disentitled under some act of parliament such as the Corrupt Practices Act, the Felony Act, &c. The lists of burgesses and county electors are prepared annually by the overseers of each parish in the borough or county, and are revised by the revising barrister at courts holden by him for the purpose in September or October of each year.

    0
    0
  • The district courts have exclusive jurisdiction in divorce, which may be granted because of impotency at time of marriage, adultery, wilful desertion for more than one year, wilful neglect to provide the necessities of life, habitual drunkenness, conviction for felony, intolerable cruelty, and permanent insanity which has existed for at least five years.

    0
    0
  • One year's residence is necessary to secure a divorce, for which the causes recognized are a conviction of felony, habitual drunkenness for one year, physical incapacity, desertion for one year and cruelty or personal indignities.

    0
    0
  • The resultant legislature (at Pawnee, later at Shawnee Mission) adopted the laws of Missouri almost en bloc, made it a felony to utter a word against slavery, made extreme pro-slavery views a qualification for office, declared death the penalty for aiding a slave to escape, and in general repudiated liberty for its opponents., The radical free-state men thereupon began the importation of rifles.

    0
    0
  • After receiving the opinion of the law officers the cabinet decided to introduce a bill into parliament increasing in England the punishment for a conspiracy to commit a felony either within or without the United Kingdom.

    0
    0
  • The secretary of state is exofficio auditor; and he acts as governor if the regularly elected ' Excepting persons under guardianship, those weak-minded or insane, those convicted (without restoration to civil rights) of treason or felony, and those who have engaged (directly or indirectly) in a duel.

    0
    0
  • Among the grounds for a divorce are adultery, extreme cruelty, habitual drunkenness, gross neglect of duty and imprisonment for felony.

    0
    0
  • By a statute of 1604 the offence was made a felony.

    0
    0
  • In the United States the law in regard to bigamy is practically founded on the English statute of 1604, with the exception that imprisonment and a fine, varying in the different states, were substituted instead of making the offence a felony.

    0
    0
  • Besides escheat for defect of heirs, there was formerly also escheat propter delictum tenentis, or by the corruption of the blood of the tenant through attainder consequent on conviction and sentence for treason or felony.

    0
    0
  • The land, therefore, escheated to the next heir, subject to the superior right of the crown to the forfeiture of the lands, - in the case of treason for ever, in the case of felony for a year and a day.

    0
    0
  • All this was abolished by the Felony Act 1870, which provided for the appointment of an administrator to the property of the convict.

    0
    0
  • making it felony " to sell, exchange or deliver within Scotland, or to the use of any Scottishman, any horse "; this, however, was very naturally repealed by James I.

    0
    0
  • All male persons who are citizens of the United States or have declared their intention to become such at least thirty days before an election have the right of suffrage provided they have attained the age of twenty-one years, have resided in the state six months, are not of unsound mind, and have not been convicted of treason or felony.

    0
    0
  • Our criminal laws make it a felony to conspire to torture a detainee abroad.

    0
    0
  • An attempt to unseat an unstable dictator armed with nuclear weapons would be a felony.

    0
    0
  • Monster by Walter Dean Meyers looks at a young man's life as he is being prosecuted for felony murder.

    0
    0
  • In some cases, using a credit card number that is created by a generator download - and which already belongs to a valid cardholder- can be a felony depending on the amount charged and the location in which the theft occurs.

    0
    0
  • Her most recent incident is a felony drug possession charge.

    0
    0
  • His service comes as a result of felony weapon and drug charges from 2006.

    0
    0
  • Although there are plenty of reasons why Steve-O needs to take a break and relax from pranks that usually involve a great deal of physical pain, another reason for him to slow down is his recent drug charge of felony cocaine possession.

    0
    0
  • Da Brat was arrested and charged with felony aggravated assault.

    0
    0
  • No word yet on formal charges, but the pair were arrested under "suspicion of felony vandalism" as the destroyed video camera is said to be worth an estimated $10,000.

    0
    0
  • Knight is currently charged with one count of misdemeanor battery and two felony counts of possession of a controlled substance.

    0
    0
  • Stern and the doctors are being charged with various felony counts, including conspiracy to prescribe illegal drugs to Smith.

    0
    0
  • The state of California is charging the trio with a total of eight felony counts.

    0
    0
  • Chris Brown cops a plea in the felony assault case brought against him after the alleged beating of his ex-girlfriend Rihanna.

    0
    0
  • By pleading guilty to felony assault, Chris Brown avoided a sentence that could have had him in jail for up to four and a half years.

    0
    0
  • Depending on the level of the weapons charge felony, the maximum sentence is seven years in prison.

    0
    0
  • In cases such as Lil Wayne's, it is considered a "Level D" violent felony and carries a maximum sentence of one year in prison.

    0
    0
  • Michael Douglas begs mercy for his son Cameron, who New York police arrested in August of last year and charged with felony possession of meth with intent to distribute.

    0
    0
  • On Christmas Day 2009, Sheen was arrested and charged with felony menacing, third-degree assault and criminal mischief when police were called to the home he shared with Mueller.

    0
    0
  • If students have a felony on their records, they must have completed all requirements of the sentencing (including being finished with any probationary periods).

    0
    0
  • The awarding body will eliminate an applicant from consideration if he pled no contest or received a conviction for a felony crime.

    0
    0
  • In some cases, shipping wine to certain states is considered a felony.

    0
    0
  • Some employers will only ask about felony convictions within the previous five years, but others will want to know about any prior convictions.

    0
    0
  • University of Chicago Hospitals & Clinics, a 1999 court case in which a man was terminated for lying about his past felony conviction.

    0
    0
  • Applicants must disclose whether they have ever been convicted of or pleaded guilty or no contest to a misdemeanor or a felony offense for which they have not received a pardon.

    0
    0
  • Brown was charged in early March for felony assault and making criminal threats.

    0
    0
  • You cannot have ever been convicted of a felony, misdemeanor or ever had a restraining order issued against you.

    0
    0
  • The causes for a divorce are cruelty, adultery, desertion for three years, or conviction after marriage of a felony and imprisonment in the state prison without being pardoned within one year after conviction; the plaintiff must reside in the county six months before beginning suit.

    0
    1
  • A petition for a divorce may be presented after a residence within the state of one year immediately preceding, and a decree may be granted against the defendant if judged guilty of adultery, desertion for two years without reasonable cause, habitual drunkenness, such inhuman treatment as to endanger the life of the plaintiff, or if convicted of felony after marriage.

    0
    1
  • The suffrage is granted to all males resident in an election precinct for ten days, in the county for thirty days, in the state for six months, in the United States for one year, and 21 years of age, except those under guardianship or insane, and those convicted of treason or felony, unless restored to civil rights.

    0
    1
  • The grounds for absolute divorce are adultery, cruelty, desertion (one year), neglect (one year), habitual drunkenness (one year) and conviction for felony; residence in the state for one year is required before application for divorce.

    0
    1
  • Whatever may have been the exact view taken by the common law, the offence was made statutory by an act of 1803, making the attempt to cause the miscarriage of a woman, not being, or not being proved, to be quick with child, a felony, punishable with fine, imprisonment, whipping or transportation for any term not exceeding fourteen years.

    0
    1
  • The English law on the subject is now governed by the Offences against the Person Act 1861, which makes the attempting to cause miscarriage by administering poison or other noxious thing, or unlawfully using any instrument equally a felony, whether the woman be, or be not, with child.

    0
    1
  • One scribbler abused Johnson for being blear-eyed, another for being a pensioner; a third informed the world that one of the doctor's uncles had been convicted of felony in Scotland, and had found that there was in that country one tree capable of supportin the weight of an Englishman.

    0
    1
  • Disfranchisement is brought about by conviction for bribery, felony or infamous crime, and an attempt to vote after such conviction is a felony.

    0
    1
  • Grounds for divorce are impotence of either party at time of marriage, previous marriage, adultery, wilful desertion for two years, habitual drunkenness, attempt on life, extreme and repeated cruelty, and conviction of felony or other infamous crime.

    0
    1
  • In 1772 it was decided by the English courts that a slave as soon as he set foot on the soil of the British Isles became free; the slave trade, however, continued actively until 1807, when an Act was passed to prevent British subjects dealing in slaves; in 1811 the traffic in slaves was declared to be felony; in 1833 the status of slavery was abolished throughout the British Dominions.

    0
    1
  • The causes for a divorce are adultery, incompetency, conviction of a felony and sentence to imprisonment therefor after marriage, conviction of a felony or infamous crime before marriage provided it was unknown to the other party, habitual drunkenness, extreme cruelty, intolerable indignities, neglect of the husband to provide the common necessaries of life, vagrancy of the husband and pregnancy of the wife before marriage by another man than her husband and without his knowledge.

    0
    1
  • A person so qualified is entitled to be enrolled as a burgess, or registered as a county elector (as the case may be), unless he is alien, has during the qualifying period received union or parochial relief or other alms, or is disentitled under some act of parliament such as the Corrupt Practices Act, the Felony Act, &c. The lists of burgesses and county electors are prepared annually by the overseers of each parish in the borough or county, and are revised by the revising barrister at courts holden by him for the purpose in September or October of each year.

    0
    1
  • In 1772 it was decided by the English courts that a slave as soon as he set foot on the soil of the British Isles became free; the slave trade, however, continued actively until 1807, when an Act was passed to prevent British subjects dealing in slaves; in 1811 the traffic in slaves was declared to be felony; in 1833 the status of slavery was abolished throughout the British Dominions.

    0
    1
Browse other sentences examples →