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fellow

fellow

fellow Sentence Examples

  • The fellow worker promised to dig around and telephone back.

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  • I would ask my fellow fool for a boon.

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  • "Aesop is a wise fellow," said his master.

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  • The story was unknown to Arthur Duck, fellow of All Souls, who wrote Chicheley's life in 1617.

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  • Educated at Harrow, Brasenose College, Oxford, and Göttingen, he was elected fellow of Brasenose and in 1884 keeper of the Ashmolean Museum at Oxford, holding this post till 1908.

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  • I looked and saw this little fellow struggling in the water.

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  • I lined up behind an old fellow whose odor almost caused me to skip the meal entirely but I stuck with it and was rewarded by a tasty bowl of chicken soup and a fresh baked roll.

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  • His father, a schoolmaster, sent him to Trinity College, Cambridge, where he was elected a fellow in 1760.

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  • "The poor, timid fellow!" said the blacksmith.

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  • We even scared off the fellow who sold Byrne his first motor home.

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  • Cassie couldn't help but smile at the way Darcie described her fellow gender.

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  • He's just a fellow worker.

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  • Indeed, her whole body is so finely organized that she seems to use it as a medium for bringing herself into closer relations with her fellow creatures.

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  • SIR CHRISTOPHER WREN (1632-1723), English architect, the son of a clergyman, was born at East Knoyle, Wiltshire, on the 10th of October 1632; he entered at Wadham College, Oxford, in 1646, took his degree in 1650, and in 1653 was made a fellow of All Souls.

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  • SIR CHRISTOPHER WREN (1632-1723), English architect, the son of a clergyman, was born at East Knoyle, Wiltshire, on the 10th of October 1632; he entered at Wadham College, Oxford, in 1646, took his degree in 1650, and in 1653 was made a fellow of All Souls.

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  • At first the Treveri resisted the appeal of Civilis and his Batavi to join the revolt, and built a defensive wall from Trier to Andernach, but soon after the two Treverans, Tutor and Classicus, led their fellow tribesmen, aided by the Lingones (Langres), in the attempt to set up a "Gallic empire."

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  • At first the Treveri resisted the appeal of Civilis and his Batavi to join the revolt, and built a defensive wall from Trier to Andernach, but soon after the two Treverans, Tutor and Classicus, led their fellow tribesmen, aided by the Lingones (Langres), in the attempt to set up a "Gallic empire."

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  • Dean's suggestion of placing the little fellow out of doors in the trash was overruled by his more compassionate wife who pointed out the resulting reduced chances of January survival.

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  • The free enterprise system—the greatest creator of wealth the world has known—will continue to produce the material gains we enjoy today and to reward most those who serve their fellow humans best.

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  • The little fellow ran into the street.

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  • Eventually Spartacus and many of his followers were killed and six thousand of his fellow rebelling slaves were crucified, a slow and agonizing form of death.

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  • "Why no, my dear fellow," said the astonished narrator, shrugging his shoulders.

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  • He didn't know a name or a number but the fellow had black hair.

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  • Between the Dawkins boys and that Westlake fellow, I don't even have a room to call my own.

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  • She cut his rope, figuring on hooking back up with that Ryland fellow but then his girlfriend showed up and in no uncertain terms pointed out why that was a dead end.

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  • "That's some of my fellow jurors," he said.

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  • Would such a gentle animal be guilty of eating a fellow creature?

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  • "Your Royal Highness and Fellow Citizens," he began; "the small cat you see a prisoner before you is accused of the crime of first murdering and then eating our esteemed Ruler's fat piglet--or else first eating and then murdering it.

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  • His parents are too poor to pay to have the little fellow sent to school; so, instead of giving me a dog, the gentlemen are going to help make Tommy's life as bright and joyous as mine.

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  • Richard Andrews, the king's secretary, like Chicheley himself a scholar of Winchester and fellow of New College, was named as first warden.

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  • In 1561 he became a fellow of his college and took holy orders.

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  • Little is known with certainty of his university career beyond the facts that he became a fellow of Jesus College in 1510 or 1511, that he had soon after to vacate his fellowship, owing to his marriage to " Black Joan," a relative of the landlady of the Dolphin Inn, and that he was reinstated in it on the death of his wife, which occurred in childbirth before the lapse of the year of grace allowed by the statutes.

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  • Little is known with certainty of his university career beyond the facts that he became a fellow of Jesus College in 1510 or 1511, that he had soon after to vacate his fellowship, owing to his marriage to " Black Joan," a relative of the landlady of the Dolphin Inn, and that he was reinstated in it on the death of his wife, which occurred in childbirth before the lapse of the year of grace allowed by the statutes.

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  • No, don't marry, my dear fellow; don't marry! concluded Prince Andrew.

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  • Here he came into contact with the Magyar refugees, who had great hopes of the high-born, high-gifted youth who was also a fellow sufferer, a large portion of his immense estates having been confiscated by the emperor.

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  • According to Strype, he was invited about this time to become a fellow of the college founded by Cardinal Wolsey at Oxford; but Dean Hook shows that there is some reason to doubt this.

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  • According to Strype, he was invited about this time to become a fellow of the college founded by Cardinal Wolsey at Oxford; but Dean Hook shows that there is some reason to doubt this.

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  • I thought they desired the freedom of their fellow men as well as their own.

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  • What an argumentative fellow you are, Monsieur Pierre!

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  • She might have been a fellow juror, but Dean sensed that he was watching Jennifer Radisson in his rearview mirror.

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  • What about the three name fellow we were discussing before dinner?

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  • Dean explained about his visit from Byrne's fellow employee and the young man's story about the possible girl friend.

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  • He was a fellow of the Royal, Royal Astronomical, Geological and other scientific societies.

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  • He was a fellow of the Royal, Royal Astronomical, Geological and other scientific societies.

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  • Jakey was the sweetest little fellow you can imagine, but he was poor and blind.

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  • What a fellow you are for dancing!

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  • Teachers, cops, girls, judges and fellow gangsters had all shared the frustration of not knowing Billie from Willie.

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  • Men went from the west to the east killing their fellow men, and the event was accompanied by phrases about the glory of France, the baseness of England, and so on.

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  • The Spartans said to one another, Let us throw this fellow into the rocky chasm.

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  • One cute little fellow stole her hair-ribbon, and another tried to snatch the flowers out of her hat.

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  • If they would only expend the same amount of energy loving their fellow men, the devil would die in his own tracks of ennui.

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  • It's time I kick that Westlake fellow off my computer so's I can post my bargains for the world to see.

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  • "I finally got a hold of that auctioneer fellow," Fred said.

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  • This Gruber fellow tossed me out of the house like a Fuller Brush Jehovah Witness selling life insurance.

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  • A fellow can't even close his eyes around here.

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  • This Gruber fellow tossed me out of the house like a Fuller Brush Jehovah Witness selling life insurance.

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  • "That fellow has no manners," she said.

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  • At length the chief of the band called to Otanes and said, "Young fellow, have you anything worth taking?"

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  • "You are a brave fellow, Mr. Ant," he said; "but you have a heavy load to carry."

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  • One night he left the beautiful palace which his father had given to him and went out into the world to do good and to help his fellow men.

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  • The little fellow who whirls his "New York Flyer" round the nursery, making "horseshoe curves" undreamed of by less imaginative engineers, is concentrating his whole soul on his toy locomotive.

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  • She was delighted, and showed her pleasure by hugging and kissing the little fellow, which embarrassed him very much.

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  • The keeper of the bears made one big black fellow stand on his hind legs and hold out his great paw to us, which Helen shook politely.

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  • "He's a low fellow, say what you will," remarked Prince Hippolyte.

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  • A fellow can't even close his eyes around here.

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  • On the 23rd of August 1480, the college being completed, the great west window being contracted to be made after the fashion of that at All Souls' College, a new president, Richard Mayhew, fellow of New College, was installed on the 23rd of August 1480, and statutes were promulgated.

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  • degrees at Oxford, Edinburgh and Dublin, and was made a fellow of the Royal Society.

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  • Yes, he is a fine fellow and a very kind relation.

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  • Her birth itself was romantic. Her father was playing a country dance at the house of a fellow officer, the future husband of Sophie's sister, when he was told that his wife, who had not long left the room, had borne him a daughter.

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  • Her birth itself was romantic. Her father was playing a country dance at the house of a fellow officer, the future husband of Sophie's sister, when he was told that his wife, who had not long left the room, had borne him a daughter.

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  • Prince Sergey is a fine fellow and clever.

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  • I wouldn't wanted to be in this Josh fellow's shorts when Ed Plotke caught up with him!

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  • Anne Quincy Martin, after she married the minister fellow.

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  • We thought it might be this Cleary fellow.

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  • The latter are dug up with the tusks; the left one being generally employed in this service, and thus becoming much more worn than its fellow.

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  • there in even greater state, when Master William Grocyn, "the Grecian," a fellow of New College, "responded," in divinity.

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  • In 1832 he was elected fellow of his college, and in the following year he was ordained, and became head master of a private school at Stockwell.

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  • Pritchard became a fellow of New College, Oxford, in 1883, and an honorary fellow of St John's College, Cambridge, in 1886.

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  • In 1834 he became a fellow of Trinity, in 1853 professor of Greek (to which a canonry in Ely Cathedral was then for the first time attached), and in 1866 master of his college.

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  • He became a fellow of Queens' College, Cambridge, in 1530, and in 1533 was appointed a public reader or professor.

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  • He was elected fellow of Balliol in 1850 and Savilian professor of geometry in 1861, and in 1874 was appointed keeper of the university museum.

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  • Herschel being senior), was elected fellow of his college in 1814, became assistant tutor in 1815 and full tutor in 1823.

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  • ACCEPTED FREWEN (1588-1664), archbishop of York, was born at Northiam, in Sussex, and educated at Magdalen College, Oxford, where in 1612 he became a fellow.

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  • A little-known book which appears to have escaped the attention of most writers on the history of modern geography was published at Oxford in 1625 by Nathanael Carpenter, fellow of Exeter College, with the title Geographie delineated forth Carpenter.

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  • The premaxilla is always unpaired, but each half has three long processes directed backwards; one fuses with the maxillary bone, another helps to form the anterior part of the palate, while the third, together with its fellow, forms the " culmen " and extends backwards to the frontals, or rather to the ethmoid which there crops up on the surface.

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  • He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society on the 26th of February 1807; he married and went to live in London in the same year, and in 1811 succeeded Maskelyne as astronomer-royal.

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  • On the 1st of October 1824 he was elected fellow of Trinity, and in December 1826 was appointed Lucasian professor of mathematics in succession to Thomas Turton.

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  • He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society in 1836, its president in 1871, and received both the Copley and Royal medals.

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  • He became a fellow of the British Academy.

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  • He was educated at Pembroke College, Oxford, of which college (after taking a first class in mathematics in 1840 and gaining the university mathematical scholarship in 1842) he becalm fellow in 1844 and tutor and mathematical lecturer in 1845.

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  • He was also a curator of the Bodleian Library, an honorary fellow of Queen's College, a governor of Winchester College and a visitor of Greenwich Observatory.

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  • He joined the Franciscan order in early life, and studied at Merton College, Oxford, of which he is said to have been a fellow.

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  • Each length was thus fastened to a sleeper at one end, while at the other it was socketed into the end of its fellow.

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  • and was elected fellow in 1538.

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  • Lockyer was elected a fellow of the Royal Society in 1869, and received the Rumford medal in 1874.

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  • He graduated senior classic and 30th wrangler, and was elected a fellow of his college.

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  • For his work on etherification Williamson in 1862 received a Royal medal from the Royal Society, of which he became a fellow in 1855, and which he served as foreign secretary from 1873 to 1889.

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  • In 1750 he was admitted a fellow of the Royal Society; and in 1754 he published, at Oxford, his Antiquities of Cornwall (2nd ed., London, 1769).

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  • In 1567 he was elected a fellow of his college, and subsequently was chosen lecturer of St Clement's church, Cambridge, where he preached to admiring audiences for many years.

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  • " The names of the Jewish soldiers who died in the cause of Italian liberty were placed along with those of their Christian fellow soldiers on the monuments erected in their honour " (Jewish Encyclopedia, vii.

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  • Before departing for the Orient, he married Miss Lou Henry, a fellow student at college, daughter of a banker at Monterey, Cal.

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  • JOHN STOKESLEY (c. 1475-1539), English prelate, was born at Colly Weston in Northamptonshire, and became a fellow of Magdalen College, serving also as a lecturer.

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  • Among the public offices held by the earl were those of lordlieutenant of Aberdeenshire, president of the society of Antiquaries from 1812 to 1846 and fellow of the Royal Society.

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  • From this an equally slender tube proceeds, which joins its fellow of the opposite side, and the two form a thick, walled tube, which opens on to the exterior within the bursa copulatrix through which the penis protrudes.

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  • In this Annelid later the sac in question joins its fellow, passing beneath the nerve cord exactly as in the leech, and also grows out to reach the exterior.

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  • He must have been elected fellow of Magdalen some years before; and as master of Magdalen College school he had under his charge three sons of Thomas Grey, first marquess of Dorset.

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  • He was elected a Perse scholar in 1628, and fellow of his college in 1633, but the best evidence of his diligence as a student is the enormous learning of which he showed so easy a command in after years.

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  • a heap of men and boys, but no body of a college, no one member, either fellow or scholar, having any legal title to his place, but thrust in by tyranny or chance."

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  • The first sign we have of his interest in economics is a letter (1749) on paper money, written to his fellow student the abbe de Cice, refuting the abbe Terrasson's defence of Law's system.

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  • He was educated at Bath, and at Queen's College, Oxford, of which he became fellow in 1869.

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  • As a fellow and lecturer of his college he remained in Cambridge for two years longer, and then left to take up the professorship of mathematics at Queen's College, Belfast.

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  • Spengel's observation of the osphradium and its nervesupply in these forms; the nerve to that organ, which is placed somewhat anteriorly - on the dorsal surface - being given off from the hinder part (visceral) of the right compound ganglion - the fellow to that marked A in fig.

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  • In 1855 he became an undergraduate member of Balliol College, Oxford, of which society he was, in 1860, elected fellow.

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  • 1906), fellow of Queen's College, in which the doctrine of the "English" or "empirical" philosophy was exhaustively examined.

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  • On the first of these visits he made the acquaintance of a fellow bibliophile in Petrarch, who records his impression (Epist.

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  • In butterflies and moths the lacinia is absent while the galea becomes a flexible process, grooved on its inner face, so as to make with its fellow a hollow sucking-trunk, and the palp is usually very small.

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  • The external part of the lateral field subsequently 14 grows up, and by coalescence with its fellow forms the t6 tergite or dorsal part of the segment.

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  • Robert Boyle, who turned his skill to account in the construction of his air-pump. On the 12th of November 1662 he was appointed curator of experiments to the Royal Society, of which he was elected a fellow in 1663, and filled the office during the remainder of his life.

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  • 1575-1660), English mathematician, was born at Eton, and educated there and at King's College, Cambridge, of which he became fellow.

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  • Educated at Marylebone grammar school and at Eton College, he proceeded to King's College, Cambridge, and was elected a fellow of this society in 1768.

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  • Paxton was elected in 1826 a fellow of the Horticultural Society.

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  • In 1833 he became a fellow of the Linnean Society, and in 1844 he was made a knight of the order of St Vladimir by the emperor of Russia.

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  • From 1864 to 1866 he was fellow and tutor of Merton College.

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  • Owing to failing health he gave up his lectures in 1904, and in May 1906 resigned his mastership, in which he was succeeded by James Leigh Strachan-Davidson, who had previously for some time, as senior tutor and fellow, borne the chief burden of college administration.

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  • in 1892; he was made a corresponding member of the French Academy of Moral and Political Science and a fellow of the British Academy.

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  • After going through the high school and university courses at Glasgow, he went to Trinity College, Oxford, and in 1862 was elected a fellow of Oriel.

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  • Meanwhile his academic honours from home and foreign universities multiplied, and he became a fellow of the Royal Society in 1894.

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  • His official duties, however, did not interfere with the prosecution of scientific pursuits, and in 1779 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society.

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  • It was thought that martyrdom would atone for sin, and imprisoned confessors not only issued to the Churches commands which were regarded almost as inspired utterances, but granted pardons in rash profusion to those who had been excommunicated by the regular clergy, a practice which caused Cyprian and his fellow bishops much difficulty.

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  • He was then employed on a survey of the Scottish coast and two years later was made a fellow of the Royal Society.

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  • There he became fellow in 1818, and after some time spent abroad he began to read law in London in the following year.

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  • A friend describes Wesley at this time as "a young fellow of the finest classical taste, and the most liberal and manly sentiments."

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  • On the 25th of September 1725 he was ordained deacon, and on the 17th of March 1726 was elected fellow of Lincoln.

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  • Alone, or in groups, or in long aisles, towering above the plantations or its fellow trees of the forest, its beautiful crest dominates every landscape.

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  • The senate contains four members from each province, chosen for eight years by a provincial electoral board, which consists of the provincial councilmen plus a double number of electors (half of them paying high taxes) who are selected at a special election by their fellow citizens.

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  • There was nothing electrical in Thoreau's intercourse with his fellow men; he gave off no spiritual sparks.

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  • In 1705 he entered as a sizar at Emmanuel College, Cambridge; in 1711 he was elected fellow of his college and was ordained.

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  • The Christian population, who in common with their Mussul- Macedo ' 'Questio man fellow subjects suffered from the defective methods of government of their rulers, had at least before them the example of their brethren - Greeks, Bulgarians or Servians - dwelling in independent kingdoms under Christian governments on the other side of the frontier.

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  • He was an Albanian, and his fellow countrymen in the Constantinople garrison at once made common cause with the opponents of the committee.

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  • His father was called Bonaccio, most probably a nickname with the ironical meaning of "a good, stupid fellow," while to Leonardo himself another nickname, Bigollone (dunce, blockhead), seems to have been given.

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  • He settled in the island of Hydra on the east of the Morea, and when the Greek War of Independence began was known among his fellow townsmen as a trader in corn who had gained wealth, and who made a popular use of his money.

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  • Courage, my dear fellow.

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  • In 1749 he became a fellow of Magdalen, of which college he was elected president in 1768.

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  • In 1663, on the occasion of his second visit to England, he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society, and imparted to that body in January 1669 a clear and concise statement of the laws governing the collision of elastic bodies.

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  • " Hang it," he replied, " a fellow must believe in something!

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  • The appendage carrying the gill-book stands out on the surface of the body in Limulus, and has other portions developed besides the gill-book and its base; it is fused with its fellow of the opposite side On the other hand, in Scorpio, the gill-book-bearing apFIG.

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  • Appendages of 1st pair consisting of three segments, completely chelate, without poison gland; of 2nd pair slender, leg-like, tipped with three claws, the basal segment without sterno-coxal process taking no share in mastication, and widely separated from its fellow of the opposite side; 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th appendages similar in form to the 2nd and to each other.

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  • Observe that the basal segment of 3 appendage III does not meet its fellow 4 in the middle line.

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  • Wollaston was educated at Charterhouse, and afterwards at Caius College, Cambridge, of which he became a fellow.

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  • He devoted much attention to the affairs of the Royal Society, of which he was elected a fellow in 1793 and made secretary in 1806.

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  • Blaine, a fellow Republican senator, was especially marked.

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  • Ray Lankester obtained the Radcliffe Travelling Fellowship at Oxford in 1870, and became a fellow and lecturer at Exeter College in 1872.

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  • During his patron's absence, Biren, a handsome, insinuating fellow, succeeded in supplanting him in the favour of Anne, and procuring the disgrace and banishment of Bestuzhev and his family.

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  • high, there is an inscription stating that it and its fellow were made within the short space of seven months.

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  • Various influences have contributed to making the Lao the pleasant, easy-going, idle fellow that he is.

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  • Sergius) is reported in the same document to have been fellow initiate and disciple.

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  • He was elected a fellow of Trinity College, and held the college living of Navestock, Essex, from 1850 to 1866.

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  • The modern oriental open waistcoat finds its fellow in the jacket or bolero from ancient Crete, and seems to have been distinctively Aegean.

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  • Relations came to his aid, and presently his anxieties were relieved by Francis Martin, bursar of Trinity, who gave him liberal help. Benson took his degree in 1852 as a senior optime, eighth classic and senior chancellor's medallist, and was elected fellow of Trinity in the following year.

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  • He became fellow of Magdalene College, Cambridge, and was a master at Eton College from 1885 to 1903.

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  • Before he was sixteen he attended lectures at Owens College, and at eighteen he gained a mathematical scholarship at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he graduated in 1871 as senior wrangler and first Smith's prizeman, having previously taken the degree of D.Sc. at London University and won a Whitworth scholarship. Although elected a fellow and tutor of his college, he stayed up at Cambridge only for a very short time, preferring to learn practical engineering as a pupil in the works in which his father was a partner.

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  • He was successively fellow, secretary and president of the Chemical Society and was elected F.R.S.

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  • In 1823 he was made a fellow of the Royal Society, and two years later received the Copley medal.

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  • degree in 1840, and was soon afterwards made fellow of his college.

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  • He was made fellow of the Royal and the Royal Geographical Societies.

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  • Ordained in 1662, he successively held the livings of Little Easton in Essex, Brighstone (sometimes called Brixton) in the Isle of Wight, and East Woodhay in Hampshire; in 1672 he resigned the last of these, and returned to Winchester, being by this time a prebendary of the cathedral, and chaplain to the bishop, as well as a fellow of Winchester College.

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  • NATHANIEL FIENNES (c. 1608-1669) English politician, second son of William, 1st Viscount Saye and Sele, by Elizabeth, daughter of John Temple, of Stow in Buckinghamshire, was born in 1607 or 1608, and educated at Winchester and at New College, Oxford, where as founder's kin he was admitted a perpetual fellow in 1624.

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  • He was elected fellow of Brasenose in 1526.

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  • But in spite of his brilliant ability and his record of having lost but two cases, the bitter attacks which he directed against his fellow advocates, especially against Gerbier (1725-1788), caused his dismissal from the bar in 1775.

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  • Prynne supported a national church controlled by the state, and issued a series of tracts against independency, including in his attacks Henry Burton his former fellow sufferer in the pillory, John Lilburne and John Goodwin [e.g.

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  • Educated at Winchester and New College, Oxford, he was elected fellow in 1548 and graduated B.C.L.

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  • In 1694 he was elected fellow of Lincoln College, and in 1697 his edition of Lycophron appeared.

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  • At the age of nineteen he became a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, and in 1832 he was elected to the Royal Society of London.

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  • degree at Oxford, and was a fellow of the College of Physicians.

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  • Taylor was elected a fellow of the Royal Society early in 1712, sat in the same year on the committee for adjudicating the claims of Sir Isaac Newton and Gottfried Wilhelm Leibnitz, and acted as secretary to the society from the 13th of January 1714 to the 21st of October 1718.

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  • He was a fellow of All Souls' from 1870 until his death, which occurred at Crickhowell, South Wales, on the 4th of August 1907.

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  • The only favour Savonarola craved before death was a short interview with his fellow victims. This the signory unwillingly granted.

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  • Conversely, if the base of the prism is turned towards the temple, the ray of light will seem to come from a point nearer the axis, and will induce the eye to turn inwards, to converge towards its fellow.

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  • He was fellow, bursar and dean of his college, but in 1574 he resigned or was dismissed his fellowship and offices, for reasons which have been disputed, some alleging improprieties of conduct, and others suspected disloyalty.

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  • In 1717 he was elected fellow of the Royal Society, which awarded him the Copley medal in 1739.

    0
    0
  • Within a year he and a fellow missionary were dispatched from that place to Abyssinia to act as spiritual directors to the Portuguese residents.

    0
    0
  • He was a fellow of the Royal Society of London, and a member of the American Philosophical Society; and was elected president of the latter society in 1791.

    0
    0
  • Again, the common Fatherhood of God should inspire a right relation among fellow Israelites, not such conduct as the divorce of Israelite wives in order to marry non-Israelite women (ii.

    0
    0
  • Returning to Oxford, he was elected a fellow of Merton College, and was ordained; and in 1833 he was presented to the rectory of Lavington-with-Graffham in Sussex by Mrs Sargent, whose granddaughter Caroline he married on the 7th of November 1833, the ceremony being performed by the bride's brother-in-law, Samuel Wilberforce, afterwards bishop of Oxford and of Winchester.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at King's College school and at Wadham College, Oxford, where, after taking a first-class in Literae Humaniores in 1853, he became fellow and tutor.

    0
    0
  • After two years he resigned his lectureship in order to devote more time to research work, and was elected John Harling fellow.

    0
    0
  • The same quality of industry remained to the Moriscos, and excited the envy of their Christian fellow countrymen.

    0
    0
  • Hallam was a fellow of the Royal Society, and a trustee of the British Museum, and enjoyed many other appropriate distinctions.

    0
    0
  • In June 1618 he became a scholar of Trinity College, Oxford, and was made a fellow of his college in June 1628.

    0
    0
  • In 1842 he took a "double-first" and was elected fellow of B alliol, and lecturer in mathematics and logic. Four years later he took orders, and with the aim of helping forward the education of the very poor, he accepted the headship of Kneller Hall, a college which the government formed for the training of masters of workhouse and penal schools.

    0
    0
  • In 1885 he was elected honorary fellow of Exeter College, Oxford.

    0
    0
  • Amongst his fellow lecturers were Moses Amyraut and Josue de la Place.

    0
    0
  • That he left an unfavourable opinion among his fellow citizens is very decidedly recorded by the historian Varchi.

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    0
  • He was elected fellow of King's College, Cambridge, in 1839, and took orders in 1842.

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  • and major fellow of the college in 1616.

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    0
  • de Graaf in 1673, and of which he was elected a fellow in 1680.

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    0
  • In 1766 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society.

    0
    0
  • In 1862 he was made a fellow of the Royal Society, and in 1865 a member of the Mathematical Society of London.

    0
    0
  • He was elected honorary fellow of St John's in 1874, having resigned his fellowship on his marriage in 1864.

    0
    0
  • In 1476 a poor young shepherd drew thousands to Nicklashausen to hear him denounce the emperor as a rascal and the pope as a worthless fellow, and urge the division of the Church's property among the members of the community.

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    0
  • In 589 his fellow citizens entrusted Pittacus with despotic power (with the title of Aesymnetes) for the purpose of protecting them against the exiled nobles, at the head of whom were Alcaeus and his brother Antimenides.

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    0
  • In 1576 he had been elected fellow of Pembroke.

    0
    0
  • In January 1837 he was elected fellow of University College.

    0
    0
  • He took orders in 1747, and was elected fellow of Queens' College, Cambridge, in 1749.

    0
    0
  • From this point the work was carried on by Philistus's fellow countryman Athanas.

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    0
  • But while literary in form and conception, its appeal is in spirit so personal a testimony to what the Gospel has done for the writer and his fellow Christians, that it is akin to the piety of the Apostolic Fathers as a group. It is true that it has marked affinities, e.g.

    0
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  • As a fellow of Magdalen College, he had been desirous of changes which he felt himself bound by his oath from advocating; and he had taken part in the discussions on the abolition of tests in the old universities.'

    0
    0
  • He obtained a second class and the chancellor's English essay prize, and was elected a fellow of Exeter College (1842).

    0
    0
  • He obtained a scholarship at Trinity College, Oxford, and a second class in the degree examination, and was elected fellow of his college (1845).

    0
    0
  • SAMUEL HARSNETT (1561-1631), English divine, archbishop of York, was born at Colchester in June 1561, and was educated at Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, where he was successively scholar, fellow and master (1605-1616).

    0
    0
  • The Czartoryscy, of all men, were bound by their principles and professions to set their fellow citizens an example of fraternal concord.

    0
    0
  • In 1820 he was sent to the university of Warsaw, where he had Goszczynski as a fellow student.

    0
    0
  • Elected a fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society in 1866, he became honorary secretary in 1872, and contributed eighty-three separate papers to its Monthly Notices.

    0
    0
  • After being at school at Ashford, Tenterden and Felsted, and being instructed in Latin, Greek and Hebrew, he was in 1632 sent to Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and afterwards was chosen fellow of Queens' College.

    0
    0
  • John's College, Cambridge, of which he was afterwards elected fellow.

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  • fellow of Worcester College, Oxford, and a select preacher of that university in 1896.

    0
    0
  • In 1878 he was elected president of the British Association, and in the same year president of the Royal Society, of which he had been a fellow since 1853.

    0
    0
  • He was a fellow of the Royal, Linnean and Geological Societies.

    0
    0
  • He was admitted to the Middle Temple in February 1637, and in May be became a fellow commoner of Balliol College, Oxford.

    0
    0
  • Three hundred thus separated from Rapp in 1833, with $105,000 as their share of the communal property, to build the millennial kingdom of New Jerusalem at Phillipsburg (now Monaca), Beaver county, Pennsylvania, under the lead of Bernhard Muller, who had come to Economy in 1831 as a fellow religionist, and was called Count Maximilian de Leon (or Proli); in 1833 Leon went, with his followers, to Louisiana, and established a religious colony 6 m.

    0
    0
  • He became a fellow of his college, and at some date subsequent to 1571 left Oxford to become master of a school at Sandwich, Kent, where he died in 1610.

    0
    0
  • In 1834 Dr Chalmers was elected fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, and in the same year he became corresponding member of the Institute of France; in 1835 Oxford conferred on him the degree of D.C.L.

    0
    0
  • Edward Wright, who was a fellow of Caius College, Cambridge, occupies a conspicuous place in the history of navigation.

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    0
  • pp. 112, Mr William Dakins, fellow of Trin.

    0
    0
  • Mr Edward Lively, fellow of Trin.

    0
    0
  • Mr Francis Dillingham, fellow of Christ's Coll..

    0
    0
  • ,j Mr Robert Spalding, fellow of St John's.

    0
    0
  • Mr Andrew Byng, fellow of St Peter's Coll.

    0
    0
  • Dr Richard Brett, fellow of Lincoln Coll.

    0
    0
  • Mr Richard Fairclough, fellow of New Coll.

    0
    0
  • Dr Jeremiah Radcliffe, fellow of Trin.

    0
    0
  • Mr Andrew Downes, fellow of St John's Coll.

    0
    0
  • Mr John Bois, fellow of St John's Coll.

    0
    0
  • Mr Robert Ward, fellow of King's Coll.

    0
    0
  • Dr John Perin, fellow of St John's Coll.

    0
    0
  • Dr Ravens [fellow of St John's Coll.] Dr John Harmer, fellow of New Coll.

    0
    0
  • ': Dr Roger Fenton, fellow of Pemb.

    0
    0
  • Dr Richard Clark, fellow of Christ's Coll., Camb.

    0
    0
  • n Dr John Layfield, fellow of Trin.

    0
    0
  • Mr Geoffrey King, fellow of King's Coll., Camb.

    0
    0
  • Fairbairn, congregationalist; the Rev. Frederick Field (1801-1885), fellow of Trinity, Cambridge; Dr C. D.

    0
    0
  • Aldis Wright, fellow of Trinity, Cambridge.

    0
    0
  • CHARLES CHAUNCY (1592-1672), president of Harvard College, was born at Yardley-Bury, Hertfordshire, England, in November 1592, and was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, of which he became a fellow.

    0
    0
  • In 1828 he was elected fellow of Oriel; and after a few years there as a tutor, during which he was ordained and acted as curate at Cuddesdon, he became rector of Broadwindsor, Dorset (1838).

    0
    0
  • He attended some of the divinity classes at the university, where also he formed a lasting friendship with two of his fellow students, well known afterwards as Professor Duncan and Dr Chalmers.

    0
    0
  • A paper which he communicated to the Royal Society on "Experimental Researches on the Strength of Pillars of Cast Iron and other Materials," in 1840 gained him a Royal medal in 1841, and he was also elected a fellow.

    0
    0
  • In April 1547 he took chambers in the Inner Temple, and began to study law; but finding divinity more congenial, he removed, in the following year, to St Catharine's Hall, Cambridge, where he studied with such assiduity that in little more than a year he was admitted by special grace to the degree of master of arts, and was soon after made fellow of Pembroke Hall, the fellowship being "worth seven pound a year."

    0
    0
  • He had a distinguished university career at Edinburgh, and Balliol College, Oxford, and after being fellow of Jesus and tutor of Balliol was elected professor of logic and metaphysics at St Andrews.

    0
    0
  • in 1848, and in 1852 became a fellow of Merton College.

    0
    0
  • He became a fellow of the Royal Society in 1837; in 1847 he married; and in 1868, after the completion of his masterpiece, the automatic telegraph, he was knighted.

    0
    0
  • i (5), one of the labial tentacles n is also thrown back to show the mouth w, and the two left gill-plates are reflected to show the gill-plates of the right side (rr, rq) projecting behind the foot, the inner or median plate of each side being united by concrescence to its fellow of the opposite side along a continuous line (aa).

    0
    0
  • In 1787 he became pastor of a Baptist church in Leicester, and began those energetic movements among his fellow religionists which resulted in the formation of the Baptist Missionary Society, Carey himself being one of the first to go abroad.

    0
    0
  • He entered the university of Oxford about 1525, and was elected fellow of All Souls' College in 1531.

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    0
  • inward to meet its fellow at the back of the bladder, just above the prostate.

    0
    0
  • He became a fellow in 1707.

    0
    0
  • In 1868 he became a fellow of St.

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  • HERBERT MARSH (1757-1839), English divine, was born at Faversham, Kent, on the 10th of December 1757, and was educated at St John's College, Cambridge, where he was elected fellow in 1782, having been second wrangler and second Smith's prizeman.

    0
    0
  • Having remained abroad nearly a year, he returned to Cambridge, and was elected a fellow of Trinity College, then first erected by King Henry VIII.

    0
    0
  • He was made honorary fellow of Corpus Christi, and occupied rooms in the college.

    0
    0
  • Hooke, he was chosen a fellow of the Royal Society.

    0
    0
  • He graduated in 1657, and was chosen fellow in 1659.

    0
    0
  • in 1545, having been elected fellow of his college in 1542.

    0
    0
  • In 1890 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Aberdeen gave him its honorary LL.D., and in 1899 he was appointed Gifford lecturer by that university, but declined on grounds of health.

    0
    0
  • In 1832 he was 34th wrangler and 8th classic, and in 1834 was made fellow of Trinity.

    0
    0
  • 1846), fellow of Merton College, Oxford.

    0
    0
  • He was president of the British Association in 1904, and became a fellow of the Royal Society in 1888.

    0
    0
  • In 1875 he was elected Jacksonian professor of natural experimental philosophy at Cambridge, becoming a fellow of Peterhouse, and in 1877 he succeeded Dr J.

    0
    0
  • The chancellor never realized the gravity of the onslaught which, with his Kulturkampf, he was making upon the conscience and liberty of his Catholic fellow citizens.

    0
    0
  • At first he went to Jena, but Zinzendorf at once sought to secure him as a fellow labourer, though the count wished to obtain from him a declaration which would remove from the Pietists of Halle all blame with regard to the disruption.

    0
    0
  • In the same year he was elected a fellow of Trinity College, and became second Smith's prizeman.

    0
    0
  • He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society in 1884, became president of the Cambridge Philosophical Society in 1894, president of Section A of the British Association in 1896, and president of the Royal Society in 1915.

    0
    0
  • He was the recipient of many British and foreign awards and honours, amongst these being the Royal and Hughes medals of the Royal Society in 1894 and 1902 respectively, the Hodgkins medal of the Smithsonian Institute of Washington in 1902, the Nobel Prize for physics in 1906, enrolment as honorary graduate of many universities, and as honorary fellow of numerous American and continental scientific academies.

    0
    0
  • PETER GUNNING (1614-1684), English divine, was born at Hoo, in Kent, and educated at the King's School, Canterbury, and Clare College, Cambridge, where he became a fellow in 1633.

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    0
  • He takes a keen interest in nature, and in the natural sciences, studying them in a way that was then new in Rome, while the small esteem in which studies of this kind were held does not deter him from endeavouring to be of service to his fellow countrymen (xxii.

    0
    0
  • Jurieu defended the doctrines of Protestantism with great ability against the attacks of Antoine Arnauld, Pierre Nicole and Bossuet, but was equally ready to enter into dispute with his fellow Protestant divines (with Louis Du Moulin and Claude Payon, for instance) when their opinions differed from his own even on minor matters.

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  • This plan, subsequently enlarged by a suggestion of a fellow plotter, J.

    0
    0
  • He withdrew subsequently with a number of fellow disciples to Megara, and it has been conjectured, though there is no direct evidence, that this was the period of Plato's residence in Megara, of which indications appear in the Theaetetus.

    0
    0
  • On the following day, along with a number of fellow martyrs, he was exposed to the fury of wild beasts, which, however, laid themselves down in tame submission at his feet.

    0
    0
  • Foremost in this work were William Ellis and John Williams (q.v.), who formed a native agency to carry the gospel to their fellow islanders, and so inaugurated what has since been a characteristic feature of South Sea Missions.

    0
    0
  • In 1654 he was sent by his uncle to Trinity College, Dublin, of which he subsequently became scholar and fellow.

    0
    0
  • Benjamin Wills Newton, head of the community there, who had been a fellow of Exeter College, Oxford, was accused of departing from the testimony of the Brethren by reintroducing the spirit of clericalism.

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    0
  • In July 1662 he was elected professor of geometry in Gresham College, on the recommendation of Dr John Wilkins, master of Trinity College and afterwards bishop of Chester; and in May 1663 he was chosen a fellow of the Royal Society, at the first election made by the council after obtaining their charter.

    0
    0
  • Upon quitting his professorship Barrow was only a fellow of Trinity College; but his uncle gave him a small sinecure in Wtles, and Dr Seth Ward, bishop of Salisbury, conferred upon him a prebend in that church.

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    0
  • PERCY GARDNER (1846-), English classical archaeologist, was born in London, and was educated at the City of London school and Christ's College, Cambridge (fellow, 1872).

    0
    0
  • His brother, Ernest Arthur Gardner (1862-), educated at the City of London school and Caius College, Cambridge (fellow, 1885), is also well known as an archaeologist.

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    0
  • To his fellow workers he was uniformly generous, free from jealousy, and prodigal of praise.

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    0
  • Fellow of the Royal Society.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at Eton and at King's College, Cambridge, of which he became fellow and tutor, graduating fourth in the classical tripos of 1860.

    0
    0
  • Educated at Helensburgh, Glasgow University and Trinity College, Cambridge, he was elected fellow of his college in 1879 and was called to the bar.

    0
    0
  • He took his degree in 1886, becoming fellow of All Souls in 1888.

    0
    0
  • He was fellow and dean of divinity at Magdalen College, Oxford, from 1893 to 1896, and at the same time vicar of the university church of St.

    0
    0
  • A story, mentioned by the chronicler Echard as unworthy of credit, makes Boniface VIII., on the first day of Lent, cast the ashes in the archbishop's eyes instead of on his head, with the words, "Remember that thou art a Ghibelline, and with thy fellow Ghibellines wilt return to naught."

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    0
  • In May 1555 he became a fellow of Peterhouse.

    0
    0
  • He entered as a pensioner of Clare Hall, Cambridge, in 1647, graduated in 1650 and was made fellow of his college in 1651.

    0
    0
  • and became a fellow of his college.

    0
    0
  • In 1748 he published some Remarks on an Enquiry into the Rejection of Christian Miracles by the Heathens (1746), by William Weston, a fellow of St John's College, Cambridge.

    0
    0
  • In 1784 he was sent to Cambridge, where he was ninth wrangler, and became fellow of his college (Jesus) in 17 9 7.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at the City of London school and at St John's College, Cambridge, where he took the highest honours in the classical, mathematical and theological triposes, and became fellow of his college.

    0
    0
  • In 1687 he became fellow of the College of Physicians, and proceeded to Jamaica the same year as physician in the suite of the duke of Albemarle.

    0
    0
  • Lincoln was very popular among his fellow legislators, and in 1838 and in 1840 he received the complimentary vote of his minority colleagues for the speakership of the state House of Representatives.

    0
    0
  • German culture, after a short revival, perished once more amid the smoke of the fires kindled by Conrad of Marburg and his fellow inquisitors.

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    0
  • In the same year he became tutor and fellow of Merton.

    0
    0
  • Ray was chosen minor fellow of Trinity in 1649, and in due course became a major fellow on proceeding to the master's degree.

    0
    0
  • In 1667 Ray was elected a fellow of the Royal Society, and in 1669 he published in conjunction with Willughby his first paper in the Philosophical Transactions on "Experiments concerning the Motion of Sap in Trees."

    0
    0
  • in 1878, and his own college made him an honorary fellow in 1885.

    0
    0
  • 1861), became a fellow of Trinity, Cambridge, and lecturer on history, and was one of the editors of the Cambridge Modern History; he was secretary to the Civil Service Commission from 1903 to 1907, when he was appointed a Civil Service Commissioner.

    0
    0
  • At Clermont Conti had been a fellow student of Moliere's for whom he secured an introduction to the court of Louis XIV., but afterwards, when writing a treatise against the stage entitled Traite de la comedic et des spectacles scion les traditions de l'Eglise (Paris, 1667), he charged the dramatist with keeping a school of atheism.

    0
    0
  • He became a fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford, in 1795, took orders in 1802, and was select university preacher in 1804.

    0
    0
  • At Cambridge, Leonard Courtney was second wrangler and first Smith's prizeman, and was elected a fellow of his college, St John's.

    0
    0
  • Lord Broughton was a partner in Whitbread's brewery, a fellow of the Royal Society, and one of the founders of the Royal Geographical Society.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at the Edinburgh Academy, St Andrews University and at Balliol College, Oxford, where he took a first class in the final classical schools in 1868, becoming a fellow and subsequently honorary fellow of Merton College.

    0
    0
  • He carried the humour and sub-acidity of discrimination which marked his criticism of fellow folk-lorists into the discussion of purely literary subjects in his Books and Bookmen (1886), Letters to Dead Authors (1886), Letters on Literature (1889), &c. His Blue Fairy Tale Book (1889), beautifully produced and illustrated, was followed annually at Christmas by a book of fairy tales and romances drawn from many sources.

    0
    0
  • After studying law for six years, he became a fellow at St John's College, Cambridge, in 1564.

    0
    0
  • He came of a middle-class Yorkshire family of pronounced Liberal and Nonconformist views, and was educated under Dr Edwin Abbott at the City of London school, from which he went as a scholar to Balliol, Oxford; there he had a distinguished career, taking a first-class in classics, winning the Craven scholarship and being elected a fellow of his college.

    0
    0
  • He was a fellow of the British Academy and a member of the Royal Commission on Ancient Monuments, England; he was also first president of the Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies.

    0
    0
  • Through the tuition of the local Protestant clergyman, who was interested in the boy, he got a scholarship in 1756 at Trinity College, Dublin, and subsequently became a fellow.

    0
    0
  • Educated at the City of London School, he obtained a studentship at King's College, London, and in 1856 a scholarship at Queen's College, Cambridge, graduated as fifth wrangler in 185 9, and was immediately elected fellow of his college.

    0
    0
  • Subsequently he became a fellow and a tutor of the college, and in 1776 was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of London.

    0
    0
  • By a second marriage, undeniably legal, Robert had a family whose claims were not permitted to give trouble at his accession, though the earl of Douglas, the fellow conspirator of David II., would have caused difficulties if he had possessed the power.

    0
    0
  • After obtaining the Ireland scholarship and Newdigate prize for an English poem (The Gypsies), he was in 1839 elected fellow of University College, and in the same year took orders.

    0
    0
  • In 1870 he became a fellow of the Chemical Society, and in 1872 graduated D.Sc. of London in electrical science.

    0
    0
  • He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society in 1904 and died at Shortlands, Kent, Dec. 13 1920.

    0
    0
  • He was also a fellow of Brasenose College, honorary fellow of Exeter, a fellow of the British Academy and of other learned societies, and a governor of Harrow School.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at Cambridge, where he was a fellow of Trinity Hall, and in 1537, president of Queen's College.

    0
    0
  • He was elected a fellow of Eton in 1817, and in 1818 the college presented him to the living of Maple Durham, Oxfordshire.

    0
    0
  • He threw his keen intellect and trenchant style into the cause of university reform, the leading champion of which was another fellow of University College, Arthur Penrhyn Stanley.

    0
    0
  • At Cambridge in 1774 Fellow Commoners were examined with such precipitation to fulfil the formal requirements of the statutes that the ceremony was termed " huddling for a degree " (Jebb, Remarks upon the Present Mode of Education in the University of Cambridge, 4th ed., 1 774, p. 32).

    0
    0
  • In 1759 he leased the Ivy House pottery in Burslem from some relatives, and like a sensible man he continued to make only such pottery as was being made at the period by his fellow - manufacturers.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at St John's College, Cambridge, where he became a fellow in 1529.

    0
    0
  • OBADIAH WALKER (1616-1699), master of University College, Oxford, was born at Dal-field near Barnsley, Yorkshire, and was educated at University College, Oxford, becoming a fellow and tutor of this society and a prominent figure in university circles.

    0
    0
  • He gained a first class in jurisprudence in 1895 and was Vinerian Law Scholar in 1896, was elected a Fellow of Merton and did a considerable amount of educational work in the next few years, being a lecturer both at Merton and at Oriel, and an extension lecturer in modern history both for Oxford and for Victoria University.

    0
    0
  • Luther's friends had been provokingly silent about the Theses; but in April 1518, at the annual chapter of the Augustinian Eremites held at Heidelberg, Luther heard his positions temperately discussed, and found somewhat to his astonishment that his views were not acceptable to all his fellow monks.

    0
    0
  • As usual he wrote out and published an account of the Disputation, which was an appeal to his fellow Germans.

    0
    0
  • From 1876 almost until his death he was connected with the Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, being in turn a fellow, an associate in history (1878-1883), an associate professor (1883-1891) and after 1891 professor of American and institutional history.

    0
    0
  • To the minority of strict Jews he was therefore " the abomination of desolation standing where he ought not "; but the majority he carried with him and, when he was dying (165 B.C.) during his eastern campaigns, he wrote to the loyal Jews as their fellow citizen and general, exhorting them to preserve their present goodwill towards him and his son, on the ground that his son would continue his policy in gentleness and kindness, and so maintain friendly relations with them (2 Macc. ix.).

    0
    0
  • In 1728 he visited London, and was elected a fellow of the Royal Society.

    0
    0
  • A scholar of University College, Oxford, he graduated with a' double-first class in 1844, and in the same year he was elected fellow of Brasenose College.

    0
    0
  • He won an open scholarship, took his degree with a first-class in literis humanioribus (1833), and became fellow and tutor of Balliol; he was also ordained deacon (1836) and priest (1838), and served the curacy of Baldon.

    0
    0
  • He was already particularly associated with the great territory north-west of the Ohio; for Virginia had tendered to Congress in 1781, while Jefferson was governor, a cession of her claims to it, and now in 1784 formally transferred the territory by act of Jefferson and his fellow delegates in congress: a consummation for which he had laboured from the beginning.

    0
    0
  • Their social tendencies are distinctly communistic; property is often owned by the family in common, and a man can call upon the services of his fellow villagers for certain purposes, as the building of a house.

    0
    0
  • He graduated at Columbia College in 1882, was a graduate fellow in philosophy there from 1882 to 1884, when he took the degree of Ph.

    0
    0
  • The king, who is said to have described him as a brave fellow who had no head, promoted him to the rank of brigadier, and then major-general with some reluctance.

    0
    0
  • He returned to England in November 1678, having by the registration of 341 stars won the title of the "Southern Tycho," and by the translation to the heavens of the "Royal Oak," earned a degree of master of arts, conferred at Oxford by the king's command on the 3rd of December 1678, almost simultaneously with his election as fellow of the Royal Society.

    0
    0
  • He was not a fellow of the Royal Society, but must certainly have known of the gift of the Copley medal to Dollond.

    0
    0
  • He died suddenly of apoplexy on the 13th of March 1845, in London, while attending a meeting of the council of the Royal Society, of which he became a fellow in 1813 and foreign secretary in 1839.

    0
    0
  • In 1850 Hort took his degree, being third in the classical tripos, and in 1852 he became fellow of his college.

    0
    0
  • BEILBY PORTEUS (1731-1808), bishop of London, was born at York and educated at Christ's College, Cambridge, where he became fellow in 1752.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at Harrow and at Balliol College, Oxford, and was elected fellow of Trinity College in 1875.

    0
    0
  • In May 1755 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of London, and published several papers on electrical subjects in the Phil.

    0
    0
  • Her son, spoiled by his mother and his step-father, became a wild young fellow, and added his debts to the heavy burden of Montpelier upon Madison.

    0
    0
  • As regards the first object the mere fact of joining the society and becoming an "initiated fellow" was supposed to involve a certain kind of intellectual and social brotherhood, though not implying anything in the nature of an economic union.

    0
    0
  • This latter aspect of the fraternity was to be satisfied by the contribution from each fellow of five dollars by way of initiation fee.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at Eton and at Magdalen College, Oxford, becoming demy or scholar in 1619, and fellow in 1625.

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  • At his university he took the Stanhope prize for an essay on the marquess Wellesley in 1877, became lecturer at Pembroke College in 1887, and fellow of All Souls College in 1 9 01.

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  • In 1734 he became a fellow of his college, and in the following year obtained his degree of B.A.

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  • Some places, such as Bidi in Sarawak, for instance, are notoriously unhealthy; but from the statistics of the Dutch government, and the records of Sarawak and British North Borneo, it would appear that the European in Borneo has in general not appreciably more to fear than his fellow in Java, or in the Federated Malay States of the Malayan Peninsula.

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  • Serious disturbances among the Chinese are now in Borneo matters of ancient history, and to-day the Chinaman forms perhaps the most valuable element in the civilization and development of the island, just as does his fellow in the mining states of the Malayan Peninsula.

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  • Historically it is of unique interest and value: it has no fellow within the New Testament or without it.

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  • The existence of these lakedwellings in Scotland was first made known by John Mackinlay, a fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, in a letter sent to George Chalmers, the author of Caledonia, in 1813, describing two crannogs, or fortified islands in Bute.

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  • He graduated in 1763 as senior wrangler, became fellow in 1766, and in 1768 tutor of his college.

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  • Oriel College was, at the time when Keble became a fellow, the centre of all the finest ability in Oxford.

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  • The House of Commons recognized in him its spoilt child, and Burke happily said that "he never thought, did or said anything" without judging its effect on his fellow members.

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  • He was a regular attendant at the meetings of the Royal Society, of which he became a fellow in 1760, and he dined every Thursday with the club composed of its members.

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  • 162 4), rector of Aller, formerly fellow of Emmanuel College, Cambridge.

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  • Cudworth was sent to his father's college, was elected fellow in 1639, and became a successful tutor.

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  • In 1735 he became a member of the Society of Antiquaries, and was elected a fellow of the Royal Society, of which he was secretary from 1752 to 1765.

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  • in 1522, and was elected fellow in 1524.

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  • Fermanagh, and educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he was elected fellow in 1788.

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  • Magee was appointed professor of mathematics and senior fellow of Trinity in 1800, but in 1812 he resigned, and undertook the charge of the livings of Cappagh, Co.

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  • The fact was that Saint-Mars was hard put to it in the prison for anybody who could be trusted, and that he had convinced himself by this time that Dauger (who had proved a quiet harmless fellow) would give no trouble.

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  • Horsley was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1767; and secretary in 1773, but, in consequence of a difference with the president (Sir Joseph Banks) he withdrew in 1784.

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  • In 1690 he became a member of the Corporation (probably the youngest ever chosen as Fellow) of Harvard College, and in 1707 he was greatly disappointed at his failure to be chosen president of that institution.

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  • from the University of Glasgow in 171c, and in 1713 was made a Fellow of the Royal Society.

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  • This action, which really broke the back of the rebellion, was bitterly denounced by some of his fellow conspirators, who even ascribed their misfortunes to his insane belief in his own superhuman powers.

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  • From 1870 he was a fellow, and from 1875 also a tutor, of New College, and in 1883 succeeded Pusey as regius professor of Hebrew and canon of Christ Church.

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  • He was a member of the Old Testament Revision Committee (1876-1884) and examining chaplain to the bishop of Southwell (1884-1904); received the honorary degrees of doctor of literature of Dublin (1892),(1892), doctor of divinity of Glasgow (1901), doctor of literature of Cambridge (1905); and was elected a fellow of the British Academy in 1902.

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  • CHARLES GRANT GLENELG, Baron (1778-1866), eldest son of Charles Grant, chairman of the directors of the East India Company, was born in India on the 26th of October 1778, and was educated at Magdalene College, Cambridge, of which he became a fellow in 1802.

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  • Glenelg's brother, SIR Robert Grant (1779-1838), who was third wrangler in 1801, was, like his brother, a fellow of Magdalene College, Cambridge, and a barrister.

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  • He was a fellow of his college, and was appointed Woodwardian professor of geology in 1762, and in 1767 rector of Thornhill in Yorkshire, where he died on the 29th of April 1793.

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  • He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society in the same year as Henry Cavendish (1760).

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  • Elected a fellow of his college, he devoted himself to teaching, and quickly proved himself one of the most successful mathematical "coaches" ever known at Cambridge.

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  • William Frend, a fellow of Jesus, accused of sedition and Unitarianism, was at this time tried and expelled from Cambridge.

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  • Having become senior moderator in mathematics and a fellow of Trinity, he took holy orders, and was appointed regius professor of divinity in Dublin University in 1866, a position which he retained until 1888, when he was chosen provost of Trinity College.

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  • As a mathematician Salmon was a fellow of the Royal Society, and was president of the mathematical and physical section of the British Association in 1878.

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  • Driven inwards upon themselves, they employed their energy in severe self-examination, or they cultivated resignation to the will of the universe, and towards their fellow men forbearance and forgiveness and humility, the virtues of the philanthropic disposition.

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  • His poetry like that of his fellow emigre, the austere Herculano, is eminently sincere and natural, but while his short lyrics are personal in subject and his longer poems historical, the verse of Herculano is generally subjective and the motives religious or patriotic. The movement not only lost much of its virility and genuineness, but became ultra-Romantic with A.

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  • He studied mathematics, civil and military architecture, and astronomy, and became associate of the Academie des Sciences, professor of geometry, secretary to the Academy of Architecture and fellow of the Royal Society of London.

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  • in 1897, and was elected a fellow of the British Academy, and he received hon.

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  • He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society in 1889.

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  • in 1569, in which year he was elected a senior fellow of his college.

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  • In 1649 he obtained the degree of doctor of physic, and was soon after elected a fellow of Brasenose College.

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  • In 1747 he was elected fellow of Exeter College, and in 1750 he took his degree of M.A.

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  • In 1764 he was made a fellow of the Royal Society, and in 1767 keeper of the Radcliffe Library.

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  • In the years 1815-1817 he contributed three papers on the "Calculus of Functions" to the Philosophical Transactions, and in 1816 was made a fellow of the Royal Society.

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  • Still less has Livy anything in common with the naïve anxiety of Dionysius of Halicarnassus to make it clear to his fellow Greeks that the irresistible people who had mastered them was in origin, in race and in language Hellenic like themselves.

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  • From the Royal Society, of which he was elected a fellow in 1860, he received a royal medal in 1886 and the Darwin medal in 1902, and honorary degrees were bestowed on him by Oxford (1894) and Cambridge (1895).

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  • He was educated at a private school in his native town, at King's College, London, and at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he was elected fellow in 1868, after being second wrangler in 1867 and second Smith's prizeman.

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  • In 1871 he was appointed professor of mathematics at University College, London, and in 1874 became fellow of the Royal Society.

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  • He went to Oxford and became fellow of St John's College in 1557, taking the oath of supremacy on the occasion of his degree in 1564, in which year he was orator in the schools.

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  • In 1826 he was chosen fellow of Oriel and was ordained, among his friends and colleagues being Newman, Pusey and Keble.

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  • In November of that year the Royal Society, of which he had become a fellow in 1803, and acted as secretary from 1807 to 1812, chose him as their president, but his personal qualities were not such as to make him very successful in that office, especially in comparison with the tact and firmness of his predecessor, Sir Joseph Banks.

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  • In 1842, also, he was elected a fellow of Trinity, and became a major fellow in 1845, the year in which he proceeded to the M.A.

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  • He was fellow or foreign corresponding member of the French Institute, the academies of Berlin, Göttingen, St Petersburg, Milan, Rome, Leiden, Upsala and Hungary; and he was nominated an officer of the Legion of Honour by President Carnot.

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  • He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society in 1852, and received from that body a Royal medal in 1859 and the Copley medal in 1882.

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  • He was also elected a fellow of the Royal Society.

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  • Discontent became rife, and on the ship breaking out of the ice in the spring Henry Hudson had a violent quarrel with a dissolute young fellow named Henry Greene, whom he had befriended by taking him on board, and who now retaliated by inciting the discontented part of the crew to put Hudson and eight others (including the sick men) out of the ship. This happened on the 22nd of June 1611.

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  • He became a fellow of Magdalen College in 1539, resigning in 1545.

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  • In all the Phyllopoda the number of endites is six, and the proximal one is more or less distinctly specialized as a gnathobase, working against its fellow of the opposite side in seizing food and transferring it to the mouth.

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  • In the same year he became a fellow of the Royal Society, and, in 1718, joined in the establishment of the Society of Antiquaries, acting for nine years as its secretary.

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  • degree and in 1720 became a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, publishing in the same year his first contribution to antiquarian literature.

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  • In November 1804 he was elected a fellow of All Souls College; and, after finishing his distinguished university career, he made a long tour in Europe.

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  • He was elected fellow of Queen's and ordained in 1542; subsequently he was elected student of Christ Church.

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  • At the age of nineteen, he was articled for five years as clerk to the master of a school in Spital Square, London, with whom at the end of that time he entered into partnership. In 1750 he read a paper before the Royal Society on a method of making artificial magnets, which procured him election as a fellow of the society and the award of the Copley medal.

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  • "He was an extremely clever fellow to whom I taught the art of elaborate rhyming" (rimer difficilement).

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  • It was probably owing to Dr. Hyde's influence with his fellow commissioners that Trinity College, following their recommendations, established a moderatorship and gold medal in Celtic studies.

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  • Anne; and the same year he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society.

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  • In 1872 he introduced in the Senate a resolution providing that the names of battles with fellow citizens should not be placed on the regimental colours of the United States.

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  • He had organized the Springfield Presbytery, but in 1804 with his five fellow ministers signed "The Last Will and Testament of the Springfield Presbytery," giving up that name and calling themselves "Christians."

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  • His early observations were made at the rectory of Wanstead in Essex, under the tutelage of his uncle, the Rev. James Pound (1669-1724), himself a skilled astronomer, and he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society on the 6th of November 1718.

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  • He was educated at Eton and at Wadham College, Oxford, of which he became a fellow in 1833.

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  • White, his fellow member of the state senate, decided to found a university of a new type - which should be broad and liberal in its scope, should be absolutely nonsectarian, and which should recognize and meet the growing need for practical training and adequate instruction in the sciences as well as in the humanities.

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  • He was elected a fellow of his college on the 1st of October 1667.

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  • In a subsequent letter on the 10th of August, Barrow expressed his pleasure at hearing the favourable opinion which Collins had formed of the paper, and added, " the name of the author is Newton, a fellow of our college, and a young man, who is only in his second year since he took the degree of master of arts, and who, with an unparalleled genius (eximio quo est acumine), has made very great progress in this branch of mathematics."

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  • On the 21st of December 1671 he was proposed as a candidate for admission into the Royal Society by Dr Seth Ward, bishop of Salisbury, and on the 11th of January 1672 he was elected a fellow of the Society.

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  • On the 8th of March 1673 Newton wrote to Oldenburg, the secretary of the Royal Society: " Sir, I desire that you will procure that I may be put out from being any longer Fellow of the Royal Society: for though I honour that body, yet since I see I shall neither profit them, nor (by reason of this distance) can partake of the advantage of their assemblies, I desire to withdraw."

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  • He had his information from Newton's favourite niece Catharine Barton, who married Conduitt, a fellow of the Royal Society, and one of Newton's intimate friends.

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  • Charles Montague, who was afterwards earl of Halifax, was a fellow of Trinity College, and was a very intimate friend of Newton; and it was on his influence that Newton relied in the main for promotion to some post of honour and emolument.

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  • As president Newton was brought into close connexion with Prince George of Denmark, the queen's husband, who had been elected a fellow of the Royal Society.

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  • In the middle of 1708 Newton's consent was obtained, but it was not till the spring of 1709 that he was prevailed upon to entrust the superintendence of it to a young mathematician of great promise, Roger Cotes, fellow of Trinity College, who had been recently appointed the first Plumian professor of astronomy and experimental philosophy.

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  • He himself published the fruit of his studies and travels in a voluminous collection of notebooks, in which he showed a lively eye for the oddities of his fellow kings.

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  • In 1872 he had been given the honorary degree of doctor of philosophy by Munich University; in 1888 Cambridge gave him the honorary degree of LL.D., and in 1889 Oxford the D.C.L.; and in 1890 he was made a fellow of All Souls.

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  • The landowners, who formed the majority of the House, were not elected directly, as was the case with the nobility of the French states-general, by their own class, but by electors who, though generally loyal to them, would have broken off from them if they had attempted to make themselves masters of their fellow citizens.

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  • "He is the most impudent and opiniative fellow I ever knew," said Wolfe Tone.

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  • With the aid of these instances of paired caeca, coupled with the frequent existence of a rudiment of its missing fellow when only one is functional, the author has been enabled to demonstrate conclusively that these double organs in birds correspond in relations with their normally single representative in mammals.

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  • Elected fellow of his college in 1843, he at once proceeded to attack the novel problem.

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  • Through the influence of Clift he was elected a fellow of the Geological Society early in 1834.

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  • He was second wrangler in 1816, became fellow and tutor of his college, and, in 1841, succeeded Dr Wordsworth as master.

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  • In 1802 he was chosen a fellow of his college.

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  • Wycliffe left three intimate disciples: - Nicolas Hereford, a doctor of theology of Oxford, who had helped his master to translate the Bible into English; John Ashton, also a fellow of an Oxford college; and John Purvey, Wycliffe's colleague at Lutterworth, and a co-translator of the Bible.

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  • (8) The gnathobase becomes greatly enlarged and not separated by a joint from the corm; it acts as a hemignath or half jaw working against its fellow of the opposite side.

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  • A monastery was subsequently added, and around it the present town of St Albans gradually grew up. Pope Adrian IV., who was born in the neighbourhood, conferred on the abbot of St Alban's the right of precedence over his fellow abbots, a right hitherto attached to the abbey of Glastonbury.

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  • where, however, the influence of the senior fellow induced him to join the Church of England, and he was ordained in 1664.

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  • During his stay in England he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society.

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  • His worst enemies were always his fellow Mahommedans.

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  • He was educated at Norwich grammar school and at Caius College, Cambridge, where he was scholar and afterwards fellow.

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  • 8) Stambolov became head of a council of regency, with Mutkurov and Karavelov as his colleagues; the latter, however, soon made way for Jivkov, a friend and fellow townsman of the first regent.

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  • Having taken his degree at Oxford (from Trinity College) in 1838, he was elected to a fellowship at Exeter College in 1840, of which from 1842 to 1846 he was fellow and tutor.

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  • This leniency may have been partly due to doubts as to the legality of the demand for his surrender by the Hamburg authorities; but the government was probably more influenced by Cornwallis's opinion that Tandy was "a fellow of so very contemptible a character that no person in this country (Ireland) seems to care the smallest degree about him."

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  • in 1600 and became a fellow of Trinity College.

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  • In the same year, finding that he could no longer declare himself a member of the Church of England, he resigned his fellowship. He retained his lectureship, and in 1881 was elected an honorary fellow.

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  • His younger brother, Arthur Sidgwick, had a brilliant school and university career, being second classic at Cambridge in 1863 and becoming fellow of Trinity; but he devoted himself thenceforth mainly to work as a teacher.

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  • After being for many years a master at Rugby, he became in 1882 fellow and tutor of Corpus, Oxford; and from 1894 to 1906 was Reader in Greek in the university.

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  • He became a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1867, and acted as president of the anthropological section of the British Association in 1882 and of the geological section in 1888.

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  • In 1778 he was elected a fellow of the Antiquarian Society, and a fellow of the Royal Society in 1779.

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  • He was elected fellow of Corpus Christi College in 1620; in 1633 he became chaplain to Archbishop Laud and in 1634 master of Jesus College, Cambridge, and rector of Yelverton, Somerset.

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  • He was also a fellow of at least fifteen learned societies in Holland, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Great Britain and the United States.

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  • He was adopted by his godfather, Edward Hearst, and his wife, and was sent to Magdalen College, Oxford, in 1689, was demy of his college from 1689 to 1701 and fellow from 1701 to 1713.

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  • He was a fellow of the Royal Society, a writer on varied topics to the reviews and the author of the hymn "Lord of our Life and God of our Salvation."

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  • The pecuniary rewards of Bessemer's great invention came to him with comparative quickness; but it was not till 1879 that the Royal Society admitted him as a fellow and the government honoured him with a knighthood.

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  • and as his fellow Christian sovereigns failed him in the hour of need, he was defeated at Alarcos.

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  • Graham was elected a fellow of the Royal Society in 1836, and a corresponding member of the Institute of France in 1847, while Oxford made him a D.

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  • Upon his recovery he removed to Huntingdon in order to be near his brother John, who was a fellow of St Benet's College, Cambridge.

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  • He gained the Newdigate prize with a poem on the Apollo Belvidere in 1812, was elected a fellow of Brasenose in 1814, and in 1816 won the English essay prize with his Comparative Estimate of Sculpture and Painting.

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  • He took his bachelor's degree in 1635, his master's degree in 1639, and immediately afterwards was chosen fellow of his college.

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  • The last section of this tube retains its connexion with the ventral portion of the somite, and so acquires an external opening, which is at first lateral, but soon shifts to the middle line, and fuses with its fellow, to form the single generative opening.

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  • in 1641 and fellow in 1642, but was ejected in 1649 for refusing to accept the "Engagement."

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  • The eldest, Thomas, retired from trade to devote himself to natural and physical science, and contributed many papers to the Royal Society, of which he was a fellow.

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  • He became a fellow of King's College, Cambridge, and after a short scholastic career in Ireland he accepted an appointment.

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  • Pusey was elected a fellow of the same society in 1823.

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  • Froude, described by Newman as "one of the acutest, cleverest and deepest men" he ever met, was elected fellow.

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  • In 1878 his old college (Trinity), to his great delight, elected him an honorary fellow, and he revisited Oxford after an interval of thirty-two years.

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  • Among other distinctions he came out as fourth classic in 1830, and in 1833 was elected fellow of St John's.

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  • In the same year Thomson was elected fellow of Peterhouse.

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  • In 1847 he took his degree as Agrege de Philosophie; that is to say, fellow of the university, and was offered a place as master in the lycee of Vendome.

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  • Cassie couldn't help but smile at the way Darcie described her fellow gender.

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  • The fellow worker promised to dig around and telephone back.

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  • He's just a fellow worker.

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  • I lined up behind an old fellow whose odor almost caused me to skip the meal entirely but I stuck with it and was rewarded by a tasty bowl of chicken soup and a fresh baked roll.

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  • What about the three name fellow we were discussing before dinner?

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  • You chose a human and serving the White God over the immortal realm at the Schism, despite the need for your power by your fellow immortals.

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  • "That's some of my fellow jurors," he said.

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  • It's time I kick that Westlake fellow off my computer so's I can post my bargains for the world to see.

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  • She might have been a fellow juror, but Dean sensed that he was watching Jennifer Radisson in his rearview mirror.

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  • "I finally got a hold of that auctioneer fellow," Fred said.

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  • Between the Dawkins boys and that Westlake fellow, I don't even have a room to call my own.

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  • Pumpkin and the Westlake fellow are over with Mrs. Langstrom, or at the funeral home.

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  • I wouldn't wanted to be in this Josh fellow's shorts when Ed Plotke caught up with him!

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  • He's a mighty nasty fellow and if he was as mad as you say, I wouldn't put it past him to hurt her.

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  • Anne Quincy Martin, after she married the minister fellow.

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  • Dean's suggestion of placing the little fellow out of doors in the trash was overruled by his more compassionate wife who pointed out the resulting reduced chances of January survival.

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  • She cut his rope, figuring on hooking back up with that Ryland fellow but then his girlfriend showed up and in no uncertain terms pointed out why that was a dead end.

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  • Fellow detectives Tom DeLeo and Andy Sackler, seated across the room, were arguing as usual while the only other occupant, newcomer Detective Lenny Harrigan, was either catching a quick nap or meditating.

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  • Teachers, cops, girls, judges and fellow gangsters had all shared the frustration of not knowing Billie from Willie.

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  • Dean explained about his visit from Byrne's fellow employee and the young man's story about the possible girl friend.

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  • We thought it might be this Cleary fellow.

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  • Mrs. Glass told him he wasn't the first person asking about her Bascomb Place tenant and the fellow wanted to know all about us.

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  • Run down this missing fellow Brunell too, Fred said, a hopeful look in his eye.

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  • He didn't know a name or a number but the fellow had black hair.

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  • We even scared off the fellow who sold Byrne his first motor home.

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