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faust

faust

faust Sentence Examples

  • Faust laughed, shaking the table.

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  • Look, if Faust is the Dawkinses' lawyer, I can't see how your saying so jeopardizes a damn thing.

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  • Faust is a divorce lawyer.

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  • After the requisite comments on the beauties of Ouray and the surrounding mountains, Faust explained he was from California, here on business—for a short stay, he added.

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  • The woman turned away and began walking down the street, leaving Faust with a disappointed look on his face.

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  • A few moments later, Dickinson Faust stepped into sight.

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  • Faust wore new hiking shorts that exposed bowed legs as white as winter.

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  • When Dean didn't introduce himself, Faust gave Jennifer what he meant as an "old boy" pat on her arm and added, "Checking out the property one last time?"

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  • She stepped back as Jennifer Radisson pointed her camera at Faust and his Jeep—and the blue sweater—and snapped a picture.

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  • The women looked frightened, Faust actually ducked, and David Dean moved to the cover of a nearby boulder, pulling his wife along with him.

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  • He turned to Faust.

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  • As he watched, Faust's Jeep passed into view, with two figures clearly visible.

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  • It certainly worked with Dickinson Faust.

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  • Dean thought about the pictures, especially the one of Dickinson Faust standing next to his Jeep, with the woman's sweater hanging over the seat.

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  • Apparently the shine is off Mr. Faust's halo.

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  • She was scared to death I'd blackmail her with the picture I took of her sweater in Dickinson Faust's Jeep.

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  • She took Joseph's gun along because she was afraid of bumping into a bear when she agreed to go up the mountain with Faust.

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  • We found the back opening when Ginger went poking around up there with Dickinson Faust.

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  • There was attorney Faust but there was no proof he had even set foot in Bird Song.

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  • Faust.

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  • Contra Faust.

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  • Besides Stephen Petelei (Jetti, a name - "Henrietta " - Felhok, " Clouds ") and Zoltan Ambrus (Pokhdlo Kisasszony, " Miss Cobweb "; Gyanu, " Suspicion") must be mentioned especially Francis Herczeg, who has published a number of very interesting studies of Hungarian social life (Simon Zsuzsa, " Susanna Simon "; Fenn es lenn, " Above and Below "; Egy ledny tortenete, " The History of a Girl "; Idegenete kozott, " Amongst Strangers "); Alexander Brody, who brings a delicate yet resolute analysis to unfold the mysterious and fascinating inner life of persons suffering from overwrought nerves or overstrung mind (A kitlelkil asszony, " The Double-Souled Lady "; Don Quixote kisasszony, " Miss Don Quixote "; Faust orvos, " Faust the Physician "; Tiinder Ilona, Rejtelmek, "Mysteries"; Az eziest kecske, " The Silver Goat "); and Edward Kabos, whose sombre and powerful genius has already produced works, not popular by any means, but full of great promise.

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  • Faust >>

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  • MEPHISTOPHELES,' in the Faust legend, the name of the evil spirit in return for whose assistance Faust signs away his soul.

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  • The origin of the idea of Mephistopheles in Faust's mind is thus clear.

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  • To Schroer this derivation seems improbable, and he appears to prefer that from Hebrew Mephiz, destroyer, To Faust himself, somnambulist and medium, Mephistopheles had - according to Kiesewetter - a real existence: he was "the objectivation of the transcendental subject of Faust," an experience familiar in dreams and, more especially, in the visions of mediums and clairvoyants.

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  • It is suggested, then, in the light of modern psychical research, that Mephistopheles, though (as the Faust-books record) invisible to any one else, was visible enough to Faust himself and to Wagner, the famulus who shared his somnambulistic experiences.

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  • He was simply Faust's "other self," appearing in various guises - as a bear, as a little bald man, as a monk, as an invisible presence ringing a bell - but always recognizable as the same "familiar."

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  • He is, however, also the devil, as the age of the Reformation conceived him: a fallen angel who has not forgotten the splendour of his first estate, and who pictures to Faust the glories of heaven, in order to accentuate the horrors of the hell to which he triumphantly drags him.

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  • Felix Jezierski, the previous editor of the above-mentioned journal, published in it translr tions of parts of Homer, and is also the author of an excellent version of Faust.

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  • (b) Translations from Goethe's Faust; sc. i.

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  • A translation of Faust, which he published in 1834, met with considerable success.

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  • Finally the romance to which it owed much of its popular appeal, became, through the medium of Rufinus's Latin, the parent of the late medieval legend of Faust, and so the ancestor of a famous type in modern literature.

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  • Faust in 1617, and has been edited by A.

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  • Greatest of all the torsos of this period, however, was the dramatization of Faust.

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  • Goethe's hero changed with the author's riper experience and with his new conceptions of man's place and duties in the world, but the Gretchen tragedy was taken over into the finished poem, practically unaltered, from the earliest Faust of the Sturm and Drang.

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  • Most interesting of all, however, is the reflection of the classic spirit in works already begun in earlier days, such as Egmont and Faust.

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  • It was Schiller, too, who induced him to undertake those studies on the nature of epic and dramatic poetry which resulted in the epic of Hermann and Dorothea and the fragment of the Achilleis; without the friendship there would have been no Xenien and no ballads, and it was his younger friend's encouragement which induced Goethe to betake himself once more to the "misty path" of Faust, and bring the first part of that drama to a conclusion.

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  • But in the end he proved himself the greatest enemy to the strict classic doctrine by the publication in 1808 of the completed first part of Faust, a work which was accepted by contemporaries as a triumph of Romantic art.

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  • Faust is a patchwork of many colours.

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  • With the aid of the vast body of Faust literature which has sprung up in recent years, and the many new documents bearing on its history above all, the so-called Urfaust, to which reference has already been made - we are able now to ascribe to their various periods the component parts of the work; it is possible to discriminate between the Sturm and Drang hero of the opening scenes and of the Gretchen tragedy - the contemporary of Gotz and Clavigo and the superimposed Faust of calmer moral and intellectual ideals - a Faust who corresponds to Hermann and Wilhelm Meister.

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  • In 1808, as we have seen, appeared the first part of Faust, and in 1809 it was followed by Die Wahlverwandtschaften.

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  • But the crowning achievement of Goethe's literary life was the completion of Faust.

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  • In the second part it is virtually a new Faust who, at the hands of a new Mephistopheles, goes out into a world that is not ours.

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  • Yet behind these unconvincing shadows of an imperial court with its financial difficulties, of the classical Walpurgisnacht, of the fantastic creation of the Homunculus, the noble Helena episode and the impressive mystery-scene of the close, where the centenarian Faust finally triumphs over the powers of evil, there lies a philosophy of life, a ripe wisdom born of experience, such as no European poet had given to the world since the Renaissance.

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  • Faust has been well called the "divine comedy" of 18th-century humanism.

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  • The second part of Faust forms a worthy close to the life of Germany's greatest man of letters, who died in Weimar on the 22nd of March 1832.

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  • Faust is Germany's most national drama, and it remains perhaps for the theatre of the future to prove itself capable of popularizing psychological masterpieces like Tasso and Iphigenie.

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  • The Sorrows of Werther no longer moves us to tears, and even Wilhelm Meister and Die Wahlverwandtschaften require more understanding for the conditions under which they were written than do Faust or Egmont.

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  • Schmidt, Goethes Faust in ursprunglicher Gestalt (1887; 5th ed., 1901); J.

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  • Collin, Goethes Faust in seiner dltesten Gestalt (1896); H.

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  • Kreyssig, Vorlesungen g iber Goethes Faust (1866); the editions of Faust by G.

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  • Fischer, Goethes Faust (3 vols., 1893, 1902, 1903); O.

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  • Pniower, Goethes Faust, Zeugnisse and Excurse zu seiner Entstehungsgeschichte (1899); J.

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  • Minor, Goethes Faust, Entstehungsgeschichte and Erklarung (2 vols., 1901).

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  • Heinemann, A Bibliographical List of the English Translations and Annotated Editions of Goethe's Faust (1886).

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  • The boy varied the monotony of his studies by pranks which revealed his unbalanced character, including an attempt to raise spirits with the aid of Dr Faust's Hallenzwang.

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  • Among the works produced for the first time or rehearsed with a view to the furtherance of musical art were Wagner's Tannhduser, Der fliegende Hollander, Das Liebesmahl der Apostel, and Eine Faust Overture, Berlioz's Benvenuto Cellini, the Symphonie Fantastique, Harold en Italie, Romeo et Juliette, La Damnation de Faust, and L'Enfance du Christ - the last two conducted by the composer - Schumann's Genoveva, Paradise and the the music to Manfred and to Faust, Weber's Euryanthe, Schubert's Alfonso and Estrella, Raff's Kanig Alfred, Cornelius's Der Barbier von Baghdad and many more.

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  • - Concerto pathetique (identical with the Konzert-Solo in E minor); Dante symphony; Faust symphony; Poemes symphoniques, 1-12; Beethoven's 9th symphony.

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  • Eine Symphonie zu Dante's " Divina Cornmedia "; Eine Faust Symphonie; Poemes symphoniques: 1.

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  • Die Ideale; Zwei Episoden aus Lenau's Faust: I.

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  • The note of Renaissance work in Germany was still Gothic. This we feel in the penetrative earnestness of Darer, in the homeliness of Hans Sachs, in the grotesque humour of Eulenspiegel and the Narrenschiff, the sombre pregnancy of the Faust legend, the almost stolid mastery of Holbein.

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  • At the same time Spanish influences reached them through the imitators of Guevara and the dramatists; French influences in the versions of romances; German in fluences in popular translations of the Faust legend, Eulenspiegel and similar productions.

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  • Without much appropriateness Elisha has been sometimes described as the "Faust of the Talmud."

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  • It is matter for regret that a request to Coleridge that he should undertake to translate Faust never received serious attention from him.

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  • These buildings are more or less square with pyramidal roofs ornamented outside with green glazed tiles, and inside with and tophel,liar (Faust, ed.

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  • Of these the Brocken (q.v.) is celebrated for the legends connected with it, immortalized in Goethe's Faust.

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  • Close to the old Rathaus is Auerbach's Hof, built about 1530 and interesting as being immortalized in Goethe's Faust.

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  • Towards the middle of the 18th century Leipzig was the seat of the most influential body of literary men in Germany, over whom Johann Christoph Gottsched, like his contemporary, Samuel Johnson, in England, exercised a kind of literary dictatorship. Then, if ever, Leipzig deserved the epithet of a "Paris in miniature" (Klein Paris) assigned to it by Goethe in his Faust.

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  • In 1847 she published a translation of Schiller's Jungfrau von Orleans; this was followed in 1850 by Faust, Tasso, Iphigenie and Egmont.

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  • In 1878 she published a complete translation of both parts of Faust, which appeared with Retsch's illustrations.

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  • After the requisite comments on the beauties of Ouray and the surrounding mountains, Faust explained he was from California, here on business—for a short stay, he added.

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  • Faust laughed, shaking the table.

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  • After a few more banalities Dickinson Faust rose, shook Dean's hand, patted his shoulder and bid a cheery adieu.

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  • Dean, in hopes of prying some Dawkins v. Dawkins information from Fred, told them of meeting with Ginger's lawyer friend, Dickinson Faust, at the Beaumont Hotel.

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  • Look, if Faust is the Dawkinses' lawyer, I can't see how your saying so jeopardizes a damn thing.

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  • Faust is a divorce lawyer.

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  • "Probably just out getting some fresh mountain air," Dean replied, but wondered if Ginger might be off discussing divorce strategy between Dickinson Faust's sheets at the Beaumont Hotel.

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  • As Dean passed the Beaumont Hotel, he caught sight of Dickinson Faust, the Dawkinses' attorney, emerging, his hand on the arm of a striking woman who didn't seem to care for the gesture.

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  • The woman turned away and began walking down the street, leaving Faust with a disappointed look on his face.

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  • I'm not sure I do, but I saw you leave The Beaumont Hotel with Dickinson Faust.

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  • A few moments later, Dickinson Faust stepped into sight.

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  • Faust wore new hiking shorts that exposed bowed legs as white as winter.

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  • When Dean didn't introduce himself, Faust gave Jennifer what he meant as an "old boy" pat on her arm and added, "Checking out the property one last time?"

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  • She stepped back as Jennifer Radisson pointed her camera at Faust and his Jeep—and the blue sweater—and snapped a picture.

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  • The women looked frightened, Faust actually ducked, and David Dean moved to the cover of a nearby boulder, pulling his wife along with him.

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  • He turned to Faust.

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  • As he watched, Faust's Jeep passed into view, with two figures clearly visible.

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  • It certainly worked with Dickinson Faust.

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  • Dean also refrained from telling Fred they'd met Dickinson Faust at the Lucky Pup, most likely with Ginger Dawkins.

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  • Dean thought about the pictures, especially the one of Dickinson Faust standing next to his Jeep, with the woman's sweater hanging over the seat.

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  • He explained about the Dawkinses' litigation, but didn't mention Jennifer Radisson or Dickinson Faust.

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  • Cynthia questioned aloud if the Beaumont would have a vacancy while Dean questioned the "alone," his dirty mind assuming Ginger would be sub-letting one side of Dickinson Faust's king-size bed.

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  • Apparently the shine is off Mr. Faust's halo.

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  • She was scared to death I'd blackmail her with the picture I took of her sweater in Dickinson Faust's Jeep.

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  • She took Joseph's gun along because she was afraid of bumping into a bear when she agreed to go up the mountain with Faust.

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  • We found the back opening when Ginger went poking around up there with Dickinson Faust.

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  • There was attorney Faust but there was no proof he had even set foot in Bird Song.

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  • copycat suicides he expects Faust to lead to more rounded and balanced human beings.

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  • For Faust, he uses three different prototype dulcimers, including a microtonal dulcimer of his own design.

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  • The Hell Candidate is an atmospheric chiller with a political background, that features a novel slant on the Faust legend.

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  • scanner calibrated using Monaco EZ Color and Wolf Faust targets which helps with color accuracy.

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  • The important small published works are Eine Faust Overture (1839-1840; rewritten, 1855); the Siegfried Idylle (an exquisite serenade for small orchestra on themes from the finale of Siegfried, written as a surprise for Frau Wagner in 1870); the Kaisermarsch (1871), the Huldigungsmarsch (1864) for military band (the scoring of the concert-version finished by Raff); Fiinf Gedichte (1862), a set of songs containing two studies for Tristan; and the early quasi-oratorio scene for male-voice chorus and full orchestra, Das Liebesmahl der Apostel (1843).

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  • Contra Faust.

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  • Besides Stephen Petelei (Jetti, a name - "Henrietta " - Felhok, " Clouds ") and Zoltan Ambrus (Pokhdlo Kisasszony, " Miss Cobweb "; Gyanu, " Suspicion") must be mentioned especially Francis Herczeg, who has published a number of very interesting studies of Hungarian social life (Simon Zsuzsa, " Susanna Simon "; Fenn es lenn, " Above and Below "; Egy ledny tortenete, " The History of a Girl "; Idegenete kozott, " Amongst Strangers "); Alexander Brody, who brings a delicate yet resolute analysis to unfold the mysterious and fascinating inner life of persons suffering from overwrought nerves or overstrung mind (A kitlelkil asszony, " The Double-Souled Lady "; Don Quixote kisasszony, " Miss Don Quixote "; Faust orvos, " Faust the Physician "; Tiinder Ilona, Rejtelmek, "Mysteries"; Az eziest kecske, " The Silver Goat "); and Edward Kabos, whose sombre and powerful genius has already produced works, not popular by any means, but full of great promise.

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  • MEPHISTOPHELES,' in the Faust legend, the name of the evil spirit in return for whose assistance Faust signs away his soul.

    0
    0
  • The origin of the idea of Mephistopheles in Faust's mind is thus clear.

    0
    0
  • To Schroer this derivation seems improbable, and he appears to prefer that from Hebrew Mephiz, destroyer, To Faust himself, somnambulist and medium, Mephistopheles had - according to Kiesewetter - a real existence: he was "the objectivation of the transcendental subject of Faust," an experience familiar in dreams and, more especially, in the visions of mediums and clairvoyants.

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    0
  • He was thus a "familiar spirit," akin to the "daemon" of Socrates; and if he was also half the devil of theology, half the kobold of old German myth, this was only because such "objectivations" are apt to clothe themselves in forms borrowed from the common stock of ideas current at the time when the seer lives; and Faust lived in an age obsessed with the fear of the devil, and by no means sceptical of the existence of kobolds.

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  • It is suggested, then, in the light of modern psychical research, that Mephistopheles, though (as the Faust-books record) invisible to any one else, was visible enough to Faust himself and to Wagner, the famulus who shared his somnambulistic experiences.

    0
    0
  • He was simply Faust's "other self," appearing in various guises - as a bear, as a little bald man, as a monk, as an invisible presence ringing a bell - but always recognizable as the same "familiar."

    0
    0
  • He is, however, also the devil, as the age of the Reformation conceived him: a fallen angel who has not forgotten the splendour of his first estate, and who pictures to Faust the glories of heaven, in order to accentuate the horrors of the hell to which he triumphantly drags him.

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  • (See FAUST.) (W.

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  • Felix Jezierski, the previous editor of the above-mentioned journal, published in it translr tions of parts of Homer, and is also the author of an excellent version of Faust.

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  • (b) Translations from Goethe's Faust; sc. i.

    0
    0
  • A translation of Faust, which he published in 1834, met with considerable success.

    0
    0
  • Finally the romance to which it owed much of its popular appeal, became, through the medium of Rufinus's Latin, the parent of the late medieval legend of Faust, and so the ancestor of a famous type in modern literature.

    0
    0
  • Faust in 1617, and has been edited by A.

    0
    0
  • Greatest of all the torsos of this period, however, was the dramatization of Faust.

    0
    0
  • Goethe's hero changed with the author's riper experience and with his new conceptions of man's place and duties in the world, but the Gretchen tragedy was taken over into the finished poem, practically unaltered, from the earliest Faust of the Sturm and Drang.

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    0
  • This work may, to some extent, be regarded as supplementary to Faust; it presents the lighter, more cheerful and optimistic side of Goethe's philosophy in these years; Graf Egmont, the most winning and fascinating of the poet's heroes, is endowed with that "demonic" power over the sympathies of men and women, which Goethe himself possessed in so high a degree.

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  • Most interesting of all, however, is the reflection of the classic spirit in works already begun in earlier days, such as Egmont and Faust.

    0
    0
  • It was Schiller, too, who induced him to undertake those studies on the nature of epic and dramatic poetry which resulted in the epic of Hermann and Dorothea and the fragment of the Achilleis; without the friendship there would have been no Xenien and no ballads, and it was his younger friend's encouragement which induced Goethe to betake himself once more to the "misty path" of Faust, and bring the first part of that drama to a conclusion.

    0
    0
  • But in the end he proved himself the greatest enemy to the strict classic doctrine by the publication in 1808 of the completed first part of Faust, a work which was accepted by contemporaries as a triumph of Romantic art.

    0
    0
  • Faust is a patchwork of many colours.

    0
    0
  • With the aid of the vast body of Faust literature which has sprung up in recent years, and the many new documents bearing on its history above all, the so-called Urfaust, to which reference has already been made - we are able now to ascribe to their various periods the component parts of the work; it is possible to discriminate between the Sturm and Drang hero of the opening scenes and of the Gretchen tragedy - the contemporary of Gotz and Clavigo and the superimposed Faust of calmer moral and intellectual ideals - a Faust who corresponds to Hermann and Wilhelm Meister.

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  • Thus the elements of which Faust is composed were even more difficult to blend than were those of Wilhelm Meister; but the very want of uniformity is one source of the perennial fascination of the tragedy, and has made it in a peculiar degree the national poem of the German people, the mirror which reflects the national life and poetry from the outburst of Sturm and Drang to the well-weighed and tranquil classicism of Goethe's old age.

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  • In 1808, as we have seen, appeared the first part of Faust, and in 1809 it was followed by Die Wahlverwandtschaften.

    0
    0
  • But the crowning achievement of Goethe's literary life was the completion of Faust.

    0
    0
  • In the second part it is virtually a new Faust who, at the hands of a new Mephistopheles, goes out into a world that is not ours.

    0
    0
  • Yet behind these unconvincing shadows of an imperial court with its financial difficulties, of the classical Walpurgisnacht, of the fantastic creation of the Homunculus, the noble Helena episode and the impressive mystery-scene of the close, where the centenarian Faust finally triumphs over the powers of evil, there lies a philosophy of life, a ripe wisdom born of experience, such as no European poet had given to the world since the Renaissance.

    0
    0
  • Faust has been well called the "divine comedy" of 18th-century humanism.

    0
    0
  • The second part of Faust forms a worthy close to the life of Germany's greatest man of letters, who died in Weimar on the 22nd of March 1832.

    0
    0
  • Faust is Germany's most national drama, and it remains perhaps for the theatre of the future to prove itself capable of popularizing psychological masterpieces like Tasso and Iphigenie.

    0
    0
  • The Sorrows of Werther no longer moves us to tears, and even Wilhelm Meister and Die Wahlverwandtschaften require more understanding for the conditions under which they were written than do Faust or Egmont.

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  • It is difficult even still to get beyond the maxims of practical wisdom he scattered so liberally through his writings, the lessons to be learned from Meister and Faust, or even that calm, optimistic fatalism which never deserted Goethe, and was so completely justified by the tenor of his life.

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  • Schmidt, Goethes Faust in ursprunglicher Gestalt (1887; 5th ed., 1901); J.

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  • Collin, Goethes Faust in seiner dltesten Gestalt (1896); H.

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  • Kreyssig, Vorlesungen g iber Goethes Faust (1866); the editions of Faust by G.

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  • Fischer, Goethes Faust (3 vols., 1893, 1902, 1903); O.

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    0
  • Pniower, Goethes Faust, Zeugnisse and Excurse zu seiner Entstehungsgeschichte (1899); J.

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  • Minor, Goethes Faust, Entstehungsgeschichte and Erklarung (2 vols., 1901).

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  • Heinemann, A Bibliographical List of the English Translations and Annotated Editions of Goethe's Faust (1886).

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  • The boy varied the monotony of his studies by pranks which revealed his unbalanced character, including an attempt to raise spirits with the aid of Dr Faust's Hallenzwang.

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  • Among the works produced for the first time or rehearsed with a view to the furtherance of musical art were Wagner's Tannhduser, Der fliegende Hollander, Das Liebesmahl der Apostel, and Eine Faust Overture, Berlioz's Benvenuto Cellini, the Symphonie Fantastique, Harold en Italie, Romeo et Juliette, La Damnation de Faust, and L'Enfance du Christ - the last two conducted by the composer - Schumann's Genoveva, Paradise and the the music to Manfred and to Faust, Weber's Euryanthe, Schubert's Alfonso and Estrella, Raff's Kanig Alfred, Cornelius's Der Barbier von Baghdad and many more.

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  • The compositions belonging to the period of his residence at Weimar comprise two pianoforte concertos, in E flat and in A, the " Todtentanz," the " Concerto pathetique " for two pianos, the solo sonata " An Robert Schumann," sundry " Etudes," fifteen " Rhapsodies Hongroises," twelve orchestral " Poemes symphoniques, " " Eine Faust Symphonie," and " Eine Symphonie zu Dante's ` Divina Commedia,' " the " 13th Psalm " for tenor solo, chorus and orchestra, the choruses to Herder's dramatic scenes " Prometheus," and the " Missa solennis " known as the " Graner Fest' Messe."

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  • By the side of it ranks the Faust Symphony (1854-1857), in which the moods of Goethe's characters - Faust, Gretchen and Mephistopheles - are depicted in three instrumental movements, with a chorus of male voices, supplying a kind of comment, by way of close.

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  • - Concerto pathetique (identical with the Konzert-Solo in E minor); Dante symphony; Faust symphony; Poemes symphoniques, 1-12; Beethoven's 9th symphony.

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  • Paraphrases, Auber, Tarantella di bravura (Masaniello); Verdi, Rigoletto, Ernani, 11 Trovatore; Mendelssohn, " Hochzeitsmarsch and Elfenreigen "; Gounod, Valse de Faust, Les Adieux de Romeo et Juliette; Tschaikowsky, Polonaise; Dargomiyski, Tarantelle; Cui, Tarantella; Saint-Satins, Danse macabre; Schubert, Soirees de Vienne, Valses caprices, 1-9.

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  • Beethoven's Nine Symphonies; Berlioz's " Symphonie fantastique," " Harold en Italie "; Benediction et Serment (Benvenuto Cellini); Danse des Sylphes (Damnation de Faust); Weber's overtures, Der Freischiitz, Euryanthe, Oberon, Jubilee; Beethoven's and Hummel's Septets; Schubert's Divertissement a la Hongroise; Beethoven's Concertos in C minor, G and E flat (orchestra for a second piano); Wagner's Tannhauser overture, march, romance, chorus of pilgrims; Lohengrin, Festzug and Brautlied, Elsa's Brautgang, Elsa's Traum, Lohengrin's Verweiss an Elsa; Fliegender Hollander, Spinnlied; Rienzi, Gebet; Rheingold, Walhall; Meistersinger, " Am stillen Herd "; Tristan, Isolde's Liebestod; Chopin's six Chants Polonais; Meyerbeer's Schillermarsch; Bach's six organ Preludes and Fugues; Prelude and Fugue in G minor; Beethoven, Adelaide; 6 miscellaneous and 6 Geistliche Lieder; Liederkreis; Rossini's Les Soirees musicales; Schubert, 59 songs; Schumann, 13 songs; Mendelssohn, 8 songs; Robert Franz, 13 songs.

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  • Eine Symphonie zu Dante's " Divina Cornmedia "; Eine Faust Symphonie; Poemes symphoniques: 1.

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  • Die Ideale; Zwei Episoden aus Lenau's Faust: I.

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  • The note of Renaissance work in Germany was still Gothic. This we feel in the penetrative earnestness of Darer, in the homeliness of Hans Sachs, in the grotesque humour of Eulenspiegel and the Narrenschiff, the sombre pregnancy of the Faust legend, the almost stolid mastery of Holbein.

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  • At the same time Spanish influences reached them through the imitators of Guevara and the dramatists; French influences in the versions of romances; German in fluences in popular translations of the Faust legend, Eulenspiegel and similar productions.

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  • Without much appropriateness Elisha has been sometimes described as the "Faust of the Talmud."

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  • It is matter for regret that a request to Coleridge that he should undertake to translate Faust never received serious attention from him.

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  • These buildings are more or less square with pyramidal roofs ornamented outside with green glazed tiles, and inside with and tophel,liar (Faust, ed.

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  • (2) On aesthetics: Vorlesungen fiber Goethes Faust (Halle, 1825); Schillers Dichtungen nach ihrem historischen Zusammenhang (Leipzig, 1837-1839).

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  • Of these the Brocken (q.v.) is celebrated for the legends connected with it, immortalized in Goethe's Faust.

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  • Close to the old Rathaus is Auerbach's Hof, built about 1530 and interesting as being immortalized in Goethe's Faust.

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  • Towards the middle of the 18th century Leipzig was the seat of the most influential body of literary men in Germany, over whom Johann Christoph Gottsched, like his contemporary, Samuel Johnson, in England, exercised a kind of literary dictatorship. Then, if ever, Leipzig deserved the epithet of a "Paris in miniature" (Klein Paris) assigned to it by Goethe in his Faust.

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  • In 1847 she published a translation of Schiller's Jungfrau von Orleans; this was followed in 1850 by Faust, Tasso, Iphigenie and Egmont.

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  • In 1878 she published a complete translation of both parts of Faust, which appeared with Retsch's illustrations.

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  • This thought pervades all German literature and is mystically expressed in Goethe's "Faust":

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  • I have my scanner calibrated using Monaco EZ Color and Wolf Faust targets which helps with color accuracy.

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  • Faust turns back to the crazy primitive world of the witches ' sabbath and to a chimerical vision of classical antiquity.

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  • His son Kyle (Chad Faust) slipped into a coma three years ago on the night his nephew Shawn (Patrick Fleuger) disappeared.

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