This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

faults

faults Sentence Examples

  • It wasn't either of your faults.

  • Sure, he had faults – like being secretive.

  • Mums always said that you had to learn to look over their faults – forgive them as you would want them to forgive yours.

  • As a proof of the seriousness with which he regarded the literary vocation, it may be mentioned that he used to write out his poems in printed characters, believing that that process best enabled him to understand his own peculiarities and faults, and probably unconscious that Coleridge had recommended some such method of criticism when he said he thought "print settles it."

  • This latter question had not presented itself to the prophet's mind; his object was simply to correct the opinion of the people that their present misfortunes were due not to their own faults but to those of their predecessors.

  • " test pillars " are placed for the purpose of enabling possible faults to be accurately located.

  • The subjection of the core to a hydraulic pressure of four tons to the square inch and an electric pressure of 5000 volts from an alternating-current transformer has been adopted, by one manufacturer at least, to secure the detection of masked faults which might develop themselves after submergence.

  • Faults or any other irregularity in the cable may be represented by putting resistances of the proper kind into the artificial line.

  • But Charles Charles Albert, who, whatever his faults, had a generous Albertre- nature, was determined that so long as be had an news the army in being he could not abandon the Lombards War, and the Venetians, whom he had encouraged in their resistance, without one more effort, though he knew full well that he was staking all on a desperate chance.

  • Worse men had been less detested, but Danby had none of the amiable virtues which often counteract the odium incurred by serious faults.

  • Henry's faults may be excused by his difficulties.

  • " I cannot forgive myself the contemptuous treatment of a man who, with all his faults, was entitled to my esteem; and I can less forgive, in a personal attack, the cowardly concealment of my name and character."

  • Oppressive taxation and unblushing nepotism were Clement's great faults.

  • The faults were not all on one side.

  • It has the "mixed" faults which make the greater poem of his Scots successor, Thomson, a "transitional" document, but these give it an historical, if not an individual, interest.

  • Coleridge, is not free from the first of these faults.

  • Structurally, the folds of this region are of ancient date; but the area is crossed by a series of depressions formed by faults, and the intervening strips, which have not been depressed to the same extent, now stand up as mountain ranges.

  • The frankness with which he attacks the court of Rome for its exactions is remarkable; so, too, is the intense nationalism which he displays in dealing with this topic. His faults of presentment are more often due to carelessness and narrow views than to deliberate purpose.

  • All these faults make him a peculiarly unsatisfactory authority where we cannot check his statements by those of other authors.

  • No wonder that it stands the comparison badly; but with all its faults the Getica of Jordanes will probably ever retain its place side by side with the De moribus Germanorum of Tacitus as a chief source of information respecting the history, institutions and modes of thought of our Teutonic forefathers.

  • The real wit and rigour of Oldham's satirical poetry are undeniable, while its faults - its frenzied extravagance and lack of metrical polish - might, as Dryden suggests, have been cured with time, for Oldham was only thirty when he died.

  • Few, if any, of the faults of that classification are removed, and the improvements suggested, if not established by his successors, those especially of other countries than France, are ignored, or, as is the case with some of those of L'Herminier, are only cited to be set aside.

  • He is bound to warrant the lessee against, and to indemnify him for, any loss arising from any faults or defects in the thing hired which prevent its use, even though he was not aware of them at the time of the lease (Art.

  • To arrest his progress, a Crusade, preached by Boniface IX., led by John the Fearless of Burgundy, and joined chiefly by French knights, was directed down the valley of the Danube into the Balkans; but the old faults stigmatized by de Mezieres, divisio and pro Aria voluntas, were the ruin of the crusading army, and at the battle of Nicopolis it was signally defeated.

  • But, with all his faults, he devoted himself so indefatigably to the service of the state, that the period of his reign could be characterized as a "golden age."

  • These faults are of less importance during the period when Greek and Roman writers notice the affairs of Britain; but they become more serious when, as is the case from nearly the beginning of the 5th century to the date of his death, Gildas's brief narrative is our only authority for most of what passes current as the history of our island during those years.

  • To handle these so successfully that we can discriminate defects from qualities at all, is proof of the technique of a master, even though the faults extend to whole categories of literature.

  • The faults make analysis exceptionally difficult, for they are no longer commonplace; indeed, the gravest dangers of modern Wagnerism arise from the fact that there is hardly any non-musical aspect in which Wagner's later work is not important enough to produce a school of essentially non-musical critics who have no notion how far Wagner's mature music transcends the rest of his thought, nor how often it rises where his philosophy falls.

  • With all his faults, and in spite of no slight amount of personal vanity, President Faure was a shrewd political observer and a good man of business.

  • When such faults occurred, the papyrus must be re-made.

  • God, they hold, is the sole creator and ruler -of the world; yet man is free, autonomous - God is not responsible for men's faults (Ecclus.

  • Mme de Stael's faults are great; her style is of an age, not for all time; her ideas are mostly second-hand and frequently superficial.

  • He is not always very critical, and he is passionately fond of allegorical interpretations, but these were the faults of his age.

  • was the victim of the faults of his predecessors.

  • These faults are painfully apparent in the lives of Hardwicke, Eldon, Lyndhurst and Brougham, and they have been pointed out by the biographers of Eldon and by Lord St Leonards.'

  • On no great subject did his principles rise above the commonplace of party, nor had he the magnanimity which excuses rather than aggravates the faults of others.

  • It is discursive and badly arranged, but it is marked by a power of style, a vigour of narrative, and a skill in delineation of character which give life to the most unattractive period of German history; notwithstanding the extreme spirit of partisanship and some faults of taste, it will remain a remarkable monument of literary ability.

  • Valdemar's worst faults were a certain aloofness and taciturnity.

  • That his brother retained the throne while James lost it is an ironical demonstration that a more pitiless fate awaits the ruler whose faults are of the intellect, than one whose faults are of the heart.

  • Whatever its faults may be - and it is for our successors to judge of these - there is this to be said in its favour: that it is in nowise dogmatic. The eloquence of facts appeals to the scientific mind nowadays much more than the assertion of crude and unproven principles.

  • The standard of excellence in the ancient writers was indeed far above the level of the 16th century; but the fatal habit of taking at second hand what should have been acquired by direct observation retarded progress more than the possession of better models assisted it, so that the fundamental faults of medieval science remained uncorrected.

  • Nevertheless, with all the Pucelle's faults, it is amusing.

  • Faulting, however, is by no means absent, and some of the faults are of considerable magnitude.

  • The Gulf of Akaba is a strip of country which has been let down between two parallel faults, and several similar faulted troughs occur in the Sinai peninsula.

  • The Red Sea itself is a great trough bounded by faults along each side.] Climate.

  • Arnold was by no means blind to the faults of Henry's government, but preferred an autocracy to the mob-rule which Simon de Montfortcountenanced in London.

  • Gamarra, born at Cuzco in 1785, never accommodated himself to constitutional usages; but he attached to himself many loyal and devoted friends, and, with all his faults he loved his country and sought its welfare according to his lights.

  • The faults of Night, the earliest of these, are pointed out in a long and friendly letter (30th of January 1819) from Robert Southey to the author.

  • Two faults, however, marred the workfirst, the shapes were clumsy and unpleasing, being copied from bronzes whose solidity justified forms unsuited to thin enamelled vessels; secondly, the colors, sombre and somewhat impure, lacked the glow and mellowness that give decorative superiority to the technically inferior Chinese enamels of the later Ming and early Tsing eras.

  • But also we are drawn by the faults of our heretical opponents to do things unlawful, to scale heights inaccessible, to speak out what is unspeakable, to presume where we ought not.

  • There is a system of lesser faults, parallel to the Great Fault, dividing the area into a number of blocks, some of which have fallen more than others.

  • There are also indications of another series of faults roughly parallel to the south-east coast, which point to the islands being fragments of a former extensive plateau.

  • His infidelity to his wife and his harshness towards his son Carlino are blemishes on a splendid career, but he more than expiated these faults by his tragic end.

  • The areas containing productive coal measures are usually known as coalfields or basins, within which coal occurs in more or less regular beds, also called seams or veins, which can often be followed over a considerable length of country without change of character, although, like all stratified rocks, their continuity may be interrupted by faults or dislocations, also known as slips, hitches, heaves or troubles.

  • the total estimated reductions on account of loss in working due to faults and other natural causes in seams and of coal required to be left for barriers, support of surface buildings, &c.; and column III.

  • The chief faults of the book are obscurity, verbal conceits and a forced ingenuity which shows itself in grotesque puns, odd metres and occasional want of taste.

  • In the vicinity of Lakes Nyasa and Tanganyika, sandstones and shales of Lower Karroo age and yielding seams of coal are considered to owe their position and preservation to being let down by rift faults into hollows of the crystalline rocks.

  • The rift-valley faults continue down the depression, marked by numerous volcanoes, in the region of the Natron Lake and Lake Manyara; while the steep walls of the deep depression of Tanganyika and Nyasa represent the western rift system at its maximum development..

  • Partly owing to its own faults and partly owing to the stress of political excitement which followed it, the Edwardean revival was followed by nearly half a century of lethargy, during which the chief interest centred in the gradual growth of doctrinal controversy.

  • Though it has resisted all attempts to reduce it to an ordered scheme, and probably was not written on any set plan, still it is possible roughly to indicate its contents: after the prologue and introductory chapter setting forth St Benedict's intention, follow instructions to the abbot on the manner in which he should govern his monastery (2, 3); next comes the ascetical portion of the Rule, on the chief monastic virtues (4-7); then the regulations for the celebration of the canonical office, which St Benedict calls "the Work of God" or "the divine work," his monks' first duty, "of which nothing is to take precedence" (8-20); faults and punishments (23-30); the cellarer and property of the monastery (31,32); community of goods (33, 34); various officials and daily life (21, 22, 35-57); reception of monks (58-61); miscellaneous (62-73).

  • Froude therefore declared that in giving them to the world he was carrying out his friend's wish by enabling him to make a posthumous confession of his faults.

  • On the political and administrative side the struggle of the Poles was weakened by the faults which had been the ruin of their kingdom - f action pushed to the point of anarchy, want.

  • A Socinian Bible was issued by Simon Budny in 1570 at Nieswiez, as he professed to find many faults in the version issued under the patronage of Radziwill; in 1597 appeared the Roman Catholic version of the Jesuit Wujek; and in 1632 the so-called Danzig Bible, which is in use among Protestants and is still the most frequently reprinted.

  • These slight inflections of the cleavage may be sharp-sided, and may pass into small faults or steps along which dislocation has taken place.

  • Grave faults the men had, from the regular's point of view.

  • He confessed freely that the Society had faults and that there was a great deal of unrest among the members; and he mentioned among the various points calling for reform the education of the novices and students; the state of the lay brother and the possessions of the Society; the spying system, which he declared to be carried so far that, if the general's archives at Rome should be searched, not one Jesuit's character would be found to escape; the monopoly of the higher offices by a small clique: and the absence of all encouragement and recompense for the best men of the Society.

  • It is true that the translation is more careful and correct than some of the renderings noticed above, but on the other hand it shares all their faults.

  • provpee The province was uplifted and divided into great blocks by faults or monoclinal flexures and thus exposed to long-lasting denudation in a mid-Tertiary cycle of erosion; and then broadly elevated again, with renewed movement on some of the fault lines; thus was introduced in late Tertiary time the current cycle of erosion in which the deep canyons of the region have been trenched.

  • During the current cycle of erosion, several of the faults, whose scarps had been worn away in the previous cycle, have been brought to light again as topographic features by the removal of the weak strata along one side of the fault line, leaving the harder strata on the other side in relief; such scarps are known as fault-line scarps, in distinction from the original fault scarps.

  • In Western Utah and through most of Nevada many of the blocks exhibit deformed structures, involving folds and faults of relatively ancient (Jurassic) date; so ancient that the moun~ tains then formed by the folding were worn down to the lowland stage of old age before the block-faulting occurred.

  • But there are two tests of a more objective character that may be used - orthography, and indication of lacunae or other faults in his exemplar.

  • In one of his letters home at this period he calls the campaign a "tissue of mismanagement, blunders, errors, ignorance and arrogance"; and outspoken criticism such as this brought him many bitter enemies throughout his career, who made the most of undeniable faults of character.

  • Resorting to stimulants after illness, his marked excess in this respect on the occasion of his inauguration as vice-president undoubtedly did him harm with the public. Faults of personality were his great handicap. Though approachable and not without kindliness of manner, he seemed hard and inflexible; and while president, physical pain and domestic anxieties, added to the struggles of public life, combined to accentuate a naturally somewhat severe temperament.

  • Jebel Akhdar, being without "faults," has no deep internal valleys, and presents, the appearance of downs: but its seaward face is very deeply eroded, and deep circular sinkings (swallow-holes) are common.

  • Feckenham used all his influence with Mary "to procure pardon of the faults or mitigation of the punishment for poor Protestants" (Fuller), and he was sent by the queen to prepare Lady Jane Grey for death.

  • In Wedderburn's character ambition banished all rectitude of principle, but the love of money for money's sake was not among his faults.

  • As a statesman, he certainly committed grave faults - through excess of diplomatic subtlety, lack of forethought, and sometimes even through ingenuousness; but it must with justice be admitted that, in spite of his reputation for pugnacity and obstinacy, he never failed, either by temperament or on principle, to exhaust every peaceful expedient in settling questions.

  • Artificial membranes are seldom or never perfectly semi-permeable - some leakage of solute nearly always occurs, but the imperfections of actual membranes need no more prevent our use of the ideal conception than the faults of real engines invalidate the theory of ideal thermodynamics founded on the conception of a perfect, reversible, frictionless, heat engine.

  • In 1685 he published Sentimens de quelques theologiens de Hollande sur l'histoire critique du Vieux Testament composee par le P. Richard Simon, in which, while pointing out what he believed to be the faults of that author, he undertook to make some positive contributions towards a right understanding of the Bible.

  • His industry as a biographer is commended by P. Bayle, who acknowledges his obligations to Adam's labours; and his biographies, though they have faults, are still useful.

  • But his view of nature and of God is essentially Stoic. It was only (he declares) the weakness of humanity that had embodied the Being of God in many human forms endued with human faults and vices (ii.

  • The electricity is solely a source of heat, free from the faults of the older sources which for certain purposes it now replaces.

  • His cruelty and deceitfulness were faults common to all Eastern despots.

  • His works, we learn, were full of repetition, and critics speak of vulgarities of language and faults of style.

  • The faults of Diodorus arise partly from the nature of the undertaking, and the awkward form of annals into which he has thrown the historical portion of his narrative.

  • But the little work, with all its faults, was a masterpiece.

  • The faults of the book resolve themselves, for the most part, into one great fault.

  • The strange dependants to whom he had given shelter, and to whom, in spite of their faults, he was strongly attached' by habit, dropped off one by one; and, in the silence of his home, he regretted even the noise of their scolding matches.

  • The depression of the Rhine is a trough lying between two faults or system of faults.

  • The spiritual princes, besides displaying all the faults of the secular princes, had special defects of their own; and as simony was universally practised, the lives of multitudes of the inferior clergy were a public scandal, while their services were cold and unimpressive.

  • His love for the English Church never blinded him to its faults, and no man was less insular than he.

  • Similar faults are found in the non-narrative portions of the Koran.

  • The north and south direction of the river has been largely determined by faults, though the geologists of the Egyptian Survey are finding that the influence of faulting in determining physical outline has, in some cases, been overestimated.

  • In general, however, the central area is one of faulting rather than of folding, and the sedimentary beds sometimes lie in troughs formed by faults.

  • This little treatise stands almost alone in Proverbs; the great mass of its aphorisms relate to vices and faults which, though possible in any tolerably well-organized community, were specially prominent in the cities in which the Jews dwelt after the conquests of Alexander.

  • speakers to be named with him in his best days at the Irish bar; but his style, if not of the most perfect kind, and often disfigured by decided faults, was marked by a peculiar subtlety and manly power, and produced great and striking effects.

  • These mountains, consisting of various sorts of gneiss, intrusive granite and gabbro, have been formed partly by faulting but mainly by erosion, the lines of which have been determined by the presence of faults or the presence of relatively soft rocks.

  • - The post-Platonic historians and critics, who, while they knew the earlier sophistry only through tradition, were eyewitnesses of the sophistry of the decadence, were more alive to the faults than to the virtues of the movement.

  • In the former even the Pliocene beds are crumpled and folded, overfolded and overthrust in the most violent fashion; in the latter none but the oldest beds, certainly none so late as the Permian, have been crumpled or crushed - occasionally they are bent and frequently they are faulted, but the faults, though sometimes of considerable magnitude, are simple dislocations, unaccompanied by any serious disturbance of the strata.

  • In more recent times there have been local disturbances, and large faults have in places been formed; but the greater part of the Peninsula rocks are only slightly disturbed.

  • When in 1666 he made his discovery of the different refrangibility of light of different colours, he soon perceived that the faults of the refracting telescope were due much more to this cause than to the spherical figure of the lenses.

  • He did not attempt the formation of a parabolic figure on account of the probable mechanical difficulties, and he had besides satisfied himself that the chromatic and not the spherical aberration formed the chief faults of previous telescopes.

  • That near the surface is generally poor in quality and the difficulties of deep mining may be great because of folds and faults in the rocks.

  • We allow the faults and crimes of his early manhood, his cruelties and deceptions, his readiness to sacrifice everything that came between him and the end he had in view.

  • The state has many mineral springs occurring in connexion with faults in the Appalachian chain of mountains; in 1908, 46 were reported, making the state third among the states of the United States in number of springs, and of these several have been in high medical repute.

  • That Homer possesses this rapidity without falling into the corresponding faults - that is, without becoming either " jerky " or monotonous - is perhaps the best proof of his unequalled poetical skill.

  • Over and above those faults, which made him odious to his fellow-citizens, we trace in him a meanness that our century is less willing to condone.

  • The San Juan, Gallinas and Nacimiento ranges are among the most notable in this group. South of the Rocky Mountains lies the so-called Basin Region, in which isolated, but sometimes lofty and massive, mountains, the result in many instances of a series of numerous parallel faults, rise from level plains like islands from the sea and enclose the valleys with bare walls of grey and brown rock.

  • The process consists of four parts, and has as many faults.

  • His great work consists in the fact that he summed up the faults which the widening of knowledge had disclosed in medieval thought, and in this sense he stands high among those who were in many parts of 16th-century Europe striving towards a new intellectual activity.

  • The Riksdag of 190o, in addition to grants for the fortifications at Boden, in the province of Norrbotten, on the Russian border, and other military objects, voted a considerable grant for an experimental mobilization, which fully exposed the defects and faults of the old system.

  • Lidner was a genuine poet, and his lack of durable success must be set down to faults of character, not to lack of inspiration.

  • With all these faults, and in spite of a terrible vulgarity of mind, an absence of humour, and a boundless confidence in the philosophy of Nietzsche, Strindberg is a writer of very remarkable power and unquestionable originality.

  • Among these may be mentioned these hardships with a fortitude and patience which go far to counterbalance his faults.

  • Ismail, Tahmasp and Abbas, whatever their faults and failings, were Persian and peculiar to Persians.

  • He was undoubtedly the most conspicuous champion produced by the old religion in the age of the Reformation, but his great gifts were marred by greater faults.

  • Naude that he has committed more faults than he has discovered in Cardan, and with Charles Nisard that his object seems to be to deny all that Cardan affirms and to affirm all that Cardan denies.

  • seldom allowed them to meet, but for years they corresponded; and nothing is more admirable than the mingled tact and firmness with which Fenelon spoke his mind about the prince's faults.

  • There is a series of such faults, approximately parallel to one another, and although they have not been traced throughout the whole chain, yet wherever they occur they seem to have formed the northern boundary of deposition of the deposits immediately to the south of them.

  • The thrust-plane, then, does not coincide with any of the boundary faults already mentioned, which are usually inclined at angles of 50° or 60°.

  • Highlands of Scotland, and the reversed faults which appear at the surface with the " minor thrusts."

  • The Ulyssea of Gabriel Pereira de Castro describes the foundation of Lisbon by Ulysses, but, notwithstanding its plagiarism of The Lusiads and faults of taste, these ten cantos contain some masterly descriptive passages, and the ottava rima shows a harmony and flexibility to which even Camoens rarely attained; but this praise cannot be extended to the tiresome Ulyssipo of Sousa de Macedo.

  • The Langobards, German in their faults and in their strength, but coarser, at least at first, than the Germans whom the Italians had known, the Goths of Theodoric and Totila, found themselves continually in the presence of a subject population very different from anything which the other Teutonic conquerors met with among the provincials - like them, exhausted, dispirited, unwarlike, but with the remains and memory of a great civilization round them, intelligent, subtle, sensitive, feeling themselves infinitely superior in experience and knowledge to the rough barbarians whom they could not fight, and capable of hatred such as only cultivated races can nourish.

  • The strike of the rocks is independent of the direction of the chain, and the chain is bounded by faults.

  • The general taste having been considerably refined since, Rabelais has in parts become nearly unreadable - the worst and most appropriate punishment for his faults.

  • Thus, Hasdrubal's devotion and valour at the battle on the Metaurus are described in terms of eloquent praise; and even in Hannibal, the lifelong enemy of Rome, he frankly recognizes the great qualities that balanced his faults.

  • He is indeed free from the grosser faults of deliberate Critical injustice and falsification, and he resists that temptation to invent, to which "the minds of authors are only too method.

  • Nor is anything more remarkable than the way in which Livy's fine taste and sense of proportion, his true poetic feeling and genuine enthusiasm, saved him from the besetting faults of the mode of treatment which he adopted.

  • It is true that here and there the "creamy richness" of his style becomes verbosity, and that he occasionally draws too freely on his inexhaustible store of epithets, metaphors and turns of speech; but these faults, which did not escape the censure even of friendly critics like Quintilian, are comparatively rare in the extant parts of his work.

  • His principal faults are his carelessness and inaccuracy in matters of chronology, his lack of artistic skill in the presentation of his material, his desultory method of treatment, and his failure to look below the surface and grasp the real significance and vital connexion of events.

  • It is true that even in the Canzoniere, as Italians prefer to call that collection of lyrics, Petrarch is not devoid of faults belonging to his age, and affectations which have imposed themselves with disastrous effect through his authority upon the literature of Europe.

  • The principal directions of crust movement in England are: (I) north and south, by which the Pennine folds and faults, and the Malvern Hills have been produced; (2) east and west, by which the folds of the Weald and the Mendip Hills, and those of Devonshire have been formed.

  • The Histoire de la delivrance de l'eglise chretienne par l'emp. Constantin, et de la grandeur et souverainetetemporelle donnee d l'eglise romaine par les rois de France (1630) gave great offence at Rome, and a Declaration (1654), directed against faults in the administration of the Oratory, was strictly suppressed.

  • He said that if his life were lengthened he would give fifty years to the study of the Yi, and might then be without great faults.

  • Though his favourite author was Dryden, whose prose is uniformly manly and simple, and though he had a keen eye for faults of taste in the style of others, Canning had himself a leaning to preciosity and tinsel.

  • Contemptuous of the opinion of his fellows, he hid his virtues, paraded his faults, affected some failings from which he was really exempt, and, since his munificent charity could not be concealed from the recipients, laboured to spoil it by gratuitous surliness.

  • But the Confederates safely recrossed the Potomac, and McClellan showed his former faults in a tardy pursuit.

  • Living during the most melancholy period of Byzantine history, Psellus exhibited the worst faults of his age.

  • Producing, as he certainly has produced, work which classes him with the greatest names in literature, he has also signed an extraordinary quantity of verse which has not merely the defects of genius, irregularity, extravagance, bizarrete, but the faults which we are apt to regard as exclusively belonging to those who lack genius, to wit, the dulness, and tediousness of mediocrity.

  • Corneille accordingly, as he tells us, set to work to cure these faults, and produced a truly wonderful work, Clitandre.

  • The work is not without its faults; Gratian is lacking in historical and critical faculty; his theories are often hesitating; but on the whole, his treatise is as complete and as perfect as it could be; so much so that no other work of the same kind has been compiled; just as there has never been made another Book of the Sentences.

  • As a poet he was essentially a balladist, with the faults of his qualities; and his ballads, in their freedom, naïveté, even in their undue length, are among the few modern examples of unsophisticated verse.

  • Like many idealists, he was a severe critic of the faults of his own and other countries, and he added something to the increasing Chauvinism in Germany.

  • To this extraordinary harangue, which from its own nature and the faults of the interpreter must have been completely unintelligible, the Inca at first returned a very temperate answer.

  • Occasionally crust-blocks resembling "graben" and "horsts" are circumscribed by folds instead of faults; when this is so they have been called respectively "infolded graben" or "overfolded horsts."

  • The typical faults of the dark ages, pluralism, simony, lax observation of the clerical rules, contented ignorance, worldliness in every aspect, were all too prevalent in England.

  • William, despite all his personal faults, was a sincerely pious man, but it could not be expected that he would acquiesce in these new developments of the religious reformation which he had done his best to forward.

  • His life of ostentatious austerity, and the courage with which he met his death, had caused all his faults to be forgotten.

  • But there were two great faults in the proceedings of Thomas of Lancaster and his friends.

  • \Vith all his faults Edward during his prime was a capable and vigorous ruler; and it was not without rea~,on that not England only but all western Europe looked up to him as the greatest king of his generation.

  • on his accession bade farewell to the faults of his youth.

  • The duke and the bishop were both unscrupulous; but the churchman, with all his faults, was a patriotic statesman, while Gloucester cared far more for his own private ends than for the welfare of the realm.

  • From this depth of despair the party which, with all its faults, represented the national sentiment of France was rescued by the astonishing exploits of Joan of Arc. Charles and joan Of his counsellors had no great confidence in the mission of this prophetess and champion, when she presented herself to them, promising to relieve Orleans and turn back the English.

  • The moral faults of the church only reflected those of the nation.

  • Some years later England realized that its new king had inherited not only the physical beauty and strength of his grandfather, but also every one of his faults, with the sole exception of his tendency to sloth.

  • Whatever their faults, they had served the house of Tudor well, and it was a grotesque perversion of justice to send them to the scaffold on a charge of high treason.

  • His own faults and errors were remembered against him.

  • But their plan suffered under two faults, the con~a~ion.

  • For, who with all his faults was never wanting in a fine and generous sensibility, proposed that there should be a public funeral, and that the body should lie among the illustrious dead in Westminster Abbey.

  • Its author directly arraigned the organization of the Holy Roman Empire and exposed its feebleness, denounced in no measured terms the faults of the house of Austria, and attacked with remarkable vigour the politics of the ecclesiastical princes.

  • The Harz is a mass of Palaeozoic rock rising through the Mesozoic strata of north Germany, and bounded on all sides by faults.

  • Thereafter, in papers published by the Cambridge Philosophical Society and the Geological Society of London, he entered largely into mathematical inquiries connected with geology, dealing with the effects which an elevatory force acting from below would produce on a portion of the earth's crust, in fissures, faults, &c. In this way he discussed the elevation and denudation of the Lake district, the Wealden area, and the Bas Boulonnais.

  • A man of extraordinary coolness and self-control, his faults in every kind were faults of excess: it is the mark of them all.

  • Faults of manner, natural in a man whose life had been spent as an official and a judge, prevented him from keeping together the German Liberals as a strong and united party; he was opposed by a powerful faction at court, and by the Clerical leaders.

  • Salvian was a 5th-century socialist of the most extreme type, and a zealous ascetic who pitilessly scourged everything that fell short of an exalted morality, and exaggerated, albeit unconsciously, the faults that he desired to eradicate.

  • The repeal agitation was unsuccessful, but let us not be extreme to mark the faults of O'Connell's later years.

  • In both cases the strike of the rocks is coincident with the direction of several large valleys, which mark huge faults in the crystalline rocks.

  • They do not seem to have been greatly disturbed, although faults occur here and there.

  • In the Archean region these are very noticeable near Lake Itasy, in the massif of Ankaratra (an ancient volcano) and in Vakinankaratra (at Betafo, Antsirabe, &c.); while there are numerous outflows of doleritic rocks, probably from faults, along the eastern side of the island and almost parallel with the coast line.

  • That method has two faults.

  • But undermining forces were already at work: the faults inherent in his unwieldy achievement.

  • The faults of the governor were those of temperament, which had been fostered by early environment.

  • His chief faults were ambition and bigotry.

  • Large masses of rock have been brought upon nearly horizontal faults (thrust-planes) over the edges of either beds with which they originally had no connexion.

  • It is often wrong in geographical and chronological details; but, in spite of its faults, the book was much used in the middle ages.

  • It is only necessary to trace carefully back the pedigree of most of the famous horses of early times to discover faults on the side of the dam-that is to say, the expression " dam's pedigree unknown," which evidently means of original or native blood.

  • But even with such moderate magnification as these instruments permitted many faults were apparent.

  • From 1830 onwards many improvements were made in the miscroscope objective; these may be best followed from a discussion of the faults of the image.

  • The examination of the objectives can only be attempted when the different faults of the objective are known.

  • A second error can arise through the inaccuracy of the eyepiece micrometer, and also in the case of a screw micrometer through periodic faults of the screw, and through dead motion.

  • Yet with all their faults the Nights have beauties enough to deserve their popularity, and to us their merit is enhanced by the pleasure we feel in being transported into so entirely novel a state of society.

  • But just as his patriotism does not blind him to the faults and follies of his countrymen (xxxviii.

  • It wasn't either of your faults.

  • Sure, he had faults – like being secretive.

  • Mums always said that you had to learn to look over their faults – forgive them as you would want them to forgive yours.

  • In third place, the Exeter Colleges Guild produced some reasonable ringing although the leading was a little adrift; they made 18 faults.

  • However, most of these faults caused annoyance rather than loss of service.

  • The same program can simulate the behavior of an item containing one of the faults in response to the stimulus.

  • You must notify us of any faults in the equipment of the boat before the boat leaves the boatyard.

  • It is really a fault zone bounded by two major faults and filled with a well cemented fault breccia.

  • caldera margin faults: Gran Canaria, Spain.

  • We can become censorious, looking for faults in everyone else that doesn't look or sound like us.

  • Say: Why does He then chastise you for your faults?

  • complain about faults that were pointed out to them or that they would have seen before they purchased the item.

  • correct ones faults and make up for any shortcomings or anything that one might have missed cannot be ignored.

  • The psychology of testing will be discussed; detecting faults versus proving correct.

  • Old people have faults of their own; they tend to become cowardly, niggardly, and suspicious.

  • Structural faults will have a seriously detrimental effect on its value.

  • Faults - Weak or pointed ears, narrow shoulders, long narrow body, excessive dewlap, fur soft and wooly.

  • dextral faults within the Simple Fold Zone link Lurestan to the E-W trending structures of Fars, in the eastern Zagros.

  • The position of pre-existing faults relative to the propagating dike will control whether slip will occur.

  • exhumed faults has tended to focus on the fault morphology.

  • Callers reporting faults to NTL were greeted with a recorded message, in a Geordie accent, that was strewn with four-letter expletives.

  • It appears rather extraordinary that he should commit the same faults twice.

  • Emergency maintenance involves: reacting immediately to a problem working out the cause of a fault fixing faults.

  • The psychology of testing will be discussed; detecting faults versus proving correct.

  • For minor faults, engineers endeavor to respond within 24 hours.

  • Nearly every one of his most glaring non-partisan faults has been exposed brutally and on a massive scale.

  • I would rather pay the extra cost than waste time trying to track down the obscure program faults that bad memory can cause.

  • No segmentation faults, only occasional unending loops for the programmers that still hang on to program their own loops.

  • faulty streetlight all faults will be attended to.

  • foot faultree can ask the Assistant Referees, to watch feet faults whilst the Referee watches hand movement faults.

  • One of these faults is that of allowing the helmsman to steer otherwise than by the compass.

  • Good signs: You are aware of your partner's faults and are able to accept some imperfections.

  • In the case of faults reception, there are seasonal variations and other imponderables, so a greater element of flexibility is needed.

  • There are 4 general faults with electric kettles Standard plug-in kettles Heating element may just " die ", or sometimes go intermittent.

  • Tho all its faults I made a decision to persevere and ordered Snoopers motorcycle fitting kit for £ 19.95.

  • Are these faults spoiling what is a truly magnificent stadium?

  • Most steering faults are the result of turning into or out of junctions too wide (swan necking ).

  • Will show open circuits, short circuits, reversals, earth faults, continuity and all with four IC's.

  • We shall see the effects of the Caledonian orogeny and the Variscan orogeny resulting in the Craven Faults and the Askrigg Block.

  • repairing faults on our network is part of the maintenance cover we provide with our service.

  • seg faults very consistently.

  • splay feet are very bad faults.

  • Provided the information received in the voice bank was sufficient to locate the faulty streetlight all faults will be attended to.

  • During the Mesozoic, most of central and western Thailand was affected by large, left lateral wrench faults and compressional tectonics.

  • thrust faults dipping eastwards beneath the folds.

  • Faults: White or black toenails, broken or missing whiskers, broken or kinked tail.

  • You are responsible during the lifetime of the goods, but only for faults that are not due to fair wear and tear.

  • No man ever was more blamed than Orleans during the Revolution, but the faults of ambition and intrigue were his friends', not his own; it was his friends who wished him to be on the throne.

  • As a proof of the seriousness with which he regarded the literary vocation, it may be mentioned that he used to write out his poems in printed characters, believing that that process best enabled him to understand his own peculiarities and faults, and probably unconscious that Coleridge had recommended some such method of criticism when he said he thought "print settles it."

  • This latter question had not presented itself to the prophet's mind; his object was simply to correct the opinion of the people that their present misfortunes were due not to their own faults but to those of their predecessors.

  • " test pillars " are placed for the purpose of enabling possible faults to be accurately located.

  • The subjection of the core to a hydraulic pressure of four tons to the square inch and an electric pressure of 5000 volts from an alternating-current transformer has been adopted, by one manufacturer at least, to secure the detection of masked faults which might develop themselves after submergence.

  • Faults or any other irregularity in the cable may be represented by putting resistances of the proper kind into the artificial line.

  • Mazzini, who had learned te distrust Carbonarism owing to its lack of a guiding principle and its absurd paraphernalia of ritual and mystery, had conceived the idea of a more serious political association for the emancipation of his country not only from foreign and domestic despotisn~ but from national faults of character; and this idea he hac materialized in the organization of a society called the Giovani Italia (Young Italy) among the Italian refugees at Marseilles After the events of 1831 he declared that the liberation of Ital) could only be achieved through unity, and his great merit lie~

  • But Charles Charles Albert, who, whatever his faults, had a generous Albertre- nature, was determined that so long as be had an news the army in being he could not abandon the Lombards War, and the Venetians, whom he had encouraged in their resistance, without one more effort, though he knew full well that he was staking all on a desperate chance.

  • Worse men had been less detested, but Danby had none of the amiable virtues which often counteract the odium incurred by serious faults.

  • All patristic students now recognize the great inequality of these authors, and admit that they are not free from the faults of their times; it is not denied that much of their exegesis is untenable, or that their logic is often feeble and their rhetoric offensive to modern taste.

  • Henry's faults may be excused by his difficulties.

  • " I cannot forgive myself the contemptuous treatment of a man who, with all his faults, was entitled to my esteem; and I can less forgive, in a personal attack, the cowardly concealment of my name and character."

  • Oppressive taxation and unblushing nepotism were Clement's great faults.

  • The faults were not all on one side.

  • It has the "mixed" faults which make the greater poem of his Scots successor, Thomson, a "transitional" document, but these give it an historical, if not an individual, interest.

  • Coleridge, is not free from the first of these faults.

  • Structurally, the folds of this region are of ancient date; but the area is crossed by a series of depressions formed by faults, and the intervening strips, which have not been depressed to the same extent, now stand up as mountain ranges.

  • The frankness with which he attacks the court of Rome for its exactions is remarkable; so, too, is the intense nationalism which he displays in dealing with this topic. His faults of presentment are more often due to carelessness and narrow views than to deliberate purpose.

  • All these faults make him a peculiarly unsatisfactory authority where we cannot check his statements by those of other authors.

  • No wonder that it stands the comparison badly; but with all its faults the Getica of Jordanes will probably ever retain its place side by side with the De moribus Germanorum of Tacitus as a chief source of information respecting the history, institutions and modes of thought of our Teutonic forefathers.

  • The real wit and rigour of Oldham's satirical poetry are undeniable, while its faults - its frenzied extravagance and lack of metrical polish - might, as Dryden suggests, have been cured with time, for Oldham was only thirty when he died.

Browse other sentences examples →