Fatuous sentence example

fatuous
  • This is going to sound completely fatuous, but it's my honest answer.
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  • Behind its fatuous claims of " managed migration ", the Government is starting to worry.
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  • Given what the NHS was, it is almost fatuous to say all the money has gone in, but nothing's happened.
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  • For all his limitations I cannot imagine Blair saying anything so fatuous.
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  • He describes his growing love of this country with an excited sense of wonder that never becomes fatuous.
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  • If he had no sympathy with revolutionary disturbers of the peace, he had even less with the fatuous extravagances of the comte d'Artois and his reactionary entourage, and his influence was thrown into the scale of the moderate constitutional policy of which Richelieu and Decazes were the most conspicuous exponents.
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  • When his father's abdication was extorted by a popular riot at Aranjuez in March 1808, he ascended the throne - not to lead his people manfully, but to throw himself into the hands of Napoleon, in the fatuous hope that the emperor would support him.
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  • The question of her marriage was all important, and her chances were not improved by the scandal of Chastelard, whether he acted as an emissary of the Huguenots, sent to smirch her character, or merely played the fatuous fool in his own conceit.
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  • Jesus never mentioned the names of the angels but Essenes had to remember them and had an extensive angelology This is pretty fatuous.
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  • Then he turned his own rather fatuous face to the company.
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  • In those circumstances, the idea that the US and the British are getting their hands on Iraqi oil is completely fatuous.
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  • The poor man was obliged to issue a special almanac to assure his clients and the public that he was not dead: he was fatuous enough to add that he was not only alive at the time of writing, but that he was also demonstrably alive on the day when the knave Bickerstaff (a name borrowed by Swift from a sign in Long Acre) asserted that he died of fever.
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