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fasting

fasting Sentence Examples

  • Nay, in the Roman church a practice of fasting on Saturday as well as on Friday was current before the time of Tertullian.

  • The king consents, the saint is acclaimed, the bodies of the thirty-seven martyrs solemnly interred, and the king, after fasting five, and listening to Gregory's homilies for sixty days, is healed.

  • The story is well known; two years before his death Francis went up Mount Alverno in the Apennines with some of his disciples, and after forty days of fasting and prayer and contemplation, on the morning of the 14th of September 1224 (to use Sabatier's words), "he had a vision: in the warm rays of the rising sun he discerned suddenly a strange figure.

  • lenzin, lengizin, lenzo, probably from the same root as "long" and referring to "the lengthening days"), in the Christian Church, the period of fasting preparatory to the festival of Easter.

  • In this season fasting played a part, but it was not universally nor rigorously enforced.

  • At Rome, for instance, the whole period of fasting was but three weeks, according to the historian Socrates (Hist.

  • The Greek Lent begins on the Monday of Sexagesima, with a week of preparatory fasting, known as TvpoOl yca, or the "butter-week"; the actual fast, however, starts on the Monday of Quinquagesima (Estomihi), this week being known as "the first week of the fast" (050µas T&vv vriamtwv).

  • Dispensations from fasting were, however, given in case of illness.

  • During the religious confusion of the Reformation, the practice of fasting was generally relaxed and it was found necessary to reassert the obligation of keeping Lent and the other periods and days of abstinence by a series of proclamations and statutes.

  • But in spite of statutes and proclamations, of occasional severities and of the patriotic example of Queen Elizabeth, the practice of fasting fell more and more into disuse.

  • "I have often noted," writes John Taylor, the water-poet, in his Jack a Lent (1620), "that if any superfluous feasting or gormandizing, paunch-cramming assembly do meet, it is so ordered that it must be either in Lent, upon a Friday, or a fasting: for the meat does not relish well except it be sauced with disobedience and comtempt of authority."

  • With the growth of the Oxford Movement in the English Church, the practice of observing Lent was revived; and, though no rules for fasting are authoritatively laid down, the duty of abstinence is now very generally inculcated by bishops and clergy, either as a discipline or as an exercise in self-denial.

  • In the middle ages the nocturnal vigilia were, except in the monasteries, gradually discontinued, matins and vespers on the preceding day, with fasting, taking their place.

  • The 41st canon of the council of Carthage enacted that the sacraments of the altar should be received fasting, except on the anniversary of the Lord's supper.

  • Thus Bede records that in a certain year (which must have been 645, 647, 648 or 651) Queen Eanfleda, who had received her instruction from a Kentish priest of the Roman obedience, was fasting and keeping Palm Sunday, while her husband, Oswy, king of Northumbria, following the rule of the British church, was celebrating the Easter festival.

  • These, however, are really "rest-days," as fasting is forbidden in Mandaeism.

  • Among those in the same list which are wholly or in part spurious are: "No woman shall kiss her child on the Sabbath or fasting day," and "No one shall travel, cook victuals, make beds, sweep house, cut hair or shave on the Sabbath day."

  • Penance might consist in fasting; it might consist in flagellation; it might consist in pilgrimage.

  • 700, was twice blessed; not only was it an act of atonement in itself, like fasting and flagellation; it also gained for the pilgrim the merit of having stood on holy ground.

  • In 511 the first Council of Orleans ordered that the three days preceding Ascension Day should be celebrated as rogation days with fasting and rogationes.

  • (pope 795-816) introduced rogation days, but without the fasting, at Rome.

  • (7) Discourses on Fasting.

  • Visions are vouchsafed only to those who to prayer have added fasting.

  • The qanki, or sanctuary, is divided from the nave, by a solid wall, pierced by a single doorway; it contains the altar, or madhb'kha (literary, the sacrificing place), and may be entered only by persons in holy orders who are fasting.

  • Again his doctrine of fasting is a spiritualizing of a current opus operatum conception on Jewish lines as though " keeping a watch " (statio) in that way atoned for sins (Sim.

  • fusca, even though fasting and kept for days in absolutely dry air, could never be induced to imbibe water, sugar-cane juice or extra vasated blood.

  • The burden of the new prophecy seems to have been a new standard of moral obligations, especially with regard to marriage, fasting and martyrdom.

  • The latter wished for more fasting, the prohibition of second marriages, a frank, courageous profession of Christianity in daily life, and entire separation from the world; the bishops, on the other hand, sought to make it as easy as possible to be a Christian, lest they should lose the greater part of their congregations.

  • Luther in his Table Talk condemns them as dealing only with fasting, meats, virginity, &c. "If he only had insisted upon the works of faith and performed them!

  • Dorsey, again, draws a distinction between lore narratives, which can be rehearsed without fasting or prayer, and rituals which require the most rigid preparation.

  • He began to preach against fasting, saint worship and the celibacy of priests; and some of his hearers began to put his teachings into practice.

  • It conceives salvation as a "wages" (µtc 063) to be earned or forfeited; and regards certain good works, such as prayer, fasting, alms - especially the last - as efficacious to cancel sins.

  • The reality of this tendency, particularly at Rome, betrays itself in Hermas, who teaches the supererogatory merit of alms gained by the selfdenial of fasting (Sim.

  • Among the laity, on the other hand, the ideal of holiness found realization in the observance of the ordinary principles of morality recognized by the world at large, in attendance upon the means of grace provided by the Church, in fasting at stated intervals, in eschewing various popular employments and amusements, and in almsgiving and prayer.

  • They should be dissolved in warm water and taken in the morning, fasting.

  • The question of missions is reserved, and the relaxations granted to the Society in such matters as fasting, reciting the hours and reading heretical books, are withdrawn; while the breve ends with clauses carefully drawn to bar any legal exceptions that might be taken against its full validity and obligation.

  • chants, fasting and other austerities, but there are some peculiarities of detail.

  • In the discipline of the Christian Church abstinence is the term for a less severe form of Fasting.

  • In many ways he was a typical Mahommedan, fiercely hostile towards unbelievers - "Let us purge the air of the air they breathe" was his aim for the demons of the Cross, - intensely devout and regular in prayers and fasting.

  • He wore a sharp shirt of hair next his skin, scourged himself every Friday and other fasting days, lay upon the bare ground with a log under his head, and allowed himself but four or five hours' sleep. This access of the ascetic malady lasted but a short time, and More recovered to all outward appearance his balance of mind.

  • The 6th of April was kept as a day of fasting and prayer, and the 1st of July was thus set apart in order to seek divine guidance for the approaching conference.

  • attached to it all matters concerning indulgences; on the other hand, he transferred to the Congregation of the Council matters concerning the precepts of the Church such as fasting, abstinence and festivals.

  • None but a scion of a priestly family could become a deacon, elder or bishop. Accordingly the primacy remained in the family of Gregory until about 374, when the king Pap or Bab murdered Nerses, who had been ordained by Eusebius of Caesarea (362-370) and was over-zealous in implanting in Armenia the canons about celibacy, marriage, fasting, hospices and monastic life which Basil had established in Cappadocia.

  • 3) was common to Marcion and Apelles, while the injunction of fasting $ is attributed to the Encratites (Iren.

  • He declared that the cenobitical life is superior to the eremitical; that fasting and austerities should not interfere with prayer or work; that work should form an integral part of the monastic life, not merely as an occupation, but for its own sake and in order to do good to others; and therefore that monasteries should be near towns.

  • Fish were supposed to be born in the water without sexual connexion, and on the basis of this old physiological fallacy the Cathars equally with the Catholic framed their rule of fasting.

  • And again, when they challenged His disciples for not observing the regular fasts, He gently reminded them that they themselves relaxed the discipline of fasting for a bridegroom's friends.

  • A penance of several years fasting might be commuted into saying so many prayers, or giving an arranged amount in alms, or even into a money-fine.

  • Dionysius Alexandrinus also, in his canonical epistle (260 A.D.), refers to the six fasting days (E Twv Pr YTECwv iijApac) in a manner which implies that the observance of them had already become an established usage in his time.

  • Under this head fall the following: - Fasting, or abstention from certain meats and drinks; denial of sexual instinct; subjection of the body to physical discomforts, such as nakedness, vigils, sleeping on the bare ground, tattooing, deformation of skull, teeth, feet, &c., vows of silence to be observed throughout life or during pilgrimages, avoidance of baths, of hair-cutting and of clean raiment, living in a cave; actual self-infliction of pain, by scourging, branding, cutting with knives, wearing of hair shirts, fire-walking, burial alive, hanging up of oneself by hooks plunged into the skin, suspension of weights by such hooks to the tenderer parts of the body, self-mutilation and numerous other, often ingenious, modes of torture.

  • Fasting is used in primitive asceticism for a variety of reasons, among which the following deserve notice.

  • Here we have the origin of the Catholic rule of fasting, seldom understood by those who observe it.

  • The prohibition of taking life, which they took over from the Farther East, in itself entailed fasting from flesh.

  • We come to a third widespread reason for fasting, common among savages.

  • Among the North American Indians ecstatic fasting is regularly practised.

  • All over the world fasting is a recognized mode of evoking, consulting and also of overcoming the spirit world.

  • This is why the Zulus and other primitive races distrust a medicine man who is not an ascetic and lean with fasting.

  • From the first, fasting was practised in the church for similar reason.

  • Not a few saints were rewarded for their fasting by glimpses of the beatific vision.

  • Above all, fasting was a mode of preparing oneself for the sacramental eating of a sacred animal, and as such often assisted by use of purgatives and aperients.

  • They insisted on the restoration of the ancient Catholic customs, and would have made neglect of fasting and other sins of omission penal offences.

  • their subjects are faith, love, fasting, prayer, wars (a somewhat mysterious setting forth of the conflict between Rome and Persia under the imagery of Daniel), the sons of the covenant (monks or ascetics), penitents, the resurrection, humility, pastors.

  • No mention is made of the Day of Atonement in the pre-exilic period, and it is a plausible conjecture that the present law arose from the desire to turn the spontaneous fasting of Neh.

  • EMBER DAYS and Ember Weeks, the four seasons set apart by the Western Church for special prayer and fasting, and the ordination of clergy, known in the medieval Church as quatuor tempora, or jejunia quatuor temporum.

  • They are as follows: (i.) The Calendar; (ii.) The names of the Faires of Scotland; (iii.) The Confession of Faith used at Geneva and received by the Church of Scotland; (iv.-vii.) Concerning the election and duties of Ministers, Elders and Deacons, and Superintendent; (viii.) An order of Ecclesiastical Discipline; (ix.) The Order of Excommunication and of Public Repentance; (x.) The Visitation of the Sick; (xi.) The Manner of Burial; (xii.) The Order of Public Worship - Forms of Confession and Prayer after Sermon; (xiii.) Other Public Prayers; (xiv.) The Administration of the Lord's Supper; (xv.) The Form of Marriage; (xvi.) The Order of Baptism; (xvii.) A Treatise on Fasting with the order thereof; (xviii.) The Psalms of David; (xix.) Conclusions or Doxologies; (xx.) Hymns - metrical versions of the Decalogue, Magnificat, Apostles' Creed, &c.; (xxi.) Calvin's Catechism; (xxii.

  • Fasting is frequent and severe.

  • Besides Wednesdays and Fridays, there are four fasting seasons, Lent, Pentecost to SS.

  • He was converted by a hermit; but as he had neither the gift of fasting nor that of prayer, he decided to devote himself to a work of charity and set himself to carry wayfarers over a bridgeless river.

  • Regarding the body as the work of the evil deity, the Cerdonians formed a moral system of great severity, prohibiting marriage, wine and the eating of flesh, and advocating fasting and other austerities.

  • took no part whatever in affairs, but devoted himself "to incessant prayer and rigorous fasting."

  • 8.3 In times of calamity litanies were held, in which the people walked in robes of penitence, fasting, barefooted, and, in later times, frequently dressed in black (litaniee nigrae).

  • Hitherto they had been erratic, lukewarm and poorly attended (vagae, tepentes, infrequentesque); those which he instituted were characterized by fasting, prayers, psalms and tears."

  • From the 6th century the season was kept as a period of fasting as strict as that of Lent; but in the Anglican and Lutheran churches the rule is now relaxed.

  • Dancing and festivities are forbidden, fasting enjoined and purple vestments are worn in the church services.

  • He exhorted his hearers to prepare themselves by fasting and prayer for the danger which menaced their civil and religious liberties, and refused even to speak to the courtier who came down to remodel the corporation of Bedford, and who, as was supposed, had it in charge to offer some municipal dignity to the bishop of the Baptists.

  • Great stress is laid upon virginity (although there is not a sign of monasticism), upon fasting (especially for the bishop), upon the regular attendance of the whole clerical body and the " more perfect " of the laity at the hours of prayer.

  • All that night he is said to have remained in deep meditation under the Bo tree; and the orthodox Buddhists believe that for seven times seven nights and days he continued fasting near the spot, when the archangel Brahma, came and ministered to him.

  • As many as are persuaded and believe that what we teach and say is true, and undertake to be able to live accordingly, are instructed to pray and entreat God with fasting, for the remission of their sins that are past, we praying and fasting with them.

  • (The candidate for baptism, we further learn from his tract On Baptism, prepared himself by prayer, fasting and keeping of vigils.) Before stepping into the font, which both sexes did quite naked, the neophytes had to renounce the devil, his pomps and angels.

  • 21: " This kind (of demon) goeth not forth except by prayer and fasting."

  • Saul and Barnabas equally are separated for a certain missionary work by imposition of hands with prayer and fasting, and are so sent forth by the Holy Ghost.

  • To refuse to submit to fasting was considered indelibly disgraceful, and was one of the things which legally degraded a man by reducing or destroying his honour-value.

  • The law said "he who does not give a pledge to fasting is an evader of all; he who disregards all things shall not be paid by God or man."

  • If a person fasting in accordance with law died during.

  • Fasting could be stopped by paying the debt, giving a pledge, or submitting to the decision of a Brehon.

  • A creditor fasting after a reasonable offer of settlement had been made to him forfeited his claim.

  • - Among the Jews it was ordered that on the Day of Atonement the high priest should make confession of sins in the name of the whole people, and the day is still kept by the Jews with fasting and confession of sins.

  • FASTING (from " fast," derived from old Teutonic fastejan; synonyms being the Gr.

  • In a looser sense the word is employed to denote abstinence from certain kinds of food merely; and this meaning, which in ordinary usage is probably the more prevalent, seems also to be at least tolerated by the Church of England when it speaks of " fast or abstinence days," as if fasting and abstinence were synonymous.

  • For the physiology of fasting, see Dietetics; Nutrition; also Corpulence.

  • In the spring of 1869 this was tried on the person of a " fasting girl " in South Wales.

  • This canon teacheth so evidently how fasting was used in the primitive church as by words it cannot be more plainly expressed " (Of Good Works; and first, of Fasting.) 2 As indeed they are, etymologically; but, prior to the Reformation, a conventional distinction between abstinentia and jejunium naturale had long been recognized.

  • - Fasting is of special interest when considered as a discipline voluntarily submitted to for moral and religious ends.

  • It is suggested that the fasting which was at first the natural and inevitable result of such sacrifice on behalf of the dead may eventually have come to be regarded as an indispensable concomitant of all sacrifice, and so have survived as a wellestablished usage long after the original cause had ceased to operate.'

  • 2 Probably, if we leave out of sight the very numerous and obvious cases in which fasting, originally the natural reflex result of grief, fear or other strong emotion, has come to be the usual conventional symbol of these, we shall find that the practice is generally resorted to, either as a means of somehow exalting the higher faculties at the expense of the lower, or as an act of homage to some object of worship. The axiom of the Amazulu, that " the continually stuffed body cannot see secret things," meets even now with pretty general acceptance; and if the notion that it is precisely the food which the worshipper foregoes that makes the deity more vigorous to do battle for his human friend be confined only to a few scattered tribes of savages, the general proposition that " fasting is a work of reverence toward God " may be said to be an article of the Catholic faith.3 Although fasting as a religious rite is to be met with almost everywhere, there are comparatively few religions, and those only of the more developed kind, which appoint definite public fasts, and make them binding at fixed seasons upon all the faithful.

  • 4 Among the ancient Egyptians fasting seems to have been associated with many religious festivals, notably with that of Isis (Herod.

  • In the Westminster Assembly's Larger Catechism fasting is mentioned among the duties required by the second commandment.

  • The practice of stated fasting was not in any other case enjoined by the law; and it is generally understood to have been forbidden on Sabbath.

  • 6 At the same time, private and occasional fasting, being regarded as a natural and legitimate instinct, was regulated rather than repressed.

  • The only other provision about fasting in the Pentateuch is of a regulative nature, Numb.

  • The history of Israel from Moses to Ezra furnishes a large number of instances in which the fasting instinct was obeyed both publicly and privately, locally and nationally, under the influence of sorrow, or fear, or passionate desire.

  • The second book (Seder Moed) of the Mishna contains two tractates bearing upon the subject of fasting.

  • deals especially with the manner in which occasional fasting is to be gone about if no rain shall have fallen on or before the 77th day of Marcheschwan.

  • They used to attend the temple in rotation, and be present at the sacrifices; and as this duty fell to each in his turn, the men of the class or family which he represented were expected in their several cities and places of abode to engage themselves in religious exercises, and especially in fasting.

  • It ought to be borne in mind that the Aramaic portion of the Megillath Taanith (a document considerably older than the treatises in the Mishna) gives a catalogue only of the days on which fasting was forbidden.

  • 18, where the correct reading appears to be - " The disciples of John, and the Pharisees, were fasting " (some customary fast).

  • He never formally forbade fasting, but neither did He ever enjoin it.

  • He assumed that, in certain circumstances of sorrow and need, the fasting instinct would sometimes be felt by the community and the individual; what He was chiefly concerned about was to warn His followers against the mistaken aims which His contemporaries were so apt to contemplate in their fasting (Matt.

  • 29 the words " and fasting " are omitted by Westcott and Hort as well as by Tischendorf on the evidence of the Cod.

  • The words which appear to encourage fasting in i Cor.

  • Fasting in the stricter sense was not unknown; but it is certain that it did not at first occupy nearly so prominent a place in Christian ritual as that to which it afterwards attained.

  • 24), informs us with reference to the customary yearly celebration of the mystery of the resurrection of our Lord, that disputes prevailed not only with respect to the day, but also with respect to the manner of fasting in connexion with it.

  • As early as the time of Tertullian it was also usual for communicants to prepare themselves by fasting for receiving the eucharist.

  • 18), Montanus was the first to give laws (to the church) on fasting.

  • The treatise of Ter- tullian, - Concerning Fasting: against the Carnal, - written as 3 On the manuscript evidence the words " I was fasting," in Acts x.

  • In that treatise (c. 15) he approves indeed of the church practice of not fasting on Saturdays and Sundays (as elsewhere, De corona, c. 3, he had expressed his concurrence in the other practice of observing the entire period between Easter and Pentecost as a season of joy); but otherwise he evinces great dissatisfaction with the indifference of the church as to the number, duration and severity of her fasts.'

  • The church thus came to be more and more involved in discussions as to the number of days to be observed, especially in " Lent," as fast days, as to the hour at which a fast ought to terminate (whether at the 3rd or at the 9th hour), as to the rigour with which each fast ought to be observed (whether by abstinence from flesh merely, abstinentia, or by abstinence from lacticinia, xerophagia, or by literal jejunium), and as to the penalties by which the laws of fasting ought to be enforced.

  • The synod of Hippo (393 A.D.) enacted that the sacrament of the altar should always be taken fasting, except on the Thursday before Easter.

  • He " did not allow himself to be hurried on by an inconsiderate zeal to condemn fasting, the life of celibacy, monachism, considered purely in themselves..

  • wrong in recommending so highly and indiscriminately the life of celibacy and fasting, though he was ready to admit that both under certain circumstances might be good and useful " (Neander).

  • He did not condemn fasting altogether, but thought that it ought to be resorted to in the spirit of gospel freedom according as each occasion should arise.

  • 22) a long catalogue of the different fasting practices of the church.

  • It is probable that the apparent severity of the medieval Latin Church on this subject was largely due to the real strictness of the Greek Church, which, under the patriarch Photius in 864, had taken what was virtually a new departure in its fasting praxis.

  • Of the nine fundamental laws of that Priscillian, whose widespread heresy evoked from the synod of Saragossa (418) the canon, " No one shall fast on Sunday, nor may any one absent himself from church during Lent and hold a festival of his own," appears, on the question of fasting, not to have differed from the Encratites and various other sects of Manichean tendency (c. 406).

  • church (EvvEa irapa'yyXpara Tijs iicKAfaias) two are concerned with fasting.

  • The Armenians are equally strict; but (adds Rycaut) " the times seem so confused and without rule that they can scarce be recounted, unless by those who live amongst them, and strictly observe them, it being the chief care of the priest, whose learning principally consists in knowing the appointed times of fasting and feasting, the which they never omit on Sundays to publish unto the people."

  • 1 At the council of Trent no more than a passing allusion was made to the subject of fasting.

  • They did not deny that fasting might be a good thing, nor did they maintain that the church or the authority might not ordain fasts, though they deprecated the imposition of needless burdens on the conscience.

  • What they protested against was the theory of the opus operatum et meritorium as applied to fasting.

  • In the practice of modern Roman Catholicism the following are recognized as fasting days, that is to say, days on which one meal only, and that not of flesh, may be taken in the course of twenty-four hours: - The forty days of Lent (Sundays excepted), all the Ember days, the Wednesdays and Fridays in Advent, and the vigils of certain feasts, namely, those of Whitsuntide, of St Peter and St Paul, of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, of All Saints and of Christmas day.

  • The following are simply days of abstinence, that is to say, days on which flesh at all events must not be eaten: - The Sundays in Lent, the three Rogation days, the feast of St Mark (unless it falls in Easter week), and all Fridays which are not days of fasting.

  • In the Anglican Church, the " days of fasting or abstinence " are the forty days of Lent, the Ember days, the Rogation days, and all the Fridays in the year, except Christmas day.

  • In this connexion the homily Of Fasting may be again referred to.

  • In the Scottish Presbyterian churches days of " fasting, humiliation and prayer " are observed by ecclesiastical appointment in each parish once or twice every year on some day of the week preceding the Sunday fixed for the administration of the sacrament of the Lord's Supper.

  • In some of the New England States, it has been usual for the governor to appoint by proclamation at some time in spring a day of fasting, when religious services are conducted in the churches.

  • On the subject of fasting the views of Aerius are to a large extent shared by modern Protestant moralists.

  • Rothe, for example, who on this point may be regarded as a representative thinker, rejects the idea that fasting is a thing meritorious in itself, and is very doubtful of its value even as an aid to devotional feeling.

  • In this last aspect, however, habitual temperance will generally be found to be much more beneficial than occasional fasting.

  • It is extremely questionable, in particular, whether fasting be so efficient as it is sometimes supposed to be in protecting against temptation to fleshly sin.

  • This day, called the " Yom Ashoora," is held sacred on many accounts: - " because it is believed to be the day on which the first meeting of Adam and Eve took place after they were cast out of paradise; and that on which Noah went out from the ark; also because several other great events are said to have happened on this day; and because the ancient Arabs, before the time of the prophet, observed it by fasting.

  • Mahomet himself called fasting the " gate of religion," and forbade it only on the two great festivals, namely, on that which immediately follows Ramadan and on that which succeeds the pilgrimage.

  • 8), while on the other hand the religious rites of the Jews (except fasting), and even Jerusalem and the temple, and the name of Israel, are studiously ignored.

  • This formal and regulated " penitence " was extended from apostasy to other grave - or, as they were subsequently called, " deadly " - sins; while for minor offences all Christians were called upon to express contrition by fasting and abstinence from ordinarily permitted pleasures, as well as verbally in public and private devotions.

  • This feeling is exhibited in the value set on fasting in the Christian church from the earliest times, and in an extreme form in the self-torments of later monasticism; while both tendencies, anti-worldliness and antisensualism, seem to have combined in causing the preference of celibacy over marriage which is common to most early Christian writers.'

  • Mourning is expressed by fasting, by shaving the head and face, or by cutting off the little finger.

  • The family went on with their usual avocations, but some of the men and women, and in some cases all, practised celibacy, and all joined in fasting and prayer.

  • They condemned marriage (save, perhaps, first marriages), the eating of meat, baptism of children, veneration of saints, fasting, prayers for the dead and belief in purgatory, denied transubstantiation, declared the Catholic priesthood worthless, and considered the whole church of their time corrupted by the "negotia saecularia" which absorbed all 1 One result is their inability to form a true theory of Judaism and of the Old Testament in relation to the Gospel, a matter of great moment for them and for their successors.

  • This feature originated in the 5th century, when Mamercus, bishop of Vienna, instituted special prayers and fasting and processions on these days.

  • However, Allah has made fasting compulsory so that we become pious, God-fearing and God-conscious.

  • Below what licensed of newly arrived in overall coverage Aaron require fasting talk.

  • Figure 4. [below] Linear regression of plasma ACTH following fasting stress on daily fatigue severity rating.

  • This is the color of penitence and fasting as well as the color of royalty to welcome the Advent of the King.

  • When Allahu ta ' ala made fasting the month of Ramadhan fardh, the fast of Muharram became nafl [optional] .

  • antidote for poison with the words ' be taken fasting, plus a grain of salt ' .

  • Anna never left the temple courtyard but worshiped day and night by fasting and praying.

  • ember days of feasting and fasting - all words associated with Advent.

  • enjoins fasting: I ' ll starve myself to death.

  • fasting sample of blood.

  • fasting plasma glucose levels, body mass index ).

  • This gives a sensitivity of 85% when performed on all patients with a fasting gastrin of less than 400 pmol/l.

  • fasting plasma glucose was similar to or lower in patients using a regimen including EXUBERA compared to patients treated with oral agents alone.

  • Lecture 23: Blood glucose homeostasis - the integrated response to food, exercise, fasting & stress.

  • homilyent wrote homilies on fasting and on evil speaking, and he also used his pen in the controversy on the Paschal question.

  • The various other benefits of fasting are that man gets to exercise sacrificing physical comfort and to endure hunger and thirst.

  • Patients need regular fasting blood glucose testing for patients who develop hyperglycemia (diabetes) while on atypical antipsychotics.

  • The improved glycaemic control is associated with a reduction in both fasting and postprandial plasma insulin concentrations.

  • He encouraged the laity to follow monastic practices such as fasting and meditation on the Gospels and lived himself in poverty.

  • mobilizing lipase (= hormone-sensitive lipase) is the enzyme responsible for the breakdown of stored triglyceride during fasting in response to circulating adrenaline.

  • Fasting has been used by patients for weight management, to rest the digestive tract and for lowering lipids.

  • Current guidelines are that fasting total lipids be below 5.2.

  • There was no significant effect on serum lipids, fasting glucose or insulin levels, or blood pressure.

  • The divine ordinance of fasting has been pretty much dropped out of our modern church life.

  • Fasting, skipping meals, and overly restrictive diets will enable you to lose weight in the short run.

  • Iron overload can be detected by measuring serum ferritin and fasting transferrin saturation.

  • serum lipids, fasting glucose or insulin levels, or blood pressure.

  • ta ' ala made fasting the month of Ramadhan fardh, the fast of Muharram became nafl [optional] .

  • In hypertensive patients eprosartan does not affect fasting triglycerides, total cholesterol, or LDL (low density lipoprotein) cholesterol levels.

  • The festal character of the Sabbath was long recognized in a modified form in the Eastern church by a prohibition of fasting on that day, which was also a point in the Jewish Sabbath law (comp. Judith viii.

  • Nay, in the Roman church a practice of fasting on Saturday as well as on Friday was current before the time of Tertullian.

  • of the sacrifice was called upavasatha, and in Buddhism the same word (uposatha) has come to denote a Sabbath observed on the full moon, on the day when there is no moon, and on the two days which are eighth from the full and the new moon respectively, with fasting and other religious exercises.'

  • The king consents, the saint is acclaimed, the bodies of the thirty-seven martyrs solemnly interred, and the king, after fasting five, and listening to Gregory's homilies for sixty days, is healed.

  • The story is well known; two years before his death Francis went up Mount Alverno in the Apennines with some of his disciples, and after forty days of fasting and prayer and contemplation, on the morning of the 14th of September 1224 (to use Sabatier's words), "he had a vision: in the warm rays of the rising sun he discerned suddenly a strange figure.

  • lenzin, lengizin, lenzo, probably from the same root as "long" and referring to "the lengthening days"), in the Christian Church, the period of fasting preparatory to the festival of Easter.

  • The length of this fast and the rigour with which it has been observed have varied greatly at different times and in different countries (see Fasting).

  • In this season fasting played a part, but it was not universally nor rigorously enforced.

  • At Rome, for instance, the whole period of fasting was but three weeks, according to the historian Socrates (Hist.

  • The Greek Lent begins on the Monday of Sexagesima, with a week of preparatory fasting, known as TvpoOl yca, or the "butter-week"; the actual fast, however, starts on the Monday of Quinquagesima (Estomihi), this week being known as "the first week of the fast" (050µas T&vv vriamtwv).

  • Dispensations from fasting were, however, given in case of illness.

  • During the religious confusion of the Reformation, the practice of fasting was generally relaxed and it was found necessary to reassert the obligation of keeping Lent and the other periods and days of abstinence by a series of proclamations and statutes.

  • But in spite of statutes and proclamations, of occasional severities and of the patriotic example of Queen Elizabeth, the practice of fasting fell more and more into disuse.

  • "I have often noted," writes John Taylor, the water-poet, in his Jack a Lent (1620), "that if any superfluous feasting or gormandizing, paunch-cramming assembly do meet, it is so ordered that it must be either in Lent, upon a Friday, or a fasting: for the meat does not relish well except it be sauced with disobedience and comtempt of authority."

  • With the growth of the Oxford Movement in the English Church, the practice of observing Lent was revived; and, though no rules for fasting are authoritatively laid down, the duty of abstinence is now very generally inculcated by bishops and clergy, either as a discipline or as an exercise in self-denial.

  • 23 to severity of the body may have to do with fasting preparatory to seeing visions (cf.

  • In the middle ages the nocturnal vigilia were, except in the monasteries, gradually discontinued, matins and vespers on the preceding day, with fasting, taking their place.

  • For in his tract on fasting (ch.

  • The 41st canon of the council of Carthage enacted that the sacraments of the altar should be received fasting, except on the anniversary of the Lord's supper.

  • Thus Bede records that in a certain year (which must have been 645, 647, 648 or 651) Queen Eanfleda, who had received her instruction from a Kentish priest of the Roman obedience, was fasting and keeping Palm Sunday, while her husband, Oswy, king of Northumbria, following the rule of the British church, was celebrating the Easter festival.

  • These, however, are really "rest-days," as fasting is forbidden in Mandaeism.

  • Among those in the same list which are wholly or in part spurious are: "No woman shall kiss her child on the Sabbath or fasting day," and "No one shall travel, cook victuals, make beds, sweep house, cut hair or shave on the Sabbath day."

  • Penance might consist in fasting; it might consist in flagellation; it might consist in pilgrimage.

  • 700, was twice blessed; not only was it an act of atonement in itself, like fasting and flagellation; it also gained for the pilgrim the merit of having stood on holy ground.

  • In 511 the first Council of Orleans ordered that the three days preceding Ascension Day should be celebrated as rogation days with fasting and rogationes.

  • (pope 795-816) introduced rogation days, but without the fasting, at Rome.

  • (7) Discourses on Fasting.

  • Visions are vouchsafed only to those who to prayer have added fasting.

  • The qanki, or sanctuary, is divided from the nave, by a solid wall, pierced by a single doorway; it contains the altar, or madhb'kha (literary, the sacrificing place), and may be entered only by persons in holy orders who are fasting.

  • Again his doctrine of fasting is a spiritualizing of a current opus operatum conception on Jewish lines as though " keeping a watch " (statio) in that way atoned for sins (Sim.

  • fusca, even though fasting and kept for days in absolutely dry air, could never be induced to imbibe water, sugar-cane juice or extra vasated blood.

  • The burden of the new prophecy seems to have been a new standard of moral obligations, especially with regard to marriage, fasting and martyrdom.

  • The latter wished for more fasting, the prohibition of second marriages, a frank, courageous profession of Christianity in daily life, and entire separation from the world; the bishops, on the other hand, sought to make it as easy as possible to be a Christian, lest they should lose the greater part of their congregations.

  • His letters (especially Ep. 45) are full of outcries against his enemies and of indignant protestations that he had done nothing unbecoming a Christian, that he had taken no money, nor gifts great nor small, that he had no delight in silken attire, sparkling gems or gold ornaments, that no matron moved him unless by penitence and fasting, &c. His route is given in the third book In Rufinum; he went by Rhegium and Cyprus, where he was entertained by Bishop Epiphanius, to Antioch.

  • Luther in his Table Talk condemns them as dealing only with fasting, meats, virginity, &c. "If he only had insisted upon the works of faith and performed them!

  • Early in 814 he was attacked by a fever which he sought to subdue by fasting; but pleurisy supervened, and after partaking of the communion, he died on the 28th of January 814, and on the same day his body was buried in the church of St Mary at Aix.

  • Dorsey, again, draws a distinction between lore narratives, which can be rehearsed without fasting or prayer, and rituals which require the most rigid preparation.

  • He began to preach against fasting, saint worship and the celibacy of priests; and some of his hearers began to put his teachings into practice.

  • It conceives salvation as a "wages" (µtc 063) to be earned or forfeited; and regards certain good works, such as prayer, fasting, alms - especially the last - as efficacious to cancel sins.

  • The reality of this tendency, particularly at Rome, betrays itself in Hermas, who teaches the supererogatory merit of alms gained by the selfdenial of fasting (Sim.

  • She conceived herself to be specially favoured by Christ, who appeared to her in the most extravagant forms. At last, by dint of fasting and lacerating her flesh, she succeeded in reducing herself to such a state of ecstatic suffering that she believed herself to be undergoing in her own person the Passion of the Lord.

  • Among the laity, on the other hand, the ideal of holiness found realization in the observance of the ordinary principles of morality recognized by the world at large, in attendance upon the means of grace provided by the Church, in fasting at stated intervals, in eschewing various popular employments and amusements, and in almsgiving and prayer.

  • They should be dissolved in warm water and taken in the morning, fasting.

  • Just as many of the punishments enjoined by the Roman criminal code were gradually commuted by medieval legislators for pecuniary fines, so the years or months of fasting enjoined by the earlier ecclesiastical codes were commuted for proportionate fines, the recitation of a certain number of psalms, and the like.

  • The question of missions is reserved, and the relaxations granted to the Society in such matters as fasting, reciting the hours and reading heretical books, are withdrawn; while the breve ends with clauses carefully drawn to bar any legal exceptions that might be taken against its full validity and obligation.

  • chants, fasting and other austerities, but there are some peculiarities of detail.

  • In the discipline of the Christian Church abstinence is the term for a less severe form of Fasting.

  • In many ways he was a typical Mahommedan, fiercely hostile towards unbelievers - "Let us purge the air of the air they breathe" was his aim for the demons of the Cross, - intensely devout and regular in prayers and fasting.

  • There is no demand that they should come fasting, or Paul could not recommend in (xi.

  • He wore a sharp shirt of hair next his skin, scourged himself every Friday and other fasting days, lay upon the bare ground with a log under his head, and allowed himself but four or five hours' sleep. This access of the ascetic malady lasted but a short time, and More recovered to all outward appearance his balance of mind.

  • The 6th of April was kept as a day of fasting and prayer, and the 1st of July was thus set apart in order to seek divine guidance for the approaching conference.

  • attached to it all matters concerning indulgences; on the other hand, he transferred to the Congregation of the Council matters concerning the precepts of the Church such as fasting, abstinence and festivals.

  • None but a scion of a priestly family could become a deacon, elder or bishop. Accordingly the primacy remained in the family of Gregory until about 374, when the king Pap or Bab murdered Nerses, who had been ordained by Eusebius of Caesarea (362-370) and was over-zealous in implanting in Armenia the canons about celibacy, marriage, fasting, hospices and monastic life which Basil had established in Cappadocia.

  • They are, however, traditionally vestments symbolical of joy (the bishop in placing the dalmatic on the newly ordained deacon says: - "May the Lord clothe thee in the tunic of joy and the garment of rejoicing"), and they are therefore not worn during seasons of fasting and penitence or functions connected with these, the folded chasuble (paenula plicata) being substituted (see Chasuble).

  • 3) was common to Marcion and Apelles, while the injunction of fasting $ is attributed to the Encratites (Iren.

  • He declared that the cenobitical life is superior to the eremitical; that fasting and austerities should not interfere with prayer or work; that work should form an integral part of the monastic life, not merely as an occupation, but for its own sake and in order to do good to others; and therefore that monasteries should be near towns.

  • Fish were supposed to be born in the water without sexual connexion, and on the basis of this old physiological fallacy the Cathars equally with the Catholic framed their rule of fasting.

  • Nordahl Brun, Claus Frimann (1746-1829), Claus Fasting (1746-1791), who edited a brilliant aesthetic journal, The Critical Observer, Christian H.

  • 843); he wore three iron rings round his body and arms, and travelled bare-footed, fasting, and devoid of linen, from church to church till he found pardon, the first ring breaking by the tomb of St Gertrude at Nivelles, the second in the crypt of St Peter, and the third by the grave of Liudger.

  • And again, when they challenged His disciples for not observing the regular fasts, He gently reminded them that they themselves relaxed the discipline of fasting for a bridegroom's friends.

  • A penance of several years fasting might be commuted into saying so many prayers, or giving an arranged amount in alms, or even into a money-fine.

  • Dionysius Alexandrinus also, in his canonical epistle (260 A.D.), refers to the six fasting days (E Twv Pr YTECwv iijApac) in a manner which implies that the observance of them had already become an established usage in his time.

  • Under this head fall the following: - Fasting, or abstention from certain meats and drinks; denial of sexual instinct; subjection of the body to physical discomforts, such as nakedness, vigils, sleeping on the bare ground, tattooing, deformation of skull, teeth, feet, &c., vows of silence to be observed throughout life or during pilgrimages, avoidance of baths, of hair-cutting and of clean raiment, living in a cave; actual self-infliction of pain, by scourging, branding, cutting with knives, wearing of hair shirts, fire-walking, burial alive, hanging up of oneself by hooks plunged into the skin, suspension of weights by such hooks to the tenderer parts of the body, self-mutilation and numerous other, often ingenious, modes of torture.

  • Fasting is used in primitive asceticism for a variety of reasons, among which the following deserve notice.

  • Here we have the origin of the Catholic rule of fasting, seldom understood by those who observe it.

  • The prohibition of taking life, which they took over from the Farther East, in itself entailed fasting from flesh.

  • We come to a third widespread reason for fasting, common among savages.

  • Among the North American Indians ecstatic fasting is regularly practised.

  • All over the world fasting is a recognized mode of evoking, consulting and also of overcoming the spirit world.

  • This is why the Zulus and other primitive races distrust a medicine man who is not an ascetic and lean with fasting.

  • From the first, fasting was practised in the church for similar reason.

  • Not a few saints were rewarded for their fasting by glimpses of the beatific vision.

  • Above all, fasting was a mode of preparing oneself for the sacramental eating of a sacred animal, and as such often assisted by use of purgatives and aperients.

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