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farragut

farragut

farragut Sentence Examples

  • Farragut and General Butler (April 18-25, 1862).

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  • Farragut from New Orleans, and the gunboat flotilla from the upper waters, had engaged the batteries in June and July, but had returned to their respective stations, while a Federal force under General Williams, which had appeared before the fortress, retired to Baton Rouge.

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  • Other works by Mahan are a Life of Admiral Farragut (1892); The Interest of America in Sea Power (1897); Lessons of the War with Spain (1899); The Story of the War with South Africa and The Problem of Asia (1900); Types of Naval Officers drawn from the History of the British Navy (1901); Retrospect and Prospect, studies of international relations (1902).

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  • The passage of the Mississippi was forced on the 24th of April 1862, and New Orleans surrendered on the 26th; this was immediately followed by the operations against Vicksburg, from which, however, Farragut was compelled to withdraw, having relearnt the old lesson that against heavy earthworks, crowning hills of sufficient height, a purely naval attack is unavailing; it was not till the following summer, and after a long siege, that Vicksburg surrendered to a land force under General Grant.

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  • During this time the service on the Mississippi continued both difficult and irksome; nor until the river was cleared could Farragut seriously plan operations against Mobile, a port to which the fall of New Orleans had given increased importance.

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  • Other works by Mahan are a Life of Admiral Farragut (1892); The Interest of America in Sea Power (1897); Lessons of the War with Spain (1899); The Story of the War with South Africa and The Problem of Asia (1900); Types of Naval Officers drawn from the History of the British Navy (1901); Retrospect and Prospect, studies of international relations (1902).

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  • The passage of the Mississippi was forced on the 24th of April 1862, and New Orleans surrendered on the 26th; this was immediately followed by the operations against Vicksburg, from which, however, Farragut was compelled to withdraw, having relearnt the old lesson that against heavy earthworks, crowning hills of sufficient height, a purely naval attack is unavailing; it was not till the following summer, and after a long siege, that Vicksburg surrendered to a land force under General Grant.

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  • David Glasgow Farragut >>

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  • Farragut, with a powerful fleet, ascended the Mississippi past Forts Jackson and St Philip, which defended the approach to New Orleans, and a military force under General B.

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  • He was commissioned lieutenant in April 1861, and in the Civil War served on the steamsloop "Mississippi" (1861-1863) during Farragut's passage of the forts below New Orleans in April 1862, and at Port Hudson in March 1863; took part in the fighting below Donaldsonville, Louisiana, in July 1863; and in 1864-1865 served on the steam-gunboat "Agawam" with the North Atlantic blockading squadron and took part in the attacks on Fort Fisher in December 1864 and January 1865.

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  • After remaining in the Philippines under orders from his government to maintain control, Dewey received the rank of admiral (March 3, 1899) - that title, formerly borne only by Farragut and Porter, having been revived by act of Congress (March 2, 1899), - and returned home, arriving in New York City, where, on the 3rd of October 1899, he received a great ovation.

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  • The part played by the gunboats on the upper Mississippi had been most conspicuous, as had been the operations of Farragut's heavier ships in the lower waters of the same river.

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  • His first voyage, with his father 1 While he was in New Orleans he adopted David Farragut, who later served with him on the "Essex."

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  • Farragut, his foster-brother, to the chief command.

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  • At Vicksburg Porter's bombardment assisted Farragut to run past the forts (June 28).

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  • In 1870 he succeeded Farragut in the grade of admiral, which lapsed after Porter's death until 1899, when it was re-established to reward Rear-Admiral George Dewey for his victory at Manila.

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  • Farragut (by Vinnie Ream Hoxie); an equestrian statue of General George H.

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  • Mumford, who had torn down a United States flag placed by Farragut on the United States mint; and for this execution he was denounced (Dec. 1862) by President Davis as "a felon deserving capital punishment," who if captured should be reserved for execution.

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  • In Hackley Park there are statues of Lincoln and Farragut, and at the Hackley School there is a statue of McKinley; all three are by C. H.

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  • DAVID GLASGOW FARRAGUT (1801-1870), first admiral of the United States navy, was the son of Major George Farragut, a Catalan by descent, a Minorquin by birth, who had emigrated to America in 1776, and, after the peace, had married a lady of Scottish family and settled near Knoxville, in Tennessee; there Farragut was born on the 5th of July 1801.

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  • After more than four years in the Mediterranean, Farragut returned to the States in November 1820.

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  • The service was one of great exposure and privation; for two years and a half, Farragut wrote, he never owned a bed, but lay down to rest wherever he found the most comfortable berth.

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  • On the 8th of September 1841 Farragut was promoted to the rank of commander, and on the 14th of September 1855 to that of captain.

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  • All this Farragut executed to the letter, with a skill and caution that won for him the love of his followers, and with a dash and boldness that gained him the admiration of the public and the popular name of "Old Salamander."

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  • With this Farragut's active service came to an end; for though in September 1864 he was offered the command of the force intended for the reduction of Wilmington, the state of his health, after the labours and anxieties of the past three years, in a trying climate, compelled him to decline it and to ask to be recalled.

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  • Farragut was promoted to it, and in July 1866 was further promoted to the rank of admiral.

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  • The appointment was an honourable distinction without political or naval import: the "Franklin" was, to all intents, for the time being, a yacht at Farragut's disposal; and her arrival in the different ports was the signal for international courtesies, entertainments and social gaiety.

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  • She returned to America in 1868, and Farragut retired into private life.

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  • Farragut was twice married, and left, by his second wife, a son, Loyall Farragut, who, in 1878, published a Life of his father "embodying his Journal and Letters."

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  • Mahan, though shorter, has a greater value from the professional point of view, by reason of the critical appreciation of Farragut's services.

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  • David Glasgow Farragut >>

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  • Farragut (H.

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  • Farragut, with a powerful fleet, ascended the Mississippi past Forts Jackson and St Philip, which defended the approach to New Orleans, and a military force under General B.

    0
    0
  • He was commissioned lieutenant in April 1861, and in the Civil War served on the steamsloop "Mississippi" (1861-1863) during Farragut's passage of the forts below New Orleans in April 1862, and at Port Hudson in March 1863; took part in the fighting below Donaldsonville, Louisiana, in July 1863; and in 1864-1865 served on the steam-gunboat "Agawam" with the North Atlantic blockading squadron and took part in the attacks on Fort Fisher in December 1864 and January 1865.

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  • After remaining in the Philippines under orders from his government to maintain control, Dewey received the rank of admiral (March 3, 1899) - that title, formerly borne only by Farragut and Porter, having been revived by act of Congress (March 2, 1899), - and returned home, arriving in New York City, where, on the 3rd of October 1899, he received a great ovation.

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  • Farragut and General Butler (April 18-25, 1862).

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  • Farragut from New Orleans, and the gunboat flotilla from the upper waters, had engaged the batteries in June and July, but had returned to their respective stations, while a Federal force under General Williams, which had appeared before the fortress, retired to Baton Rouge.

    0
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  • The part played by the gunboats on the upper Mississippi had been most conspicuous, as had been the operations of Farragut's heavier ships in the lower waters of the same river.

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  • His first voyage, with his father 1 While he was in New Orleans he adopted David Farragut, who later served with him on the "Essex."

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  • Farragut, his foster-brother, to the chief command.

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  • In the expedition Porter himself commanded the mortar flotilla, which, when Farragut's fleet passed the forts on the early morning of the 24th of April 1862, covered its passage by a terrific bombardment that neutralized the fire of Fort Jackson.

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  • At Vicksburg Porter's bombardment assisted Farragut to run past the forts (June 28).

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  • In 1870 he succeeded Farragut in the grade of admiral, which lapsed after Porter's death until 1899, when it was re-established to reward Rear-Admiral George Dewey for his victory at Manila.

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  • (See Hampton Roads.) Farragut, with a wooden fleet, ran past the twin forts St Philip and Jackson, compelled the surrender of New Orleans (26th April), and gained control of the lower Mississip p i.

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  • Farragut (by Vinnie Ream Hoxie); an equestrian statue of General George H.

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  • Mumford, who had torn down a United States flag placed by Farragut on the United States mint; and for this execution he was denounced (Dec. 1862) by President Davis as "a felon deserving capital punishment," who if captured should be reserved for execution.

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  • In Hackley Park there are statues of Lincoln and Farragut, and at the Hackley School there is a statue of McKinley; all three are by C. H.

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  • DAVID GLASGOW FARRAGUT (1801-1870), first admiral of the United States navy, was the son of Major George Farragut, a Catalan by descent, a Minorquin by birth, who had emigrated to America in 1776, and, after the peace, had married a lady of Scottish family and settled near Knoxville, in Tennessee; there Farragut was born on the 5th of July 1801.

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  • After more than four years in the Mediterranean, Farragut returned to the States in November 1820.

    0
    0
  • The service was one of great exposure and privation; for two years and a half, Farragut wrote, he never owned a bed, but lay down to rest wherever he found the most comfortable berth.

    0
    0
  • On the 8th of September 1841 Farragut was promoted to the rank of commander, and on the 14th of September 1855 to that of captain.

    0
    0
  • All this Farragut executed to the letter, with a skill and caution that won for him the love of his followers, and with a dash and boldness that gained him the admiration of the public and the popular name of "Old Salamander."

    0
    0
  • During this time the service on the Mississippi continued both difficult and irksome; nor until the river was cleared could Farragut seriously plan operations against Mobile, a port to which the fall of New Orleans had given increased importance.

    0
    0
  • With this Farragut's active service came to an end; for though in September 1864 he was offered the command of the force intended for the reduction of Wilmington, the state of his health, after the labours and anxieties of the past three years, in a trying climate, compelled him to decline it and to ask to be recalled.

    0
    0
  • Farragut was promoted to it, and in July 1866 was further promoted to the rank of admiral.

    0
    0
  • The appointment was an honourable distinction without political or naval import: the "Franklin" was, to all intents, for the time being, a yacht at Farragut's disposal; and her arrival in the different ports was the signal for international courtesies, entertainments and social gaiety.

    0
    0
  • She returned to America in 1868, and Farragut retired into private life.

    0
    0
  • Farragut was twice married, and left, by his second wife, a son, Loyall Farragut, who, in 1878, published a Life of his father "embodying his Journal and Letters."

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  • Mahan, though shorter, has a greater value from the professional point of view, by reason of the critical appreciation of Farragut's services.

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