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fancies

fancies Sentence Examples

  • But I must put away these idle fancies until we meet again.

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  • As it was, these studies of Leonardo - "studies intense of strong and stern delight" - seemed to his trivial followers and biographers merely his whims and fancies, ghiribizzi, things to be spoken of slightingly and with apology.

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  • The same cramping realism clings to him everywhere beyond the domain of politics - in his religion, in his fancies, in his affections.

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  • One of the ablest was John Sergeant, a priest of the Roman Church, in Solid Philosophy Asserted Against the Fancies of the Ideists (1697).

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  • These Persian fancies can hardly be borrowed from the Christian Gnostic systems, their definiteness and much more strongly dualistic character recalling the exposition of the Mandaean (and Manichaean) system, are proofs to the contrary.

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  • These Persian fancies can hardly be borrowed from the Christian Gnostic systems, their definiteness and much more strongly dualistic character recalling the exposition of the Mandaean (and Manichaean) system, are proofs to the contrary.

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  • The chief names in this advanced theology connected with Cartesian doctrines are Ludwig Meyer, the friend and editor of Spinoza, author of a work termed Philosophia scripturae interpres (1666); Balthasar Bekker, whose World Bewitched helped to discredit the superstitious fancies about the devil; and Spinoza, whose Tractatus theologico-politicus is in some respects the classical type of rational criticism up to the present day.

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  • He fancies that he has tried or observed everything in human experience, and his deliberate conclusion is that nothing is worth doing.

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  • The earliest efforts of his art (the Eclogues) reproduce the cadences, the diction and the pastoral fancies of Theocritus; but even in these imitative poems of his youth Virgil shows a perfect mastery of his materials.

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  • Justinian was rather quick than strong or profound; his policy does not strike one as the result of deliberate and well-considered views, but dictated by the hopes and fancies of the moment.

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  • At nighttime in the moon's fair glow How sweet, as fancies wander free, To feel that in this world there's one Who still is thinking but of thee!

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  • In this philosophy the mystical properties of numbers are a leading feature; absurd and mechanical notions are glossed over with the sheen of sacramental mystery; myths are explained by pious fancies and fine-sounding pietistic reflections; miracles, even the most ridiculous, are believed in, and miracles are wrought.

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  • Epicureanism generally was content to affirm that whatever we effectively feel in consciousness is real; in which sense they allow reality to the fancies of the insane, the dreams of a sleeper, and those feelings by which we imagine the existence of beings of perfect blessedness and endless life.

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  • As she looked and thought, the strangest fancies unexpectedly and disconnectedly passed through her mind: the idea occurred to her of jumping onto the edge of the box and singing the air the actress was singing, then she wished to touch with her fan an old gentleman sitting not far from her, then to lean over to Helene and tickle her.

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  • His Christliche Dogmatik (3 vols., 1849-1852, new edition, 1870) "contains many fruitful and suggestive thoughts, which, however, are hidden under such a mass of bold figures and strange fancies, and suffer so much from want of clearness of presentation, that they did not produce any lasting effect" (Otto Pfleiderer).

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  • I recall with unmixed delight those days when a thousand childish fancies became beautiful realities.

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  • Some of the old masters of the Yamato school were, however, admirable in their rendering of the burlesqtie, and in modern times KyOsai, the last of the Hokusai school, outdid all his predecessors in the riotous originality of his weird and comic fancies.

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  • The end of his life was marked by singular hypochondriacal fancies.

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  • The other poems of Petter Dass are less universally read; they abound, however, in queer turns of thought, and fine homely fancies.

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  • The ancient books, preserved in the Pali Pitakas, being mainly occupied with the details of Arahatship, lost their exclusive value in the eyes of those whose attention was being directed to the details of Bodhisatship. And the opinion that every leader in their religious circles, every teacher distinguished among them for his sanctity of life, or for his extensive learning, was a Bodhisat, who might have and who probably had inherited the karma of some great teacher of old, opened the door to a flood of superstitious fancies.

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  • not mythical: a medley of Franco-Burgundian historical traditions, overlaid with mythical fancies.

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  • He fancies himself as something of an amateur social anthropologist.

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  • bluff yorkshireman indulged the whims and fancies of the new man and supported an improvement in conditions for the players.

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  • bristleinly from those slimy, tormented lips above the bristling gray beard came nothing but dreams and disconnected fancies... .

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  • fancyer mind about waiting for it to arrive on DVD... who fancies a trip to the cinema next week?

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  • fancylsea sees through her mom's act and reckons that she secretly fancies Kevin.

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  • fondant fancies are sitting prettily on a doily.

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  • fourpenny piece, in the shape of these abominable fancies.

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  • gormless brother Wishee Washee ever find a girl who fancies him?

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  • He's fancies her too, but he's a complete mentalist.

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  • mingled with the audience and tickled not a few men's fancies!

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  • Let's hope my rice pud fancies Will be cured by quirks of fate.

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  • Small Talk fancies a night of late-night revelry in our fair capital, preferably with a bevy of buxom beauties.

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  • It is part of her gift: The capacity to write succinct, intelligent songs devoid of genre, fads or fancies.

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  • On his return to London in 1818 he applied himself assiduously to the art of engraving, in which he acquired a skill that in after years became a most valuable assistant to his literary labours, and enabled him to illustrate his various humours and fancies by a profusion of quaint devices, which not only repeated to the eye the impressions of the text, but, by suggesting amusing analogies and contrasts, added considerably to the sense and effect of the work.

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  • The chief names in this advanced theology connected with Cartesian doctrines are Ludwig Meyer, the friend and editor of Spinoza, author of a work termed Philosophia scripturae interpres (1666); Balthasar Bekker, whose World Bewitched helped to discredit the superstitious fancies about the devil; and Spinoza, whose Tractatus theologico-politicus is in some respects the classical type of rational criticism up to the present day.

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  • It may be supposed that these crude fancies embody a dim recognition of the physical forces and objects personified under the forms of deities, and a rude attempt to account for their genesis as a natural process.

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  • The Fancies Chaste and Noble (acted before 1636, printed 1638), though it includes scenes of real force and feeling, is dramatically a failure, of which the main idea is almost provokingly slight and feeble; and The Lady's Trial (acted 1638, printed 1639) is only redeemed from utter wearisomeness by an unusually even pleasingness of form.

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  • He fancies that he has tried or observed everything in human experience, and his deliberate conclusion is that nothing is worth doing.

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  • His Christliche Dogmatik (3 vols., 1849-1852, new edition, 1870) "contains many fruitful and suggestive thoughts, which, however, are hidden under such a mass of bold figures and strange fancies, and suffer so much from want of clearness of presentation, that they did not produce any lasting effect" (Otto Pfleiderer).

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  • Law's mystic tendencies divorced him from the practical minded Wesley, but in spite of occasional wild fancies the books are worth reading.

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  • They were met by the criticism that possibly such a development had taken place; but, as no one could show as a simple fact of observation that it had taken place, nor as a result of legitimate inference that it must have taken place, it was quite as likely that the past and present species of animals and plants had been separately created or individually brought into existence by unknown and inscrutable causes, and (it was held) the truly scientific man would refuse to occupy himself with such fancies, whilst ever continuing to concern himself with the observation and record of indisputable facts.

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  • Many zoologists - prominent among them in Great Britain being Huxley - had been repelled by the airy fancies and assumptions of the " philosophical " morphologists.

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  • Briefly speaking, the NO was a dance of the most stately character, adapted to the incidents of dramas which embrace within their scope a world of legendary lore, of quaint fancies and of religious sentiment.

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  • Some of the old masters of the Yamato school were, however, admirable in their rendering of the burlesqtie, and in modern times KyOsai, the last of the Hokusai school, outdid all his predecessors in the riotous originality of his weird and comic fancies.

    0
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  • The earliest efforts of his art (the Eclogues) reproduce the cadences, the diction and the pastoral fancies of Theocritus; but even in these imitative poems of his youth Virgil shows a perfect mastery of his materials.

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  • We have the testimony of two men of shrewd common sense and masculine understanding - Martial and Juvenal - to the stale and lifeless character of the art of the Silver Age, which sought to reproduce in the form of epics, tragedies and elegies the bright fancies of the Greek mythology.

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  • He was taught Latin orally by servants (a German tutor, Horstanus, is especially mentioned), who could speak no French, and many curious fancies were tried on him, as, for instance, that of waking him every morning by soft music. But he was by no means allowed to be idle.

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  • The end of his life was marked by singular hypochondriacal fancies.

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  • The other poems of Petter Dass are less universally read; they abound, however, in queer turns of thought, and fine homely fancies.

    0
    0
  • In this philosophy the mystical properties of numbers are a leading feature; absurd and mechanical notions are glossed over with the sheen of sacramental mystery; myths are explained by pious fancies and fine-sounding pietistic reflections; miracles, even the most ridiculous, are believed in, and miracles are wrought.

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  • Its very growth invited attempts to weave ascetic, theosophic, semi-Jewish fancies round the faith, not unlike the attempts often made in modern India to assimilate Christian and local philosophies of religion.

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  • Epicureanism generally was content to affirm that whatever we effectively feel in consciousness is real; in which sense they allow reality to the fancies of the insane, the dreams of a sleeper, and those feelings by which we imagine the existence of beings of perfect blessedness and endless life.

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  • But in such an undertaking one is always apt to take subjective assumptions or mere fancies for established data.

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  • Justinian was rather quick than strong or profound; his policy does not strike one as the result of deliberate and well-considered views, but dictated by the hopes and fancies of the moment.

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  • The meanest of the fancies of the mind and the most casual of its whims he regarded as a better warrant for the being of God than any single object of nature.

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  • The apple of discord, the arrows of Philoctetes, the invulnerability of Achilles, and similar fancies, are the additions of later poets.

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  • The ancient books, preserved in the Pali Pitakas, being mainly occupied with the details of Arahatship, lost their exclusive value in the eyes of those whose attention was being directed to the details of Bodhisatship. And the opinion that every leader in their religious circles, every teacher distinguished among them for his sanctity of life, or for his extensive learning, was a Bodhisat, who might have and who probably had inherited the karma of some great teacher of old, opened the door to a flood of superstitious fancies.

    0
    0
  • As it was, these studies of Leonardo - "studies intense of strong and stern delight" - seemed to his trivial followers and biographers merely his whims and fancies, ghiribizzi, things to be spoken of slightingly and with apology.

    0
    0
  • The same cramping realism clings to him everywhere beyond the domain of politics - in his religion, in his fancies, in his affections.

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  • Of the six parts into which it is divided, the first translates into manysided music the joys and sorrows, the thoughts and fancies, the studies and ardours and speculations of youth; the second, as full of light and colour, grows gradually deeper in tone of thought and music; the third is yet riper and more various in form of melody and in fervour of meditation; the fourth is the noblest of all tributes ever paid by song to sorrow - a series of poems consecrated to the memory of the poet's eldest daughter, who was drowned, together with her husband, by the upsetting of a boat off the coast of Normandy, a few months after their wedding-day, in 1843; the fifth and the sixth books, written during his first four years of exile (all but one noble poem which bears date nine years earlier than its epilogue or postscript), contain more than a few poems unsurpassed and unsurpassable for depth and clarity and trenchancy of thought, for sublimity of inspiration, for intensity of faith, for loyalty in translation from nature, and for tenderness in devotion to truth; crowned and glorified and completed by their matchless dedication to the dead.

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  • One of the ablest was John Sergeant, a priest of the Roman Church, in Solid Philosophy Asserted Against the Fancies of the Ideists (1697).

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  • This predisposed him to regard physical miracles as the solid criterion for distinguishing reasonable religious conviction from " inclinations, fancies and strong assurances."

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  • On the same prelate fell the task of conducting a public controversy with the archbishop of Armagh, George Dowdall, which of course ended in the conversion [From Anglo-Norman Invasion] him as lord-lieutenant, the litany was chanted in English, both cathedrals having been painted, and scripture texts substituted for " pictures and popish fancies."

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  • not mythical: a medley of Franco-Burgundian historical traditions, overlaid with mythical fancies.

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  • You always have such strange fancies!

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  • Small Talk fancies a night of late-night revelry in our fair capital, preferably with a bevy of buxom beauties.

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  • It is part of her gift: The capacity to write succinct, intelligent songs devoid of genre, fads or fancies.

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  • Moreover, a cat is a truly curious animal and fancies itself a keen observer.

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  • If you have some in your group that fancies themselves a Romero in the making or the next Tom Savini then perhaps some special effects could be thrown in the mix and one place that could help you out is 100% free and is called Indy Mogul.

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  • Taurus has a penchant for the fine art and fancies himself knowledgeable enough to know what constitutes good art.

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  • The snooze function could be a handy fall back for days when someone is exceptionally tired or fancies a lie in.

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  • It may be supposed that these crude fancies embody a dim recognition of the physical forces and objects personified under the forms of deities, and a rude attempt to account for their genesis as a natural process.

    0
    1
  • Law's mystic tendencies divorced him from the practical minded Wesley, but in spite of occasional wild fancies the books are worth reading.

    0
    1
  • Many zoologists - prominent among them in Great Britain being Huxley - had been repelled by the airy fancies and assumptions of the " philosophical " morphologists.

    0
    2
  • But in such an undertaking one is always apt to take subjective assumptions or mere fancies for established data.

    0
    2
  • He was taught Latin orally by servants (a German tutor, Horstanus, is especially mentioned), who could speak no French, and many curious fancies were tried on him, as, for instance, that of waking him every morning by soft music. But he was by no means allowed to be idle.

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  • The meanest of the fancies of the mind and the most casual of its whims he regarded as a better warrant for the being of God than any single object of nature.

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  • Hamann, however, was quite unfitted for business, and when left in London, gave himself up entirely to his fancies, and was quickly reduced to a state of extreme poverty and want.

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  • The apple of discord, the arrows of Philoctetes, the invulnerability of Achilles, and similar fancies, are the additions of later poets.

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  • This predisposed him to regard physical miracles as the solid criterion for distinguishing reasonable religious conviction from " inclinations, fancies and strong assurances."

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  • What might be taken as poetic fancies in our text are recounted as historical facts in rabbinical literature.

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  • Hamann, however, was quite unfitted for business, and when left in London, gave himself up entirely to his fancies, and was quickly reduced to a state of extreme poverty and want.

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  • What might be taken as poetic fancies in our text are recounted as historical facts in rabbinical literature.

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  • I first tried to ascertain what had suggested to Helen's mind the particular fancies which made her story seem like a reproduction of one written by Miss Margaret Canby.

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