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fanaticism

fanaticism

fanaticism Sentence Examples

  • Civil war was raging in France, and Clement became an ardent partisan of the League; his mind appears to have become unhinged by religious fanaticism, and he talked of exterminating the heretics, and formed a plan to kill Henry III.

  • This appeared in 1860 and gave rise to a strange outbreak of fanaticism.

  • Meanwhile Spanish fanaticism, the suppression of the Huguenots in France and the Catholic policy of Austria combined to strengthen their authority as pontiffs.

  • When they first appeared in Europe they were idolaters or Shamanists, and as such they had naturally no religious fanaticism; but even when they adopted Islam they remained as tolerant as before, and the khan of the Golden Horde (Berkai) who first became a Mussulman allowed the Russians to found a Christian bishopric in his capital.

  • This scheme did not please any of the contending factions and it roused the anti-Catholic fanaticism of the masses.

  • The cruel persecutions instituted by the authorities with a view to securing conformity increased the number and fanaticism of the schismatics and heretics, and created among them a widespread belief that the reign of Antichrist, foretold in the Apocalypse, was at hand.

  • But economic laws are often too strong for civil vagaries or sectarian fanaticism, and as the commerce of Austria suffered by the absence of the Jews, it was impossible to exclude the latter from the fairs in the provinces of from the markets of the capital.

  • Though the outbreak was unconnected with the religious feud, the latent fanaticism of both creeds was soon aroused, and the island once more became a scene of pillage and devastation.

  • In fact, nearly the whole of the region between the Caucasus and the Perso-Turkish frontier on the south, from the Caspian Sea on the one side to the Black Sea on the other, was embroiled in a civil war of the most sanguinary and ruthless character, the inveterate racial animosities of the combatants being in both cases inflamed by religious fanaticism.

  • The fanaticism of the caliph Hakim destroyed the church of the Sepulchre and ended the Frankish protectorate (Ioio); and the patronage of the Holy Places, a source of strife between the Greek and the Latin Churches as late as the beginning of the Crimean War, passed to the Byzantine empire in 1021.

  • They are remarkable for the fanaticism displayed in successive attacks upon the Hindus, and they have several times resisted British troops.

  • Their only value was from a fiscal point of view, and in times of fanaticism or when antiforeign sentiment ran high even this was held of little account, so that more than once they very nearly became the victims of a general and state-ordered massacre.

  • External influences and latent fanaticism were active; a serious insurrection broke out in Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1875, and the efforts to quell it almost exhausted Turkey's resources; the example spread to Bulgaria, where abortive outbreaks in September 1875 and May 1876 led to those cruel measures of repression which were known as " the Bulgarian atrocities," 3 Mussulman public feeling was inflamed, and an attempt at Salonica to induce a Christian girl who had embraced Islam to return to her faith caused the murder of two foreign consuls by a fanatical mob.

  • On the other hand, the Russians, once their fatherland was invaded, became dominated by an ever-growing spirit of fanaticism, and they were by nature too obedient to their natural leaders, and too well inured to the hardships of campaigning, to lose their courage in a retreat.

  • The Extreme Left was infected by the fanaticism of Kossuth, who condemned the compromise and refused to take the benefit of the amnesty, while the prelates and magnates who had originally opposed the compromise were now to be found by the side of Deal(and Andrassy.

  • We know but little of Isaiah's predecessors and models in the prophetic art (it were fanaticism to exclude the element of human preparation); but certainly even the acknowledged prophecies of Isaiah (and much more the disputed ones) could no more have come into existence suddenly and without warning than the masterpieces of Shakespeare.

  • The hostility he encountered in the propagation of these new religious ideas after his return to Khorasan in 1052 and Sunnite fanaticism compelled him at last to flee, and after many wanderings he found a refuge in Yumgan (about 1060) in the mountains of Badakshan, where he spent as a hermit the last decades of his life, and gathered round him a considerable number of devoted adherents, who have handed down his doctrines to succeeding generations.

  • Yet even in the enlightened 18th century popular fanaticism made of sacrilege the most heinous offence.

  • The outburst of fanaticism which convulsed Arabia twenty years later had not then reached Yemen, and Europeans, as such, were not exposed to any special danger.

  • Fesal may well have watched with jealous anxiety the growing strength of his neighbour's state as compared with his own, where all progress was arrested by the deadening tyranny of religious fanaticism.

  • The actual conquest of the country was not effected without a serious struggle with Moslem fanaticism, especially at Sfax; but all Tunisia was brought completely under French jurisdiction and administration, supported by military posts at every important point.

  • The inhabitants are notorious for fanaticism and lawlessness, and Europeans are usually greeted with vile epithets.

  • Savonarola, perceiving that a trap was being laid for him, discountenanced the "experiment" until his calmer judgment was at last overborne by the fanaticism of his followers.

  • He was also the means of checking the fanaticism of the more turbulent Mahommedans in British India, which in times of internal troubles and misunderstandings finds vent in the shape of religious or political riots.

  • Various repressive remedies were proposed, but Shaftesbury maintained that fanaticism was best encountered by "raillery" and "good-humour."

  • Since 1648 it has been the custom of Moorish sultans to despatch superfluous sons and daughters to Tafilalt, and as the males are all sharifs, the fanaticism against Europeans is comprehensible.

  • The whole of the responsibility for this crime, therefore, rests with Catherine; unlike the populace, she had not even the excuse of fanaticism.

  • The compatibility of Christian and later Neo-Platonic ideas is evidenced by the writings of Synesius, bishop of Ptolemais, and though Neo-Platonism eventually succumbed to Christianity, it had the effect, through the writings of Clement and Origen, of modifying the tyrannical fanaticism and ultradogmatism of the early Christian writers.

  • Fanaticism took advantage of this order; 1 Scultetus, Annales, ii.

  • The storming of their favourite positions - stockades strengthened with rifle-pits - was often costly; and a strange anti-Christian fanaticism, the Hau-Hau cult, encouraged them to face the white men's bullets and bayonets.

  • But the development of modern culture has rendered these exploits of an unbridled fanaticism impossible, and no government would consent to enforce the once obligatory sentences of ecclesiastical courts.

  • Thus Ultramontanism is not to be conceived as a theological movement, but as the programme of a party whose principles are in fundamental opposition to modern culture, modern education, modern tolerance and the modern state - a party which seeks to carry out its campaign against the society of to-day, not by bridging the gulf betwixt creed and creed, but by widening it, by awakening religious fanaticism, and by closing the way to a peaceful co-operation of Catholics and non-Catholics in the highest tasks of culture and human civilization.

  • But independently of the public anxieties of the war, and of those aroused by the violent and unexpected outbreak of fanaticism in China, the year brought deep private griefs to the queen.

  • Marius had a decided tinge of fanaticism and superstition.

  • An outbreak of Mahommedan fanaticism in Sumatra also gave much trouble.

  • As he loathed fish, so he loathed clerical fanaticism.

  • And when out of Luther's revolt there arose a new fanaticism - that of evangelism, Erasmus recoiled from the violence of the new preachers.

  • With the ferocious fanaticism or the ruthless opportunism of the future organizers of the Terror they had nothing in common.

  • die christliche Kirche des 2ten Jahrhunderts (1841), in which he pointed out for the first time that Montanism was much more than an isolated outbreak of eccentric fanaticism in the early church, though he himself introduced fresh misconceptions by connecting it with Ebionitism as he conceived the latter.

  • From the first they were better treated in Poland than elsewhere, though frequently exposed to outbreaks of popular fanaticism.

  • Harris had been sent to Oxford in the autumn of 1735 to " cure him of his fanaticism," but he left in the following February.

  • The influence of the priests kept up the fanaticism of the peasants, and a great manifestation of religious feeling took place on Easter eve, but the republican soldiers taken prisoners were often maltreated and even tortured.

  • The time of the Ashtarkhanides had been for the most part a time of dissolution and decay; fanaticism and imbecility went hand in hand.

  • Dying in 1802 he was succeeded by Said, who in bigotry and fanaticism was a true son of his father.

  • Still, as compared with the later Neoplatonists, he is comparatively free from crass superstition and wild fanaticism.

  • But after the beginning of the 5th century the fanaticism of the church could no longer endure the presence of " heathenism."

  • abandoned him to the fanaticism of the Magians, and caused him to be crucified in the capital in the year 276/7.

  • At first he seemed inclined to act with moderation and on lines of constitutional agitation, but soon, carried away by fanaticism, ambition and vanity, he turned to armed organization against the government.

  • On his release, overwrought and weakened by six months spent "in the common gaol and dungeon," he performed what was almost the only and certainly the most pronounced act of his life which had the appearance of wild fanaticism.

  • It is very doubtful whether this was possible, and an impartial historian must take into account the insuperable difficulties encountered by the medieval popes in their efforts to stem the flood of fanaticism.

  • Never was man more free than Latimer from the taint of fanaticism or less dominated by " vainglory," but the motives which now inspired his courage not only placed him beyond the influence of fear, but enabled him to taste in dying an ineffable thrill of victorious achievement.

  • Silesia remained a principal objective of the various contending armies and was occupied almost continuously by a succession of ill-disciplined mercenary forces whose depredations and exactions, accentuated at times by religious fanaticism, reduced the country to a state of helpless misery.

  • The mis-government and financial straits of the country brought on the outbreak of Mussulman discontent and fanaticism which eventually culminated in the murder of two consuls at Salonica and in the "Bulgarian atrocities," and cost Abd-ul-Aziz his throne.

  • He had a settled hatred of fanaticism.

  • Paul of Samosata represented the high-water mark of Christian speculation; and it is deplorable that the fanaticism of his own and of succeeding generations has left us nothing but a few scattered fragments of his writings.

  • In dealing with this outburst of fanaticism many of the princes, both spiritual and secular, displayed vigour and humanity, but Charles saw only in the sufferings of this people an excuse for robbing them of their wealth.

  • But the policy he pursued in turning the crusaders against Constantinople, in order to promote the interests of the republic, while serving to break up the Greek empire, created in its place a Latin state that was far too feeble to withstand the onslaught of Greek national feeling and Orthodox fanaticism; at the same time the Greeks were greatly weakened and their power of resisting the Turks consequently lessened.

  • Their vague pantheism landed them in moral confusion, and many of them were marked by fierce fanaticism.

  • Then came the religious fanaticism of Akhenaton, mutilating all figures of Ammon and all inscriptions containing his name; this made havoc of the exquisite monuments of Hatshepsut; and the restorers of the XIXth Dynasty, refusing to recognize the legitimacy of the queen, had no scruples in replacing her names by those of the associate kings Tethmosis I., II.

  • with the aid of the mob, and by the murder of the beautiful philosopher Hypatia marked the lowest depth to which ignorant fanaticism could descend.

  • The period between the rise of the Abbasids and the quasi-independent dynasties of Egypt was marked by much religious persecution, occasioned by the fanaticism of some of the caliphs, the victims being generally Moslem sectarians.

  • The fellahin, a patient, long-suffering race save when stirred by religious fanaticism, submitted to the kurbash, ~~t~2s freely used by the Turkish and Bashi Bazuk taxfdiahin.

  • While the removal of ancient jealousies among the European powers interested in Egypt helped to smooth the path pursued by the Egyptian administration under the guiding hand of Great Britain, the intrigues of the Turks and movement, the danger of a revival of Moslem fanaticism threatened during 1905-1906 to disturb the peace of the country.

  • This incident inflamed the minds of many Egyptians, and almost all the opposition elements in the country were united by the appeal to religious fanaticism, of which the incident was partly the effect and partly the cause.

  • These sons of poor peasants, artisans or tradesmen are already disposed to narrow fanaticism, and generally take up study as a means of livelihood rather than from genuine religious interest.

  • It draws few students from foreign parts, 2 where the local schools are of the poorest kind, except in India (thanks to a British government) and perhaps in Constantinople., Bokhara was once a chief seat of learning, but is now so sunk in narrow fanaticism that its eighty madrasas (medresses) with their 5000 students only turn out a bigoted and foolish clergy (V5.mbery).

  • The bitter fanaticism of Knox on this point encountered the wiser policy of Lord James and of Lethington.

  • Political complications arising out of the work of the Arabian mission have been singularly few, a happy circumstance which must be attributed chiefly to the missionaries themselves, whose general opinion is that for a Mahommedan country the Persian Gulf and eastern Arabia are peculiarly free from religious fanaticism.

  • The subordination of reason to a sense of superstitious fanaticism is the keynote of his character, and largely the explanation of his life.

  • There is a ferocity and fanaticism which manifests itself in the belief that war was a sacred campaign of deity against deity.

  • In the western provinces about Kandahar (amongst the Durani Afghans - the people who claim to be Beni-Israel), and especially in Zamindawar, the spirit of fanaticism runs high, and every other Afghan is a possible Ghazi - a man who has devoted his life to the extinction of other creeds.

  • The Moplahs of Malabar are notorious for repeated outbreaks of bloody fanaticism.

  • by the Brahmanic reaction, a new faith was being born in Arabia, destined to supply a youthful fanaticism which should.

  • By birth a Brahman, and brought up as a slave in Persia, he united the administrative ability of a Hindu to the fanaticism of a renegade.

  • The British army was not ready to act in the hot season, and, despite the single-handed exertions of Lieutenant (afterwards Sir Herbert) Edwardes, this outbreak of fanaticism led to a general rising.

  • Being under the protection of the constitution, and enjoying the advantages of the common law, Catholicism could not meet with any official opposition; such few outbursts of fanaticism as there have been were but temporary or local, and did not represent the true feelings of the country.

  • Phalaris may thus have been one of those men who combine justice and even humanity with religious fanaticism (Suidas, s.v.; Diod.

  • The mind of the nation being so preoccupied with the Covenant, it naturally followed that those who carried their fanaticism farthest were ready to denounce and to unchurch those who showed any inclination to moderation and political sanity, and that the beginnings of schism soon appeared in the ranks of the Covenanters.

  • Finally, no religion has been without exhibitions of fanaticism and excess on the part of its followers, and if the Old Testament itself was the authority for witch-burning among Christians, it is no longer profitable to ask whether the Talmud was responsible for offences committed by or alleged against those whose lives were regulated by it.

  • In cities where many nonM ussulinan subjects, reside a special official is appointed to protect them; and the ministry of justice has a special section to look after them and see that they are protected against fanaticism and injustice.

  • At this time not only was there religious fanaticism at work to stir up the mutual hatred ever existing between Sunni and Shiah, but the intrigue of European courts was probably directed towards the maintenance of an hostility which deterred the sultan from aggressive operations north and west of Constantinople.

  • Many of these found their way to Crete, and becoming porters, &c. in Canea and Candia, were notorious for turbulence and fanaticism.

  • The fanaticism or blind allegiance to his priest.

  • The fanaticism of the clerical and absolutist parties in Portugal (collectively termed apostolicos) was enhanced by recrudescence of Sebastianism.

  • Against superstition, fanaticism and priestcraft they protested unceasingly.

  • The bitter feeling against them in Rumania is not so much due to religious fanaticism as to the fear that if given political and other rights they will gradually possess themselves of the whole soil.

  • The very earnestness with which Spener had insisted on the necessity of a new birth, and on a separation of Christians from the world, led to exaggeration and fanaticism among followers less distinguished than himself for wisdom and moderation.

  • and of the fanaticism of the papists in England.

  • His intimacy with foreigners and his imitation of their ways were sufficient to rouse fanaticism and create dissatisfaction.

  • The fanaticism of the people was aroused, and a revolt broke out near the Algerian frontier.

  • In fact, Kashgaria flourished under them, and the fanaticism of Islam was considerably abated.

  • But Locke's hereditary sympathy with the Puritans was gradually lessened by the intolerance of the Presbyterians and the fanaticism of the Independents.

  • But in course of time, as the struggle became embittered, Catholicism itself grew revolutionary; and this twofold fanaticism, Catholic and Protestant, even more than the ambition of the leaders, made the war a ferocious one from the very first.

  • But the parlement soon became disgusted with its alliesthe princes and nobles, who bad only drawn their swords in order to beg more effectively with arms in their hands; and the Parisian mob, whose fanaticism had been aroused by Paul de Gondi, a warlike ecclesiastic, a Catiline in a cassock, who preached the gospel at the daggers point.

  • The promulgation and application of systematic measures from above had a response from below, from the corporation, the urban workshop, and the village street, which supported ecclesiastical and royal authority in its suppression of heresy, and frequently even went further: individual and local~ fanaticism co-operating with the head of the state, the intendants, and the military and judiciary authorities.

  • But the patriotism and the religious fanaticism of the Dutch revolted against this insupportable tyranny.

  • fanaticism, the Jews no longer used the learned Arabic, and translations of the works of Averroes became necessary.

  • The attempt to destroy the sect by force had the result of intensifying its fanaticism.

  • Under the influence of orthodox Berber teachers their fanaticism was turned against the amir himself.

  • Under the stimulus of Berber fanaticism the toleration first shown to the Christians was turned to persecution.

  • A counter fanaticism was aroused in them, and for years the Martyrs of Cordoba continued to force the often reluctant cadis to behead them, by blaspheming the Prophet.

  • The Jews, who had suffered cruelly from the brutal fanaticism of the Almohifdes, had done a great deal to forward the conquest of Andalusia.

  • The fanaticism with which the Mandi had inspired his followers remained almost unbroken to the end.

  • In 1906 a rising attributed to religious fanaticism occurred near Sokoto in which unfortunately three white officers lost their lives.

  • The whole of this region is a well-known hotbed of fanaticism, the headquarters of the Achakzais, the most aggressive of all Durani tribes.

  • When this is combined with religious fanaticism and military adventurism, a threat is posed to global civilized norms, which we strive for.

  • fanaticism of all kinds.

  • Soviet or Chinese communism was never driven by such fanaticism.

  • Moreover, bombing or invasion is more likely in the long-term to increase than to defeat fanaticism cloaked in religion.

  • While avoiding fanaticism, we must give ourselves with loving enthusiasm to the service of others.

  • From The Times, November 6 04 Benedict Nightingale argues that Greeks understood fanaticism better than anyone.

  • In certain parts f the world the right premises for certain classes might seem to be religious fanaticism.

  • Extract: We all know about the perils of Islamic fanaticism.

  • It's possible for political fanaticism alone to drive people to suicide attacks, but it's hard.

  • You may call this religion, but I call it wild fanaticism!

  • founded on a belief, one whose fanaticism is such it can't be moderated.

  • These dealers are motivated by greed, or fanaticism, or both.

  • motivated by greed, or fanaticism, or both.

  • He stands squarely in a tradition in which dishonesty and fanaticism merge, in an amalgam which is often not easily separable from insanity.

  • The fanaticism of the Muwahhadis did not prevent them from encouraging the establishment of Christians even in Fez, and after the battle of Las Navas de Tolosa they occasionally entered into alliances with the kings of Castile.

  • Civil war was raging in France, and Clement became an ardent partisan of the League; his mind appears to have become unhinged by religious fanaticism, and he talked of exterminating the heretics, and formed a plan to kill Henry III.

  • This appeared in 1860 and gave rise to a strange outbreak of fanaticism.

  • Meanwhile Spanish fanaticism, the suppression of the Huguenots in France and the Catholic policy of Austria combined to strengthen their authority as pontiffs.

  • When they first appeared in Europe they were idolaters or Shamanists, and as such they had naturally no religious fanaticism; but even when they adopted Islam they remained as tolerant as before, and the khan of the Golden Horde (Berkai) who first became a Mussulman allowed the Russians to found a Christian bishopric in his capital.

  • This scheme did not please any of the contending factions and it roused the anti-Catholic fanaticism of the masses.

  • The cruel persecutions instituted by the authorities with a view to securing conformity increased the number and fanaticism of the schismatics and heretics, and created among them a widespread belief that the reign of Antichrist, foretold in the Apocalypse, was at hand.

  • Such innovations troubled deeply the pious souls of the conservative Muscovites, and confirmed them in their repugnance to accept the ecclesiastical reforms. Though this original fanaticism gradually cooled and the rigorists had to make many concessions to the exigencies of practical life, a large section of the Russian people remained outside the official fold, so that at the present day, if we may credit the most competent authorities, the schismatics and heretics number more than twelve millions.

  • But economic laws are often too strong for civil vagaries or sectarian fanaticism, and as the commerce of Austria suffered by the absence of the Jews, it was impossible to exclude the latter from the fairs in the provinces of from the markets of the capital.

  • Though the outbreak was unconnected with the religious feud, the latent fanaticism of both creeds was soon aroused, and the island once more became a scene of pillage and devastation.

  • In fact, nearly the whole of the region between the Caucasus and the Perso-Turkish frontier on the south, from the Caspian Sea on the one side to the Black Sea on the other, was embroiled in a civil war of the most sanguinary and ruthless character, the inveterate racial animosities of the combatants being in both cases inflamed by religious fanaticism.

  • The fanaticism of the caliph Hakim destroyed the church of the Sepulchre and ended the Frankish protectorate (Ioio); and the patronage of the Holy Places, a source of strife between the Greek and the Latin Churches as late as the beginning of the Crimean War, passed to the Byzantine empire in 1021.

  • monster of iniquity; but, in spite of the harshness and occasional cruelty with which he treated his religious opponents, for which an excuse may be found in the obstinate fanaticism of the monks,.

  • That the Quakers were, at times, irritating cannot be denied: some of them appear to have publicly mocked the institutions and the rulers of the colony and to have interrupted public worship; and a few of their men and women acted with the fanaticism and disorder which frequently characterized the religious controversies of the time.

  • They are remarkable for the fanaticism displayed in successive attacks upon the Hindus, and they have several times resisted British troops.

  • Their only value was from a fiscal point of view, and in times of fanaticism or when antiforeign sentiment ran high even this was held of little account, so that more than once they very nearly became the victims of a general and state-ordered massacre.

  • External influences and latent fanaticism were active; a serious insurrection broke out in Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1875, and the efforts to quell it almost exhausted Turkey's resources; the example spread to Bulgaria, where abortive outbreaks in September 1875 and May 1876 led to those cruel measures of repression which were known as " the Bulgarian atrocities," 3 Mussulman public feeling was inflamed, and an attempt at Salonica to induce a Christian girl who had embraced Islam to return to her faith caused the murder of two foreign consuls by a fanatical mob.

  • On the other hand, the Russians, once their fatherland was invaded, became dominated by an ever-growing spirit of fanaticism, and they were by nature too obedient to their natural leaders, and too well inured to the hardships of campaigning, to lose their courage in a retreat.

  • In a letter to the cardinal patriarch of Lisbon entitled (1850), he denounced the fanaticism and ignorance of the clergy in plain terms, and this provoked a fierce pamphlet war marked by much personal abuse.

  • The Extreme Left was infected by the fanaticism of Kossuth, who condemned the compromise and refused to take the benefit of the amnesty, while the prelates and magnates who had originally opposed the compromise were now to be found by the side of Deal(and Andrassy.

  • We know but little of Isaiah's predecessors and models in the prophetic art (it were fanaticism to exclude the element of human preparation); but certainly even the acknowledged prophecies of Isaiah (and much more the disputed ones) could no more have come into existence suddenly and without warning than the masterpieces of Shakespeare.

  • The hostility he encountered in the propagation of these new religious ideas after his return to Khorasan in 1052 and Sunnite fanaticism compelled him at last to flee, and after many wanderings he found a refuge in Yumgan (about 1060) in the mountains of Badakshan, where he spent as a hermit the last decades of his life, and gathered round him a considerable number of devoted adherents, who have handed down his doctrines to succeeding generations.

  • Yet even in the enlightened 18th century popular fanaticism made of sacrilege the most heinous offence.

  • The outburst of fanaticism which convulsed Arabia twenty years later had not then reached Yemen, and Europeans, as such, were not exposed to any special danger.

  • Fesal may well have watched with jealous anxiety the growing strength of his neighbour's state as compared with his own, where all progress was arrested by the deadening tyranny of religious fanaticism.

  • The actual conquest of the country was not effected without a serious struggle with Moslem fanaticism, especially at Sfax; but all Tunisia was brought completely under French jurisdiction and administration, supported by military posts at every important point.

  • The inhabitants are notorious for fanaticism and lawlessness, and Europeans are usually greeted with vile epithets.

  • Savonarola, perceiving that a trap was being laid for him, discountenanced the "experiment" until his calmer judgment was at last overborne by the fanaticism of his followers.

  • He was also the means of checking the fanaticism of the more turbulent Mahommedans in British India, which in times of internal troubles and misunderstandings finds vent in the shape of religious or political riots.

  • Others attribute it to religious fanaticism, or to the result of some barbaric invasion, such as Axum may have repeatedly endured before it was sacked by Mahommed Gran, sultan of Harrar, about 1535.

  • Various repressive remedies were proposed, but Shaftesbury maintained that fanaticism was best encountered by "raillery" and "good-humour."

  • Since 1648 it has been the custom of Moorish sultans to despatch superfluous sons and daughters to Tafilalt, and as the males are all sharifs, the fanaticism against Europeans is comprehensible.

  • The whole of the responsibility for this crime, therefore, rests with Catherine; unlike the populace, she had not even the excuse of fanaticism.

  • The compatibility of Christian and later Neo-Platonic ideas is evidenced by the writings of Synesius, bishop of Ptolemais, and though Neo-Platonism eventually succumbed to Christianity, it had the effect, through the writings of Clement and Origen, of modifying the tyrannical fanaticism and ultradogmatism of the early Christian writers.

  • Fanaticism took advantage of this order; 1 Scultetus, Annales, ii.

  • The storming of their favourite positions - stockades strengthened with rifle-pits - was often costly; and a strange anti-Christian fanaticism, the Hau-Hau cult, encouraged them to face the white men's bullets and bayonets.

  • But the development of modern culture has rendered these exploits of an unbridled fanaticism impossible, and no government would consent to enforce the once obligatory sentences of ecclesiastical courts.

  • Thus Ultramontanism is not to be conceived as a theological movement, but as the programme of a party whose principles are in fundamental opposition to modern culture, modern education, modern tolerance and the modern state - a party which seeks to carry out its campaign against the society of to-day, not by bridging the gulf betwixt creed and creed, but by widening it, by awakening religious fanaticism, and by closing the way to a peaceful co-operation of Catholics and non-Catholics in the highest tasks of culture and human civilization.

  • But independently of the public anxieties of the war, and of those aroused by the violent and unexpected outbreak of fanaticism in China, the year brought deep private griefs to the queen.

  • Marius had a decided tinge of fanaticism and superstition.

  • An outbreak of Mahommedan fanaticism in Sumatra also gave much trouble.

  • As he loathed fish, so he loathed clerical fanaticism.

  • And when out of Luther's revolt there arose a new fanaticism - that of evangelism, Erasmus recoiled from the violence of the new preachers.

  • With the ferocious fanaticism or the ruthless opportunism of the future organizers of the Terror they had nothing in common.

  • die christliche Kirche des 2ten Jahrhunderts (1841), in which he pointed out for the first time that Montanism was much more than an isolated outbreak of eccentric fanaticism in the early church, though he himself introduced fresh misconceptions by connecting it with Ebionitism as he conceived the latter.

  • From the first they were better treated in Poland than elsewhere, though frequently exposed to outbreaks of popular fanaticism.

  • Harris had been sent to Oxford in the autumn of 1735 to " cure him of his fanaticism," but he left in the following February.

  • The influence of the priests kept up the fanaticism of the peasants, and a great manifestation of religious feeling took place on Easter eve, but the republican soldiers taken prisoners were often maltreated and even tortured.

  • The time of the Ashtarkhanides had been for the most part a time of dissolution and decay; fanaticism and imbecility went hand in hand.

  • Dying in 1802 he was succeeded by Said, who in bigotry and fanaticism was a true son of his father.

  • Still, as compared with the later Neoplatonists, he is comparatively free from crass superstition and wild fanaticism.

  • But after the beginning of the 5th century the fanaticism of the church could no longer endure the presence of " heathenism."

  • abandoned him to the fanaticism of the Magians, and caused him to be crucified in the capital in the year 276/7.

  • At first he seemed inclined to act with moderation and on lines of constitutional agitation, but soon, carried away by fanaticism, ambition and vanity, he turned to armed organization against the government.

  • On his release, overwrought and weakened by six months spent "in the common gaol and dungeon," he performed what was almost the only and certainly the most pronounced act of his life which had the appearance of wild fanaticism.

  • It is very doubtful whether this was possible, and an impartial historian must take into account the insuperable difficulties encountered by the medieval popes in their efforts to stem the flood of fanaticism.

  • Never was man more free than Latimer from the taint of fanaticism or less dominated by " vainglory," but the motives which now inspired his courage not only placed him beyond the influence of fear, but enabled him to taste in dying an ineffable thrill of victorious achievement.

  • Silesia remained a principal objective of the various contending armies and was occupied almost continuously by a succession of ill-disciplined mercenary forces whose depredations and exactions, accentuated at times by religious fanaticism, reduced the country to a state of helpless misery.

  • The mis-government and financial straits of the country brought on the outbreak of Mussulman discontent and fanaticism which eventually culminated in the murder of two consuls at Salonica and in the "Bulgarian atrocities," and cost Abd-ul-Aziz his throne.

  • He had a settled hatred of fanaticism.

  • Paul of Samosata represented the high-water mark of Christian speculation; and it is deplorable that the fanaticism of his own and of succeeding generations has left us nothing but a few scattered fragments of his writings.

  • In dealing with this outburst of fanaticism many of the princes, both spiritual and secular, displayed vigour and humanity, but Charles saw only in the sufferings of this people an excuse for robbing them of their wealth.

  • But the policy he pursued in turning the crusaders against Constantinople, in order to promote the interests of the republic, while serving to break up the Greek empire, created in its place a Latin state that was far too feeble to withstand the onslaught of Greek national feeling and Orthodox fanaticism; at the same time the Greeks were greatly weakened and their power of resisting the Turks consequently lessened.

  • Their vague pantheism landed them in moral confusion, and many of them were marked by fierce fanaticism.

  • Then came the religious fanaticism of Akhenaton, mutilating all figures of Ammon and all inscriptions containing his name; this made havoc of the exquisite monuments of Hatshepsut; and the restorers of the XIXth Dynasty, refusing to recognize the legitimacy of the queen, had no scruples in replacing her names by those of the associate kings Tethmosis I., II.

  • with the aid of the mob, and by the murder of the beautiful philosopher Hypatia marked the lowest depth to which ignorant fanaticism could descend.

  • The period between the rise of the Abbasids and the quasi-independent dynasties of Egypt was marked by much religious persecution, occasioned by the fanaticism of some of the caliphs, the victims being generally Moslem sectarians.

  • The fellahin, a patient, long-suffering race save when stirred by religious fanaticism, submitted to the kurbash, ~~t~2s freely used by the Turkish and Bashi Bazuk taxfdiahin.

  • While the removal of ancient jealousies among the European powers interested in Egypt helped to smooth the path pursued by the Egyptian administration under the guiding hand of Great Britain, the intrigues of the Turks and movement, the danger of a revival of Moslem fanaticism threatened during 1905-1906 to disturb the peace of the country.

  • This incident inflamed the minds of many Egyptians, and almost all the opposition elements in the country were united by the appeal to religious fanaticism, of which the incident was partly the effect and partly the cause.

  • These sons of poor peasants, artisans or tradesmen are already disposed to narrow fanaticism, and generally take up study as a means of livelihood rather than from genuine religious interest.

  • It draws few students from foreign parts, 2 where the local schools are of the poorest kind, except in India (thanks to a British government) and perhaps in Constantinople., Bokhara was once a chief seat of learning, but is now so sunk in narrow fanaticism that its eighty madrasas (medresses) with their 5000 students only turn out a bigoted and foolish clergy (V5.mbery).

  • The bitter fanaticism of Knox on this point encountered the wiser policy of Lord James and of Lethington.

  • They have never aimed at any social or political revolution, and have been as remarkable for sobriety of conduct as the Munster sect was for its fanaticism (see Mennonites).

  • Political complications arising out of the work of the Arabian mission have been singularly few, a happy circumstance which must be attributed chiefly to the missionaries themselves, whose general opinion is that for a Mahommedan country the Persian Gulf and eastern Arabia are peculiarly free from religious fanaticism.

  • The subordination of reason to a sense of superstitious fanaticism is the keynote of his character, and largely the explanation of his life.

  • There is a ferocity and fanaticism which manifests itself in the belief that war was a sacred campaign of deity against deity.

  • The ignorant fanaticism of the multitude viewed speculative studies with deep dislike and distrust, and deemed any one a Zendik (infidel) who did not rest content with the natural science of the Koran.

  • In the western provinces about Kandahar (amongst the Durani Afghans - the people who claim to be Beni-Israel), and especially in Zamindawar, the spirit of fanaticism runs high, and every other Afghan is a possible Ghazi - a man who has devoted his life to the extinction of other creeds.

  • The Moplahs of Malabar are notorious for repeated outbreaks of bloody fanaticism.

  • by the Brahmanic reaction, a new faith was being born in Arabia, destined to supply a youthful fanaticism which should.

  • By birth a Brahman, and brought up as a slave in Persia, he united the administrative ability of a Hindu to the fanaticism of a renegade.

  • The British army was not ready to act in the hot season, and, despite the single-handed exertions of Lieutenant (afterwards Sir Herbert) Edwardes, this outbreak of fanaticism led to a general rising.

  • Being under the protection of the constitution, and enjoying the advantages of the common law, Catholicism could not meet with any official opposition; such few outbursts of fanaticism as there have been were but temporary or local, and did not represent the true feelings of the country.

  • Phalaris may thus have been one of those men who combine justice and even humanity with religious fanaticism (Suidas, s.v.; Diod.

  • The mind of the nation being so preoccupied with the Covenant, it naturally followed that those who carried their fanaticism farthest were ready to denounce and to unchurch those who showed any inclination to moderation and political sanity, and that the beginnings of schism soon appeared in the ranks of the Covenanters.

  • Finally, no religion has been without exhibitions of fanaticism and excess on the part of its followers, and if the Old Testament itself was the authority for witch-burning among Christians, it is no longer profitable to ask whether the Talmud was responsible for offences committed by or alleged against those whose lives were regulated by it.

  • In cities where many nonM ussulinan subjects, reside a special official is appointed to protect them; and the ministry of justice has a special section to look after them and see that they are protected against fanaticism and injustice.

  • At this time not only was there religious fanaticism at work to stir up the mutual hatred ever existing between Sunni and Shiah, but the intrigue of European courts was probably directed towards the maintenance of an hostility which deterred the sultan from aggressive operations north and west of Constantinople.

  • Many of these found their way to Crete, and becoming porters, &c. in Canea and Candia, were notorious for turbulence and fanaticism.

  • The fanaticism or blind allegiance to his priest.

  • The fanaticism of the clerical and absolutist parties in Portugal (collectively termed apostolicos) was enhanced by recrudescence of Sebastianism.

  • Against superstition, fanaticism and priestcraft they protested unceasingly.

  • The bitter feeling against them in Rumania is not so much due to religious fanaticism as to the fear that if given political and other rights they will gradually possess themselves of the whole soil.

  • The fanaticism of the Meccan is an affair of the purse; the mongrel population (for the town is by no means purely Arab) has exchanged the virtues of the Bedouin for the worst corruptions of Eastern town life, without casting off the ferocity of the desert, and it is hardly possible to find a worse certificate of character than the three parallel gashes on each cheek, called Tashrit, which are the customary mark of birth in the holy city.

  • The very earnestness with which Spener had insisted on the necessity of a new birth, and on a separation of Christians from the world, led to exaggeration and fanaticism among followers less distinguished than himself for wisdom and moderation.

  • and of the fanaticism of the papists in England.

  • His intimacy with foreigners and his imitation of their ways were sufficient to rouse fanaticism and create dissatisfaction.

  • The fanaticism of the people was aroused, and a revolt broke out near the Algerian frontier.

  • In fact, Kashgaria flourished under them, and the fanaticism of Islam was considerably abated.

  • But Locke's hereditary sympathy with the Puritans was gradually lessened by the intolerance of the Presbyterians and the fanaticism of the Independents.

  • But in course of time, as the struggle became embittered, Catholicism itself grew revolutionary; and this twofold fanaticism, Catholic and Protestant, even more than the ambition of the leaders, made the war a ferocious one from the very first.

  • But the parlement soon became disgusted with its alliesthe princes and nobles, who bad only drawn their swords in order to beg more effectively with arms in their hands; and the Parisian mob, whose fanaticism had been aroused by Paul de Gondi, a warlike ecclesiastic, a Catiline in a cassock, who preached the gospel at the daggers point.

  • The promulgation and application of systematic measures from above had a response from below, from the corporation, the urban workshop, and the village street, which supported ecclesiastical and royal authority in its suppression of heresy, and frequently even went further: individual and local~ fanaticism co-operating with the head of the state, the intendants, and the military and judiciary authorities.

  • But the patriotism and the religious fanaticism of the Dutch revolted against this insupportable tyranny.

  • fanaticism, the Jews no longer used the learned Arabic, and translations of the works of Averroes became necessary.

  • The attempt to destroy the sect by force had the result of intensifying its fanaticism.

  • Under the influence of orthodox Berber teachers their fanaticism was turned against the amir himself.

  • Under the stimulus of Berber fanaticism the toleration first shown to the Christians was turned to persecution.

  • A counter fanaticism was aroused in them, and for years the Martyrs of Cordoba continued to force the often reluctant cadis to behead them, by blaspheming the Prophet.

  • The Jews, who had suffered cruelly from the brutal fanaticism of the Almohifdes, had done a great deal to forward the conquest of Andalusia.

  • The fanaticism with which the Mandi had inspired his followers remained almost unbroken to the end.

  • In 1906 a rising attributed to religious fanaticism occurred near Sokoto in which unfortunately three white officers lost their lives.

  • The whole of this region is a well-known hotbed of fanaticism, the headquarters of the Achakzais, the most aggressive of all Durani tribes.

  • He stands squarely in a tradition in which dishonesty and fanaticism merge, in an amalgam which is often not easily separable from insanity.

  • Scorpio characteristics can account for this sign's classic penetrating gaze, the need to nail down concepts, taking extreme points of view and an internal fire that can lead to fanaticism.

  • The list of Soap Opera Digest Award winners is both long and sporadic, as it follows the fanaticism of both daytime and primetime soap opera viewers.

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