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fame

fame

fame Sentence Examples

  • His fame spread widely and rapidly.

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  • But his fame rests mainly on his theological works.

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  • His fame had not been forgotten in the Land of Oz, by any means.

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  • Greifswald is, however, best known to fame by reason of its university.

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  • A kind of jam-cake, called a "Bakewell pudding," gives another sort of fame to the place.

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  • Bacon's fame in popular estimation has always rested on his mechanical discoveries.

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  • In 1857 he became tutor and his fame as a scholar grew rapidly.

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  • It was against them that was broken his invincible will, sweeping away in the defeat the work of Panama, his own fortune, his fame and almost an atom of his honour.

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  • His monastery acquired great fame and became the wealthiest in middle Russia.

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  • But his fame had reached the ears of the papal legate in England, Guy de Foulques, who in 1265 became pope as Clement IV.

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  • But his fame had reached the ears of the papal legate in England, Guy de Foulques, who in 1265 became pope as Clement IV.

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  • Near the village a "wishing well" of ancient fame is seen, and close to it the ruins of a baptistery of extreme antiquity.

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  • Rather than love, than money, than fame, give me truth.

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  • The man who lives for fame, wealth, power, may be satisfied in this life; but he who lives for the ideals of truth, beauty, goodness, lives not for time but for eternity, for his ideals cannot be realized, and so his life fulfilled on this side of the grave.

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  • In accumulating property for ourselves or our posterity, in founding a family or a state, or acquiring fame even, we are mortal; but in dealing with truth we are immortal, and need fear no change nor accident.

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  • Barclay de Tolly tried to command the army in the best way, because he wished to fulfill his duty and earn fame as a great commander.

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  • His scientific fame is based mainly on his encouragement of astronomy.

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  • They talked to me of the age of the wine and the fame of the vintage; but I thought of an older, a newer, and purer wine, of a more glorious vintage, which they had not got, and could not buy.

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  • When Ravenna is taken, and Vitigis carried into captivity, Jordanes almost exults in the fact that "the nobility of the Amals and the illustrious offspring of so many mighty men have surrendered to a yet more illustrious prince and a yet mightier general, whose fame shall not grow dim through all the centuries."

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  • George Armstrong Custer, of "Custer's Last Stand" fame, became a major general at twenty-four.

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  • Owing to the fame of this work, he is mentioned by Dante as the Magister sex principiorum.

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  • In World War II, for instance, the Singer Corporation, of sewing-machine fame, made handguns for the war effort.

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  • Although he wrote poetry, also an anthology of verses on the monasteries of Mesopotamia and Egypt, and a genealogical work, his fame rests upon his Book of Songs (Kitab ul-Aghani), which gives an account of the chief Arabian songs, ancient and modern, with the stories of the composers and singers.

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  • Although he wrote poetry, also an anthology of verses on the monasteries of Mesopotamia and Egypt, and a genealogical work, his fame rests upon his Book of Songs (Kitab ul-Aghani), which gives an account of the chief Arabian songs, ancient and modern, with the stories of the composers and singers.

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  • He was a man of erudition, but he owed his fame chiefly to his personality.

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  • He is associated with the fame of his great contemporary Rab (Abba Araka q.v.).

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  • It is important to observe that in resting the fame of Pheidias upon the sculptures of the Parthenon we proceed with little evidence.

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  • His fame rests upon his exposition of the principles necessary to chemistry as a secience, but of his contributions to analytical inorganic chemistry little can be said.

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  • Thoreau's fame will rest on Walden; or, Life in the Woods (Boston, 1854) and the Excursions (Boston, 1863), though he wrote nothing which is not deserving of notice.

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  • She did attempt to engage an uninterested climber in a conversation about her Great-aunt Annie being one of the founders of the Ouray Woman's Club, back in 1897 and how she helped form the Ouray Library, with her friend, the famous millionaire, of Hope Diamond fame, Tom Walsh.

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  • keeper of the famous library of Alexandria in 247 B.C., and died in that city in 195 B.C. He won fame as having been the first to determine the size of the earth by a scientific method.

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  • But sometimes it was a really noble and inspiring strain that reached these woods, and the trumpet that sings of fame, and I felt as if I could spit a Mexican with a good relish--for why should we always stand for trifles?--and looked round for a woodchuck or a skunk to exercise my chivalry upon.

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  • The question as to whether copper really was first used in Egypt is not yet resolved, and many arguments can be brought against the theory of Egyptian origin and in favour of one in Syria or further north.26 Egypt has also recently been credited with being the inceptor of the whole " megalithic (or heliolithic, as the fashionable word now is) culture " of mankind, from Britain to China and (literally) Peru or at any rate Mexico via the Pacific Isles.27 The theory is that the achievements of the Egyptians in great stone architecture at the time of the pyramid-builders so impressed their contemporaries that they were imitated in the surrounding lands, by the Libyans and Syrians, that the fame of them was carried by the Phoenicians further afield, and that early Arab and Indian traders passed on the megalithic idea to Farther India, and thence to Polynesia and so on so that both the teocalli of Teotihuacan and Stonehenge are ultimately derived through cromlechs and dolmens innumerable from the stone pyramid of Saqqara, built by Imhotep, the architect of King Zoser, about 3100 B.C. (afterwards deified as the patron of science and architecture).

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  • The question as to whether copper really was first used in Egypt is not yet resolved, and many arguments can be brought against the theory of Egyptian origin and in favour of one in Syria or further north.26 Egypt has also recently been credited with being the inceptor of the whole " megalithic (or heliolithic, as the fashionable word now is) culture " of mankind, from Britain to China and (literally) Peru or at any rate Mexico via the Pacific Isles.27 The theory is that the achievements of the Egyptians in great stone architecture at the time of the pyramid-builders so impressed their contemporaries that they were imitated in the surrounding lands, by the Libyans and Syrians, that the fame of them was carried by the Phoenicians further afield, and that early Arab and Indian traders passed on the megalithic idea to Farther India, and thence to Polynesia and so on so that both the teocalli of Teotihuacan and Stonehenge are ultimately derived through cromlechs and dolmens innumerable from the stone pyramid of Saqqara, built by Imhotep, the architect of King Zoser, about 3100 B.C. (afterwards deified as the patron of science and architecture).

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  • Bakewell's fame as a breeder was for a time enhanced by the improvement which he effected on the Long-horned cattle, then the prevailing breed of the midland counties of England.

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  • He was grave and gay, affable and dignified, cruel and gentle, mean and generous, eager for fame yet not vain, impulsive and cautious, secretive and open.

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  • "As soon as Napoleon's interpreter had spoken," says Thiers, "the Cossack, seized by amazement, did not utter another word, but rode on, his eyes fixed on the conqueror whose fame had reached him across the steppes of the East.

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  • Of Mendelssohn's remaining years it must suffice to say that he progressed in fame numbering among his friends more and more of the greatest men of the age.

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  • But among the Greeks themselves the two works of Pheidias which far outshone all others, and were the basis of his fame, were the colossal figures in gold and ivory of Zeus at Olympia and of Athena Parthenos at Athens, both of which belong to about the middle of the 5th century.

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  • The minor importance of his Memoir of John Mason Good (1828) is due to the narrower fame of the subject.

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  • In Arrian's narrative of Alexander's exploits, whose fame had already faded before the greater glory of Rome, there is no mention of the visit or the city or the Jews.

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  • His fame spread at Oxford, though it was mingled with suspicions of his dealings in the black arts and with some doubts of his orthodoxy.

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  • Paphos owes its ancient fame to the cult of the "Paphian goddess" llacNaFavavaa, or 7) IIacaia, in inscriptions, or simply n 8ea), a nature-worship of the same type as the cults of Phoenician Astarte, maintained by a college of orgiastic ministers, practising sensual excess and self-mutilation.'

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  • The contrast between the obscurity of such a man and the fame enjoyed by the fluent young doctors roused Bacon's indignation.

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  • The restaurant's real claim to fame is its tequila.

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  • Their biggest claim to fame is their award winning pizza.

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  • But Samuel's fame rests on the service which he rendered in adapting the life of the Jews of the diaspora to the law of the land.

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  • His great fame as a professor of civil law at the university of Bologna caused Balduinus to be elected podestd of the city of Genoa, where he was entrusted with the reforms of the law of the republic. He died at Bologna in 1225, and has left behind him some treatises on procedure, the earliest of their kind.

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  • Miracles were worked at his tomb, and in 1164 he was canonized and was declared the patron saint of Norway, whence his fame spread throughout Scandinavia and even to England, where churches are dedicated to him.

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  • The works at Vinovo, which had fame in the f 8th century,, came to an untimely end in 1820; those of Castelli (in, Ares the Abruzzi), which have been revived, were supplanted f~t by Charles III.s establishment at Capodimonte, I7~ which after producing articles of surprising execution was closed before the end of the century.

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  • From about 1250 onwards his fame as a preacher spread over all the German-speaking parts of the continent of Europe.

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  • Alembert's fame spread rapidly throughout Europe and procured for him more than one opportunity of quitting the comparative retirement in which he lived in Paris for more lucrative and prominent positions.

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  • Moreover, their children and kindred would benefit by the good name and fame belonging to those who died for the Law.

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  • 1868), became widely known as a philanthropist, and particularly for her generous gifts to American army hospitals in the war with Spain in 1898 and for her many contributions to New York University, to which she gave $250,000 for a library in 1895 and $100,000 for a Hall of Fame in 1900.

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  • his fame as an historian rests, is his Deutsche Geschichte vom Tode Friedrichs des Grossen bis zur Griindung des deutschen Bundes (Leipzig, 18 5418 57, 4 vols.).

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  • Even before this, however, he had shown a strong inclination for natural science, and this had been fostered by his intimacy with a "self-taught philosopher, astronomer and mathematician," as Sir Walter Scott called him, of great local fame - James Veitch of Inchbonny, who was particularly skilful in making telescopes.

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  • But Samuel's fame rests on the service which he rendered in adapting the life of the Jews of the diaspora to the law of the land.

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  • Vico founded no school, and though during his lifetime and for a while after his death he had many admirers both in Naples and the northern cities, his fame and name were soon obscured, especially as the Kantian system dominated the world of thought.

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  • The fame of Boetius increased after his death, and his influence during the middle ages was exceedingly powerful.

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  • The language of Polybius suggests that he was acquainted with other Jewish communities and with the fame of the Temple: in his view they are not an organized state.

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  • Mendelssohn's Phaedo, on the immortality of the soul, brought the author into immediate fame, and the simple home of the " Jewish Plato " was sought by many of the leaders of Gentile society in Berlin.

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  • Parker's consecration was, however, only made legally valid by the plentitude of the royal supremacy; for the Edwardine Ordinal, which was used, had been repealed by Mary and not re-enacted by the parliament of 1559 Parker owes his fame to circumstances rather than to personal qualifications.

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  • The jerk acted drunk with his instant fame.

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  • We tied Doylestown—my one athletic claim to fame.

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  • He vigorously restored Roman Catholicism in his diocese, made no difficulty about submitting to the papal jurisdiction which he had forsworn, and in 1555 began the persecution to which he owes his fame.

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  • While the British were at work in the direction of the Niger, the Portuguese were not unmindful of their old exploring fame.

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  • In June 1835 Airy was appointed Astronomer Royal in succession to John Pond, and thus commenced that long career of wisely directed and vigorously sustained industry at the national observatory which, even more perhaps than his investigations in abstract science or theoretical astronomy, constitutes his chief title to fame.

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  • From Holland, earlier, had proceeded an apologetic work by a man of European fame.

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  • Four years afterwards he made his first appearance as an author with an elegy called Fame's Memorial, or the Earl of Devonshire deceased, and dedicated to the widow of the earl (Charles Blount, Lord Mountjoy, "coronized," to use Ford's expression, by King James in 1603 for his services in Ireland) - a lady who would have been no unfitting heroine for one of his own tragedies of lawless passion, the famous Penelope, formerly Lady Rich.

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  • I will not dissemble the first emotions of joy on the recovery of my freedom, and, perhaps, the establishment of my fame.

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  • Jews no longer attached to the Synagogue, such as the Herschels and Disraelis, attained to fame.

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  • During the Revolution he received yet more help; men were proud to labour for him, and did not murmur because he absorbed all the credit and fame.

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  • Dorset died in 1501, but Wolsey found other patrons in his pursuit of wealth and fame.

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  • Owing to this resolution, and to the jealousy of Hasan Maimandi, who often refused to advance him sufficient for the necessaries of life, Firdousi passed the later portion of his life in great privation, though enjoying the royal favour and widely extended fame.

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  • was the event which brought Desmoulins to fame.

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  • Its proximity to Athens and the islands of the Saronic gulf, the commercial advantages of its position, and the fame of its temple of Asclepius combined to make Epidaurus a place of no small importance.

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  • But many hold that his letters and essays are finer contributions to pure literature, and that on these exquisite mixtures of wisdom, pathos, melody and humour his fame is likely to be ultimately based.

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  • Thus there was an Illyrian tribe Brygi, a Thracian one Bryges; some of the latter had passed into Asia and settled in the land called from them Phrygia, whence some of them later passed into Armenia; some of the Mysians (regarded by Strabo as Thracians) had also crossed into what was later known as Mysia: closely connected with the Mysians were the Dardanii, of Trojan fame, who had a city Dardania or Dardanus.

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  • The severity with which Henry treated the last rebels was regarded as a blot upon his fame; but the only case of merely vindictive punishment was that of the poet Luke de la Barre, who was sentenced to lose his eyes for a lampoon upon the king, and only escaped the sentence by committing suicide.

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  • For the next ten years he lived in various health resorts, in considerable suffering (he declares that the year contained for him 200 days of pure pain), but dashing off, at high pressure, the brilliant essays on which his fame rests.

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  • Omars great scientific fame, however, is nearly eclipsed by his still greater poetical renown, which he owes to his rubais or quatrains, a collection of about 500 epigrams. The peculiar form of the rubaiviz.

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  • At an early age he came to Athens, and was induced to remain by the fame of Socrates, whose pupil he became.

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  • In 1864 he was appointed, by Sella, secretary-general of finance, and after being created senator in 1865, acquired considerable fame as a financial authority.

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  • By these performances Lagrange found himself, at the age of twenty-six, on the summit of European fame.

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  • But despite its fame, the university, though an autonomous corporation, does not seem to have had any fixed residence: the professors lectured in their own houses, or later in rooms hired or lent by the civic authorities.

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  • This was the most distinguished post in the most famous of continental universities, and Dempster was now at the height of his fame.

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  • It was during the period 1841-1849, when he had no legal duty, except the self-imposed one of occasionally hearing Scottish appeals in the House of Lords, that the unlucky dream of literary fame troubled Lord Campbell's leisure.'

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  • But his fame had gone forth throughout Europe, and intimations reached him from many quarters that his voice would be listened to everywhere with favour, in advocacy of the doctrines to the triumph of which he had so much contributed at home.

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  • In 1786 Horne Tooke conferred perpetual fame upon his benefactor's country house by adopting, as a second title of his elaborate philological treatise of "EirEa the more popular though misleading title of The Diversions of Purley.

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  • All this time the pressure of the Turks upon the southern provinces of Hungary had been continuous, but fortunately all their efforts had so far been frustrated by the valour and generalship of the ban of Szoreny, John Hunyadi, the fame of whose victories, notably in 1442 and 1443, encouraged the Holy See to place Hungary for the third time at the head of a general crusade against the infidel.

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  • The Regek, or " Tales of the Past," were published at Buda from 1807 to 1808, and still further increased Kisfaludy's fame; but in his dramatic works he was not equally successful.

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  • d'Alembert, then at the height of his fame, in the hope of finding a career in Paris.

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  • Richelieu was anxious for literary fame, and his writings are not unworthy of him.

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  • The fame of this astronomer and mathematician rests on his work, the Aryabhattiyam, the third chapter of which is devoted to mathematics.

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  • 1007), whose fame rests on a dissertation on amicable numbers, and on the schools which were founded by his pupils at Cordova, Dania and Granada.

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  • His fame has been somewhat obscured by that of his great minister Absalon, whom their common chronicler Saxo constantly magnifies at the expense of his master.

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  • Cecilia, whose musical fame rests on a passing notice in her legend that she praised God by instrumental as well as vocal music, has inspired many a masterpiece in art, including the Raphael at Bologna, the Rubens in Berlin, the Domenichino in Paris, and in literature, where she is commemorated especially by Chaucer's "Seconde Nonnes Tale," and by Dryden's famous ode, set to music by Handel in 1736, and later by Sir Hubert Parry (1889).

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  • Returning to Germany, he became privy councillor to the elector palatine Philip, whom he assisted in bringing the university of Heidelberg to the height of its fame.

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  • His fame was not confined to his own country, for it is said that Voltaire, when challenged to produce a character as perfect as that of Christ, at once mentioned Fletcher of Madeley.

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  • According to this writer Gerbert's fame began to spread over Gaul, Germany and Italy, till it roused the envy of Otric of Saxony, in whom we may recognize Octricus of Magdeburg, the favourite scholar of Otto I., and, in earlier days, the instructor of St Adalbert, the apostle of the Bohemians.

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  • To the Prophecy of Restoration we may fitly apply the words, too gracious and too subtly chosen to be translated, of Renan, "ce second Isaie, dont Fame lumineuse semble comme impregnee, six cent ans d'avance, de toutes les rosees, de tous les parfums de l'avenir" (L'Antechrist, p. 464); though, indeed, the common verdict of sympathetic readers sums up the sentence in a single phrase - "the Evangelical Prophet."

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  • "Il faut avoir de fame pour avoir du gait."

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  • As a politician and statesman, Chesterfield's fame rests on his short but brilliant administration of Ireland.

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  • He accordingly returned in 1871 to England from Italy, where he was studying, and modelled the figures of Shakespeare, Fame and Clio, which were rendered in marble and in bronze.

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  • The " Fame," already mentioned, was shown in 1873.

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  • Antoninus Pius, hearing of his fame, appointed him tutor to his adopted sons Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus.

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  • As a politician Fourier achieved uncommon success, but his fame chiefly rests on his strikingly original contributions to science and mathematics.

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  • Gelo's general rule was mild, and he won fame as the champion of Hellas by his great victory over the Carthaginians at Himera.

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  • It is not surprising when these characteristics of Lamartine's work are appreciated to find that his fame declined with singular rapidity in France.

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  • Pergamum was early distinguished for its medical school; but in this as in other respects its reputation was ultimately effaced by the more brilliant fame of Alexandria.

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  • Among his own countrymen the fame and position of Abulcasis were soon eclipsed by the greater name of Avicenna.

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  • In the case of Laennec himself this qualification takes nothing from his fame, for he studied so minutely the relations of post-mortem appearances to symptoms during life that, had he not discovered auscultation, his researches in morbid anatomy would have made him famous.

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  • Those at St Peter's, Westminster, and St Paul's, attained a fame which has survived, while other similar foundations lapsed, such as St Anthony's (Threadneedle Street, City), at which Sir Thomas More, Archbishop Whitgift and many other men of eminence received education.

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  • This tradition is important in spite of the fact that it first comes clearly before us in a writer belonging to the latter part of the 2nd century, because the prominence and fame of Luke were not such as would of themselves have led to his being singled out to have a Gospel attributed to him.

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  • The fame of Venice in glass-making so completely eclipsed that of other Italian cities that it is difficult to learn much respecting their progress in the art.

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  • Several warriors and wrestlers, hearing of Guru Har Govind's fame, came to him for service.

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  • In the 16th century when the university was at the height of its fame it counted six thousand.

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  • But the fame of these early establishers of Semitic supremacy was far eclipsed by that of Sargon of Akkad and his son, Naram-Sin.

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  • The original Studio Fiorentino was founded in the 14th century, and acquired considerable fame as a centre of learning under the Medici, enhanced by the presence in Florence of many learned Greeks who had fled from Constantinople after its capture by the Turks (1453).

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  • The fame of his vast journeys appears to have made a much greater impression on the laity of his native territory than on his Franciscan brethren.

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  • Popular acclamation made him an object of devotion; the municipality erected a noble shrine for his body, and his fame as saint and traveller had spread far and wide before the middle of the century, but it was not till four centuries later (1755) that the papal authority formally sanctioned his beatification.

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  • A native of Apamea in Syria and a pupil of Panaetius, he spent after his teacher's death many years in travel and scientific researches in Spain (particularly at Gades), Africa, Italy, Gaul, Liguria, Sicily and on the eastern shores of the Adriatic. When he settled as a teacher at Rhodes (hence his surname "the Rhodian") his fame attracted numerous scholars; next to Panaetius he did most, by writings and personal intercourse, to spread Stoicism in the Roman world, and he became well known to many leading men, such as Marius, Rutilius Rufus, Pompey and Cicero.

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  • Linguet received the support of Marie Antoinette; his fame at the time surpassed that of his rival Beaumarchais, and almost excelled that of Voltaire.

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  • Hariri (q.v.) quite eclipsed the fame of his predecessor in this department, and his Maqamas retain their influence over Arabian literature to the present day.

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  • All these histories are more or less thrown into the shade by the great work of Tabari (q.v.), whose fame has never faded from his own day to ours.

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  • Of his numerous works, that on which his fame principally rests is the treatise entitled De Morbis Venereis libri sex, 1736.

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  • A speech, denouncing the projected incorporation of Schleswig and Holstein with Denmark, delivered in the Chamber of Baden on the 6th of February 1845, spread his fame beyond the limits of his own state, and his popularity was increased by his expulsion from Prussia on the occasion of a journey to Stettin.

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  • The fame of this Belad-el-Jerid, or "Country of the Date Palms," was so exaggerated during the r 7th and 18th centuries that the European geographers extended the designation from this small area in the south of Tunisia to cover much of inner Africa.

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  • 227); the epithet Amathusia in Roman poetry often means little more than "Cypriote," attesting however the fame of the city.

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  • Here is situated the Ruhmeshalle or hall of fame, a Doric colonnade containing busts of eminent Bavarians.

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  • After attending the gymnasium of his native town, he studied at Marburg and Heidelberg, and then, attracted by the fame of Liebig, went in 1839 to Giessen, where he became a privatdozent in 1841, and professor of chemistry twelve years later.

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  • When Savonarola returned to Florence in 1490, his fame as an orator had gone there before him.

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  • Even now, when his authority was at its highest, when his fame filled the land, and the vast cathedral and its precincts lacked space for the crowds flocking to hear him, his enemies were secretly preparing his downfall.

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  • It is no detriment to Comte's fame that some of the ideas which he recombined and incorporated in a great philosophic structure had their origin in ideas that were produced almost at random in the incessant fermentation of Saint-Simon's brain.

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  • He announced a course of lectures (1826), which it was hoped would bring money as well as fame, and which were to be the first dogmatic exposition of the Positive Philosophy.

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  • Careless alike of fame and of influence, Tennyson spent these years mainly at Somersby, in a uniform devotion of his whole soul to the art of poetry.

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  • It is from 1842 that the universal fame of Tennyson must be dated; from the time of the publication of the two volumes he ceased to be a curiosity, or the darling of an advanced clique, and took his place as the leading poet of his age in England.

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  • Gradually the Kabuki developed the features of a genuine theatre; the actor and the playwright were discriminated, and, the performances taking the form of domestic drama (Wagoto and Sewamono) or historical drama (Aragoto or Jidaimono), actors of perpetual fame sprang up, as Sakata TOjOrO and Ichikawa DanjinrO (1660-1704).

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  • Amongst these the most famous were Goshun (1742-1811), who is sometimes regarded as one of the founders of the school; Sosen (1757-1821), an animal painter of remarkable power, but especially celebrated for pictures of monkey life; ShhO, the younger brother of the last, also an animal painter; ROsetsu (1755-1799), the best landscape painter of his school; Keibun, a younger brother of Goshun, and some later followers of scarcely less fame, notably Hoyen, a pupil of Keibun; Tessan, an adopted son of Sosen; Ippo and YOsai (1788-1878), well known for a remarkable set of volumes, the Zenken kojitsu, containing a long series of portraits of ancient Japanese celebrities.

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  • But their skill as decorators was as great as its range was wide, and they produced a multitude of masterpieces on which alone Japans ceramic fame might safely be rested.

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  • They still manufacture quantities of tea and coffee sets, and dinner or dessert services of red-and-gold porcelain for foreign markets; but about 1885 some of them made zealous and patient efforts to revert to the processes that won so much fame for the old Kutaniyaki, with its grand combinations of rich, lustrous, soft-toned glazes.

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  • His work on palaeontology shows him the predecessor of all the Scandinavian geologists, and his contributions in this field alone would have been sufficient to perpetuate his fame.

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  • It is clear from the traditions about Lycurgus, for example, that even the Spartans had been a long while in Laconia before their state was rescued from disorder by his reforms; and if there be truth in the legend that the new institutions were borrowed from Crete, we perhaps have here too a late echo of the legislative fame of the land of Minos.

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  • St Herbert's Isle receives its name from having been the abode of a holy man of that name mentioned by Bede as contemporary with St Cuthbert of Fame Island in the 7th century.

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  • Though his fame has become dimmed in comparison with that of Shaftesbury, Russell and Sidney, he was not less conspicuous in the parliamentary proceedings of Charles II.'s reign, and he left a more permanent mark than any of them on the constitutional changes of the period.

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  • 1), and of others less known to fame.

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  • The Order thus reached the highest pinnacle of its fame, and new knights flocked to be enrolled therein from the flower of the nobility of Europe; La Valette refused a cardinal's hat, determined not to impair his independence.

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  • was the most brilliant in Europe, and he was himself well fitted to be the head of the magnificent chivalry that obtained fame in the French wars.

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  • Early in the 'forties the Frenchman Botta, quickly followed by Sir Henry Layard, began making excavations on the site of ancient Nineveh, the name and fame of which were a tradition having scarcely more than mythical status.

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  • These are the three works on which the fame of Hallam rests.

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  • Jacques Bernoulli wrote elegant verses in Latin, German and French; but although these were held in high estimation in his own time, it is on his mathematical works that his fame now rests.

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  • It is, however, his works in pure mathematics that are the permanent monuments of his fame.

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  • de Maupertuis and Alexis Claude Clairaut, whom the fame of the Bernoullis had attracted to Basel.

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  • His fame now rests, however, entirely upon his achievements in mathematics.

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  • His fame as a poet rests upon his patriotic lyrics, which were published by his father under the title Leier and Schwert in 1814.

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  • Arndt's fame rests on his writings.

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  • In the first three centuries of the Christian era Hippo was one of the richest cities in Roman Africa; but its chief title to fame is derived from its connexion with St Augustine, who lived here as priest and bishop for thirty-five years.

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  • Constance owes its fame, not to the Roman station that existed here, but to the fact that it was a bishop's see from the 6th century (when it was transferred hither from Vindonissa, near Brugg, in the Aargau) till its suppression in 1821, after having been secularized in 1803 and having lost, in 1814-1815, its Swiss portions.

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  • From that time his fame as a preacher, which had been steadily growing, may be considered established.

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  • His fame as a reformer brought him to the governor's chair in 1874, and he at once gave his attention to a second set of plunderers - the "canal ring," made up of members of both parties who had been systematically robbing the state through the maladministration of its canals - and succeeded in breaking them up. In 1876 the Democrats nominated him for the presidency, the Republicans nominating Rutherford B.

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  • The more imposing of the two is the Walhalla, a costly reproduction of the Parthenon, erected as a Teutonic temple of fame on a hill rising from the Danube at Donaustauf, 6 m.

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  • The fame of his predecessor was altogether eclipsed.

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  • During the sixteen years of his sway Sweden advanced greatly in fame and prosperity.

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  • Sigurd acquired great fame and riches by slaying the dragon Fafnir, but the chief interest of the story centres round his connexion with the court of the Burgundian king Gunnar (Gunther).

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  • The fame of Erasmus Darwin as a poet rests upon his Botanic Garden, though he also wrote The Temple of Nature, or the Origin of Society, a Poem, with Philosophical Notes (1803), and The Shrine of Nature (posthumously published).

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  • Richard Millikin's song, "The Groves of Blarney" (c. 1798), contributed to the fame of the castle, which is also bound up with the civil history of the county and the War of the Great Rebellion.

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  • The Perkins Institution is memorable for its association with the fame of S.

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  • In 1762, in reply to the attacks on his order, he published an A pologie generale de l'institut et de la doctrine des Jesuites, which won him much fame and some exalted patronage; notably that of the ex-king Stanislaus of Poland and of his grandson the dauphin.

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  • The district has a further fame through Richard Blackmore's novel, Lorna Doone.

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  • Immediately after his return to Paris the war with Prussia broke out, and his conduct during the disastrous year that followed was marked by a devoted heroism which has secured for him an enduring fame.

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  • It was famous in ancient times for its bees, which gathered honey of peculiar flavour from its aromatic herbs; their fame still persists.

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  • He read also the older Church Fathers and soon won for himself fame as a student, whilst his skill in the classics led his friends to hail him as "the undoubted Cicero of our age."

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  • NICOMACHUS, of Thebes, Greek painter, of the early part of the 4th century, was a contemporary of the greatest painters of Greece; Vitruvius observes that if his fame was less than theirs, it_ was the fault of fortune rather than of demerit.

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  • The fame of the martyrs led to the building of a basilica in their honour at Carthage; and their annual commemoration required that the brevity and obscurity of their Acts should be supplemented and explained, to make them suitable for public recitation.

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  • 13) extols his fame for rebuilding the desolate city of Jerusalem and for raising up fresh homes for the downtrodden people.

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  • He took part in the voyage of the Argonauts and in the chase of the Calydonian boar; but his chief fame is in connexion with the expedition of the Seven against Thebes, organized by Adrastus, the brother of his wife Eriphyle, for the purpose of restoring Polyneices to the throne.

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  • The neutrality which had made Palmyra's fortune was abandoned for an active military policy which, while it added to Odainath's fame, in a short time brought his native city to its ruin.

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  • He was also a dramatist, and apart from his prominence as a Jewish Nationalist would have found a niche in the temple of fame.

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  • In 1851 he established his fame as a philologist by The Study of Words, originally delivered as lectures to the pupils of the Diocesan Training School, Winchester.

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  • After this period of formation his fame began to spread abroad, and the monks of a neighbouring monastery induced him to become their abbot; but their lives were irregular and dissolute, and on his trying to put down abuses they attempted to poison him.

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  • In 1832 appeared his Gismonda da Mendrizio, Erodiade and the Leoniero, under the title of Tre nuovi tragedie, and in the same year the work which gave him his European fame, Le Mie prigioni, an account of his sufferings in prison.

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  • It is in the simple narrative and naive egotism of Le Mie prigioni that he has established his strongest claim to remembrance, winning fame by his misfortunes rather than by his genius.

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  • 3 2 -34, 37 (excitement at Capernaum); 3 8, 45 (fame spreads through a wide district); iii.

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  • His sole object, the author says, is to leave for his friends and relations a mental portrait of himself, defects and all; he cares neither for utility nor for fame.

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  • As his fame spread abroad, people came to hear his wisdom, and costly presents were showered upon him.

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  • The fortress-abbey to which Mont St Michel owes its fame stands upon the more precipitous side of the islet towards the north and west, the sloping portion towards the east and south being occupied by houses.

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  • This silly libel so enraged the performers at the Opera that they hanged and burned with him, the Dijon academy, which had founded his fame, announced the subject of "The Origin of Inequality," on which he wrote a discourse which was unsuccessful, but at least equal to the former in merit.

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  • was not indisposed to protect the persecuted when it cost him nothing and might bring him fame, and in Marshal Keith, the governor of Neuchatel,.

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  • There is little doubt that for the last ten or fifteen years of his life, if, not from the time of his quarrel with Diderot and Madame d'Epinay, Rousseau was not wholly sane - the combined influence of late and unexpected literary fame and of constant solitude and discomfort acting upon his excitable temperament so as to overthrow the balance, never very stable, of his fine and acute but unrobust intellect.

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  • The history of the Kentish oyster fisheries goes back to the time of the Roman occupation, when the fame of the oyster beds off Rutupiae (Richborough) extended even to Rome.

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  • Austria is also in a very backward state, in spite of the fame of the Vienna cliniques.

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  • His fame as a clever doctor was now great, and on the 24th of June 1777, the comte d'Artois, afterwards Charles X.

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  • Rivals in fame, they were unlike in accomplishment, each having the quality which the other wanted.

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  • Pradier and Chaponniere, the sculptors; Arlaud, Diday and Calame, the artists; Mallet, who revealed Scandinavia to the literary world; Necker, the minister; Sismondi, the historian of the Italian republics; General Dufour, author of the great survey which bears the name of the "Dufour Map," have each a niche in the Temple of Fame.

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  • His chief title to fame, however, is his pioneering work in the application of the art of photography to astronomical research.

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  • His fame spread, and in 1641 he was appointed chaplain and tutor to Prince Charles.

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  • Lastly, he gained enduring fame by the construction of a road and an aqueduct, which - a thing unheard of before - he called by his own name (Livy ix.

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  • Maurice Goslawski also won fame by his Poems of a Polish Outlaw in the struggle of 1830-1831.

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  • Naturally a fine orator, his new-born zeal gave an edge to his eloquence, and his fame spread abroad.

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  • Much of Holbach's fame is due to his intimate connexion with the brilliant coterie of bold thinkers and polished wits whose creed, the new philosophy, is concentrated in the famous Encyclopedie.

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  • His fame rests chiefly on the preface and notes to his translation of Pufendorf's treatise De Jure Naturae et Gentium.

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  • The work is uncritical and partial, but is his best title to fame.

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  • The presence within half a century of the date of its foundation of such scholars as Justus Lipsius, Joseph Scaliger, Francis Gomarus, Hugo Grotius, Jacobus Arminius, Daniel Heinsius and Guardas Johannes Vossius, at once raised Leiden university to the highest European fame, a position which the learning and reputation of Jacobus Gronovius, Hermann Boerhaave, Tiberius Hem sterhuis and David Ruhnken, among others, enabled it to maintain down to the end of the 18th century.

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  • It is on the Wealth of Nations that Smith's fame rests.

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  • Its fame was due to the tradition that it was the starting-place of the Greek fleet before the Trojan War, the scene of the sacrifice of Iphigenia.

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  • She was so devoted to her sons Tiberius and Gaius that it was even asserted that she was concerned in the death of her son-in-law Scipio, who by his achievements had eclipsed the fame of the Gracchi, and was said to have approved of the murder of Tiberius.

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  • Be it enough for our purpose to say that he thoroughly saturated his mind with the " new learning," first at Oxford, where in 1515 he was admitted to the degree of M.A., and then in Cambridge, where the fame of Erasmus still lingered.

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  • Histoire de la revolution francaise, which founded his literary and helped his political fame.

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  • It is on his skill as a reader of palimpsests that Mai's fame chiefly rests.

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  • His tomb in St Peter's acquired fame for miraculous cures, and he was pronounced blessed by Pius IX.

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  • His fame rests chiefly on his successful wars, in particular his numerous invasions of India.

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  • Acad., 1848) gave him a wider fame; he became in 1849 consulting astronomer to the American Nautical Almanac, and for this work prepared new tables of the moon (1852).

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  • Pierce was not a great statesman, and his fame has been overshadowed by that of Benton, Calhoun, Clay and Webster.

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  • He notes with exultation the 9th of July 1595, as the date of the pseudodiscovery, the publication of which in Prodromus Dissertationum Cosmographicarum seu Mysterium Cosmographicum (Tubingen, 1596) procured him much fame, and a friendly correspondence with the two most eminent astronomers of the time, Tycho Brahe and Galileo.

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  • But the fantastic relations imagined by him of planetary movements and distances to musical intervals and geometrical constructions seemed to himself discoveries no less admirable than the achievements which have secured his lasting fame.

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  • His fame lives in Eastern history as the conqueror who stemmed the tide of Western conquest on the East, and turned it definitely from East to West, as the hero who momentarily united the unruly East, and as the saint who realized in his personality the highest virtues and ideals of Mahommedanism.

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  • The English public first became interested in his works in 1912, and his fame rapidly spread.

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  • On the death of Henri de Villars, archbishop of Vienne, in 1693, he was commissioned to deliver a funeral oration, and this was the beginning of his fame.

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  • There a man wins local fame as an ascetic with abnormal powers, or a wife, because Alcestis-like she sacrificed herself for her husband and immolated herself on his pyre.

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  • Jesus, 0 Lord, of waxing fame full moon, O Jesus.

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  • The present fame of Lourdes is entirely associated with this grotto, where the Virgin Mary is believed in the Roman Catholic world to have revealed herself repeatedly to a peasant girl named Bernadette Soubirous in 1858.

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  • His fame collected round him a host of followers, emulous of his sanctity.

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  • The fame of Cluny spread far and wide.

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  • His treatise on Conics gained him the title of The Great Geometer, and is that by which his fame has been transmitted to modern times.

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  • Balfour was one of the scholars who contributed to spread over Europe the fame of the praefervidum ingenium Scotorum.

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  • They Were Men Of Action, Not Of Words, And Had No Thought Of Literary Fame, But Their Absorbingly Interesting Journals Are None The, Less An Essential Part Of The Literature Of The Country.

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  • But His Fame Rests On Jean Rivard (1874), The Prose Bucolic Of The Habitant.

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  • So in Triumph of Life, 265, "Whom from the flock of conquerors I Fame singled out for her thunderbearing minion," out seems to be due to the compositor.

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  • Sir Herbert Maxwell won great fame by defending his castle of Carlaverock against Edward I.

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  • Sir Murray Maxwell (1775-1831), a naval officer, gained much fame by his conduct when his ship the "Alceste" was wrecked in Gaspar Strait in 1817.

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  • This popular work, which has given him most of his fame, is unfortunately but a second or third hand compilation.

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  • He, however, like his father Alp Arslan, was indebted for his greatest fame to wise and salutary measures of their vizier, Nizam ul-Mulk.

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  • But his greatest military fame was won by a war which, however glorious, was to prove fatal to the Seljuk empire in the future: in conjunction with his ally, the Ayyubite prince Ashraf, he defeated the Khwarizm shah Jalal ud-din near Erzingan (1230).

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  • This feat so pleased the commanderin-chief that he empowered him to raise a regiment of 2000 irregular horse, which became known to fame as Hodson's Horse, and placed him at the head of the Intelligence Department.

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  • Its chief industry is the manufacture of tweeds and fine yarns, which, together with the fame of its medicinal springs, brought the burgh into prominence towards the end of the 18th century.

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  • Venerated and beloved by the greatest and the lowliest, the old hero entered, as it were, into the immortality of his fame while still among his countrymen.

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  • The Order of Fontevrault was founded about 1too by Robert of Arbrissel, who was born in the village of Arbrissel or Arbresec, in the diocese of Rennes, and attained great fame as a preacher and ascetic. The establishment was a double monastery, containing a nunnery of 300 nuns and a monastery of 200 monks, separated completely so that no communication was allowed except in the church, where the services were carried on in common; there were, moreover, a hospital for 120 lepers and other sick, and a penitentiary for fallen women, both worked by the nuns.

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  • Dresden owes a large part of its fame to its extensive artistic, literary and scientific collections.

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  • This last name indicates the general character of Ithacan history (if history it can be called) in modern and indeed in ancient times; for the fame of the island is almost solely due to its position in the Homeric story of Odysseus.

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  • His fame was so completely overshadowed by that of Democritus, who subsequently developed the theory into a system, that his very existence was denied by Epicurus (Diog.

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  • His chief fame, however, rests upon his monumental edition of the New Testament in Greek (4 vols.), which occupied him from 1841 to 1861.

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  • The name of Well Walk recalls them, but their fame is lost.

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  • His fame spread through the kingdom, and students flocked from all parts of Scotland and even beyond, till the class-rooms could not contain those who came for admission.

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  • an abiding title to fame.

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  • The reputation of a greater Maecenas - ascribed to him by his eulogists - dwindles before a sober, critical contemplation, and his undeniable merits are by no means equal to those which fame has assigned to him.

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  • The importance of IIarran was doubtless due not only to its fame as a seat of the Moon-god Sin, honoured also west of the Euphrates, and to its political position, but also to its trade relations.

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  • John balormy y es his name, a man of ful gud fame."

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  • Its fame is due chiefly to its Mysteries, for which see Mystery.

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  • HESYCHASTS (i)avXacrrai or iluvX& ovens, from ajavxos, quiet, also called 6µ0aX61,GvXot, Umbilicanimi, and sometimes referred to as Euchites, Massalians or Palamites), a quietistic sect which arose, during the later period of the Byzantine empire, among the monks of the Greek church, especially at Mount Athos, then at the height of its fame and influence under the reign of Andronicus the younger and the abbacy of Symeon.

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  • His fame, however, rests upon the influence which he exercised over the statesmen of his day.

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