This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

fam

fam Sentence Examples

  • "Churchy la fam," he said smugly.

  • Fam.

  • See Cicero, Ad Fam.

  • 37; Ad fam.

  • (From Owen, after Cuvier.) Fam.

  • D Fam.

  • rudimentary cteni Fam.

  • not having its axis fused Fam.

  • chamber is the notable Fam.

  • They are all pelagic. Fam.

  • (i.) Fam.

  • (iii.) Fam.

  • Cicero, Ad Fam.

  • Appietas) is coined by Cicero (Ad Fam.

  • 2, 139; Cicero, ad Fam.

  • It is sometimes quoted as fam.

  • 1 Fam.i and fam.

  • It is best discussed by Rendel Harris's books, The Origin of the Leicester Codex (1887), The Origin of the Ferrar Group (1893), and The Ferrar Group (1900), all published at Cambridge; the text of fam.'

  • ,Idiv, found in BCL boh., abTOL, found in DX fam.

  • i, fam.

  • P Fam.

  • shell and right mantle-flap Fam.

  • They were fixed by the Fam.

  • Fam 7.

  • Cic. ad Fam.

  • - Fam.

  • ad fam.

  • 12; Cicero, Ad Fam.

  • 2 - His chief works of this kind are: (a) de 1 Fam.

  • Cicero says of this work in a letter (Fam.

  • Cicero says of this work that he has " concentrated in it all his taste " (Fam.

  • Cicero complains that all the jokes of the day were attributed to himself, including those made by very sorry jesters (Fam.

  • Thus, the eighth Book ad Fam.

  • There is an amazingly indiscreet letter of Quintus to his brother's freedman, Tiro, in which he says of the consulselect, Hirtius and Pansa, that he would hesitate to put one of them in charge of a village on the frontier, and the other in that of the basement of a tavern (Fam.

  • On another occasion he jestingly charges Tiro with wishing to have his own letters included in the " volumes " (Fam.

  • That Cicero kept copies of his letters, or of many of them, we know from a passage in which, when addressing a friend who had inadvertently torn up a letter from him, he says that there is nothing to grieve about; he has himself a copy at home and can replace the loss (Fam.

  • Nepos thought that he would have been an ideal historian, but as Cicero ranks history with declamation and on one occasion with great naiveté asks Lucius Lucceius, who was embarking on this task, to embroider the facts to his own credit, we cannot accept this criticism (Fam.

  • Fam.'

  • The most important part of it is that which deals with metres, based on the work of Caesius Bassus, ' See Ep. ad Fam.

  • -{Fam.

  • (ii.) Fam.

  • - Apodina, tail not (i.) Fam.

  • We learn from Cicero (Ad Fam.

  • 24), a history of the Numantine War (Cic. Ad Fam.

  • Fam.: Cricotidae, Permian.

  • "Churchy la fam," he said smugly.

  • It's makes me falter a bit on the 'Churchy la Fam' theory.

  • Powdered Digitalis leaf is occasionally adulterated; the following leaves have been substituted for the true drug: mullein (Verbascum thapsus, fam.

  • DERMATOLOGY Storax is known to be allergenic and to cross react with gum benzoin derived from Styrax L. species (fam.

  • black rust of wheat (Triticum L., fam.

  • pale catechu, which has similar medicinal properties, is derived from the unrelated plant Uncaria gambir Roxb., fam.

  • Pale catechu has properties and uses similar to those of black catechu derived from Acacia catechu Willd., fam.

  • Polygonaceae -- yields wild American red ginseng Withania somnifera Dunal, fam.

  • Since splinters of Australian lancewood (Acacia shirleyi Maiden, fam.

  • var pereirae Harms, fam.

  • var pereirae Harms, fam.

  • See Cicero, Ad Fam.

  • 37; Ad fam.

  • (From Owen, after Cuvier.) Fam.

  • D Fam.

  • rudimentary cteni Fam.

  • not having its axis fused Fam.

  • chamber is the notable Fam.

  • They are all pelagic. Fam.

  • (i.) Fam.

  • (iii.) Fam.

  • Calvus held a correspondence on questions connected with rhetoric, perhaps (if the reading be correct) the commentarii alluded to by Tacitus (Dialogus, 23; compare also Cicero, Ad Fam.

  • Cicero, Ad Fam.

  • Appietas) is coined by Cicero (Ad Fam.

  • 2, 139; Cicero, ad Fam.

  • It is sometimes quoted as fam.

  • 1 Fam.i and fam.

  • It is best discussed by Rendel Harris's books, The Origin of the Leicester Codex (1887), The Origin of the Ferrar Group (1893), and The Ferrar Group (1900), all published at Cambridge; the text of fam.'

  • ,Idiv, found in BCL boh., abTOL, found in DX fam.

  • i, fam.

  • P Fam.

  • shell and right mantle-flap Fam.

  • They were fixed by the Fam.

  • Fam 7.

  • Cic. ad Fam.

  • ad fam.

  • 12; Cicero, Ad Fam.

  • 2 - His chief works of this kind are: (a) de 1 Fam.

  • Cicero says of this work in a letter (Fam.

  • Cicero says of this work that he has " concentrated in it all his taste " (Fam.

  • Cicero complains that all the jokes of the day were attributed to himself, including those made by very sorry jesters (Fam.

  • Thus, the eighth Book ad Fam.

  • There is an amazingly indiscreet letter of Quintus to his brother's freedman, Tiro, in which he says of the consulselect, Hirtius and Pansa, that he would hesitate to put one of them in charge of a village on the frontier, and the other in that of the basement of a tavern (Fam.

  • On another occasion he jestingly charges Tiro with wishing to have his own letters included in the " volumes " (Fam.

  • That Cicero kept copies of his letters, or of many of them, we know from a passage in which, when addressing a friend who had inadvertently torn up a letter from him, he says that there is nothing to grieve about; he has himself a copy at home and can replace the loss (Fam.

  • Nepos thought that he would have been an ideal historian, but as Cicero ranks history with declamation and on one occasion with great naiveté asks Lucius Lucceius, who was embarking on this task, to embroider the facts to his own credit, we cannot accept this criticism (Fam.

  • The more important rules for initial mutation are the following: the soft mutation occurs in a feminine singular noun after the article, thus y fam, " the mother " (radical mam); in an adjective following a feminine singular noun, as in mam dda, " a good mother " (da, " good "); in a noun following a positive adjective, as in hen dd9n, " old man," because this order represents what was originally a compound; in a noun following dy, " thy," and ei, " his," thus dy ben," thy head," ei ben, " his head " (pen," head "); in the object after a verb; in a noun after a simple preposition; in a verb after the relative a.

  • Fam.'

  • The most important part of it is that which deals with metres, based on the work of Caesius Bassus, ' See Ep. ad Fam.

  • (ii.) Fam.

  • - Apodina, tail not (i.) Fam.

  • We learn from Cicero (Ad Fam.

  • 24), a history of the Numantine War (Cic. Ad Fam.

  • Fam.: Cricotidae, Permian.

  • Six of eleven patients who were contact sensitive to balsam of Peru (from Myroxylon balsamum Harms var pereirae Harms, fam.

Browse other sentences examples →