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fallacy

fallacy

fallacy Sentence Examples

  • By the lastnamed he finally exploded a fallacy which had up to that time vitiated the chronology of contemporary Egyptologists.

  • Fallacy >>

  • as have been adduced for this view are, however, based on the fallacy of reading into words (mitra, infula, &c.) used by early writers a special meaning which they only acquired later.

  • It is enough to point out that we have in his work another proof of the multiplicity of the factors which must be taken into consideration by the systematist, and another proof of the fallacy of trusting to one set of characters alone.

  • They were no doubt expelled or absorbed by the Hittites, but we have the proof of their existence and of the fallacy of the statement that the Semite never crossed the Taurus, in the cuneiform tablets written in their language which have been found near Kaisariyeh and are now being published by various scholars.

  • Accordingly, it is a fallacy for any determination of x to consider "x is an x" or "x is not an x" as having the meaning of propositions.

  • This distinction, however, does not exist for science, and indeed the first definition involves a fallacy of which it will be as well to dispose forthwith.

  • The fallacy that Maltese is a dialect of Arabia has been luminously disproved by A.

  • But modern commentators, possessed by the fallacy that Aristotle like a modern author must from the first have comtemplated a whole treatise in a regular order for definite publication, lose themselves in vain disputes as to whether to go by the traditional order of books indicated by their letters and known to have existed as early as the abstract (given in Stobaeus, Ed.

  • Nor does the process of acquiring the premisses of eristical syllogism, which is fallacious either in its premisses or in its process, differ, except that, when the premisses are fallacious, the dialectical interrogations must be such as to cause this fallacy.

  • He accepted the Leibnitzian fallacy that unity is indivisibility, which led to the Leibnitzian analysis of material bodies into immaterial monads, indivisible and therefore unextended, and to the theory of monadic souls and entelechies.

  • He concluded therefore that, having disposed of this fallacy of introjection, we ought to return to the view of reality as an essential co-ordination of ego and environment, of central part and counterpart, with R-values, C-values and E-values.

  • In no case is the evidence of the senses fallacious or mendacious; the fallacy is in the inference.

  • Dealing with the phenomena of interest, he exposes the old fallacy that the rate depends upon the amount of money in a country; low interest does not follow on abundance of money.

  • Fish were supposed to be born in the water without sexual connexion, and on the basis of this old physiological fallacy the Cathars equally with the Catholic framed their rule of fasting.

  • But when men set themselves to cultivate skill in disputation, regarding the matter discussed not as a serious issue, but as a thesis upon which to practise their powers of controversy, they learn to pursue, not truth, but victory; and, their criterion of excellence having been thus perverted, they presently prefer ingenious fallacy to solid reasoning and the applause of bystanders to the consciousness of honest effort.

  • Paradox, however, soon becomes stale, and fallacy wearisome.

  • There will always be adherents of the fallacy that Italy should have attacked through the Trentino, though they are in the main confined to those who do not know the country, or those who have no experience of modern war.

  • How does inference become the source of error and fallacy?

  • S is partially identical with P. In the first the fallacy is the indifferent contingency of the conclusion caused by the non-sequitur from a negative premise to an affirmative conclusion; while the second is either a mere repetition of the premises if the conclusion means " S is like P in being M," or, if it means " S is P," a non-sequitur on account of the undistributed middle.

  • Here there is no syllogistic fallacy in the premises; but the question is what syllogistic conclusion can be drawn, and there is only one which follows without an illicit process of the minor, namely, " Some metals are fusible."

  • To give the name of syllogism to inferences which infringe the general rules against undistributed middle, illicit process, two negative premises, non-sequitur from negative to affirmative, and the introduction of what is not in the premises into the conclusion, and which consequently infringe the special rules against affirmative conclusions in the second figure, and against universal conclusions in the third figure, is to open the door to fallacy, and at best to confuse the syllogism with other kinds of inference, without enabling us to understand any one kind.

  • Hence also induction is a real process, because, when we know that this individual magnet attracts iron, we are very far from knowing that all alike do so similarly; and the question of inductive logic, how we get from some similars to all similars, remains, as before, a difficulty, but not to be solved by the fallacy that inference is identification.

  • Hence the fallacy of those who, like Bosanquet, or like Paulsen in his Einleitung in die Philosophie, represent the realistic theory of inference as if it meant that knowledge starts from ideas and then infers that ideas are copies of things, and who then object, rightly enough, that we could not in that case compare the copy with the original, but only be able to infer from idea to idea.

  • of the fact that in one sense to go beyond what is in the premises is fallacy, Problem of while in another sense not to go beyond them is futility, Inference.

  • If we may pass by the doctrine of the Identity of Indiscernibles, which played a part of some importance in subsequent philosophy, and the Law of Continuity, which as Leibnitz represents it is, if not sheer dogma, reached by something very like a fallacy, Gerhardt, vi.

  • The extreme formalist is guilty of a fallacy of composition in regard to abstraction.

  • He appeals to the direct testimony of consciousness in the sense in which the appeal involves a fallacy.

  • As for the claim that the "Renaissance" delivered men from that blind reliance upon authority which was typical of "medieval" thought, that is a fallacy cherished by those who themselves rely upon the authority of historians, blind to the most ordinary processes of thought.

  • In most of the delusive machines commonly called perpetual motions, of which so many are patented in each year, and which are expected by their inventors to perform work without receiving energy, the fundamental fallacy consists in an expectation that some reciprocating force shall restore more energy than it has been the means of storing.

  • This proof rests, objectively regarded, on a fallacy; for the law, of which the validity is threatened by the doctrine of justification, is that part of the book of the law which demands the observance of all commands, not that which relates anything about Abraham.

  • Yet, as has been already said, he showed his consciousness of the fallacy of his claim by offering to barter it again and again during the course of the war for land or money.

  • He could not have become suddenly blind to the fallacy of the expectations derived from such a course; and all his life it had been his distinction to look above the transient and trafficking expedients of the professional politician.

  • What is possibly not so obvious is the extent to which libertarians have themselves been guilty of a similar fallacy.

  • But Vuk Stefanovich Karajich, a self-taught writer, proved the fallacy of that assumption.

  • If tradition has not misrepresented these paradoxes of time, space and motion, there is in Zeno's reasoning an element of fallacy.

  • Violation of this is the fallacy of " undistributed middle."

  • But his arguments are generally vitiated by the fallacy of assuming what they profess to prove.

  • ad hominem fallacy to impugn the honesty of a critic to avoid his arguments.

  • RESPONSE: Bravo commits the fallacy of false analogy.

  • The fallacy argumentum ad hominem (abusive) supported by unsubstantiated assertions.

  • The ecological fallacy has become a bugbear to frighten people away from interpreting social observations in collective terms.

  • determiner of meaning is the " intentional fallacy.

  • fallacy of that argument.

  • fallacy of dependency theory has been demonstrated by sociologist Peter Berger of Boston University.

  • fallacy of composition ).

  • Joe Cummins has exposed the fallacy of this claim [3] .

  • RESPONSE: Bravo commits the fallacy of false analogy.

  • The work also amply demonstrates the fallacy of that argument.

  • This illustrates the fallacy of treating acute disturbance in this manner.

  • This is why Moore's own view of goodness as sui generis and irreducible is supposed to avoid the naturalistic fallacy.

  • Keywords: Base rate fallacy, Bayes ' theorem, decision making, ecological validity, ethics, fallacy, judgment, probability.

  • Fifth, the whole thing involves the extreme value fallacy.

  • Social engineering fits into the paradigm of the trusted technology fallacy quite well, actually.

  • So the so-called naturalistic fallacy is no fallacy at all.

  • I've always been a big fan of the pathetic fallacy, unlike Ruskin, who coined the term.

  • Ah, the logical fallacy of " You prove it first.

  • A popular expression often used to argue against the view that the author is the determiner of meaning is the " intentional fallacy.

  • The ' ecological fallacy ' is a statement about ' ecological correlation ', not about ecology in itself.

  • fallacy in this argument is that such a treaty is practically unenforceable.

  • The novel shows the falsity of his public image in order to demonstrate the fallacy of the doctrines he pretends to hold.

  • In this report the continued insistence on this test shows the fallacy of judging the system by the wrong mark of efficacy.

  • logical fallacy to me.

  • naturalistic fallacy is no fallacy at all.

  • pathetic fallacy, unlike Ruskin, who coined the term.

  • By the lastnamed he finally exploded a fallacy which had up to that time vitiated the chronology of contemporary Egyptologists.

  • as have been adduced for this view are, however, based on the fallacy of reading into words (mitra, infula, &c.) used by early writers a special meaning which they only acquired later.

  • It is enough to point out that we have in his work another proof of the multiplicity of the factors which must be taken into consideration by the systematist, and another proof of the fallacy of trusting to one set of characters alone.

  • They were no doubt expelled or absorbed by the Hittites, but we have the proof of their existence and of the fallacy of the statement that the Semite never crossed the Taurus, in the cuneiform tablets written in their language which have been found near Kaisariyeh and are now being published by various scholars.

  • From the period of the rediscovery of the catacombs in the 16th century till comparatively recent times a gigantic fallacy prevailed, repeated by writer after writer, identifying the Christian burial-places with disused sand-pits.

  • Accordingly, it is a fallacy for any determination of x to consider "x is an x" or "x is not an x" as having the meaning of propositions.

  • For Ignoratio Elenchi (ignorance of the refutation) see Fallacy.

  • This distinction, however, does not exist for science, and indeed the first definition involves a fallacy of which it will be as well to dispose forthwith.

  • aa4c oXia), in logic, a verbal fallacy arising from ambiguity in the grammatical structure of a sentence (Aristot., Organon, Soph., EL, chap. iv.).

  • The fallacy that Maltese is a dialect of Arabia has been luminously disproved by A.

  • According to Frazer's view, " as time goes on the fallacy of magic becomes more and more apparent and is slowly displaced by religion; in other words the magician gives way to the priest.

  • But modern commentators, possessed by the fallacy that Aristotle like a modern author must from the first have comtemplated a whole treatise in a regular order for definite publication, lose themselves in vain disputes as to whether to go by the traditional order of books indicated by their letters and known to have existed as early as the abstract (given in Stobaeus, Ed.

  • Nor does the process of acquiring the premisses of eristical syllogism, which is fallacious either in its premisses or in its process, differ, except that, when the premisses are fallacious, the dialectical interrogations must be such as to cause this fallacy.

  • He accepted the Leibnitzian fallacy that unity is indivisibility, which led to the Leibnitzian analysis of material bodies into immaterial monads, indivisible and therefore unextended, and to the theory of monadic souls and entelechies.

  • He concluded therefore that, having disposed of this fallacy of introjection, we ought to return to the view of reality as an essential co-ordination of ego and environment, of central part and counterpart, with R-values, C-values and E-values.

  • In no case is the evidence of the senses fallacious or mendacious; the fallacy is in the inference.

  • Dealing with the phenomena of interest, he exposes the old fallacy that the rate depends upon the amount of money in a country; low interest does not follow on abundance of money.

  • Fish were supposed to be born in the water without sexual connexion, and on the basis of this old physiological fallacy the Cathars equally with the Catholic framed their rule of fasting.

  • But when men set themselves to cultivate skill in disputation, regarding the matter discussed not as a serious issue, but as a thesis upon which to practise their powers of controversy, they learn to pursue, not truth, but victory; and, their criterion of excellence having been thus perverted, they presently prefer ingenious fallacy to solid reasoning and the applause of bystanders to the consciousness of honest effort.

  • Paradox, however, soon becomes stale, and fallacy wearisome.

  • There will always be adherents of the fallacy that Italy should have attacked through the Trentino, though they are in the main confined to those who do not know the country, or those who have no experience of modern war.

  • How does inference become the source of error and fallacy?

  • S is partially identical with P. In the first the fallacy is the indifferent contingency of the conclusion caused by the non-sequitur from a negative premise to an affirmative conclusion; while the second is either a mere repetition of the premises if the conclusion means " S is like P in being M," or, if it means " S is P," a non-sequitur on account of the undistributed middle.

  • Here there is no syllogistic fallacy in the premises; but the question is what syllogistic conclusion can be drawn, and there is only one which follows without an illicit process of the minor, namely, " Some metals are fusible."

  • To give the name of syllogism to inferences which infringe the general rules against undistributed middle, illicit process, two negative premises, non-sequitur from negative to affirmative, and the introduction of what is not in the premises into the conclusion, and which consequently infringe the special rules against affirmative conclusions in the second figure, and against universal conclusions in the third figure, is to open the door to fallacy, and at best to confuse the syllogism with other kinds of inference, without enabling us to understand any one kind.

  • Hence also induction is a real process, because, when we know that this individual magnet attracts iron, we are very far from knowing that all alike do so similarly; and the question of inductive logic, how we get from some similars to all similars, remains, as before, a difficulty, but not to be solved by the fallacy that inference is identification.

  • Hence the fallacy of those who, like Bosanquet, or like Paulsen in his Einleitung in die Philosophie, represent the realistic theory of inference as if it meant that knowledge starts from ideas and then infers that ideas are copies of things, and who then object, rightly enough, that we could not in that case compare the copy with the original, but only be able to infer from idea to idea.

  • of the fact that in one sense to go beyond what is in the premises is fallacy, Problem of while in another sense not to go beyond them is futility, Inference.

  • If we may pass by the doctrine of the Identity of Indiscernibles, which played a part of some importance in subsequent philosophy, and the Law of Continuity, which as Leibnitz represents it is, if not sheer dogma, reached by something very like a fallacy, Gerhardt, vi.

  • The extreme formalist is guilty of a fallacy of composition in regard to abstraction.

  • He appeals to the direct testimony of consciousness in the sense in which the appeal involves a fallacy.

  • As for the claim that the "Renaissance" delivered men from that blind reliance upon authority which was typical of "medieval" thought, that is a fallacy cherished by those who themselves rely upon the authority of historians, blind to the most ordinary processes of thought.

  • In most of the delusive machines commonly called perpetual motions, of which so many are patented in each year, and which are expected by their inventors to perform work without receiving energy, the fundamental fallacy consists in an expectation that some reciprocating force shall restore more energy than it has been the means of storing.

  • This proof rests, objectively regarded, on a fallacy; for the law, of which the validity is threatened by the doctrine of justification, is that part of the book of the law which demands the observance of all commands, not that which relates anything about Abraham.

  • Yet, as has been already said, he showed his consciousness of the fallacy of his claim by offering to barter it again and again during the course of the war for land or money.

  • He could not have become suddenly blind to the fallacy of the expectations derived from such a course; and all his life it had been his distinction to look above the transient and trafficking expedients of the professional politician.

  • 4 A strange fallacy arose that this case or sheath was movable.

  • What is possibly not so obvious is the extent to which libertarians have themselves been guilty of a similar fallacy.

  • But Vuk Stefanovich Karajich, a self-taught writer, proved the fallacy of that assumption.

  • More particularly "argument" means a synopsis of the contents of a book, the outline of a novel, play, &c. In logic it is used for the middle term in a syllogism, and for many species of fallacies, such as the argumentum ad hominem, ad baculum, &c. '(see' Fallacy).

  • If tradition has not misrepresented these paradoxes of time, space and motion, there is in Zeno's reasoning an element of fallacy.

  • (b) If the middle term is ambiguous there are really four not three terms. The violation of (a) is the fallacy " Quaternio terminorum "; of (b) " ambiguous middle."

  • Violation of this is the fallacy of " undistributed middle."

  • But his arguments are generally vitiated by the fallacy of assuming what they profess to prove.

  • So our ability to find cause and effect in that—and to really discern fact from fallacy, what's good from what's bad for us—is highly suspect.

  • The sole importance of the crossing of the Berezina lies in the fact that it plainly and indubitably proved the fallacy of all the plans for cutting off the enemy's retreat and the soundness of the only possible line of action--the one Kutuzov and the general mass of the army demanded--namely, simply to follow the enemy up.

  • Another now classic fallacy has been called the illigitimate totality transfer.

  • Part of this comparison fallacy ignores the facts.

  • Thus, the concept of firm breast exercises is a fallacy.

  • As you probably know, spot training is a fallacy.

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