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fairness

fairness Sentence Examples

  • Whatever happened, Dean knew he could count on the sheriff's fairness and honesty.

  • Though, in all fairness, ten years had changed some people enormously.

  • The political trials over which he presided, although they gave rise to numerous accusations against him, were conducted with singular fairness and propriety.

  • Here, too, he published, in 1531, his most important work, the Chronica, Zeitbuch and Geschichtsbibel, largely a compilation on the basis of the Nuremberg Chronicle (1493), and in its treatment of social and religious questions connected with the Reformation, exhibiting a strong sympathy with heretics, and an unexampled fairness to all kinds of freedom in opinion.

  • it is difficult to judge his career with fairness.

  • Martinengo Cesarescos Liberation of Italy (London, 1895) is to be strongly recommended, and is indeed, for accuracy, fairness and synthesis, as well as for charm of style, one of the very best books on the subject in any language; Bolton Kings History of Italian Unity (2 vols., London, 1899) is bulkier and less satisfactory, but contains a useful bibliography.

  • It should, however, in fairness be added that only notorious bloodsuckers, or obstinately resisting noblemen, were destroyed in this way.

  • The policy of the railways was always one rather of extortion than of fairness or of any interest in the development of the country, but better conditions have begun..

  • Editors seemed tc be incapable of rising above the dead level of political strife, anc their utterances were not relieved even by a semblance of fairness Readers turned away in disgust, and journal after journal passe out of existence.

  • If Hallam can ever be said to have deviated from perfect fairness, it was in the tacit assumption that the 19th-century theory of the constitution was the right theory in previous centuries, and that those who departed from it on one side or the other were in the wrong.

  • The Religion of Protestants is characterized by much fairness and acuteness of argument, and was commended by Locke as a discipline of "perspicuity and the way of right reasoning."

  • But by nature he was pre-eminently a diplomatist, and it must in fairness be admitted that his diplomacy in every direction was distinctly beneficial to Poland.

  • Yet all these obstacles to a good understanding might, perhaps, have been surmounted if only the Polish diet had treated the Cossacks with common fairness and common sense.

  • - Fairness forbids us to omit the name of William (or Daniel?) Mace, a Presbyterian minister who published The New Testament in Greek and English, in 2 vols.

  • 5-6) needs rearrangement through their not noticing that, according to Aristotle, reciprocal justice, being the fairness of a commercial bargain, is not part of absolute or political justice, but is part of analogical or economical justice.

  • These works provoked no little criticism on account of the challenge they threw down to the high-church party, but the research and fairness displayed were admitted on all hands.

  • He lacked, moreover, the tact and bonhomie of the Jagiellos; but in fairness it should be added that the Jagiellos were natives of the soil, that they had practically made the monarchy, and that they could always play Lithuania off against Poland.

  • His works are marked by exegetical skill, unusual power of condensation and uniform fairness.

  • There has been some discussion as to the fairness of the treatment accorded by Pascal to his rivals, but no question of the fact that his initiative led to a great extension of our knowledge of the properties of the cycloid, and indirectly hastened the progress of the differential calculus.

  • A show of fairness was indeed necessary to the prosperity of the Magazine.

  • The chancellor, while not discouraging LUderitz, acted with perfect fairness to Great Britain, and throughout 1883 that country might have acted had she known her mind.

  • As was only natural, his studied fairness did not satisfy partisans on either side; and his efforts towards conciliation laid him open to much misunderstanding.

  • His own temper of mind was conservative and somewhat aristocratic, but he guided political development, often under circumstances of great difficulty, with singular fairness and conspicuous magnanimity.

  • Upon the accession of the Republican party to power in 180 r, Madison became secretary of state in Jefferson's cabinet, a position for which he was well fitted both because he possessed to a remarkable degree the gifts of careful thinking and discreet and able speaking, and of large constructive ability; and because he was well versed in constitutional and international law and practised a fairness in discussion essential to a diplomat.

  • After the conquest of Peru by the Spaniards in the 16th century the natives were subjected to much tyranny and oppression, though it must in fairness be said that much of it was carried out in defiance of the efforts and the wishes of the Spanish home government, whose legislative efforts to protect the Indians from serfdom and ill-usage met with scant respect at the hands of the distant settlers and mine-owners, who bid defiance to the humane and protective regulations of the council of the Indies, and treated the unhappy natives little better than beasts of burden.

  • In 1856 he was chosen vice-president of the United States on the Buchanan ticket, and although a strong pro-slavery and states rights man, he presided over the Senate with conspicuous fairness and impartiality during the trying years before the Civil War.

  • His exegesis is superior to that of most of his contemporaries, and his apologetic is marked by fairness of statement, breadth of treatment, and an instinctive appreciation of the difference between important and unimportant points.

  • The orphans court may be held either by the judge of the court of common pleas or by a justice of the supreme court; and it has jurisdiction over controversies respecting the existence of wills, the fairness of inventories, the right of administration and guardianship, the allowance of accounts to executors, administrators, guardians or trustees, and over suits for the recovery of legacies and distributive shares, but it may refer any matter coming before it to a master in chancery.

  • And Gardiner has the defects of his supreme qualities, of his fairness and critical ability as a judge of character; his work lacks enthusiasm, and leaves the reader cold and unmoved.

  • He evinced, as premier of the Cape Colony, the same inability to understand the Uitlanders' grievances, the same futile belief in the eventual fairness of President Kruger, as he had shown when giving evidence before the British South Africa Select Committee into the causes of the Jameson Raid.

  • This submission having been made, Edward acted with honesty and fairness, handing over the adjudication to a body of eighty Scottish and twenty-four English barons, knights and bishops.

  • The modern idea of personality, though with doubtful fairness, helps the change.

  • Justice is administered, on the whole, with fairness and impartiality; but the taxation seems too heavy for the means of the people, indeed it is affirmed by trustworthy natives that the well-to-do classes are being gradually drained of their property.

  • When the British arbitrator appeared on the scene in the beginning of 1872, though compelled to admit the shah's possession of what has been called " Seistan Proper," he could in fairness insist on the evacuation of Nad Ali, Kala Fath, and all places occupied on the right bank by Persian troops; and furthermore he left to the Afghans both sides of the river Helmund from the dam of Kuhak to its elbow west of Rudbar.

  • Whatever happened, Dean knew he could count on the sheriff's fairness and honesty.

  • Swiping at the air, A'Ran couldn't help but feel furious that the Council would protect such civilizations from those that were more advanced out of some sense of fairness while sitting by doing nothing as his planet was overrun and his parents murdered.

  • In all fairness, Lori wasn't out there in the field working with Josh either.

  • Though, in all fairness, ten years had changed some people enormously.

  • Proverbs chapter 16:11 "The Lord demands fairness in every business deal; he sets the standard."

  • In all fairness, he did come home straight away, but then that made me feel worse coz I'd dragged him away.

  • damning indictment of the fairness of our society today.

  • deduction of wages for those working on a commission basis Fairness at Work White Paper: family friendly policies Casual about employe status?

  • In fairness City never gave up hope and never stopped working, with Hoskins and Smith up front being especially deserving of praise.

  • Beyond this, however, the preservation of fairness becomes inconceivable.

  • These figures are a damning indictment of the fairness of our society today.

  • In fairness, they were pretty inoffensive, and as with many Jamaicans knew a lot of the birds.

  • The government had listened to our argument about the fairness of the question and that the question should be not loaded or ambiguous.

  • mistaken notion of fairness.

  • The concept of ' fairness ' is thus somewhat nebulous.

  • Office says west parsons Fairness for Good Drivers Coalition we will take advantage of offered through that organization.

  • procedural fairness is, in general, exemplary.

  • scrupulous fairness.

  • In fairness to both teams these lads do not shirk a tackle, they play for real.

  • In fairness, the English literature on double jeopardy is relatively sparse.

  • Of course we must maintain vigilance that the ethic of fairness does not fade.

  • It is difficult to be sure why the British are so wedded to absolute fairness in the distribution of public services.

  • The political trials over which he presided, although they gave rise to numerous accusations against him, were conducted with singular fairness and propriety.

  • Here, too, he published, in 1531, his most important work, the Chronica, Zeitbuch and Geschichtsbibel, largely a compilation on the basis of the Nuremberg Chronicle (1493), and in its treatment of social and religious questions connected with the Reformation, exhibiting a strong sympathy with heretics, and an unexampled fairness to all kinds of freedom in opinion.

  • it is difficult to judge his career with fairness.

  • Martinengo Cesarescos Liberation of Italy (London, 1895) is to be strongly recommended, and is indeed, for accuracy, fairness and synthesis, as well as for charm of style, one of the very best books on the subject in any language; Bolton Kings History of Italian Unity (2 vols., London, 1899) is bulkier and less satisfactory, but contains a useful bibliography.

  • It should, however, in fairness be added that only notorious bloodsuckers, or obstinately resisting noblemen, were destroyed in this way.

  • The policy of the railways was always one rather of extortion than of fairness or of any interest in the development of the country, but better conditions have begun..

  • In theology he upheld the Arminian against the Calvinist position, but always with courtesy and fairness; his resignation on doctrinal grounds of the superintendency (1768-1771) of the countess of Huntingdon's college at Trevecca left no unpleasantness.

  • Editors seemed tc be incapable of rising above the dead level of political strife, anc their utterances were not relieved even by a semblance of fairness Readers turned away in disgust, and journal after journal passe out of existence.

  • If Hallam can ever be said to have deviated from perfect fairness, it was in the tacit assumption that the 19th-century theory of the constitution was the right theory in previous centuries, and that those who departed from it on one side or the other were in the wrong.

  • The Religion of Protestants is characterized by much fairness and acuteness of argument, and was commended by Locke as a discipline of "perspicuity and the way of right reasoning."

  • But by nature he was pre-eminently a diplomatist, and it must in fairness be admitted that his diplomacy in every direction was distinctly beneficial to Poland.

  • Yet all these obstacles to a good understanding might, perhaps, have been surmounted if only the Polish diet had treated the Cossacks with common fairness and common sense.

  • - Fairness forbids us to omit the name of William (or Daniel?) Mace, a Presbyterian minister who published The New Testament in Greek and English, in 2 vols.

  • 5-6) needs rearrangement through their not noticing that, according to Aristotle, reciprocal justice, being the fairness of a commercial bargain, is not part of absolute or political justice, but is part of analogical or economical justice.

  • These works provoked no little criticism on account of the challenge they threw down to the high-church party, but the research and fairness displayed were admitted on all hands.

  • He lacked, moreover, the tact and bonhomie of the Jagiellos; but in fairness it should be added that the Jagiellos were natives of the soil, that they had practically made the monarchy, and that they could always play Lithuania off against Poland.

  • His works are marked by exegetical skill, unusual power of condensation and uniform fairness.

  • There has been some discussion as to the fairness of the treatment accorded by Pascal to his rivals, but no question of the fact that his initiative led to a great extension of our knowledge of the properties of the cycloid, and indirectly hastened the progress of the differential calculus.

  • A show of fairness was indeed necessary to the prosperity of the Magazine.

  • The chancellor, while not discouraging LUderitz, acted with perfect fairness to Great Britain, and throughout 1883 that country might have acted had she known her mind.

  • As was only natural, his studied fairness did not satisfy partisans on either side; and his efforts towards conciliation laid him open to much misunderstanding.

  • His own temper of mind was conservative and somewhat aristocratic, but he guided political development, often under circumstances of great difficulty, with singular fairness and conspicuous magnanimity.

  • Upon the accession of the Republican party to power in 180 r, Madison became secretary of state in Jefferson's cabinet, a position for which he was well fitted both because he possessed to a remarkable degree the gifts of careful thinking and discreet and able speaking, and of large constructive ability; and because he was well versed in constitutional and international law and practised a fairness in discussion essential to a diplomat.

  • The terrible cruelty at first exercised on the natives was restrained, not merely by the zeal of the missionaries, but by effective official measures; and ultimately home-born Spaniards and Creoles lived on terms of comparative fairness with the Indians and with the half-breed population.

  • After the conquest of Peru by the Spaniards in the 16th century the natives were subjected to much tyranny and oppression, though it must in fairness be said that much of it was carried out in defiance of the efforts and the wishes of the Spanish home government, whose legislative efforts to protect the Indians from serfdom and ill-usage met with scant respect at the hands of the distant settlers and mine-owners, who bid defiance to the humane and protective regulations of the council of the Indies, and treated the unhappy natives little better than beasts of burden.

  • In 1856 he was chosen vice-president of the United States on the Buchanan ticket, and although a strong pro-slavery and states rights man, he presided over the Senate with conspicuous fairness and impartiality during the trying years before the Civil War.

  • His exegesis is superior to that of most of his contemporaries, and his apologetic is marked by fairness of statement, breadth of treatment, and an instinctive appreciation of the difference between important and unimportant points.

  • The author embarks on special pleading in favour of Earl Robert and Bishop Roger of Salisbury, but shows a certain liking for the personal character of Stephen, whose case he states with studious fairness.

  • The orphans court may be held either by the judge of the court of common pleas or by a justice of the supreme court; and it has jurisdiction over controversies respecting the existence of wills, the fairness of inventories, the right of administration and guardianship, the allowance of accounts to executors, administrators, guardians or trustees, and over suits for the recovery of legacies and distributive shares, but it may refer any matter coming before it to a master in chancery.

  • And Gardiner has the defects of his supreme qualities, of his fairness and critical ability as a judge of character; his work lacks enthusiasm, and leaves the reader cold and unmoved.

  • He evinced, as premier of the Cape Colony, the same inability to understand the Uitlanders' grievances, the same futile belief in the eventual fairness of President Kruger, as he had shown when giving evidence before the British South Africa Select Committee into the causes of the Jameson Raid.

  • This submission having been made, Edward acted with honesty and fairness, handing over the adjudication to a body of eighty Scottish and twenty-four English barons, knights and bishops.

  • The modern idea of personality, though with doubtful fairness, helps the change.

  • Justice is administered, on the whole, with fairness and impartiality; but the taxation seems too heavy for the means of the people, indeed it is affirmed by trustworthy natives that the well-to-do classes are being gradually drained of their property.

  • When the British arbitrator appeared on the scene in the beginning of 1872, though compelled to admit the shah's possession of what has been called " Seistan Proper," he could in fairness insist on the evacuation of Nad Ali, Kala Fath, and all places occupied on the right bank by Persian troops; and furthermore he left to the Afghans both sides of the river Helmund from the dam of Kuhak to its elbow west of Rudbar.

  • She has a large, generous sympathy and absolute fairness of temper.

  • "And fairness, of course," he added, "for if the peasant is naked and hungry and has only one miserable horse, he can do no good either for himself or for me."

  • The minimum standard of fairness does not permit a person to be punished twice for the same offense.

  • Every request has to be judged carefully, and that we are doing with scrupulous fairness.

  • In fairness to both teams these lads do not shirk a tackle, they play for real.

  • In fairness, the English literature on double jeopardy is relatively sparse.

  • In addition, impartiality implies fairness, although its application may be trammelled by the overall constraints of adjudication.

  • Of course we must maintain vigilance that the ethic of fairness does not fade.

  • It is difficult to be sure why the British are so wedded to absolute fairness in the distribution of public services.

  • While the IRS is monitoring these more carefully than in the past, it's still not a guarantee of fairness or honesty.

  • Despite that, I gave it a shot in the interest of fairness.

  • Few regulations exist to assure fairness of games or provide checks to insure responsibility of game operators, most of whom operate outside the U.S.. Online gambling is a 24/7/365 activity.

  • GLAAD has spoken up on the news, congratulating Chastity on his brave decision on how going public with it helps by "…advancing discussions about fairness and equality for transgender people."

  • If issues of morality and fairness don't convince you, perhaps the threat of being kicked out of college will.

  • In fairness, it should be noted that to date there have only been approximately nine cases reported out of millions of treats sold, so the actual incident rate is relatively low.

  • In all fairness to our dog, we had over 300 acres and were miles away from any major street.

  • The fairness of the Social Security cost-of-living adjustment, referred to as COLA.

  • In all fairness, whether or not you're a fan of the video game series, the fact that this one is still being played religiously around the world deserves some credit.

  • But in fairness, all the wines drank well.

  • Note, to demonstrate my fairness and neutrality, wineries in surrounding AVAs such as Mt. Veeder, Howell Mountain and others that overlook the Valley are also included.

  • Schools are returning to character education programs, popular in the 1920s and 1930s, where certain virtues such as honesty, fairness, and loyalty, are taught to students along with the regular academic subjects.

  • Concerns about fairness: Parents whose children have different temperaments are sometimes concerned that treating the children differently will be perceived as unfair or unjust.

  • Strive for an overall sense of fairness, but don't let your children get in the habit of expecting total equality.

  • This equals a substitute for an SPF of around five to ten, depending on the fairness of your skin and the time of day.

  • In all fairness, this depends on the date.

  • In all fairness, adults are just as likely to confuse the two as any teenager.

  • She'll strive to strike a balance of fairness in all that she does and will rile against anything she deems to be an injustice.

  • In 2003 and 2004, the FTC passed the Fairness to Contact Lens Consumers and the Contact Lens Rule.

  • He symbolizes balance, fairness, trust and benevolence.

  • To ensure fairness in the hiring process, the previously mentioned physical or cultural attributes are not allowed to enter into the decision making process of hiring for an open position.

  • Many of the original founding values are still important in the organization today, including fairness, honesty, citizenship, courage, and compassion.

  • Many people believe that reality TV in general is outrageous, but plenty of shows manage to keep integrity and fairness in play.

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