Facile sentence example

facile
  • Such was the first conquest of Ireland, a conquest too facile to be secure.

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  • It has been used here in a very facile manner, very arrogantly.

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  • To the west of the Casiquiare there is a much shorter and more facile connexion between the Orinoco and Amazon basins, called the isthmus of Pimichin, which is reached by ascending the Terni branch of the Atabapo affluent of the Orinoco.

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  • It may seem facile to talk, at such a time, about failure being a signpost for future success.

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  • In proportion as such conversion was facile and rapid, it was probably imperfect.

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  • The German dialects were too rough to receive that artistic elaboration under antique influences which had been so facile in Tuscany.

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  • The towns were growing fast, and extending their municipal liberties; the necessities of John and the facile carelessness of Henry led to the grant of innumerable charters and privileges.

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  • This fortunate capture put an enormous advantage in the hands of the English; for John, a facile and selfish prince, was The ready to buy his freedom by almost any concessions.

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  • Such facile metres are called "political," in the sense of "commonplace," "of the city."

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  • I thought that was a pretty facile argument then and I think it is a pretty facile argument now.

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  • Although these may sound rather facile, they probably work well in practice, especially if others do not know they are there.

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  • At first thought, linking soul music with food may seem like a peculiar, if slightly facile, connection.

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  • So it is a little facile to think that the use of modern technology has simply scared the demon off!

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  • This kind of facile observation, however, merely invites a loud raspberry.

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  • Saying that there is no evidence that Jesus claimed divinity can only be managed by ignoring reams of evidence, or by facile dismissal.

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  • It was more profound than anything that facile creation spiritualities have to offer.

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  • The effect, rather than a commendable attempt to resist offering facile explanations, is to glorify the crimes and make them seem acceptable.

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  • One somewhat facile response is that for several research purposes, deep contextual knowledge is not essential.

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  • Thomas de Noronha and Antonio Serrao de Castro, the first a natural and facile writer, the second the author of Os Ratos da Inquisicao, a facetious poem composed during his incarceration in the dungeons of the Inquisition, while Diogo de Sousa Camacho showed abundant wit at the expense of the slaves of Gongorism and Marinism.

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  • A man of literary taste and culture, familiar with the classics, a facile writer of Latin verses' as well as of Ciceronian prose, he was as anxious that the Roman clergy should unite human science and literature with their theological studies as that the laity should be educated in the principles of religion; and to this end he established in Rome a kind of voluntary school board, with members both lay and clerical; and the rivalry of the schools thus founded ultimately obliged the state to include religious teaching in its curriculum.

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  • St Paul was in any case an unusual writer, by no means facile or with ready command of expression; still, he could by an effort express what he wanted, and new situations called up new words and new minor ideas.

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  • But the prevailing opinion is against this conjecture, and sees in these designs the work not of a strenuous student and searcher such as Darer was, but of a riper and more facile hand working in a spirit of settled routine.

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  • Thus, it may be too facile to blame the ' increase ' on a greater popularity of smoking among women.

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  • They can guzzle champagne till it runs from their ears, and become facile to the point of dumbness.

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  • Its facile flow and rhythm seem to adapt it to the expression and illustration of personal feeling.

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  • As a nickname the term "agnostic" was soon misused to cover any and every variation of scepticism, and just as popular preachers confused it with atheism in their denunciations, so the callow freethinker - following Tennyson's path of "honest doubt" - classed himself with the agnostics, even while he combined an instinctively Christian theism with a facile rejection of the historical evidences for Christianity.

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  • His forceful, facile pen gave him great influence from the first; but though a foremost member of several great deliberative bodies, he can fairly be said never to have made a speech.

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  • Unusual bodily vigour enabled him to combine severe devotion to work with facile indulgence in sensual pleasures.

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  • Brissot became known as a facile and able writer, and was engaged on the Mercure, on the Courrier de l'Europe, and on other papers.

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  • The abbe de Chateauneuf instructed him early in belleslettres and deism, and he showed when a child the unsurpassed faculty for facile verse-making which always distinguished him.

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  • When the facile tendency of Arthropoda to develop tracheal air-tubes is admitted, it becomes probable that the tracheae of Hexapods do not all belong to one original system, but may be accounted for by new developments within the group. Whether the primitive tracheal system of Hexapoda was a closed one or open by serial stigmata in every somite remains at present doubtful, but the intimate relation of the system to the wings and tracheal gills cannot be overlooked.

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  • They found a brilliant interpreter in Aeschines, who, after having been a tragic actor and a clerk to the assembly, had entered political life with the advantages of a splendid gift for eloquence, a fine presence, a happy address, a ready wit and a facile conscience.

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  • Since these combinations have often been as illogical as facile, "eclecticism" has generally acquired a somewhat contemptuous significance.

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  • When the source of the name was forgotten its meaning was not unnaturally misinterpreted, and gained for Gawain the reputation of a facile morality, which was exaggerated by the pious compilers of the later Grail romances into persistent and aggravated wrong-doing; at the same time it is to be noted that Gawain is never like Tristan and Lancelot, the hero of an illicit connexion maintained under circumstances of falsehood and treachery.

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  • They lose their facile cleavage and become hard, dark-coloured, slightly lustrous rocks, which have a splintery character or break into small cuboidal fragments.

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