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faber

faber Sentence Examples

  • FABER, Fabri or Fabry (surnamed [[Stapulensis), Jacobus]] [Jacques Lefevre d'Etaples] (c. 1455 - c. 1536), a pioneer of the Protestant movement in France, was born of humble parents at Etaples, in Pas de Calais, Picardy, about 1455.

  • Francis being in captivity after the battle of Pavia (February 25, 1525), Faber was condemned and his works suppressed by commission of the parlement; these measures were quashed on the return of Francis some months later.

  • Faber (Theologian) >>

  • His writings, consisting of short poems, philosophical essays, grammatical notes and letters, were published after his death by his pupil Jacob Faber.

  • Here he came under the influence of Jacobus Faber (Stapulensis), on whose recommendation he was appointed professor in the college of Cardinal Lemoine.

  • The persecuting measures of 1523, from which Faber found a refuge at Meaux, determined Farel to leave France.

  • tion of " Faunae "; 1 but these are so numerous that it Faber's Prodromus der islandischen Ornithologie (8vo, 1822), though the island has since been visited by several good ornithologistsProctor, Kruper and Wolley among them.

  • He won over the Savoyard Pierre Lefevre (Faber), whose room he shared, and the Navarrese Francis Xavier, who taught philosophy in the college of St Barbara.

  • On the 15th of August 1534, the Feast of the Assumption, they assembled in the crypt of the church of St Mary on Montmartre, and Faber, the only one who was a priest, said Mass.

  • He left Paris for Spain in the autumn of 1535, leaving Faber in charge of his companions to finish their studies.

  • During the absence of Ignatius, Faber gained three more adherents.

  • Finding it impossible to keep this part of their vow, the fathers met at Vicenza, where Ignatius was staying in a ruined monastery; and here after deliberation it was determined that he, Laynez and Faber should go to Rome to place the little band at the disposal of the pope.

  • The pope appointed Faber to teach Holy Scripture, and Laynez scholastic theology, in the university of the Sapienza.

  • Manchotnd Richter, Ber., 1906, 39, pp. 320, 488, and also Faber, Abst. ?

  • He received his early education at the famous Latin school of Schlettstadt, and afterwards (1503) went to Paris, where he came under the influence of Jacobus Faber Stapulensis, an eminent Aristotelian.

  • TANNEGUY LEFEBVRE (TANAQUILLUS Faber) (1615-1672), French classical scholar, was born at Caen.

  • This was due to the renewed enthusiasm for, and appreciation of, St Paul with which Erasmus sympathized, and which found an able exponent in England in John Colet and in France in Lefevre of Etaples (Faber Stapulensis).

  • The confession was turned over to a committee of conservative theologians, including Eck, Faber and Cochlaeus.

  • See Faber, Die Hauptand Residenzstadt Konigsberg in Preussen (Konigsberg, 1840); Schubert, Zur 600 jahrigen JubelfeierKonigsbergs (Konigsberg, 1855); Beckherrn, Geschichte der Befestigungen Konigsbergs (Konigsberg, 1890); H.

  • FREDERICK WILLIAM FABER (1814-1863), British hymn writer and theologian, was born on the 28th of June 1814 at Calverley, Yorkshire, of which place his grandfather, Thomas Faber, was vicar.

  • In 1849 a branch of the oratory - subsequently independent - was established in London, first in King William Street, and afterwards at Brompton, over which Faber presided till his death on the 26th of September 1863.

  • It is mainly as a hymn-writer, however, that Faber is remembered.

  • In addition to many pamphlets and translations, Faber published the following works: All for Jesus; The Precious Blood; Bethlehem; The Blessed Sacrament; The Creator and the Creature; Growth of Holiness; Spiritual Conferences; The Foot of the Cross (8 vols., London, 1853-1860).

  • Faber, D.D., by his brother the Rev. F.

  • Faber (London, 1869).

  • Jacobus Faber >>

  • Faber (1847); Mgr.

  • Whatever may have been his private hopes and intentions, it was not until he, Laynez and Faber (Pierre Lefevre), in the name of their companions, were sent to lay their services at the feet of the pope that the history of the Society really begins.

  • On their arrival at Rome the three Jesuits were favourably received by Paul III., who at once appointed Faber to the chair of scripture and Laynez to that of scholastic theology in the university of the Sapienza.

  • Alfonso Salmeron and Pasquier-Brouet, as papal delegates, were sent on a secret mission to Ireland to encourage the native clergy and people to resist the religious changes introduced by Henry VIII.; Nicholas Bobadilla went to Naples; Faber, first to the diet of Worms and then to Spain; Laynez and Claude le Jay to Germany, while Ignatius busied himself at Rome in good works and in drawing up the constitutions and completing the Spiritual Exercises.

  • The council of Trent, in its first period, seemed to increase the reputation of the Society; for the pope chose Laynez, Faber and Salmeron to act as his theologians in that assembly, and in this capacity they had no little influence in framing its decrees.

  • Faber (4 vols., London, 1848-1849); M.

  • Faber, I Zur Hydrographie des Maingebiets (Munich, 1895), and Lill, Mainthal, Main and Mainschiffahrt (Berlin, 1904).

  • Faber, Essay on Beatification, Canonization, &c. (London, 1848); A.

  • The most interesting travels may be found under the names of Felix Faber, Evagatorium (Stuttgart, 1843); de Villamont, Voyages (Arras, 1598); van Kootwyck, Cotovici itinerarium (Antwerp, 1619); R.

  • BASIL FABER (1520 - c. 1576), Lutheran schoolmaster and theologian, was born at Sorau, in lower Lusatia, in 1520.

  • Frederick William Faber >>

  • - The first gas-producers, which were built by Faber du Faur at Wasseralfingen in 1836 and by C. G.

  • Faber are favourable specimens.

  • The conservative theology was becoming discredited, and humanists like Jacques Lefevre of Staples (Faber Stapulensis) and Gerard Roussel were favoured by the court under the influence of Margaret of Angouleme, queen of Navarre and sister of Francis I.

  • It found its first adherents and its first defenders among the clerics and learned men grouped around Faber (Lefvre) of Etaples at Meaux; while Marguerite of Navarre, des Roynes la non.

  • " Practical commonplaceness," says Frederick William Faber in his panegyric of Neri, was the special mark which distinguishes his form of ascetic piety from the types accredited before his day.

  • Faber as superior; in 1854 it was transferred to Brompton.

  • Faber (2 vols., London, 1847); Crispin°, La Scuola di San Filippo Neri (Naples, 1875); F.

  • Faber, Spirit and Genius of St Philip Neri (London, 1850); F.

  • Before the house at Edgbaston was occupied he had established the London Oratory, with Father Faber as its superior, and there (in King William Street, Strand) he delivered a course of lectures on "The Present Position of Catholics in England," in the fifth of which he protested against the anti-Catholic utterances of Dr Achilli, an ex-Dominican friar, whom he accused in detail of numerous acts of immorality.

  • Meticulously researched but eminently approachable, The Faber Book of Twentieth Century German Poems is an essential new addition to any poetry bookshelf.

  • The Unitarian chapel, Ipswich, is located in Friars Street beside the Willis Faber building.

  • novella horses was published in Faber's First Fictions 13 to great critical acclaim.

  • They could certainly run Faber better than the bunch of lefty twats currently in charge!

  • FABER, Fabri or Fabry (surnamed [[Stapulensis), Jacobus]] [Jacques Lefevre d'Etaples] (c. 1455 - c. 1536), a pioneer of the Protestant movement in France, was born of humble parents at Etaples, in Pas de Calais, Picardy, about 1455.

  • Francis being in captivity after the battle of Pavia (February 25, 1525), Faber was condemned and his works suppressed by commission of the parlement; these measures were quashed on the return of Francis some months later.

  • Faber (Theologian) >>

  • His writings, consisting of short poems, philosophical essays, grammatical notes and letters, were published after his death by his pupil Jacob Faber.

  • Here he came under the influence of Jacobus Faber (Stapulensis), on whose recommendation he was appointed professor in the college of Cardinal Lemoine.

  • The persecuting measures of 1523, from which Faber found a refuge at Meaux, determined Farel to leave France.

  • tion of " Faunae "; 1 but these are so numerous that it Faber's Prodromus der islandischen Ornithologie (8vo, 1822), though the island has since been visited by several good ornithologistsProctor, Kruper and Wolley among them.

  • He won over the Savoyard Pierre Lefevre (Faber), whose room he shared, and the Navarrese Francis Xavier, who taught philosophy in the college of St Barbara.

  • On the 15th of August 1534, the Feast of the Assumption, they assembled in the crypt of the church of St Mary on Montmartre, and Faber, the only one who was a priest, said Mass.

  • He left Paris for Spain in the autumn of 1535, leaving Faber in charge of his companions to finish their studies.

  • During the absence of Ignatius, Faber gained three more adherents.

  • Finding it impossible to keep this part of their vow, the fathers met at Vicenza, where Ignatius was staying in a ruined monastery; and here after deliberation it was determined that he, Laynez and Faber should go to Rome to place the little band at the disposal of the pope.

  • The pope appointed Faber to teach Holy Scripture, and Laynez scholastic theology, in the university of the Sapienza.

  • Manchotnd Richter, Ber., 1906, 39, pp. 320, 488, and also Faber, Abst. ?

  • He received his early education at the famous Latin school of Schlettstadt, and afterwards (1503) went to Paris, where he came under the influence of Jacobus Faber Stapulensis, an eminent Aristotelian.

  • TANNEGUY LEFEBVRE (TANAQUILLUS Faber) (1615-1672), French classical scholar, was born at Caen.

  • This was due to the renewed enthusiasm for, and appreciation of, St Paul with which Erasmus sympathized, and which found an able exponent in England in John Colet and in France in Lefevre of Etaples (Faber Stapulensis).

  • The confession was turned over to a committee of conservative theologians, including Eck, Faber and Cochlaeus.

  • See Faber, Die Hauptand Residenzstadt Konigsberg in Preussen (Konigsberg, 1840); Schubert, Zur 600 jahrigen JubelfeierKonigsbergs (Konigsberg, 1855); Beckherrn, Geschichte der Befestigungen Konigsbergs (Konigsberg, 1890); H.

  • FREDERICK WILLIAM FABER (1814-1863), British hymn writer and theologian, was born on the 28th of June 1814 at Calverley, Yorkshire, of which place his grandfather, Thomas Faber, was vicar.

  • In 1849 a branch of the oratory - subsequently independent - was established in London, first in King William Street, and afterwards at Brompton, over which Faber presided till his death on the 26th of September 1863.

  • It is mainly as a hymn-writer, however, that Faber is remembered.

  • In addition to many pamphlets and translations, Faber published the following works: All for Jesus; The Precious Blood; Bethlehem; The Blessed Sacrament; The Creator and the Creature; Growth of Holiness; Spiritual Conferences; The Foot of the Cross (8 vols., London, 1853-1860).

  • Faber, D.D., by his brother the Rev. F.

  • Faber (London, 1869).

  • Jacobus Faber >>

  • Faber (1847); Mgr.

  • 1536), Faber d'Etaples (d.

  • Whatever may have been his private hopes and intentions, it was not until he, Laynez and Faber (Pierre Lefevre), in the name of their companions, were sent to lay their services at the feet of the pope that the history of the Society really begins.

  • On their arrival at Rome the three Jesuits were favourably received by Paul III., who at once appointed Faber to the chair of scripture and Laynez to that of scholastic theology in the university of the Sapienza.

  • Alfonso Salmeron and Pasquier-Brouet, as papal delegates, were sent on a secret mission to Ireland to encourage the native clergy and people to resist the religious changes introduced by Henry VIII.; Nicholas Bobadilla went to Naples; Faber, first to the diet of Worms and then to Spain; Laynez and Claude le Jay to Germany, while Ignatius busied himself at Rome in good works and in drawing up the constitutions and completing the Spiritual Exercises.

  • The council of Trent, in its first period, seemed to increase the reputation of the Society; for the pope chose Laynez, Faber and Salmeron to act as his theologians in that assembly, and in this capacity they had no little influence in framing its decrees.

  • Faber (4 vols., London, 1848-1849); M.

  • Faber, I Zur Hydrographie des Maingebiets (Munich, 1895), and Lill, Mainthal, Main and Mainschiffahrt (Berlin, 1904).

  • Faber, in his additions to Hernandez's work on the Natural History of Mexico (1651),(1651), figures (p. 697) one seen and described by Puteus (Dal Pozzo) at Fontainebleau.

  • de Koninck, Bibliographie nationale brought down to 1880; Biographie rationale de Belgique (1866, &c.) in progress; see also articles by Emile Verhaeren in the Revue des revues (15th June 1896), by Albert Mockel in the Revue encyclopedique (24th July 1897); a collection of criticisms chiefly on Belgian writers by Eugene Gilbert, France et Belgique; etudes litteraires (1905); Frederic Faber, Histoire du theatre francais en Belgique (5 vols., 1878-1880).

  • Faber, Essay on Beatification, Canonization, &c. (London, 1848); A.

  • The most interesting travels may be found under the names of Felix Faber, Evagatorium (Stuttgart, 1843); de Villamont, Voyages (Arras, 1598); van Kootwyck, Cotovici itinerarium (Antwerp, 1619); R.

  • BASIL FABER (1520 - c. 1576), Lutheran schoolmaster and theologian, was born at Sorau, in lower Lusatia, in 1520.

  • Frederick William Faber >>

  • - The first gas-producers, which were built by Faber du Faur at Wasseralfingen in 1836 and by C. G.

  • Faber are favourable specimens.

  • The conservative theology was becoming discredited, and humanists like Jacques Lefevre of Staples (Faber Stapulensis) and Gerard Roussel were favoured by the court under the influence of Margaret of Angouleme, queen of Navarre and sister of Francis I.

  • It found its first adherents and its first defenders among the clerics and learned men grouped around Faber (Lefvre) of Etaples at Meaux; while Marguerite of Navarre, des Roynes la non.

  • " Practical commonplaceness," says Frederick William Faber in his panegyric of Neri, was the special mark which distinguishes his form of ascetic piety from the types accredited before his day.

  • Faber as superior; in 1854 it was transferred to Brompton.

  • Faber (2 vols., London, 1847); Crispin°, La Scuola di San Filippo Neri (Naples, 1875); F.

  • Faber, Spirit and Genius of St Philip Neri (London, 1850); F.

  • Before the house at Edgbaston was occupied he had established the London Oratory, with Father Faber as its superior, and there (in King William Street, Strand) he delivered a course of lectures on "The Present Position of Catholics in England," in the fifth of which he protested against the anti-Catholic utterances of Dr Achilli, an ex-Dominican friar, whom he accused in detail of numerous acts of immorality.

  • Ashley Greene is primarily known for her television roles such as Ann Rappaport in Crossing Jordan and Natalie Faber in Shark.

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