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Extent sentence examples

extent
  • That was the extent of their conversation before Señor Medena cut in.

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  • porreus, is pervaded with a garlic flavour to an equal extent with the last.

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  • How did she assess the extent of betrayal already committed by a man she trusted as an uncle?

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  • The coal beds are of enormous extent, and constitute an important element in the wealth of the state.

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  • Extended body has no limits to its extent, though the power of God has divided it in lines discriminating its parts in endless ways.

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  • People will only contribute to the extent that their most personal information is protected.

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  • Here is life, an experiment to a great extent untried by me; but it does not avail me that they have tried it.

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  • The rate of loss of charge is thus largely dependent on the extent to which ions are present in the surrounding air.

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  • Hannah would be a basket case if she only knew the extent of Katie.s issues!

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  • Such too, to a greater or less extent, is the condition of the operatives of every denomination in England, which is the great workhouse of the world.

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  • To an extent she had even been an accomplice.

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  • While Fred, and to a lesser extent Cynthia, had solved cryptograms in the newspaper, neither were particularly adept at it.

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  • Of course, to an extent, she did.

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  • The latter are to a large extent incorrect.

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  • They have been to some extent restored.

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  • The cities which they founded - Cornus, Tharros, Sulci, Nora, Caralesare all on the coast of the island, and it is doubtful to what extent they penetrated into the interior.

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  • The extent of his wealth was still a mystery.

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  • Would he go to this extent to be granted admittance, even though he might not survive long enough to get whatever it was he came for?

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  • I think to the extent the data is not identifiable to a person and is only used to make suggestions to others, people will participate.

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  • Before describing the process of teaching Helen to speak, it may be well to state briefly to what extent she had used the vocal organs before she began to receive regular instruction in articulation.

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  • It was obvious Donald, and to a lesser extent Dean, would enjoy steeper, longer and more challenging runs.

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  • Every child begins the world again, to some extent, and loves to stay outdoors, even in wet and cold.

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  • The fineness of the hair may perhaps be ascribed to some peculiarity in the atmosphere, for it is remarkable that the cats, dogs and other animals of the country are to 'a certain extent affected in the same way, and that they all lose much of their distinctive beauty when taken from their native districts.

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  • The fingers and toes flow to their extent from the thawing mass of the body.

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  • Toby was silent, knowing a normal Immortal could never understand.  He didn't yet have the full power of a real guardian angel, but he should've been able to do more than … nothing.  Angels were placed with human mothers so they could understand the creatures they were meant to take care of.  Human mothers raised them as their own, yet none of his human mothers had gone to the extent Katie did to try to protect him.

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  • "I don't know the extent of the Others' subversion," Jonny admitted at last.

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  • The cultivation of the vine prevails far more in the province of Cagliari than in that of Sassari, considerable progress having been made both in the extent of land under cultivation and in the ratio of produce to area.

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  • Mossman thinks that the apparent increase at Edinburgh and London in the later decades is to some extent at least real.

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  • Another was the jealousy prevailing in England against the principles of the Roman law on which English equity to a large extent was founded.

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  • During his campaign and his time in office, the extent of the effect of his polio was kept from the public, but the fact he had the disease was commonly known.

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  • To the extent that the Internet is able to increase trade, it increases utility.

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  • Clicking from one spreadsheet to another, she was shocked at the extent of his investments.

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  • In another annual called the Gem appeared the poem on the story of "Eugene Aram," which first manifested the full extent of that poetical vigour which seemed to advance just in proportion as his physical health declined.

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  • The echo is, to some extent, an original sound, and therein is the magic and charm of it.

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  • I'm sure he meant well, but his lecture wasn't what Howie, and to a lesser extent Betsy, wanted to hear.

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  • It was like he had a check list of what parents were supposed to do, and he filled in all the little blocks—middle-class home, straight teeth, and a college education—figured that was the extent of his obligations to us.

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  • If he found out the extent she'd gone to in order to be here with him?

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  • She was to a considerable extent selftaught; and her love of reading made her acquainted first with Plutarch - a passion for which author she continued to cherish throughout her life - thereafter with Bossuet, Massillon, and authors of a like stamp, and finally with Montesquieu, Voltaire and Rousseau.

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  • There was no trail indicating the extent of Sirian's betrayal, no one to reveal his plans but him and the small army holed up near the northern wall.

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  • He'd been ignoring the extent of the power available from the souls for fear of violating the Code, which he now understood was not binding in the face of a threat like Darkyn.

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  • Horses are bred to some extent, while the native race of donkeys is remarkably small in size.

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  • No matter what Katie or Alex said or thought, exploring the extent of his wealth was uncomfortable for her.

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  • It is thus clear that in the Bronze Age Sardinia was fairly thickly populated over by far the greater part of its extent; this may explain the lack of Greek colonies, except for Olbia, the modern Terranova, and Neapolis on the cians.

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  • Likewise for mental illnesses: We should be able to cure them to the extent the person in question would wish them to be.

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  • To some extent, we have this in the form of high taxes on cigarettes, which are seen to have negative externalities, and a home interest deduction on income taxes, as home ownership is viewed as having positive social good.

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  • I needed time to formulate a response to Detective Jackson's questions but I wished I had some idea of the extent of what he knew or had deduced.

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  • Awed by the power she had over him, she began to understand the extent of his solitary existence for the millennia of his life.

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  • I've come to terms over Randy—at least to the extent where I realize I can't do anything about it.

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  • To the extent this world is a meritocracy, the most talented will be the movie star and the least talented will be hauling manure.

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  • This is a force for peace—to the extent that as we share the same set of cultural references, we understand each other better.

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  • To what extent she now identifies objects by their odour is hard to determine.

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  • "And of state interest to some extent," said Prince Andrew.

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  • Others have disgraced themselves to the extent of disobeying sentinels and officers, and have abused and beaten them.

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  • It is easy to see that such conclusions ignore important distinctions, and are, indeed, to a large extent an abuse of language.

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  • and intended to eliminate irregular changes, but they also to some extent eliminate regular changes if the hours of maxima and minima or the character of the diurnal variation alter throughout the year.

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  • All the cities along the Mississippi River had been marked as contaminated to some extent.

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  • Oxen and cows are of secondary importance and the climate is unsuitable for sheep; horses of a small breed are used to some extent.

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  • in extent, 908 ft.

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  • in extent, 212 ft.

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  • To the extent that I get accurate information from other consumers of the product, I will tend to make better choices.

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  • While Martha and Betsy, buoyed by our recent success, were eager to tackle the case, Quinn, not surprisingly, and yours truly to a lesser extent, were hesitant.

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  • The striped (as distinct from the blotched) short-haired tabby is probably the one most nearly allied to the wild ancestors, the stripes being, however, to a great extent due to the European wild cat.

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  • To that extent, the contraption that automatically metes out the daily allotment of cat food for your pet is a robot.

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  • Whilst no small amount of observational work has been done in these new branches of atmospheric electricity, the science has still not developed to a considerable extent beyond preliminary stages.

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  • Even the bison, to some extent, keeps pace with the seasons cropping the pastures of the Colorado only till a greener and sweeter grass awaits him by the Yellowstone.

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  • Ryland looked relieved that the shiner was the extent of his injuries.

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  • The true mushroom itself is to a great extent a dung-borne species, therefore mushroom-beds are always liable to an invasion from other dung-borne forms. The spores of all fungi are constantly floating about in the air, and when the spores of dung-infesting species alight on a mushroom-bed they find a nidus already prepared that exactly suits them; and if the spawn of the new-comer becomes more profuse than that of the mushroom the stranger takes up his position at the expense of the mushroom.

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  • The same evening that the prince gave his instructions to Alpatych, Dessalles, having asked to see Princess Mary, told her that, as the prince was not very well and was taking no steps to secure his safety, though from Prince Andrew's letter it was evident that to remain at Bald Hills might be dangerous, he respectfully advised her to send a letter by Alpatych to the Provincial Governor at Smolensk, asking him to let her know the state of affairs and the extent of the danger to which Bald Hills was exposed.

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  • The Mesozoic beds are limited in extent, the most extensive areas lying around the Gulf of Orosei on the east and west of Sassari in the north.

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  • Two gates, the one of the time of Edward I., the other erected early in the 15th century, overlook the marshes; a third stands at a considerable distance west of the town, its position pointing the contrast between the extent of the ancient town and that of the shrunken village of to-day.

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  • And he was right, to some extent.

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  • The Giddon's had filled the role of family only to an extent.

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  • The extent of the Dark One's powers on his home turf in Hell was beyond anyone's ability to know.

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  • Scarcely any member of the Arabian circle of the sciences, including theology, philology, mathematics, astronomy, physics and music, was left untouched by the treatises of Avicenna, many of which probably varied little, except in being commissioned by a different patron and having a different form or extent.

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  • The trade of the northern and western districts has to some extent been diverted to Salonica since the opening of the railways from that town to Mitrovitza and Monastir.

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  • The early history of the territory comprised within the district of Dharwar has been to a certain extent reconstructed from the inscription slabs and memorial stones which abound there.

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  • The extent of overflow has thus on each occasion been less.

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  • extent, covered in summer with an exuberant vegetable growth, which dies every year.

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  • The climate of Manitoba, being that of a region of wide extent and of similar conditions, is not subject to frequent variations.

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  • With closed stoves much less heat is wasted, and consequ;ntly less fuel is burned, than with open grates, but they often cause an unpleasant sensation of dryness in the air, and the products of combustion also escape to some extent, rendering this method of heating not only unpleasant but sometimes even dangerous.

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  • In districts supplied with soft water, copper should be employed to as large an extent as possible.

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  • The table given below will be useful in calculating the size of the radiating surface necessary to raise the temperature to the extent required when the external air is at freezing point (32° Fahr.): - At the city of Lockport in New York state, America, an interesting example of the direct app of Lockport.

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  • The extent to which the employment of the local preacher is characteristic of Methodism may be seen from the fact that in the United Kingdom while there are only about 5000 Methodist ministers, there are more than 18,000 congregations; some 13,000 congregations, chiefly in the villages, are dependent on local preachers.

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  • The manuscripts had not been arranged or examined, so that the extent of the loss is unknown.

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  • In this way his independence among the people to whom he ministers is to a large extent secured.

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  • Yet even in a church court inequality, generally speaking, is visible to the extent that an elder is not usually eligible for the moderator's chair.

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  • On the whole, the preponderating preference has always been in favour of so-called extemporaneous, or free prayer; and the Westminster Directory of Public Worship has to a large extent stereotyped the form and order of the service in most Presbyterian churches.

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  • The southern basin of Chad is described under the Shari, which empties its waters into the lake about the middle of the southern shore, forming a delta of considerable extent.

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  • Modern reform in Judaism is parting to some extent from this conception, but it still holds good even among the liberals.

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  • Although having a great extent of coast-line, Argentina has but few really good harbours.

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  • This definition unfortunately ignored the fact that the Andes do not run from north to south in one continuous line, but are separated into cordilleras with valleys between them, and covering in their total breadth a considerable extent of country.

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  • No great mountain chain was ever raised by a single effort, and folding went on to some extent in other periods besides those mentioned.

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  • The rocks are mainly basalts and andesites, together with trachytes and phonolites, and some of the basaltic flows are of enormous extent.

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  • of uncultivable area covered by lakes, rivers, towns, &c. Only the roughest estimate is possible as to the sizes of holdings, but in general terms it may be said that about 3 million persons are proprietors of holdings under 25 acres in extent amounting to between 15 and 20% of the cultivated area, the rest being owned by some 750,000 proprietors, of whom 150,000 possess half the area in holdings averaging 400 acres in extent.

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  • Meslin, a mixture of wheat and rye, is produced in the great majority of French departments, but to a marked extent in the basin of the Sarthe.

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  • It is collected in accordance with a register of property (cadastre) drawn up for the most part in the first half of the 19th century, dealing with every piece of property in France, and giving its extent and value and the name of the owner.

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  • In the extent and importance of her colonial dominion France is second only to Great Britain.

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  • His power was formerly of great extent, but he has now practically no important duty to exercise except that of chairman of the Dover harbour board.

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  • The company also owns iron mines, limestone and quartz quarries, large iron-works at Domnarfvet and elsewhere, a great extent of forests and saw-mills, and besides the output of the copper mines it produces manufactured iron and steel, timber, wood-pulp, bricks and charcoal.

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  • We have no information regarding Jerusalem during the period of the captivity, but fortunately Nehemiah, who was permitted to return and rebuild the defences about 445 B.C., has given a fairly clear description of the line of the wall which enables us to obtain a good idea of the extent of the city at this period.

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  • He encouraged learning to the extent of admitting Sir Thomas More into his household, and writing a Latin history of Richard III., which More translated into English.

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  • yvvacKE70v, from yvvi i, woman), that part in a Greek house which was specially reserved for the women, in contradistinction to the "andron," the men's quarters; in the larger houses there was an open court with peristyles round, and as a rule all the rooms were on the same level; in smaller houses the servants were placed in an upper storey, and this seems to have been the case to a certain extent in the Homeric house of the Odyssey.

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  • The Great Barrier Reef forms the prominent feature off the north-east coast of Australia; its extent from north to south is 1200 m., and it is therefore the greatest of all coral reefs.

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  • There is, besides, a powerful determining cause in the uniform character and undivided extent of its dry interior.

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  • Of course, in a territory of such large extent there are many varieties of climate, and the heat is greater along the coast than on the elevated lands of the interior.

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  • A large area of the interior is watered to the extent of 20 to 30 in.

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  • Oysters abound on the eastern coast, and on the shelving banks of a vast extent of the northern coast the pearl oyster is the source of a considerable industry.

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  • There is also to a limited extent a European element present.

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  • At the close of 1905 the area devoted to tillage was 9,365,000 acres, the area utilized for the production of breadstuffs being 6,270,000 acres or over two-thirds of the whole extent of cultivation.

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  • Tasmania is a gold producer to the extent of about 70,000 or 80,000 oz.

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  • Dr Jack, late government geologist of Queensland, considers the extent of the coal-fields of that state to be practically unlimited, and is of opinion that the carboniferous formations extend to a considerable distance under the Great Western Plains.

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  • Kaolin, or porcelain clay, although capable of application to commercial purposes, has not as yet been utilized to any extent, although found in several places in New South Wales and in Western Australia.

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  • About the same time, in the opposite direction, south-west of Sydney, a large extent of the interior was revealed.

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  • long., an extent of half a million square miles, still remained a blank in the map. But the two expeditions of 1873, conducted by William Christie Gosse (1842-1881), afterwards deputy surveyorgeneral for South Australia, and Colonel (then Major) Egerton Warburton, made a beginning in the exploration of this terra incognita west of the central telegraph route.

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  • Forrest and his party safely crossed the entire extent of Western Australia, and entering South Australia struck the overland telegraph line at Peake station, and, after resting, journeyed south to Adelaide.

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  • The search for gold and the quest for unoccupied pasturage daily diminish the extent of these areas.

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  • Immigrants from Europe, and to some extent from North America and China, poured into Melbourne, where the arrivals in 1852 averaged 2000 persons in a week.

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  • In fact, everywhere the demand for goods, especially of those for domestic consumption, fell away; and there was a reduction in the average number of persons employed in the manufacturing industries to the extent of more than 20%.

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  • By this time the duchy had increased considerably in extent, but petty wars with the other Saxon princes combined with the extravagance of the court and the desolation caused by the Seven Years' War to plunge it into distress and bankruptcy.

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  • Mehemet Ali, who was the viceroy of Egypt, owed his position, to a certain extent, to the recommendations made in his behalf to the French government by Mathieu de Lesseps, who was consul-general in Egypt when Mehemet Ali was a simple colonel.

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  • To a certain extent these works embody the more important discoveries of their author.

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  • The number 30 stands obviously in connexion with the thirty days as the average extent of his course until he stands again in conjunction with the sun.

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  • The colony of the Straits Settlements, and to a lesser extent the towns of the Federated Malay States, carry a considerable heterogenous population, in which most of the races of Asia find their representatives.

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  • As minister of religion he was to a certain extent responsible for the concordat which again subjected the schools to the control of the Church: to a certain extent he thereby undid some of his work for the extension of education, and it was of him that Grillparzar said, "I have to announce a suicide.

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  • This grant was confirmed in 1378 when its extent and jurisdiction were defined.

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  • But the most distinguishing features of Fermanagh are the Upper and Lower Loughs Erne, which occupy a great extent of its surface, stretching for about 45 m.

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  • While his treaty with Lord Lyons in 1862 for the suppression of the slave trade conceded to England the right of search to a limited extent in African and Cuban waters, he secured a similar concession for American war vessels from the British government, and by his course in the Trent Affair he virtually committed Great Britain to the American attitude with regard to this right.

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  • 63°, and near the Lindesnaes forms woods of some extent, the trees occasionally acquiring a considerable size.

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  • To what extent he is dependent on these originals, and how far he departed from them, we shall perhaps never know exactly.

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  • It is probable that the wind pressure is not strictly proportional to the extent of the surface exposed.

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  • This is the extent enclosed by the medieval walls; within them are considerable remains of the lofty terrace walls of the Eutruscan period.

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  • This sorting can occur spontaneously to a limited extent; while if we could carry it out as far as we pleased we might transform the whole of the heat of a body into work.

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  • For example, it has often been said that the extent to which their orchestral viola parts double the basses is due, partly to bad traditions of Italian opera, and partly to the fact that viola players were, more often than not, simply persons who had failed to play the violin.

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  • Before that time there was no basin or wet-dock, though the river Medway to some extent answered the same purpose, but a portion of the adjoining salt-marshes was then taken in, and three basins have been constructed, communicating with each other by means of large locks, so that ships can pass from the bend of the Medway at Gillingham to that at Upnor.

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  • Tests of the comparative efficiencies of hydraulic and electric cranes tend to show that, although they do not vary to any very considerable extent with full load, yet the efficiency of the hydraulic crane falls away very much more rapidly than that of the electric crane when working on smaller loads.

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  • This drawback can be corrected to a slight extent by furnishing the hydraulic crane with more than one cylinder, and thus compounding it, but the arrangement does not give the same economical range of load "as in an electric crane.

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  • The only basin of any extent is the Sambhar salt lake, of about 50 m.

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  • battery and to earth alternately, the relative time sender during which it is to battery and to earth depending to a great extent on the operator.

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  • As the direction and intensity of this induced current are a function of the position of the second coil in its field, and as this position is determined by its mechanical connexion with the recorder coil, it is evident that, by a suitable choice of the electrical elements of the second coil and its alternating field, the indications on the siphon recorder can be magnified to any reasonable extent.

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  • So zealously was the work of improvement pursued that within little more than six years of the transfer the aggregate extent of road wires in the United Kingdom was already 63,000 m.

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  • These suggestions were to some extent an anticipation of the work of Reis; but the conditions to be fulfilled before the sounds given out at the receiving station can be similar in pitch, quality and relative intensity to those produced at the transmitting station are not stated, and do not seem to have been appreciated.

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  • Neither of them seemed to recognize anything as important except pitch and amplitude, and Reis thought the amplitude was to some extent obtained by the varying length of contact in the transmitting instrument.

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  • This might possibly be true to a small extent; but, considering the small capacity of the circuits he used and the nature of his receiving instrument, it is hardly probable that duration of contact sensibly influenced the result.

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  • The quality of the sounds was to some extent also reproduced; but, judging from the results of later telephone investigation, it is highly probable that this was due, not to the varying duration, but to the varying firmness of the contact.

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  • currents, and sounds were given out corresponding in pitch, and also to some extent in quality, with the sounds produced at the transmitting station.

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  • The " call-wire " system has been used to some extent, but it is now obsolete.

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  • Particulars of calls are now passed between trunk centres to a great extent over telegraph circuits superposed upon the trunk lines.

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  • Open aerial longdistance lines have also been loaded, but not to the same extent.

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  • The study of telephone economics showed that the proper basis for charging was the " message-mile," on the theory that the user should pay according to the facilities offered and the extent to which he made use of them.

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  • There is no other instance in Europe of a basin of similar extent equally clearly characterized—the perfectly level character of the plain being as striking as the boldness with which the lower slopes of the mountain ranges begin to rise on each side of it.

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  • The narrow strip of coast-land between the Maritime Alps, the Apennines and the sea—called in ancient times Liguria, and now known as the Riviera of Genoa—is throughout its extent, from Nice to Genoa on the one side, and from Genoa to Spezia on the other, almost wholly mountainous.

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  • Besides the lofty central masses enumerated there are two other lofty peaks, outliers from the main range, and separated from it by valleys of considerable extent.

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  • But the Apennines of Central Italy, instead of presenting, like the Alps and the northern Apennines, a definite central ridge, with transverse valleys leading down from it on both sides, in reality constitute a mountain mass of very considerable breadth, composed of a number of minor ranges and groups of mountains, which preserve a generally parallel direction, and are separated by upland valleys, some of them of considerable extent as well as considerable elevation above the sea.

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  • The northern part of Tuscany is indeed occupied to a considerable extent by the underfalls and offshoots of the Apennines, which, besides the slopes and spurs of the main range that constitutes its northern frontier towards the plain of the Po, throw off several outlying ranges or groups.

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  • long by 10 broad; while the Lago Maggiore, notwithstanding its name, though considerably exceeding it in length (37 m.), falls materially below it in superficial extent.

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  • The most important of these, the Lacus Fucinus of the ancients, now called the Lago di Celano, situated almost exactly in the centre of the peninsula, occupies a basin of considerable extent, surrounded by mountains and without any natural outlet, at an elevation of more than 2000 ft.

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  • The only lake properly so called in southern Italy is the Lago del Matese, in the heart of the mountain group of the same name, of small extent.

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  • Thus the great plain of northern Italy is chilled by the cold winds from the Alps, while the damp warm winds from the Mediterranean are to a great extent intercepted by the Ligurian Apennines.

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  • The increased figures may, to a minor extent, be due to better registration, in consequence of the law of 1901.

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  • The, importation has, however, enormously increased since 1882from 164,600 to 1,126,368 tons; while the extent of land devoted to corn cultivation has slightly decreased.

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  • The fields of Tuscany for the most part bear wheat one year and maize the next, in perpetual interchanges, relieved to some extent by green crops.

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  • This has been due to speculation, to the unrestricted pasturage of goats, to the rights which many communes have over the forests, and to some extent to excessive taxation, which led the proprietors to cut and sell the trees and then abandon the ground to the Treasury.

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  • The chief minerals are sulphur, in the production of which Italy holds one of the first places, iron, zinc, lead; these, and, to a smaller extent, copper of an inferior quality, manganese and antimony, are successfully mined.

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  • The industry is chiefly developed in Lombardy, Piedmont and Liguria; to some extent also in Campania, Venetia and Tuscany, and to a less extent in Lazio (Rome), Apulia, Emilia, the Marches, Umbria, the Abruzzi and Sicily.

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  • To some extent the industry also exists in Emilia, Calabria, Basilicata, the Abruzzi, Sardinia and Sicily.

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  • The evening schools have to some extent helped to spread education.

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  • In addition to the regular charitable institutions, the communal and provincial authorities exercise charity, the former (in 1899) to the extent of 1,827,166 and the latter to the extent of 919,832 per annum.

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  • - In 1885, however, rates tended to rise, and though they fell in I 88(they subsequently increased to such an extent as to reach 1IoA at the end of August 1894.

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  • The extent to which communal independence had been maintained in Italy through all the centuries of its political disintegration was strongly in its favor.

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  • The upper classes were still to a large extent inoculated with French ideas, but the common people were either devoted to the dynasty or indifferent.

    0
    0
  • Eritrea has now approximately the same extent as before the revolt of Bath-Agos, except in regard (I) to Kassala, which was transferred to the Anglo-Egyptian authorities on the 25th of December 1897, lfl pursuance of the above-mentioned Anglo-Italian convention; and (2) to slight rectifications of its northern and eastern boundaries by conventions concluded between the Eritrean and the Anglo-Egyptian authorities.

    0
    0
  • 'Shaftesbury, doubtless no friendly witness, speaks of him as .an inveterate liar, "proud, ambitious, revengeful, false, prodigal and covetous to the highest degree," 4 and Burnet supports his unfavourable judgment to a great extent.

    0
    0
  • The chief interest, however, attaching to the Brahmanas is doubtless their detailed description of the sacrificial system as practised in the later Vedic ages; and the information afforded by them in this respect should be all the more welcome to us, as the history of religious institutions knows of no other sacrificial ceremonial with the details of which we are acquainted to anything like the same extent.

    0
    0
  • This feeling was fostered by its many confirmations, and in subsequent ages, especially during the time of the struggle between the Stewart kings and the parliament, it was regarded as something sacrosanct, embodying the very ideal of English liberties, which to some extent had been lost, but which must be regained.

    0
    0
  • This was refused, and although some of the bishops entered a mild protest, the question was allowed to drop. Regarding another matter also, the extent of the royal forests, the prelates made a protest.

    0
    0
  • John and his friends feared lest the inquiry promised into the extent of the hated forest areas would be carried out too rigorously, and that these would be seriously curtailed, if not abolished altogether.

    0
    0
  • This had already been to some extent the practice when this class of cases was heard; it was now made the rule.

    0
    0
  • The hardship of attendance at the county courts was to some extent obviated.

    0
    0
  • When Gotama the Buddha, himself a Kosalan by birth, determined on the use, for the propagation of his religious reforms, of the living tongue of the people, he and his followers naturally made full use of the advantages already gained by the form of speech current through the wide extent of his own country.

    0
    0
  • Sulphur is present to the extent of more than i %, whence the smell of suiphuretted hydrogen when the resin is heated.

    0
    0
  • Amber and certain similar substances are found to a limited extent at several localities in the United States, as in the greensand of New Jersey, but they have little or no economic value.

    0
    0
  • The cotton-wood timber, though soft and perishable, is of value in its prairie habitats, where it is frequently the only available wood either for carpentry or fuel; it has been planted to a considerable extent in some parts of Europe, but in England a form of this species known as P. monilifera is generally preferred from its larger and more rapid growth.

    0
    0
  • In the 19th century the word chymist became altered to chemist, although the original spelling is still continued to a small extent.

    0
    0
  • The latter is often sclerized, especially opposite the phloem, and to a less extent opposite the xylem, as in the stem.

    0
    0
  • The extent of development of the phelloderm is dependent upon whether the phellogen has a superficial or a deep-seated origin.

    0
    0
  • But by the ordinary student of thirty years later their work was to some extent overlooked, and the cell-wall assumed a prominence to which it was not entitled.

    0
    0
  • This method of study has to a large extent modified our ideas of the relative importance of the parts of such an organism as a large tree.

    0
    0
  • The protoplasm is in a condition of instability and is continually breaking down to a certain extent, giving rise to various substances of different degrees of complexity, some of which are again built up by it into its own substances, and others, more simple in composition, are given off.

    0
    0
  • This is not perhaps so evident in the case of axial organs as it is in that of leaves and their modifications, but even in them it can be detected to a certain extent.

    0
    0
  • (2) There must be a supply of water to such an extent as to set up a certain hydrostatic pressure in the cell, for only turgid cells can grow.

    0
    0
  • The extent to which the disturbance spreads depends on the violence of the stimulationit may be confined to a few leaflets or it may extend to all the leaves of the plant.

    0
    0
  • The extent of the area affected and of the variation in the turgor depends upon many circumstances, but we have no doubt that in the process of modifying its own permeability by some molecular change we have the counterpart of muscular contractibility.

    0
    0
  • The various degrees of parasitism are to a certain extent explained by the foregoing.

    0
    0
  • The coriaceous leaves of sclerophyllous plants also, to some extent, are similarly protective.

    0
    0
  • their leaves and, to some extent, their stems have much water-storing tissue and few intercellular spaces.

    0
    0
  • The staining reactions of the various parts of the nucleus depend to some extent upon their chemical constitution.

    0
    0
  • In the yeast cell the nucleus is represented by a homogenous granule, probably of a nucleolar nature, surrounded and perhaps to some extent impregnated by chromatin and closely connected with a vacuole which often has chromatin at its periphery, and contains one or more volutin granules which appear to consist of nucleic acid in combination with an unknown base.

    0
    0
  • A consideration of these regions makes it apparent that they are to a large extent adaptive.

    0
    0
  • There were several early indications of the existence of the great Australian continent, and the Dutch endeavoured to obtain further knowledge concerning the country and its extent; but only its northern and western coasts had been visited before the time of Governor van Diemen.

    0
    0
  • The deviation is of importance in the movement of air, of ocean currents, and to some extent of rivers.3 In popular usage the words " physical geography " have come to mean geography viewed from a particular standpoint rather than any special department of the subject.

    0
    0
  • Opinion still differs as to the extent to which the geographer's work should overlap that of the geologist.

    0
    0
  • If the continuous, unbroken, horizontal extent of land in a continent is termed its trunk,' and the portions cut up by inlets or channels of the sea into islands and peninsulas the limbs, it is possible to compare the continents in an instructive manner.

    0
    0
  • A depression of small extent when steep-sided is termed a " caldron," and a long narrow depression crossing a part of the continental border is termed a " furrow."

    0
    0
  • An elevation of great extent which rises at a very gentle angle from a surrounding depression is termed a " rise," one which is relatively narrow and steep-sided a " ridge," and one which is approximately equal in length and breadth but steep-sided a " plateau," whether it springs direct from a depression or from a rise.

    0
    0
  • An elevation of small extent is distinguished as a " dome " when it is more than 100 fathoms from the surface, a " bank " when it is nearer the surface than 100 fathoms but deeper than 6 fathoms, and a " shoal " when it comes within 6 fathoms of the surface and so becomes a serious danger to shipping.

    0
    0
  • The scarp or steeply inclined slope; this is necessarily of small extent except in the direction of its length.

    0
    0
  • Beryllium to a certain extent stands alone in many of its chemical' properties, resembling to some extent the metal aluminium.

    0
    0
  • In the vicinity of Farnham it contains a bed of "coprolites" of considerable extent and 2 to 15 ft.

    0
    0
  • and the Glockenturm to the E., both of which to a large extent had formed part of the Carolingian palace, were all but destroyed in the fire by which the Rathaus was seriously damaged in 1883.

    0
    0
  • Between them arises a median crest, which varies much in extent and composition, and is of considerable taxonomic value.

    0
    0
  • The extent of the origin of this muscle from the sternum, on which it leaves converging, parallel or diverging impressions, is of some taxonomic value.

    0
    0
  • According to the position of the chief sound-producing membranes, three types of syrinx are distinguishable: - (i) Tracheo-bronchial, by far the commonest form, of which the two others are to a certain extent modifications.

    0
    0
  • The hoactzin, Opisthocomus, feeds to a great extent upon the leaves of the aroid Montrichardia or Caladium arborescens.

    0
    0
  • It is therefore just as much the business of the zoogeographer, who wishes to arrive at the truth, to ascertain what groups of animals are wanting in any particular locality (altogether independently of its extent) as to determine those which are forthcoming there.

    0
    0
  • Its extent is so vast that it necessarily contains some peculiar, outlying forms, so to say forgotten, which in their long-continued isolation have specialized themselves.

    0
    0
  • In the wars he carried on with the Turks during nearly the whole of his reign, his successes were numerous, and he acquired, or regained, a large extent of territory.

    0
    0
  • But this very development of Mosaism implies the existence of an original nucleus or substratum, although the recovery of its precise extent is very difficult.

    0
    0
  • (2) If, however, the worshipper place his god on a level with himself, so far at any rate as to make him to some extent dependent on the service man contracts to render him, then genuine prayer tends to be replaced by a mere bargaining, often conjoined with flattery and with insincere promises.

    0
    0
  • It has a hot, humid climate, relieved to some extent by the south-east trade winds.

    0
    0
  • Mangabeira rubber is collected to a limited extent, and piassava fibre is an article of export.

    0
    0
  • and printed editions to a greater or less extent.

    0
    0
  • Their literature, with which alone we are here concerned, is largely polemical and to a great extent deals with grammar and exegesis.

    0
    0
  • From this point downward, and to some extent above this as far as Samawa, the river forms a succession of reedy lagoons of the most hopeless character, the Paludes Chaldaici of antiquity, el Batihat of the Arabs.

    0
    0
  • This reproach was subsequently to a great extent removed by his own labours.

    0
    0
  • The Norman settler in Wales, therefore, did not to any perceptible extent become a Welshman; the existing relations of England and Wales were such that he in the end became an Englishman, but he seems not unnaturally to have been somewhat slower in so doing in Wales than he was in England.

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    0
  • Indigenous palms grow in the valleys of the Sierra Jose Ignacio, also to some extent in the departments of Minas, Maldonado and Paysandu.

    0
    0
  • Minerals are known to exist in the northern section of the republic, and gold-mining is carried on to a small extent.

    0
    0
  • The element is of extremely rare occurrence, being met with only in argyrodite and, to a very small extent, in euxenite.

    0
    0
  • Some of the most important deposits of sulphur in the world are worked in Sicily, chiefly in the provinces of Caltanisetta and Girgenti, as at Racalmuto and Cattolica; and to a less extent in the provinces of Catania, Palermo (Lercara) and Trapani (Gibellina).

    0
    0
  • The state capitol stands in a square 8 acres in extent, and has a central tower and dome 240 ft.

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    0
  • Diamonds have been found, but only to a very limited extent.

    0
    0
  • This was what the later nobility of Rome was always striving at, and what they did to a great extent practically establish.

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    0
  • From this purest type of nobility, as seen in the aristocratic commonwealths, we may pass to nobility as seen in states of greater extent - that is, for the most part in monarchies.

    0
    0
  • Stories like these prove even more than the real rise of Hagano and Eadric. In England the nobility of the thegns was to a great extent personally displaced, so to speak, by the results of the Norman Conquest.

    0
    0
  • Once more, it must be borne in mind that, while it is essential to the idea of nobility that it should carry with it some hereditary privilege, the nature and extent of that privilege may vary endlessly.

    0
    0
  • Poland, in short, came nearer than any kingdom or country of large extent to the nature of an aristocracy, as we have seen aristocracy in the aristocratic cities.

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    0
  • These works formed to a large extent the source from which the middle ages derived their knowledge of Aristotle.

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    0
  • Order is maintained in Liberia to some extent by a militia.

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    0
  • friendly relations are maintained with Spain, as the Spanish plantations in Fernando Po are to a great extent worked by Liberian labour.

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    0
  • Thomas' great rival, Duns Scotus, does this to a large extent, at times affirming " two truths."

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    0
  • The town was strongly fortified by medieval walls, which have to some extent been demolished.

    0
    0
  • and S., be left out of account, a striking uniformity of physical feature prevails throughout the whole vast extent of the Russian empire.

    0
    0
  • This desert is now filled to only a small extent by the salt waters of the Caspian, Aral and Balkash inland seas; but it bears unmistakable traces of having been during Post-Pliocene times an immense inland basin.

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    0
  • Russia of much less extent than that assigned to them by Murchison.

    0
    0
  • The Atlantic cyclones penetrate to the Russian plains, mitigating to some extent the cold of winter, and in summer bringing with them their moist winds and thunderstorms. Their influence is chiefly felt in W.

    0
    0
  • of this line the forests are of great extent and densely grown, more frequently diversified by marshes than by meadows or cultivated fields.

    0
    0
  • The White Russians, intermingled to some extent with Great and Little Russians, Poles and Lithuanians, occupy the upper parts of the W.

    0
    0
  • of the Gulf of Finland, in the region of the Livs and Kurs, where they fused to some extent with the Lithuanians and the Letts.

    0
    0
  • Considerable numbers of Germans, tradesmen and artisans, settled at the invitation of the Russian government in many of the larger towns as early as the 16th century, and to a much greater extent in the 18th century.

    0
    0
  • The Tatars, Bashkirs and Kirghiz are Mahommedans; but the last-named have to a great extent maintained along with Mahommedanism their old Shamanism.

    0
    0
  • 1 The restrictions on domicile were to some extent relaxed in the beginning of 1907.

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    0
  • Finally, a great number of artels on the stock exchange, in the seaports, in the great cities, during the great fairs and on railways have grown up, and have acquired the confidence of tradespeople to such an extent that considerable sums of money and complicated banking operations are frequently handed over to an artelshik (member of an artel) without any receipt, his number or his name being accepted as sufficient guarantee.

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    0
  • Having thus gained the support of a large majority of the landed proprietors and the ecclesiastics, Boris Godunov increased his influence to such an extent that on the Boris death of Tsar Feodor without male issue in 1598 he Godunov, was elected his successor by a Great National Assembly.

    0
    0
  • During the reign of Michael (1613-45) the new dynasty came to be accepted by all classes, and the country recovered to some extent from the disorders and exhaustion -4 f r om which it had suffered so severely; but it was not 1613-45.

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    0
  • This method of construction, however, has been adopted only to a very limited extent.

    0
    0
  • In Great Britain, Germany and France, at least 90% of the wooden sleepers are " treated " before they are laid, to ii.crease their resistance to decay, and the same practice is followed to some extent in other European countries.

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    0
  • some extent in France and India, the rails have rounded bases and are supported by being wedged, with wooden keys, in castiron chairs which are bolted to the sleepers.

    0
    0
  • The Stephenson link motion is used almost universally in England and America, but it has gradually been displaced by the Walschaert gear on the continent of Europe, and to some extent in England by the Joy gear.

    0
    0
  • 7 hose conditions are to a certain extent mutually antagonistic, since an engine designed to satisfy either condition independently of the other R euld Le a different engine from that designed to make the best ccmpromise between them.

    0
    0
  • due to the two cylinders is variable to a greater or less extent, depending upon the degree of expansion in the cylinders and the speed.

    0
    0
  • Coal-saving can be shown to the extent of about 1% in some cases, but the saving depends upon the kind of service on which the engine is employed.

    0
    0
  • Used to some extent in France and Germany and considerably in England for passenger traffic of moderate weight.

    0
    0
  • It is used to a limited extent both in Great Britain and on the continent of Europe, but is much more common in America.

    0
    0
  • It is used to a limited extent for mountain-grade goods traffic, and has the advantage over the " Consolidation " or eight-coupled type of lighter axle loads for a given tractive capacity.

    0
    0
  • When the service is frequent enough to give a good power factor continuously, the steam locomotive cannot compete with the electric motor for the purpose of quick acceleration, because the motors applied to the axles of a train may for a short time absorb power from the central station to an extent far in excess of anything which a locomotive boiler can supply.

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    0
  • To some extent cars divided into separate compartments are also in use in that country.

    0
    0
  • In addition the increased size of the American freight car has diminished the interest on the first cost and the expenses of maintenance relatively to the work done; it has diminished to some extent the amount.

    0
    0
  • in extent, characterized by wholly interior drainage, a peculiar mountain system and extreme aridity.

    0
    0
  • To a great extent the idea had been modified already.

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    0
  • Lafone, a wealthy cattle and hide merchant on the river Plate, obtained from government a grant of the southern portion of the island, a peninsula 600,000 acres in extent, and possession of all the wild cattle on the island for a period of six years, for a payment of £10,000 down, and £20,000 in ten years from January 1, 1852.

    0
    0
  • He was the real founder of the Parthian empire, which was of very limited extent until the final decay of the Seleucid empire, occasioned by the Roman intrigues after the death of Antiochus IV.

    0
    0
  • These were to some extent made use of by Prosper Leveque in his Memoires pour servir (1753), as well as by the Abbe Boisot in the Tresor de Granvella.

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    0
  • In Athelstan's reign these animals abounded to such an extent in Yorkshire that a retreat was built by one Acehorn, at Flixton, near Filey, wherein travellers might seek refuge if attacked by them.

    0
    0
  • During the periods above mentioned the extent and boundaries of the city varied considerably.

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    0
  • With the systematic study of the Latin, and to a slight extent also of the Greek classics, he conjoined that of logic in the prolix system of Crousaz; and he further invigorated his reasoning powers, as well as enlarged his knowledge of metaphysics and jurisprudence, by the perusal of Locke, Grotius and Montesquieu.

    0
    0
  • These commentaries may be described as to a certain extent a new departure in New Testament exegesis.

    0
    0
  • As these lakes shrank after the return of an arid climate, they left elevated beaches and deposits of various minerals, which mark their former extent.

    0
    0
  • The Federalist Party, which may be regarded as definitely organized practically from 1791, was led, leaving Washington aside, by Alexander Hamilton and John Adams. A nationalization of the new central government to the full extent warranted by a broad construction of the powers granted to it by the constitution, and a correspondingly strict construction of the powers reserved to the states and the citizens, were the basic principles of Hamilton's policy.

    0
    0
  • His boyhood was spent with a grandmother in Middletown, Connecticut; and prior to his entering college he had read widely in English literature and history, had surpassed most boys in the extent of his Greek and Latin work, and had studied several modern languages.

    0
    0
  • We must conceive a time when the sun was swollen to such an extent that it filled up the entire space girdled by the orbit of Mercury.

    0
    0
  • Clausius, to such an extent as to put its general accuracy beyond a doubt; but it received enormous developments from Maxwell, who in this field appeared as an experimenter (on the laws of gaseous friction) as well as a mathematician.

    0
    0
  • Southwark Park in the centre of the borough is 63 acres in extent.

    0
    0
  • In his extensive work Tractatus de legibus ac deo legislatore (reprinted, London, 1679) he is to some extent the precursor of Grotius and Samuel Pufendorf.

    0
    0
  • Suarez refutes the patriarchal theory of government and the divine right of kings founded upon it---doctrines popular at that time in England and to some extent on the Continent.

    0
    0
  • To a geographical distribution of the widest extent, Diptera add a range of habits of the most diversified nature; they are both animal and vegetable feeders, an enormous number of species acting, especially in the larval state, as scavengers in consuming putrescent or decomposing matter of both kinds.

    0
    0
  • Thus if concentrated instead of dilute sulphuric acid acts upon zinc, the action takes place to a great extent not according to the equation given above, but according to the equation Zn +2H 2 SO 4 = ZnS04+S02+2 H20, sulphur dioxide and water being produced instead of hydrogen.

    0
    0
  • Yet he was a great king, the type and to some extent the victim of the confusions of his age - Christian in creed and ambition, but more than half oriental in his household.

    0
    0
  • To what extent specific Babylonian influence showed itself in other directions is not completely known.

    0
    0
  • At all events the first of a series of annalistic notices of the kings of Israel ascribes to Saul conquests over the surrounding peoples to an extent which implies that the district of Judah formed part of his kingdom (I Sam.

    0
    0
  • If the impression left upon current thought can be estimated from certain of the utterances of the court-prophet Isaiah and the Judaean countryman Micah, the light which these throw upon internal conditions must also be used to gauge the real extent of the religious changes ascribed to Hezekiah.

    0
    0
  • (b) Some fluctuation is obvious in the number, dates and extent of the deportations.

    0
    0
  • Smith thus sums up a discussion of the extent of the deportations:..

    0
    0
  • The true inwardness of this movement, its extent and its history, can hardly be recovered at present, but it is noteworthy that the evidence generally involves the Levites, an ecclesiastical body which underwent an extremely intricate development.

    0
    0
  • To a certain extent it would seem that even as Chronicles (q.v.) has passed through the hands of one who was keenly interested in the Temple service, so the other historical books have been shaped not only by the late priestly writers (symbolized in literary criticism by P), but also by rather earlier writers, also of priestly sympathies, but of " southern " or half-Edomite affinity.

    0
    0
  • historical criticism is faced with the established literary conclusions which, it should be noticed, place the Deuteronomic and priestly compilations posterior to the great changes at and after the fall of the northern monarchy, and, to some extent, contemporary with the equally serious changes in Judah.

    0
    0
  • Having satisfied himself of the extent of the ruins, he aroused the people to the necessity of fortifying and repopulating the city, and a vivid account is given in his name of the many dangers which beset the rebuilding of the walls.

    0
    0
  • The post-exilic priestly spirit represents a tendency which is absent from the Judaean Deuteronomic book of Kings but is fully mature in the later, and to some extent parallel, book of Chronicles (q.v.).

    0
    0
  • The bitterness aroused by the ardent and to some extent unjust zeal of the reforming element can only be conjectured.

    0
    0
  • His defeat left the resources of his kingdom exhausted and its extent diminished; and so the Jews became important to his successors for the sake of their wealth and their position on the frontier.

    0
    0
  • But the rebels collected adherents from the villages; and, when they resolved to violate the sabbath to the extent of resisting attack, they were joined by the company of the Assideans (Hasidim).

    0
    0
  • In the early 14th century, the age of Dante, the new spirit of the Renaissance made Italian rulers the patrons of art and literature, and the Jews to some extent shared in this gracious change.

    0
    0
  • in extent and 300 ft.

    0
    0
  • Tobacco and cotton succeed well in the plains and low grounds, though not at present cultivated to any great extent.

    0
    0
  • " Minoan " towns, some of considerable extent, have been discovered at Cnossus itself, at Gournia, Palaikastro, and at Zakro.

    0
    0
  • The above summary gives, indeed, a very imperfect idea of the extent to which the remains of the great Minoan civilization are spread throughout the island.

    0
    0
  • It stands in grounds 4000 acres in extent, which include the White and Black Lochs and the ruins of Castle Kennedy, finely situated on the isthmus between the lakes.

    0
    0
  • We find the Jewish usage from time to time reasserting itself after this, but it never prevailed to any large extent.

    0
    0
  • It is probably impossible to recover the whole truth either as to Crichton's death or as to the extent of his attainments, which were so quickly elevated into legendary magnitude.

    0
    0
  • Sugar-cane is grown principally in the southern part of the state, but sorghum-cane is grown to some extent in nearly every county.

    0
    0
  • The Yazoo, Tallahatchie, Yalobusha, Sunflower, Big Black, Pascagoula and Pearl rivers are also navigable to a limited extent.

    0
    0
  • The intervening depression, which seems to be bounded on the west by a fault, is filled to a large extent by sandstones and marls of Eocene age.

    0
    0
  • The river valleys of the campo region are also cultivated to some extent.

    0
    0
  • Clerical immunities, of course, differed largely at different times and in different countries, the extent of them having been gradually curtailed from a period a little earlier than the close of the middle ages.

    0
    0
  • Owing to the great extent of Asia, it is not easy to obtain a correct conception of the actual form of its outline from ordinary maps, the distortions which accompany projections of great and misleading.

    0
    0
  • This second barrier is one of the most mighty upheavals in the world, by reason both of its extent and its altitude.

    0
    0
  • or about half the extent of the other two.

    0
    0
  • in extent.

    0
    0
  • Such lakes (in common with all the plateau hamuns of south-west Baluchistan and Persia) change their form and extent from season to season, and many of them are impregnated with saline deposits from the underlying strata.

    0
    0
  • Hence the study of the mountain ranges of a continent is, for a proper apprehension of its physical conditions and characteristics, as essential as the examination of its extent and position in relation to the equator and poles, and the configuration of its coasts.

    0
    0
  • The mountain mass, moreover, is not less important in causing a complete separation between the atmospheric conditions on its opposite flanks, by reason of the extent to which it penetrates that stratum of the atmosphere which is in contact with the earth's surface and is effective in determining climate.

    0
    0
  • The whole tract, excepting south-eastern Arabia, is nominally subject to Turkey, but the people are to no small extent practically independent, living a nomadic, pastoral and freebooting life under petty chiefs, in the more arid districts, but settled in towns in the more fertile tracts, where agriculture becomes more profitable and external commerce is established.

    0
    0
  • The population is very scanty; the cultivated tracts are comparatively small in extent and restricted to the more settled districts.

    0
    0
  • Extent of of Greenwich.

    0
    0
  • Structurally, the folds of this region are of ancient date; but the area is crossed by a series of depressions formed by faults, and the intervening strips, which have not been depressed to the same extent, now stand up as mountain ranges.

    0
    0
  • The Eocene sea, however, cannot have been much inferior in extent.

    0
    0
  • The heaviest falls of rain occur along lines of mountain of some extent directly facing the vapour-bearing winds, as on the Western Ghats of India and the west coast of the Malay peninsula.

    0
    0
  • As they are now known to us, they have undergone a process of partial civilization, first at the hands of the Brahminical Indians, from whom they borrowed a religion, and to some extent literature and an alphabet, and subsequently from intercourse with the Arabs, which has led to the adoption of Mahommedanism by most of them.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand Christianity, though Asiatic in its origin and essential ideas, has to a large extent taken its present form on European soil, and some of its most important manifestations - notably the Roman Church - are European reconstructions in which little of the Asiatic element remains.

    0
    0
  • It has profoundly affected and to a large extent subjugated all western Asia including India, all eastern and northern Africa as well as Spain, and all eastern Europe.

    0
    0
  • Korea received its civilization and religion from China, but differs in language, and to some extent in customs. An alphabet derived from Indian sources is in use as well as Chinese writing.

    0
    0
  • The first empire, called Maurya,reached its greatest extent in the time of Asoka (264-227 B.C.), who ruled from Afghanistan to Madras.

    0
    0
  • But in spite of this total political collapse, Arabic religion and literature are still one of the greatest forces working in the western half of Asia, in northern Africa and to some extent in eastern Europe.

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  • The Turks, and to some extent the Arabs in Spain, were successful because they first conquered the parts of Asia and Africa adjoining Europe, so that the final invaders were in touch with Asiatic settlements.

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  • Alexander's conquests resulted in the foundation of a Perso-Greek kingdoms in Asia, which not only hellenized their own area but influenced the art and religion of India and to some extent of China.

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  • Though the geographical extent of Russian territory and influence is enormous, she has always moved along the line of least resistance.

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  • There has been great difference of opinion as to the extent to which Alexander's conquests influenced Asia, and it is equally hard to say what is the effect now being produced by Europe.

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  • 3 Opinion will differ, however, as to the extent to which later ideals have influenced the narratives upon which the student of Hebrew history and religion is dependent, and how far the reigns of David and Solomon altered the face of Hebrew history.

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  • In Hyperiodrilus the whole spermatheca is thus included in a corresponding sac, which is of great extent.

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  • This may be associated with mud-eating habits; but it is not wholly certain that this is the case; for in Chaetogaster and Agriodrilus, which are predaceous worms, there is no protrusible pharynx, though in the latter the oesophagus is thickened through its extent with muscular fibres.

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  • There is a spacious cavity surrounding the gut and containing also bloodvessels, and to some extent the generative organs.

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  • Their kingdom cannot have been of large extent, as Nabonidus in a contemporary inscription (Cylinder from Abu Habba, VR.

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  • Lastly, in matters of finance he showed his wisdom: he attacked Necker's "caisse d'escompte," which was to have the whole control of the taxes, as absorbing the Assembly's power of the purse; and he heartily approved of the system of assignats, but with the reservation that they should not be issued to the extent of more than one-half the value of the lands to be sold.

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  • Thus Agrippa became one of the greatest princes of the east, the territory he possessed equalling in extent that held by Herod the Great.

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  • in 1688, and under this the appointment of officers and other of the corporation, arrangements are to a great extent regulated.

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  • The advent of Christianity, with its categorical assertion of future happiness for the good, to a large extent did away with pessimism in the true sense.

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  • We can only say that he wrote on the origin and history of the Goths, using both Gothic saga and Greek sources; and that if Jordanes used Cassiodorus, Cassiodorus used, if to a less extent, the work of Ablabius.

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  • It is often stated that in India British conquest or annexation succeeded Mahommedan rule; and to a considerable extent this was the case.

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  • Some remaining territories of small extent were acquired by the French after the revolution of 1789, including Miilhausen, which had been a republic allied to Switzerland.

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  • grown chiefly in the valley of the Kura and in Lenkoran; the tobacco in the Rion valley and on the Black Sea coastlands, also to some extent in Kuban; and the cotton in the eastern provinces.

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  • south of Batum), at Akhtala south of Tiflis, and at Kedabek in Elisavetpol; manganese to a considerably greater extent (over 400,000 tons annually) at Chiaturi in the Kvirila valley in Kutais.

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  • The climate of Bellary is characterized by extreme dryness, due to the passing of the air over a great extent of heated plains, and it has a smaller rainfall than any other district in south India.

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  • For many of these this county has long been famous, especially for that of silk, which is carried on to a large extent in Derby, as well as in Belper and Duffield.

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  • Elastic web weaving by power looms is carried on to a great extent, and the manufacture of lace and net curtains, gimp trimmings, braids and cords.

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  • Besides lead, gypsum and zinc are raised, to a small extent; and for the quarrying of limestone Derbyshire is one of the principal English counties.

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  • Swine and poultry were used for food to a greater extent than oxen, which were bred chiefly for ploughing.

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  • In addition to the cereals, beans, peas and vetches were grown to some extent.

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  • Dawson of Frogden in Roxburghshire is believed to have been the first who grew turnips as a field crop to any extent.

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  • Its report, published in 1882, testified to " the great extent and intensity of the distress which has fallen upon the agricultural community.

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  • Abundant evidence was forthcoming as to the extent to which agriculture had been injuriously affected " by an unprecedented succession of bad seasons."

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  • Whereas formerly the farmer was to some extent compensated by a higher price for a smaller yield, in recent years he had had to compete with an unusually large supply at greatly reduced prices.

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  • In 1891 excessively heavy autumn rains washed the arable soils to such an extent that the next season's corn crops were below average.

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  • As a consequence, the extent of land devoted to wheat in the British Isles receded in 1895 to less than i 2 million acres.

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  • The extent of this decline is seen in Table II., wherein are given the annual average prices from 1875 to 1905, calculated upon returns from the 190 statutory markets of England and Wales (Corn Returns Act 1882).

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  • Going back to 1869, it is found that the extent of wheat in that year was 3,981,989 acres or very little short of four million acres.

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  • more pastoral, while the figures already given demonstrate the extent to which they became less arable.

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  • The imports of potatoes into the United Kingdom vary, to some extent inversely; thus, the low production in 1897 was accompanied by an increase of imports from 3,921,205 cwt.

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  • The extent to which the annual production of the leading fodder crop may vary is shown in the table by the two consecutive years 1893 and 1894; from only nine million tons in the former year the production rose to upwards of fifteen million tons in the latter, an increase of over 70%.

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  • The fact that the growth of a leguminous crop, such as red clover, leaves the soil in a higher condition for the subsequent growth of a grain crop - that, indeed, the growth of such a leguminous crop is to a great extent equivalent to the application of a nitrogenous manure for the cereal crop - was in effect known ages ago.

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  • Other essential conditions of success will commonly include the liberal application of potash and phosphatic manures, and sometimes chalking or liming for the leguminous crop. As to how long the leguminous crop should occupy the land, the extent to which it should be consumed on the land, or the manure from its consumption be returned, and under what conditions the whole or part of it should be ploughed in - these are points which must be decided as they arise in practice.

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  • Under such conditions of supply, however, the root-crops, gross feeders as they are, and distributing a very large extent of fibrous feeding root within the soil, avail themselves of a much larger quantity of the nitrogen supplied than the cereal crops would do in similar circumstances.

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  • The extent to which these growing imports were associated with a decline in value is shown in Table XVI.

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  • For its size and in relation to its sheep population Wales harbours the disease to a far greater extent than the other divisions of Great Britain.

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  • The labour question again became acute in the early years of the 10th century, when, owing to the scarcity of hands and the high rate of wages, selfbinding harvesters were resorted to in England for the ingathering of the corn crops to a greater extent than ever before.

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  • About 293 he installed his son Antiochus there as viceroy, the vast extent of the empire seeming to require a double government.

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  • In times past, and to a less extent in our own day, philosophical conceptions have formed the basis of great systems of politics and economics.

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  • - The chief contemporary authorities for the life of Bruce are coloured to some extent by the nationality of the writers.

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  • On hearing this message, Mahmud at first reproached Hasan with having caused him to break his word, but the wily treasurer succeeded in turning his master's anger upon Firdousi to such an extent that he threatened that on the morrow he would "cast that Carmathian (heretic) under the feet of his elephants."

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  • Comparative anatomy and embryology prove that this condition is due, not as formerly supposed to a difference in the relations of the visceral commissure which prevented it from being included in the torsion of the visceral hump, but to an actual detorsion which has taken place in evolution and is repeated to a great extent in individual development.

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  • The relation of the delicate shell to the mantle is peculiar, since it occupies an oval area upon the visceral hump, the extent of which is indicated in fig.

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  • Its superficial extent is seen when the folds covering the shell are cut away and the shell removed; the external surface forms a triangle with its base bordering the pericardium, and its apex directed posteriorly and reaching to the lefthand posterior corner of the shell-chamber.

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  • Its constitution was drawn up in the spring of 1797 by committees appointed, and to some extent supervised, by him; and he appointed the first directors, deputies and chief administrators of the new state (July 1797).

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  • Negotiations with England and Russia served to show the extent of his ambition.

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  • Firstly we may remark that the Austrian alliance furnished one of the motives which led him to refrain during the campaign of 1812 from reconstituting the Polish realm in its ancient extent.

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  • There, too, as sometimes in 1815, he began to suffer intermittently from ischury, but to no serious extent.

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  • (4) Commerce was practised to some extent in very early times, as is proved by the distribution of Melian obsidian over all the Aegean area and by the Nilotic influence on early Minoan art.

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  • We shall try to indicate the extent to which it can legitimately be applied.

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  • They are divided into a number of classes (kings, hypostases, forms, &c.); the proper names by which they are invoked are many, and for the most part obscure, borrowed doubtless, to some extent, from the Parsee angelology.

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  • - A striking feature in the food-canal of the Hexapoda, as in other Arthropods, is the great extent of the " foregut " and " hind-gut," lined with a chitinous cuticle, continuous with the exoskeleton.

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  • The genital armature of the male is formed to a considerable extent by modifications of the segments themselves.

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  • In the embryos of many insects there are projections from the segments of the abdomen similar, to a considerable extent, to the rudimentary thoracic legs.

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  • - The nervous system is ectodermal in origin, and is developed and segmented to a large extent in connexion with the outer part of the body, so that it affords important evidence as to the segmentation thereof.

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  • (The feelers and legs are cut short.) years; (2) certain stages of the life that are naturally " resting stages " may be in exceptional cases prolonged, and that to a very great extent; in this case no food is taken, and the activity of the individual is almost nil; (3) the life of certain insects in the adult state may be much prolonged if celibacy be maintained; a female of Cybister roeselii (a large water-beetle) has lived five and a half years in the adult state in captivity.

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  • the bionomic nature of metamorphosis, and to what extent it existed in primitive insects.

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  • And thus perfection of structure and instinct in the imago has been accompanied by degradation in the larva, and by an increase in the extent of transformation and in the degree of reconstruction before and during the pupal stage.

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  • The fascinating difficulties presented to the student by the metamorphosis of the Hexapoda are to some extent explained, as he ponders over the evolution of the class.

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  • His publications, though always of the most thorough and scholarly character, were to a large extent dispersed in the pages of reviews, dictionaries, concordances, texts edited by others, Unitarian controversial treatises, &c.; but he took a more conspicuous and more personal part in the preparation (with the Baptist scholar, Horatio B.

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  • Like nearly all his predecessors since Aelian, he adopted an alphabetical arrangement, though this was not too pedantically preserved, and did not hinder him from placing together the kinds of birds which he supposed (and generally supposed rightly) to have the most resemblance to that one whose name, being best known, was chosen for the headpiece (as it were) of his particular theme, thus recognizing to some extent the principle of classification.3 Belon, with perhaps less book-learning than his contemporary, was evidently no mean scholar, and undoubtedly had more practical knowledge of birds - their internal as well as external structure.

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  • These authors, being zealous amateur artists, were their own draughtsmen to the extent even of lithographing the figures.

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  • The following year Ranzani of Bologna, in his Elementi di zoologia - a very respectable compilation - came to treat of birds, and then followed to some extent the plan of De Blainville and Merrem (concerning which much more has to be said by and by), placing the Struthious birds in an Order by themselves.

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  • 8vo, 1867), strove to remedy, and to some extent did remedy, the grosser errors of the first, but enough still remain to make few statements in the work trustworthy unless corroborated by other evidence.

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  • Considering the extent of their materials, which was limited to the bodies of such animals as they could obtain from dealers and the several menageries that then existed in or near London, the progress made in what has since proved to be the right direction is very wonderful.

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  • Its line to some extent may be partly made out - very clearly, for the matter of that, so far as its details have been published in the series of papers to which reference has been given - and some traces of its features are probably preserved in his Catalogue of the specimens of birds in the museum of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, which, after several years of severe labour, made its appearance at Calcutta in 1849; but, from the time of his arrival in India, the onerous duties imposed upon Blyth, together with the want of sufficient books of reference, seem to have hindered him from seriously continuing his former researches, which, interrupted as they were, and born out of due time, had no appreciable effect on the views of systematisers generally.

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  • Carrying on the work from the anatomical point at which he had left it, correcting his errors, and utilizing to the fullest extent the observations of Keyserling and Blasius, to which reference has already been made, Muller, though hampered by mistaken notions of which he seems to have been unable to rid himself, propounded a scheme for the classification of this group, the general truth of which has been admitted by all his successors, based, as the title of his treatise expressed, on the hitherto unknown different types of the vocal organs in the Passerines.

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  • Nothing whatever is to be said against the composition of his first and second " tribes"; but the third is an assemblage still more heterogeneous than that which Nitzsch brought together under a name so like that of Muller - for the fact must never be allowed to go out of sight that the extent of the Picarii of the latter is not at all that of the Picariae of the former.'

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  • As it is, so much of them as we have are of considerable importance; for, in this unfortunately unfinished memoir, he describes in some detail the several differences which the sternum in a great many different groups of his Tropidosternii presents, and to some extent makes a methodical disposition of them accordingly.

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  • That the eggs laid by birds should offer to some extent characters of utility to systematists is only to be expected, when it is considered that those from the same nest generally bear an extraordinary family likeness to one another, and also that in certain groups the essential peculiarities of the egg-shell are constantly and distinctively characteristic. Thus no one who has ever examined the egg of a duck or of a tinamou would ever be in danger of not referring another tinamou's egg or another duck's, that he might see, to its proper family, and so on with many others.

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  • Christianity consists for him in the doctrines, guaranteed by the manifestation of the Logos in the person of Christ, of God, righteousness and immortality, truths which have been to a certain extent foreshadowed in the monotheistic religious philosophies.

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  • Before 1405 the mortar used in Venice was made of lime from Istria, which possessed no hydraulic qualities and was consequently very perishable, a fact which to a large extent accounts for the fall of the Campanile of San Marco.

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  • Contarini was to some extent his own architect.

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  • The health of the city depends, of course, to a large extent on this ebb and flow.

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  • He also published several sermons, and Considerations on the Nature and Extent of the Legislative Authority of the British Parliament (1774), sometimes attributed to Benjamin Franklin.

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