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exports

exports Sentence Examples

  • The respective shares of the leading customs in the tfade of the country is approximately shown in the following table, which gives the value of their exports and imports (general trade) in 1905 in millions sterling.

    30
    3
  • The town is noted for its fruit, especially its vines; and it exports tissues, carpets, hides, yellow berries and dried fruit.

    21
    8
  • The town is noted for its fruit, especially its vines; and it exports tissues, carpets, hides, yellow berries and dried fruit.

    21
    8
  • Its chief exports are of cotton, hemp, sugar and stone.

    18
    6
  • Its chief exports are of cotton, hemp, sugar and stone.

    17
    6
  • Exports (Thousands of).

    16
    6
  • The exports consist of coffee, pepper, cardamoms and coco-nuts.

    8
    2
  • From Cartagena the principal exports are metallic ores, esparto grass, wine, cereals and fruit.

    8
    3
  • Imports are mainly from Germany, exports to Germany and to other West African colonies.

    6
    1
  • The following are the principal countries receiving the exports of France (special trade), with values for the same periods.

    4
    1
  • In 1905 exports reached a value of £3,816,000, and imports a value of £4,834,000 (not including treasure and transit trade).

    4
    2
  • Vessels of light draught easily ascend the Orinoco to this point, and a considerable trade is carried on, the exports being cocoa, sugar, cotton, hides, jerked beef and various forest products.

    4
    2
  • Food exports: US$1.6 billion.

    4
    7
  • Among its natural productions are lemons, citrons, olives, wine and honey; it also exports a considerable quantity of valonia.

    3
    1
  • Principal Exports (Thousands of).

    3
    1
  • A third difficulty is the comparatively small tonnage and volume of Italian exports relatively to the imports, the former in 1907 being about one-fourth of the latter, and greatl out of proportion to the relative value; while a fourth is the lac of facilities for handling goods, especially in the smaller ports.

    3
    1
  • The exports for the corresponding period amounted to 35,840,000, a diminution of 1,520,000 as compared with the corresponding period of 1906.

    3
    1
  • Principal Exports (Thousands of).

    3
    1
  • A third difficulty is the comparatively small tonnage and volume of Italian exports relatively to the imports, the former in 1907 being about one-fourth of the latter, and greatl out of proportion to the relative value; while a fourth is the lac of facilities for handling goods, especially in the smaller ports.

    3
    1
  • Italian trade with foreign countries (imports and exports) during the quinquennium 1872-1876 averaged 94,000,000 a year; in the quinquennium 1893f 897 it fell to 88,960,000 a year.

    3
    4
  • The trade of France was divided between foreign countries and her colonies in the following proportions (imports and exports combined).

    3
    15
  • outside the customs union (Zollverein), the imports being principally coals, bricks and timber, and the exports fish.

    2
    0
  • Of the exports, France, Argentina, Belgium and Germany take the bulk.

    2
    0
  • Of the exports, France, Argentina, Belgium and Germany take the bulk.

    2
    0
  • Excellent fruits are produced in its vicinity, and its exports include cacao, coffee, sugar, hides, tobacco and sundry products in small quantities.

    2
    1
  • Aisne imports coal, iron, cotton and other raw material and machinery; it exports cereals, live-stock and agricultural products generally, and manufactured goods.

    2
    1
  • In the season of 1899-1900 the wool exports weighed 420,000,000 lb, and averaged more than 5 lb per sheep. The extra weight of fleece was owing to the large importation of better breeds.

    2
    1
  • 1899 the wheat exports exceeded 50,000,000 bushels, and the Indian corn 40,000,000 bushels.

    2
    1
  • The existing system of taxation also presses heavily upon the provinces, as may be seen from the fact that the national, provincial and municipal exactions together amount to £7 per head of population, while the total value of the exports in 1898 was only L6 in round numbers.

    2
    1
  • The chief trade is in, and the principal exports are, palm oil and kernels, rubber, cotton, maize, groundnuts (Arachis), shea-butter from the Bassia parkii (Sapotaceae), fibres of the Raphia vinifera, and the Sansevieria guineensis, indigo, and kola nuts, ebony and other valuable wood.

    2
    1
  • The exports include hides, skins, rubber, wax, tobacco and cotton.

    2
    1
  • In the exports, alimentary products came first, while raw materials for manufacture and manufactured articles were of little account.

    2
    1
  • 1899 the wheat exports exceeded 50,000,000 bushels, and the Indian corn 40,000,000 bushels.

    2
    1
  • The decline both in imports and in exports of articles of food, which is the most noteworthy fact exhibited in the preceding table, was due to the almost prohibitive tax in the Customs Law of 1892, upon agricultural products.

    2
    2
  • Numerically the flocks of Australia represent one-sixth of the world's sheep, and in just over half a century (1851-1905) the exports of Australian wool alone reached the value of £650,000,000.

    2
    2
  • £425,000, of the exports £389,000.

    2
    2
  • The countries with which this trade is mainly carried on are: (imports) United Kingdom, Germany, United States, France, Russia and India; (exports) Switzerland, United States, Germany, France, United Kingdom and Argentina.

    2
    2
  • The chief exports are animal products and agricultural products.

    2
    2
  • The decline both in imports and in exports of articles of food, which is the most noteworthy fact exhibited in the preceding table, was due to the almost prohibitive tax in the Customs Law of 1892, upon agricultural products.

    2
    2
  • The countries with which this trade is mainly carried on are: (imports) United Kingdom, Germany, United States, France, Russia and India; (exports) Switzerland, United States, Germany, France, United Kingdom and Argentina.

    2
    2
  • In normal years (that is to say, when there is no large movement of capital) the exports of Australia exceed the imports by some £15,300,000.

    2
    6
  • The large predominance of imports over exports after 1884 was a result of the falling off of the export trade in live stock, olive oil and wine, on account of the closing of the French market, while the importation of corn from Russia and the Balkan States increased considerably.

    2
    6
  • The coasting trade consists chiefly of imports of coal and provisions, the exports being principally timber for shipbuilding and flint for the Staffordshire potteries.

    2
    6
  • The coasting trade consists chiefly of imports of coal and provisions, the exports being principally timber for shipbuilding and flint for the Staffordshire potteries.

    2
    6
  • The principal exports are grain, livestock and fruit.

    2
    9
  • Amongst exports manufactured goods (silk, cotton and woollen goods, fancy wares, apparel, &c.) come before raw materials and articles of food (wine and dairy products bought chiefly by England).

    2
    10
  • The total exports of the province of Cagliari in 1905 attained a value of £1,388,735, of which £J50,023 was foreign trade, while the imports amounted to £1,085,514, of which £360,758 was foreign trade.

    1
    0
  • Among the exports may be noticed minerals, wines and spirits, tobacco, hides, live animals; and among the imports, groceries, cotton and cereals.

    1
    0
  • Recovery required years, although made easier by the sound and steady development of the pastoral and agricultural industries, which were slightly affected by the crisis; and the steadily increasing volume of exports, mainly foodstuffs and other staples, saved the situation.

    1
    0
  • The exports, which are almost wholly of agricultural and pastoral products, increased from $103,219,000 in 1891 to $322,843,841 in 1905.

    1
    0
  • The latter is subdivided into general commerce, which includes all goods entering or leaving the country, and special commerce whirls includes imports for home use and exports of home produce.

    1
    0
  • Divided into these classes the imports and exports (special trade) for quinquennial periods from 1886 to 1905 averaged as shown in the preceding table.

    1
    0
  • In the same period Spain received exports from France averaging 4,700,000.

    1
    0
  • The imports represent £9:11:6 per inhabitant and the exports 11 4: 4: 2, with a total trade of L23:15:8.

    1
    0
  • The import trade is divided between the United Kingdom and possessions and foreign countries as follows: - United Kingdom £23,074,000, British possessions £5,3 8 4, 000, and foreign states L9,889,000, while the destination of the exports is, United Kingdom £26,703,000, British possessions £12,519,000, and foreign countries £17,619,000.

    1
    0
  • In 1894 the excess of imports over exports fell to 2,720,000, but by 1898 it had grown to 8,391,000, in consequence chiefly of the increased importation of coal, raw cotton and cotton thread, pig and cast iron, old iron, grease and oil-seeds for use in Italian industries.

    1
    0
  • In 1899 the excess of imports over exports fell to 3,006,000; but since then it has never been less than 12,000,000,

    1
    0
  • The value of French exports into Italy decreased immediately by one-half, while Italian exports to France decreased by nearly two-thirds.

    1
    0
  • The total exports of the province of Cagliari in 1905 attained a value of £1,388,735, of which £J50,023 was foreign trade, while the imports amounted to £1,085,514, of which £360,758 was foreign trade.

    1
    0
  • Recovery required years, although made easier by the sound and steady development of the pastoral and agricultural industries, which were slightly affected by the crisis; and the steadily increasing volume of exports, mainly foodstuffs and other staples, saved the situation.

    1
    0
  • The exports, which are almost wholly of agricultural and pastoral products, increased from $103,219,000 in 1891 to $322,843,841 in 1905.

    1
    0
  • The latter is subdivided into general commerce, which includes all goods entering or leaving the country, and special commerce whirls includes imports for home use and exports of home produce.

    1
    0
  • Divided into these classes the imports and exports (special trade) for quinquennial periods from 1886 to 1905 averaged as shown in the preceding table.

    1
    0
  • The imports represent £9:11:6 per inhabitant and the exports 11 4: 4: 2, with a total trade of L23:15:8.

    1
    0
  • In 1894 the excess of imports over exports fell to 2,720,000, but by 1898 it had grown to 8,391,000, in consequence chiefly of the increased importation of coal, raw cotton and cotton thread, pig and cast iron, old iron, grease and oil-seeds for use in Italian industries.

    1
    0
  • Angora is connected with Constantinople by railway, and exports wool, mohair, grain and yellow berries.

    1
    1
  • Exceptions were made permitting the states to grant bounties on mining and (with the consent of the parliament) on exports of produce or manufactures - Western Australia being for a time partially exempted from the prohibition to impose import duties.

    1
    1
  • The exports consist principally of sugar, cotton, and rum (aguardiente).

    1
    1
  • The principal exports are silk and cotton tissues, live stock, wines, spirits and oils; corn, flour, macaroni and similar products; and minerals, chiefly sulphur.

    1
    1
  • The exports of Aube consist of timber, cereals, agricultural products, hosiery, wine, dressed pork, &c.; its imports include wool and raw cotton, coal and machinery, especially looms. The department is served by the Eastern railway, of which the main line to Belfort crosses it.

    1
    1
  • Exceptions were made permitting the states to grant bounties on mining and (with the consent of the parliament) on exports of produce or manufactures - Western Australia being for a time partially exempted from the prohibition to impose import duties.

    1
    1
  • The principal exports are silk and cotton tissues, live stock, wines, spirits and oils; corn, flour, macaroni and similar products; and minerals, chiefly sulphur.

    1
    1
  • Food exports: US$22 billion.

    1
    1
  • In 1908 the exports were valued at $11,353,339 and the imports at $1,189,964.

    1
    5
  • Norfolk is combined with Portsmouth in one customs district, the foreign trade of which in 1908 amounted to $11,326,817 in exports and $1,150,044 in imports.

    0
    0
  • Exports.

    0
    0
  • £38,347,000 imports, and £56,841,000 exports.

    0
    0
  • The exports of breadstuffs - chiefly to the United Kingdom - exceed six millions per annum, butter two and a half millions, and minerals of all kinds, except gold, six millions.

    0
    0
  • was in 1840 a busy town of 6000 inhabitants, the population of the whole district, with the towns of Geelong and Portland, reaching 12,850; while its import trade amounted to 204,000, and its exports to 138,000.

    0
    0
  • The population of Victoria was doubled in the first twelvemonth of the gold fever, and the value of imports and exports was multiplied tenfold between 1851 and 1853.

    0
    0
  • Since 1899 there has been a steady increase both in imports and exports.

    0
    0
  • Imports over Exports.

    0
    0
  • It is served by the Madras railway, and is the chief seaport on the Malabar coast, and the principal exports are coffee, timber and coco-nut products.

    0
    0
  • Panama has had an important trade: its imports, about twice as valuable as its exports, include cotton goods, haberdashery, coal, flour, silk goods and rice; the most valuable exports are gold, india-rubber, mother of pearl and cocobolo wood.

    0
    0
  • It contains breweries, tanneries, sugar, tobacco, cloth, and silk factories, and exports skins, cloth, cocoons, cereals, attar of roses, "dried fruit, &c. Sofia forms the centre of a railway system radiating to Constantinople (300 m.), Belgrade (206 m.) and central Europe, Varna, Rustchuk and the Danube, and Kiustendil near the Macedonian frontier.

    0
    0
  • Flax is one of the principal exports of this region, timber being another.

    0
    0
  • The imports of foreign metals in the rough and of coal are steadily increasing, while the exports, never otherwise than insignificant, show no advance.

    0
    0
  • The external trade of the Russian empire (bullion and the external trade of Finland not included) since the year 1886 is shown in the following table: The exports rank in the following order :- cereals (wheat, barley, rye, oats, maize, buckwheat) and flour, 49.2%; timber and wooden wares, 7.2; petroleum, 5.8; eggs, 5.4; flax, 5; butter, 3; sugar, 2-4; cottons and oilcake, 2 each; oleaginous seeds, &c., 1.5; with hemp, spirits, poultry, game, bristles, hair, furs, leather, manganese ore, wool, caviare, live-stock, gutta-percha, vegetables and fruit, and tobacco.

    0
    0
  • The two best customers of Russia are Germany, which takes 23.3% of her total exports, and the United Kingdom, which takes 22.9%.

    0
    0
  • Trade is carried on almost entirely with the United Kingdom; the approximate annual value of exports is £120,000, and of imports a little more than half that sum.

    0
    0
  • Cultivation has been extended under European and American rule, and in 1904 the exports from the German islands had reached a value of 83,750, and those from the American islands of is'4200.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports are sugar, oil-seeds and indigo.

    0
    0
  • The principal imports are grain and agricultural produce, timber and coal, and the exports cement and fish.

    0
    0
  • The total value of imports in the four years 1901-1904 was £1,756,888, of exports £1,386,777; excess of imports over exports, £370,111.

    0
    0
  • Exports in 1904 were valued at £419,642, the principal items being agricultural products (oranges, lemons, carobs, almonds, grapes, valonia, &c.), value £153,858, olives and products of olives-(oil, soap, &c.), £134,788, and wines and liquors, £48,544.

    0
    0
  • Imports are charged 8%, exports 1% ad valorem duty.

    0
    0
  • Its imports for 1909 were valued at $82,028 and its exports at $8,581,471.

    0
    0
  • The harbour of Cagliari (along the north side of which runs a promenade called the Via Romo) is a good one, and has a considerable trade, exporting chiefly lead, zinc and other minerals and salt, the total annual value of exports amounting to nearly 12 million sterling in value.

    0
    0
  • Notwithstanding the disadvantages of its open roadstead, the foreign trade has rapidly expanded, the annual value of the exports having increased from 62 millions sterling in 1899 to over ro millions sterling in 1904.

    0
    0
  • The exports consist chiefly of woollen yarn, woollens, cotton goods, cotton yarn, machinery, &c. and coal.

    0
    0
  • The imports increased from $755,316 in 1897 and $490,093 in 1898 (an extremely unfavourable year owing to the SpanishAmerican War) to $4,179,464 in 1909; the exports from $820,792 in 1897 and $521,792 in 1898 to $1,344,786 in 1899 and $4,492,498 in 1909; a part of the custom-house clearings of Key West are actually shipped from Tampa.

    0
    0
  • The exports through the Black Sea ports of Batum, Poti and Novo-rossiysk average in value a little over £ro,000,000 annually, though showing a tendency to increase slightly.

    0
    0
  • Richmond is the port of entry for the District of Richmond; in 1907 its imports were valued at 8913,234 and its exports at 8158,275; in 1909, its imports at $693,822 and its exports at $ 2 4,39 0.

    0
    0
  • Exports of Animals from the United Kingdom.

    0
    0
  • Exports during war, and of arms at any time, were prohibited.

    0
    0
  • Through Acajutla it exports coffee and sugar, and imports grain for distribution to all parts of the interior.

    0
    0
  • A comparison between the exports and imports of the years 1886 and 1905 will give an exact idea of the rate at which the port of Venice developed.

    0
    0
  • In 1886 the total value of exports to foreign countries amounted to £7,239,479; of imports, £8,788,012.

    0
    0
  • In 1905 the exports to foreign countries valued £11,650,932, the imports £13,659,306.

    0
    0
  • They are Cleveland, Toledo, Sandusky, Cincinnati, Columbus and Dayton, and the value of the foreign commerce passing through these in 1909 amounted to $9,483,974 in imports (more than one-half to Cleveland) and $10,920,083 in exports (nearly eight-ninths from Cleveland).

    0
    0
  • The value of imports and exports for 1907 were respectively $123,414,168 and $104,610,908.

    0
    0
  • their manufactures are the leading exports.

    0
    0
  • It exports filberts (for which product it is the centre), walnuts, hides and timber.

    0
    0
  • The trade was enormously profitable, not only to the merchants but to the town, which levied a rigorous duty on all exports and imports; at the same time formidable risks had to be faced both from the desert-tribes and from the Parthians, and successfully to plan or convoy a great caravan came to be looked upon as a distinguished service to the state, often recognized by public monuments erected by " council and people " or by the merchants interested in the venture.

    0
    0
  • The exports dwindled from 3600 bales in 1865 to 946 in 1905; great fluctuations occur, the export in 1904, for example, being only 338 bales.

    0
    0
  • The exports, however, are small, almost all the crop being used locally.

    0
    0
  • Exports of Cotton from Lagos.

    0
    0
  • 1869 1785 1900 48 1901 15 1902 25 1903 582 1904 1725 1905 2578 Exports of Cotton from British West Africa, 1904, 1905 and 1906.

    0
    0
  • The exports were equivalent to 2 bales of 50o lb in 1902-1903, 114 bales in 1903 - 1904, 570 bales in '904 - 1905, 1 553 bales in 1905-1906 and 1052 bales in 1906-1907.

    0
    0
  • In 1906 the combined exports had risen to 362 bales, including a little from German East Africa.

    0
    0
  • During 1901-1903 there were no exports of cotton, and in 1904 only 70 bales were sent out.

    0
    0
  • According to the custom-house returns the value of the foreign imports and exports in the year 1880 was L691,954 and L1,117,790 respectively, besides a large native trade carried on in junks.

    0
    0
  • In 1904 the value of foreign imports had risen to -'2,7 57,962, but the exports amounted to {1,742,859 only, the comparatively low figure being accounted for by the Russo-Japanese war.

    0
    0
  • From the Egyptian and Assyrio-Babylonian monuments we learn that in ancient times one of the principal exports of Syria was timber; this has now entirely ceased.

    0
    0
  • As regards the cultivation of the soil Syria remains stable; but the soil is becoming relatively poorer, the value of the imports constantly gaining upon that of the exports.

    0
    0
  • The chief exports are wheat, mealies, Kaffir corn, wool, mohair, horses and cattle.

    0
    0
  • The value of the trade depends on regular rains, so that in seasons of drought the exports seriously diminish.

    0
    0
  • The average annual value of trade for the five years ending the 30th of June 1905 was: - Exports £215,668, imports 203,026.

    0
    0
  • Other exports are tin and copper, granite, serpentine, vegetables and china clay.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports are wine, cognac and marble from Pentelicus.

    0
    0
  • The total value of exports in 1904 was f459,5 6 5; of imports, £2,459,278.

    0
    0
  • Tea and camphor are the staple exports.

    0
    0
  • The value of its exports to the United States increased from $5,581,288 in the fiscal year ending on the 30th of June 1901 to $26,998,542 in 1909, and the value of its imports from the United States increased during this period from $7,413,502 to $25,163,678.

    0
    0
  • In the meantime the value of its exports to foreign countries increased only from $3,002,679 to $4,565,598, and the value of its imports from foreign countries only from $1,952,728 to $3,054,318.

    0
    0
  • It was Orduin who first abolished the onerous system of tolls on exports and imports, and established a combination of native merchants for promoting direct commercial relations between Sweden and Russia.

    0
    0
  • The chief exports are oil-cake, flint, cod and Benedictine liqueur.

    0
    0
  • Timber makes up 59% of the imports, and coal and ships each about 30% of the exports.

    0
    0
  • Ivory, rubber and copal are the chief exports.

    0
    0
  • Olive oil and silk are the chief exports.

    0
    0
  • The chief exports are raw cotton, rice, wheat, oil-seeds, hides and lac. The exports of wheat are liable to extreme fluctuations, especially during famine periods.

    0
    0
  • It has tanneries and flour-mills, and exports timber, corn and mushrooms.

    0
    0
  • The chief article of export is coal from the neighbouring collieries, the other leading exports being ale, whisky, glass and manufactured goods.

    0
    0
  • The annual average value of the imports for the three years1904-1906was X97,035, of the exports X71,636.

    0
    0
  • The exports are chiefly groundnuts, rubber of inferior quality, sesamum and other oil seeds, tortoise-shell and ebony.

    0
    0
  • Germany has a large share of the exports.

    0
    0
  • Eure-et-Loir exports the products of its soil and live-stock; its imports include coal, wine and wearing apparel.

    0
    0
  • The important exports are gums and resin, fibre, hides, ivory, ostrich feathers, coffee, ghee, livestock, gold ingots from Abyssinia and mother-of-pearl; the shells being found along the coast from Zaila to beyond Berbera.

    0
    0
  • The exports are chiefly coffee, hides, ivory (all from Abyssinia), gum, mother-of-pearl and a little gold; the imports cotton and other European stuffs, cereals, beverages, tobacco and arms and ammunition for the Abyssinians.

    0
    0
  • The total volume of trade in 1902, the year of the completion of the railway, was X725,000, in 1905 it had risen to £1,208,000 - imports £480.000, exports 728,000.

    0
    0
  • It is connected with Ponce by railway (1910), and with the port of Arroyo by an excellent road, part of the military road extending to Cayey, and it exports sugar, rum, tobacco, coffee, cattle, fruit and other products of the department, which is very fertile.

    0
    0
  • About 90% of the total exports and imports of the country pass through the port, though the completion, in 1904, of a broad-gauge railway connecting Cairo and Port Said deflected some of the cotton exports to the Suez Canal route.

    0
    0
  • The staple export is raw cotton, the value of which is about 80% of all the exports.

    0
    0
  • Of the total trade Great Britain supplies from 35 to 40% of the imports and takes over 50% of the exports.

    0
    0
  • The copper output has not greatly increased since 1890, and is of slight importance in mineral exports.

    0
    0
  • The first exports from the Daiquiri district were made by an American company in 1884; the Nipe (Cagimaya) mines became prominent in promise in 1906.

    0
    0
  • Sugar and tobacco products together represent seven-eighths (in 1904-1907 respectively 60.3 and 27.3%) of the normal annual exports.

    0
    0
  • During the American military occupation of the island in 1899-1902, of the total imports 45.9% were from the United States, 14 from other American countries, 15 from Spain, 14 from the United Kingdom, 6 from France and 4 from Germany; of the exports the corresponding percentages for the same countries were 70.7, 2, 3, To, 4 and 7.

    0
    0
  • 81 9% of all exports.

    0
    0
  • The trade of the city is principally in Bolivian products - mineral ores, alpaca wool, &c. - but it also receives and exports the products of the neighbouring Peruvian provinces, and the output of the borax deposits in the neighbourhood.

    0
    0
  • The average annual value of imports is somewhat over £300,000, and of exports £200,000.

    0
    0
  • The extraordinary difference between the normal trade of the islands and that due to blockade-running will be seen by comparing the imports and exports before the' closing of the southern ports in 1860 with those of 1864.

    0
    0
  • In the first year the imports were £234,029, and the exports £157,350,.

    0
    0
  • exports £4,672,398.

    0
    0
  • The following tables show the total value of exports and imports arranged according to countries of origin or destination for1905-1906and 1908-1909; the same information for the year1905-1906with respect to the principal ports of the empire, and the tonnage of vessels cleared thereat during the year 1908-1909; and the value of the principal articles imported and exported for the year 1905-1906.

    0
    0
  • Its chief exports are rubber, gum, coffee and copper.

    0
    0
  • It is the chief port for exports from and imports to east Finland and a centre of the timber trade.

    0
    0
  • The total exports of the Cardiff docks in 1906 amounted to 8,767,502 tons, of which 8, 433, 629 tons were coal, coke and patent fuel, 151,912 were iron and steel and their manufactures, and 181,076 tons of general merchandise.

    0
    0
  • Besides the products of the soil Allier exports coal, mineral waters and cattle for the Paris market.

    0
    0
  • The modern town is connected with Smyrna by railway, and exports cotton, wool, opium, cocoons and cereals.

    0
    0
  • Callias And Hipponicus The exports from Callao are guano, sugar, cotton, wool, hides, silver, copper, gold and forest products, and the imports include timber and other building materials, cotton and other textiles, general merchandise for personal, household and industrial uses, railway material, coal, kerosene, wheat, flour and other food stuffs.

    0
    0
  • Honolulu's total exports for the fiscal year 1908 were valued at $4 2, 2 3 8, 455, and its imports at $19,985,724.

    0
    0
  • It exports citrons, wool, oak, bark and skins.

    0
    0
  • In the external trade the exports to Russia consist chiefly of grain, cattle, sheep, butter and other animal products, furs, game, feathers and down.

    0
    0
  • The total trade between Russia and China amounts to about £5,500,000 annually, of which 87% stands for imports into Russia and 13% for exports to China.

    0
    0
  • Tea makes up nearly one-half of the imports, the other commodities being silks, cottons, hides and wool; while cottons and other manufactured wares constitute considerably over 50% of the exports.

    0
    0
  • As nearly as can be estimated, the total imports into Siberia amount approximately to £5,000,000, the amount having practically doubled between 1890 and 1902; the total exports average about £9,000,000.

    0
    0
  • The city's foreign trade is of some importance; in 1907 the imports were valued at $2,720,594, and the exports at $1,272,247.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports are Portland stone, bricks and tiles and provisions, and the imports are coal, timber, garden and dairy produce and wine.

    0
    0
  • The chief exports are chestnut extract for tanning, cedrates, citrons, oranges, early vegetables, fish, copper ore and antimony ore.

    0
    0
  • 13 Javan exports slaves to Tyre, not conversely.

    0
    0
  • Segesvar has a good woollen and linen trade, as well as exports of wine and fruit.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports are sugar, coal, cereals, wool, forage, cement, chalk, phosphates, iron and steel, tools and metal-goods, thread and vegetables.

    0
    0
  • The average annual value of the imports for the years 1901-1905 was X23,926,000 (L22,287,000 for 1896-1900), of exports £6,369,000 (4,48r,000 for 1896-1900).

    0
    0
  • It is the distributing centre for the surrounding district, and exports railway carriages, engines, boilers, stoves, &c.

    0
    0
  • Cattle, phosphate of lime and salt, manufactured from a lake in the interior, are the principal exports, the market for these being the neighbouring island of St Thomas.

    0
    0
  • The imports, exports and domestic trade of Brazil 2105 4093 Miles.

    0
    0
  • The exports cover a wide range of agricultural, pastoral and natural productions, including coffee, rubber, sugar, cotton, cocoa, Brazil nuts, mate (Paraguay tea), hides, skins, fruits, gold, diamonds, manganese ore, cabinet woods and medicinal leaves, roots and resins.

    0
    0
  • Coffee and rubber, however, represent from 80 to 90% of the official valuation of all exports.

    0
    0
  • According to a summary for the six years 1901 to 1906, derived from official sources and published in the annual Retrospecto of the Jornal do Commercio, of Rio de Janeiro, the values of the imports and exports for those years (exclusive of coin), reduced to pounds sterling at the average rate of exchange (or value of one milreis) for each year, were as follows: - Nearly 761% of the exports of 1906 were of coffee and rubber, the official valuations of these being: coffee 2 45,474,5 2 5 milreis gold (27,615,884), and rubber (including manigoba and mangabeira), 12 4,941,433 milreis gold (£14,055,911).

    0
    0
  • Before the middle of the 19th century coffee became one of the leading exports, and its cultivation in the states of Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and Minas Geraes has been so increased since that time that it represents over four-fifths in value of the total export of agricultural produce.

    0
    0
  • Caca.0 (cocoa) is cultivated extensively in the Amazon Valley and along the coast as far south as southern Bahia, and forms one of the leading exports.

    0
    0
  • Of the exports of 1905, 36% were of this class, while those of the pastoral and mining industries combined were not quite 61%.

    0
    0
  • Of the total exports of this group (1905) very nearly 90% was of india-rubber, which percentage was reduced to 85 in the following year.

    0
    0
  • Besides these, tonka beans, anatto, vanilla, and castor-oil seeds form a part of the exports.

    0
    0
  • The mineral exports are surprisingly small.

    0
    0
  • Salt, which does not figure in the list of exports, is produced along the coast between Pernambuco and Cape St Roque.

    0
    0
  • They have the sole right also to impose duties on exports and taxes upon real estate, industries and professions, and transfers of property.

    0
    0
  • The national revenue is derived largely from the duties on imports, the duties on exports having been surrendered to the states when the republic was organized.

    0
    0
  • The chief exports are fish, cereals, bacon; imports, petroleum and coal.

    0
    0
  • The exports are, on the average, over one million sterling, and imports about double in value.

    0
    0
  • The chief exports, not all products of the province, are coal, wool, mohair, hides and skins, wattle bark, tea, sugar, fruits and jams. The import trade is of a most varied character, and a large proportion of the goods brought into the country are in transit to the Transvaal and Orange Free State, Natal affording, next to Delagoa Bay, the shortest route to the Rand.

    0
    0
  • In 1896 the value of exports was £1,785,000; in 1908 the value was £9,622,000.

    0
    0
  • The bulk of these exports are to the Transvaal and neighbouring countries, and previously figure as imports, other exports, largely wool and hides, are first imported from the Transvaal.

    0
    0
  • Over three-fifths of the imports are from Great Britain, and about one-seventh of the exports go to Great Britain.

    0
    0
  • The following table gives the foreign trade of Hungary only for a period of years in millions sterling: - Of the merchandise' entering the country, 75-80% comes from Austria, and exports go to the same country to the extent of 75%.

    0
    0
  • Next comes Germany with about 10% of the value of the total exports and 5% of that of imports.

    0
    0
  • The neighbouring Balkan states - Rumania and Servia - follow, and the United Kingdom receives somewhat more than 2% of the exports, while supplying about 1.5% of the imports.

    0
    0
  • The exports, which show plainly the prevailing agricultural character of the country, are flour, wheat, cattle, beef, barley, pigs, wine in barrels, horses and maize.

    0
    0
  • Wine and meat were the chief exports.

    0
    0
  • Its exports in 1908 were valued at $285,913 and its imports at $10,313.

    0
    0
  • The chief exports are gold and diamonds.

    0
    0
  • Of the total exports in 1908, valued at £33,323,000, gold was worth £29,643,000 and diamonds £1,977,000.

    0
    0
  • The gold and diamonds are sent to England via Cape Town; the other exports go chiefly to Deiagoa Bay.

    0
    0
  • The department imports coal, lime, stone, salt, raw sulphur, skins and timber and exports agricultural and mineral products, bricks and tiles, and other manufactured goods.

    0
    0
  • It exports iodine and immense quantities of nitrate of soda obtained from the desert region of the province.

    0
    0
  • The exports are chiefly sugar and cotton.

    0
    0
  • The exports (total value in 1905 £ 2 37, 010) comprise tea, raw silk and small quantities of cotton, rice and sugar-cane.

    0
    0
  • Wool and hides are the principal exports.

    0
    0
  • The total foreign trade in 1908 amounted to $9,778,810 imports and $14,560,830 exports, the values being in U.S. gold.

    0
    0
  • The exports to the United States were valued at $5,550,073 and to France $5,496,627.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports were coffee, cacau, divi-divi, rubber, hides and skins, cattle and asphalt.

    0
    0
  • The public revenues are derived from customs taxes and charges on imports and exports, transit taxes, cattle taxes, profits on coinage, receipts from state monopolies, receipts from various public services such as the post office, telegraph, Caracas waterworks, &c., and sundr y taxes, fines and other sources.

    0
    0
  • The chief imports are coal, timber and iron, and the exports grain and other agricultural products and salt.

    0
    0
  • The exports include cattle, hides, coffee, rubber, fruit and salt.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports are rubber, sugar, ground-nuts and oil seeds, beeswax, chromite (from Rhodesia), and gold (from Manica).

    0
    0
  • For the three years, 1905-1907, the average annual value of the imports and exports, excluding the transit trade with Rhodesia, was, imports £200,000, exports £90,000.

    0
    0
  • The Port Authority fixes the port rates, which, however, must not in any two consecutive years exceed one-thousandth part of the value of all imports and exports, or a three-thousandth of the value of goods discharged from or taken on board vessels not within the premises of a dock.

    0
    0
  • The following figures may be quoted for distinct purposes of comparison at different periods: Value of Exports of Home Produce (1840), £11,586,037; (1874), £60,232,118; (1880), £52,600,929; (1902-1905 average), £60,095,294.

    0
    0
  • These figures point to the fact that London is essentially a mart, and neither is itself, nor is the especial outlet for, a large manufacturing centre; hence imports greatly exceed exports.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports are wheat and indigo.

    0
    0
  • Subordinate products for exports include cutch dye, caoutchouc or india-rubber, cotton, petroleum and jade.

    0
    0
  • The company set to work with energy and the result was seen in largely increased exports.

    0
    0
  • The value of exports, about £6,500,000 in 1910, was over £1 1, 000,- 00o in 1916.

    0
    0
  • During that period rubber fell from being 77% to 15 in value of the exports of produce of the colony, though the quantity exported-3,000-4,000 tons - was about the same.

    0
    0
  • From 1914 onward copper and palm kernels and oil were the chief exports.

    0
    0
  • Before the war 60 to 70% of the imports came from Belgium, which also took the bulk of the exports.

    0
    0
  • Taxes on imports and exports, not exceeding the equivalent of io% ad valorem, direct taxation of Europeans, and a poll tax on native adult males, a tax on ivory and the Government share in the exploitation of mines were the chief sources of revenue; the administrative services and interest on debt the largest items of expenditure.

    0
    0
  • Under the bounty system, by which the protectionist countries of Europe stimulated the beet sugar industry by bounties on exports, the production of sugar in bounty-paying countries was encouraged and pushed far beyond the limits it could have reached without state aid.

    0
    0
  • Commerce is lively and the exports to foreign countries are very considerable.

    0
    0
  • Before that time timber had been one of its most important exports.

    0
    0
  • In 1900 the total had risen to £820,000, of which £480,000 was for imports and £340,000 for exports, the share of France in that year having been 45% of imports and 47% of exports.

    0
    0
  • The island imports wines, spirits, tissues, clothing and ironmongery; and exports ores, nickel, cobalt and chrome (which represent over three-quarters of the total exports in value), preserved meats and hides, coffee, copra and other colonial produce.

    0
    0
  • The exports go mainly to Austria-Hungary, Rumania, Italy, Egypt, the United Kingdom and the United States.

    0
    0
  • The exports of manufactured tobacco, such as Manila cheroots, find their principal market in China, British India, Australasia and the United Kingdom, whilst of the leaf tobacco fully three-quarters goes to Spain.

    0
    0
  • After the Restoration, to appease the planters, doubtful as to the title under which they held the estates which they had converted into valuable properties, the proprietary or patent interest was abolished, and the crown took over the government of the island; a duty of 41% on all exports being imposed to satisfy the claims of the patentees.

    0
    0
  • The imports to Jidda in the same year were £1,405,000, largely consisting of rice, wheat and other food stuffs from India; the exports, which have dwindled away in late years, amounted in 1904 to only £25,000.

    0
    0
  • To balance the exports and imports specie was exported in the three years 1902-1904 amounting to £2,319,000; a large proportion of this was perhaps provided by cash brought into the country by pilgrims.

    0
    0
  • In the latter year the imports amounted to £467,000, and the exports to £451,000; coffee, the mainstay of Yemen trade, shows a serious decline from £302,000 in 1902 to £229,000 in 1904; this is attributable partly to the great increase of production in other countries, but mainly to the insecurity of the trade routes and the exorbitant transit dues levied by the Turkish administration.

    0
    0
  • Oman, through its chief port Muscat, had a total trade of about £55 0, 000, two-thirds of which is due to imports and one-third to exports.

    0
    0
  • The principal trade centre of the Arabian side of the Persian Gulf is Bahrein; the total volume of trade of which amounted in 1904 to £1,900,000, nearly equally divided between imports and exports; rice, piece goods, &c., form the bulk of the former, while pearls are the most valuable part of the latter.

    0
    0
  • It exports bananas and other fruit.

    0
    0
  • Cabinet woods, fruit, tobacco, sugar, wax, honey and cattle products are the leading exports.

    0
    0
  • In the same year the imports from France exceeded £2,750,000 and the exports to France £1,685,000.

    0
    0
  • From Algeria the imports were £656,000; to Algeria the exports were £185,000.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports are olive oil, wheat, esparto grass, barley, sponges, dates, fish (especially tunny), hides, horses, wool, phosphates, copper, zinc and lead.

    0
    0
  • Mollendo is a shipping port for Bolivian exports sent over the railway from Puno.

    0
    0
  • The imports were valued in 1907 at 55,147,870 soles (to soles = £1 stg.) and the exports at 57,477,320 soles - the former showing a considerable increase and the latter a small decrease in comparison with 1906.

    0
    0
  • The exports consist of cotton, sugar, cocaine, hides and skins, rubber and other forest products, wool, guano and mineral products.

    0
    0
  • From guano an immense revenue was derived during the third quarter of the 19th century and it is still one of the largest exports.

    0
    0
  • Timber, pig-iron and iron ore are the leading imports, and coal, produce and iron the chief exports.

    0
    0
  • Hong-Kong being a free port, there are no official figures as to the amount of trade; but the value of the exports and imports is estimated as about £50,000,000 in the year.

    0
    0
  • There are large copper-smelting establishments in the city, which exports a very large amount of copper, some gold and silver, and cattle and hay to the more northern provinces.

    0
    0
  • The exports mainly consist of grain, cattle, fish, dairy produce and potatoes; the imports of coal and timber.

    0
    0
  • The value of trade probably exceeds 2,000,000, principal exports being rice, raw silk, dry fruit, fish, sheep and cattle, wool and cotton, and cocoons, the principal imports sugar, cotton goods, silkworm "seed" or eggs (70,160 worth in 1906-7), petroleum, glass and china., The trade in dried silkworm cocoons has increased remarkably since 1893, when only 76,150 lb valued at 6475 were exported; during the year 1906-7 ending 10th March, 2,717,540 lb valued at 238,000 were exported.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports are grain, eggs, cattle, linen cloth and flax, and the imports include timber, groceries and coal.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports are salt, minerals, opium, cotton, cereals, wool and live stock; and the imports cloth-goods, coffee, rice and petroleum.

    0
    0
  • San Juan exports wine, and has a profitable trade with Chile over the Patos and Uspallata passes.

    0
    0
  • The staple exports are beans, pulse and peas, marine products, sulphur, furs and timber; the staple imports, comestibles (especially salted fish), kerosene and oil-cake.

    0
    0
  • Cereals, cotton, forest products, cattle, and hides, and brass and copper vessels are the chief exports from the district.

    0
    0
  • Its inhabitants are noted for their skill as traders; the town itself produces nothing in the way of exports.

    0
    0
  • The state has a natural water outlet in the Providence river and Narragansett Bay, but there is lack of adequate dockage in Providence harbour, and insufficient depth of water for ocean traffic. The ports of entry are Providence (by far the largest, with imports valued at $ 1, 8 93,55 1, and exports valued at $12,517 in 1909), Newport and Bristol.

    0
    0
  • Cotton yarn and cloth, petroleum, timber and furs are among the chief imports; copper, tin, hides and tea are important exports; medicines in the shape not only of herbs and roots, but also of fossils, shells, bones, teeth and various products of the animal kingdom; and precious stones, principally jade and rubies, are among the other exports.

    0
    0
  • Its principal imports are cotton and woollen goods, yarn, metals, sugar, coffee, tea, spices, cashmere shawls, &c., and its principal exports opium, wool, carpets, horses, grain, dyes and gums, tobacco, rosewater, &c. The importance of Bushire has much increased since about 1862.

    0
    0
  • Consulates of Great Britain, Germany, France, Russia and Turkey and several European mercantile houses are established at Bushire, and notwithstanding the drawbacks of bad roads to the interior, insufficient and precarious means of transport, and want of security, the annual value of the Bushire trade since 1890 averaged about £1,500,000 (one-third being for exports, two-thirds for imports), and over two-thirds of this was British.

    0
    0
  • The chief exports of the islands besides coir and cowries (a decreasing trade) are coco-nuts, copra, tortoise-shell and dried bonito-fish.

    0
    0
  • Sugar and molasses are the chief exports.

    0
    0
  • The exports of Baden, which coincide largely with the industries just mentioned, are of considerable importance, but the bulk of its trade consists in the transit of goods.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports are wines, especially champagne, spirits, hay, straw, wool, potatoes, woven goods, fruit, glass-ware, lace and metal-ware.

    0
    0
  • During the five years 1901-1905 the average annual value of exports was X8,388,000 06,363,000 in the years 1896-1900), of imports X4,145,000 03,759, 000 in 1896-1900).

    0
    0
  • It exports a considerable quantity of oranges, olives and liquorice.

    0
    0
  • Among its exports are sugar, coffee, cacao, tobacco and fruit.

    0
    0
  • The exports include copper and silver and their ores, nitrate of soda, borax, guano and other minerals in small quantities.

    0
    0
  • It exports large quantities of sugar, hides, tobacco, and bees-wax; also some cedar and mahogany.

    0
    0
  • Raw cotton and silk are the principal exports, while manufactured goods are imported from Russia.

    0
    0
  • In that year the tribute of the allies was commuted for a 5% tax on all imports and exports by sea.

    0
    0
  • It exports largely through Beirut and Saida, using both the French railway which crosses S.

    0
    0
  • Large quantities of timber are imported from Canada and Norway; coal, iron, manufactured goods and agricultural produce are the chief exports.

    0
    0
  • It is on the Glasgow & South-Western railway, and has a harbour and dock from which coal and goods are the main exports.

    0
    0
  • The exports are copra, fungus and straw hats, which the women plait very cleverly.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports from Maracaibo are coffee, hides and skins, cabinet and dye-woods, cocoa, and mangrove bark, to which may be added dividivi, sugar, copaiba, gamela and hemp straw for paper-making, and fruits.

    0
    0
  • In 1906, 26% of the coffee exports was of Colombian origin.

    0
    0
  • Its chief exports are seedless grapes ("currants"), olive-oil, silk and cereals.

    0
    0
  • The chief exports are linen, whisky, aerated waters, iron ore and cattle.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports of local produce are potatoes, cumin seed, vegetables, oranges, goats and sheep, cotton goods and stone.

    0
    0
  • The annual value of exports would be set off against imported food for about one month and a half.

    0
    0
  • The financial position in1906-1907is indicated by the following: Public revenue £513,594 (including £51,039 carried to revenue from capital); expenditure £446,849; imports (actual), I,219,819; imports in transit, £5,876,981; exports (actual), £123,510; exports in transit £6,127,277; imports from the United Kingdom (actual), £218,461.

    0
    0
  • The main exports were asphalt and calcium carbide.

    0
    0
  • The total value of exports and imports was in1876-1877upwards of £1,536,000.

    0
    0
  • Samsun exports cereals, tobacco and wool.

    0
    0
  • Both exports and imports are about stationary, the Angora railway having neutralized any tendency to rise.

    0
    0
  • The exports are mahogany, rosewood, cedar, logwood and other cabinet-woods and dye-woods, with cocoanuts, sugar, sarsaparilla, tortoiseshell, deerskins, turtles and fruit, especially bananas.

    0
    0
  • It imports general merchandise and manufactures, and exports phosphates, iron, zinc, barley, sheep, wool, cork, esparto, &c. There are manufactories of native garments, tapestry and leather.

    0
    0
  • Holguin has trade in cabinet woods, tobacco, Indian corn and cattle products, which it exports through its port Gibara, about 25 m.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports are rice and teak, and the principal imports, cotton and silk goods and gold-leaf.

    0
    0
  • The value of trade, which more than doubled between the years 1900 and 1907, amounted in the latter year to £5,600,000 imports and 7,Ioo,000 exports.

    0
    0
  • Coal, textiles and iron and steel goods figure prominently amongst the imports, and emery, leather, lemons, sponges, flour, valonia and iron ore amongst the exports.

    0
    0
  • The chief exports are stone for road-making, butter, eggs and vegetables; the chief imports are coal, timber, superphosphates and wine from Algeria.

    0
    0
  • For the last thirty years the average increase in the output has been 22% per annum, and that in the exports (including bunkers) 42% per annum.

    0
    0
  • The chief exports consist of rice, rattans, torches, dried fish, areca-nuts, sesamum seeds, molasses, sea-slugs, edible birds' nests and tin.

    0
    0
  • Straw or grass hats, straw mats, samshu (from the Shao-sing district), Chinese drugs, vegetable tallow and fish are among the chief exports; in 1904 the hats numbered 2,125,566, though in 1863 they had only amounted to 40,000, and the mats, mainly despatched to south China, average from 1,000,000, to 2,000,000.

    0
    0
  • The chief exports are sisal fibre, rubber, hides and skins, wax, ivory, copra, coffee, ground-nuts and cotton.

    0
    0
  • In 1907 the imports were valued at (1,190,000, the exports at £625,000.

    0
    0
  • Revenue is raised by taxes on imports and exports, on licences for the sale of land and spirituous liquors, and for wood-cutting, by harbour and other dues, and a hut tax on natives.

    0
    0
  • In 1898, the year before the beginning of the Anglo-Boer war, the volume of trade was: - Imports £5,128,292, exports £15,881,952.

    0
    0
  • In 1904, two years after the conclusion of the war the figures were: - imports £9,070,757; exports £17,471,760.

    0
    0
  • In 1907 during a period of severe and prolonged trade depression the imports had fallen to £5,263,930, but the exports owing entirely to the increased output of gold from the Rand mines had increased to £37,994,658; gold and diamonds represented over £37,000,000 of this total.

    0
    0
  • The value of the trade during1901-1902was approximately £400,000 in imports (largely railway material) and £50,000 in exports.

    0
    0
  • For the six years1903-1904to1908-1909the imports increased from £147,000 to £419,000, and the exports - produce of the protectorate - from £43, 000 to £127,000.

    0
    0
  • Among the new industries are sugar and coffee plantations, while cotton, ground-nuts and rubber figure increasingly among the exports, cotton and cottonseed being of special importance.

    0
    0
  • Imports were valued at £72,286 in1899-1900(an increase of over £20, I Io in the year), and exports (including the gold mines) at £56,167, while in 1905 the figures were £67,188 for imports and £73,669 for exports, and in 1906 £79,671 and £80,290 respectively.

    0
    0
  • In 1905 imports into Kaiser Wilhelms Land were valued at £33,316, and exports at £7702, and the estimated expenditure for1907-1908of £76,000 included an imperial subvention of £57,696.

    0
    0
  • The exports consist chiefly of cereals, cattle, horses, sheep, wine, fish and hides.

    0
    0
  • Iron mines, slate and stone quarries are worked at various points, and, with live stock, poultry, wool and timber form the chief exports.

    0
    0
  • Exports are all kinds of manufactured goods, such as cotton, linen, woollen, worsted and leather goods, machinery and hardware.

    0
    0
  • The city's exports were valued at $45,000 in 1907 and at $306,439 in 1908.

    0
    0
  • It produces rice, tobacco, coffee, cotton and sugar-cane, none of them important as exports.

    0
    0
  • Only a small part of the exports and imports of Massachusetts is now carried in American bottoms.'

    0
    0
  • In that year the value of imports at the Boston-Charlestown customs district was $123,411,168, and the value of exports was $104,610,908; for 1909 the corresponding figures were $127,025,654 and $72,936,869.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports are cereals and flour, cattle, horses, hemp, flax, timber, sugar and oilcake.

    0
    0
  • In the year last named imports were valued at £5 8 9,979 and exports at £130,305, the annual averages since 1895 being about £426,300 and £112,500 respectively.

    0
    0
  • The chief exports are butter and eggs; the chief imports sugar, petroleum, coal and iron.

    0
    0
  • In 1909 its foreign imports were valued at $513,439; its foreign exports at $2,507,373.

    0
    0
  • The exports consist chiefly of agricultural produce.

    0
    0
  • The exports are chiefly phosphates and other minerals, cereals, olive oil, cattle, hides, sponges and wax.

    0
    0
  • The total tonnage of the exports in 1906 was 9,757,380 (all of which, except 26,491 tons, was coal), and of the imports 506,103 tons.

    0
    0
  • As, however, this decline was accompanied with a considerable decrease in the proportion of the country's exports which passed through the port of New York, interest in the canals revived, and in 1903 the electorate of the state authorized the issue of bonds to the amount of $101,000,000 for the purpose of increasing the capacity of the Erie, the Champlain and the Oswego canals, to make each navigable by barges of 1000 tons burden.

    0
    0
  • The imports to the port of New York increased in value from $466,527,631 in 1897 to $891,614,678 in 1909, while the exports increased in value from $404,750,496 to $627,782,767.

    0
    0
  • Before 1886 exports exceeded imports; but in the twenty subsequent years there was an invariable excess of exports, valued in all at £52,000,000.

    0
    0
  • Wool (£4,250,000 to £7,657,000 according to prices) remains at the head of the list of exports.

    0
    0
  • In 1895 began a marked commercial revival, mainly due to the steady conversion of the colony's waste lands into pasture; the development of frozen meat and dairy exports; the continuous increase of the output of coal; the invention of gold-dredging; the revival and improvement of hemp manufacture; the exploiting of the deposits of kauri gum; the reduction in the rates of interest on mortgage money; a general rise in wages, obtained without strikes, and partially secured by law, which has increased the spending power of the working classes.

    0
    0
  • In the 18th century it ranked next to Leith as a port, but the growth of Grangemouth, higher up the firth, seriously affected its shipping trade, which is, however, yet considerable, coal and pig-iron forming the principal exports, and pit props from the Baltic the leading import.

    0
    0
  • An active trade is carried on in corn, wine and timber (exports), and manufactures and grocery wares (imports).

    0
    0
  • Its chief exports are diamonds, live stock (cattle, horses and mules, sheep and goats), wool, mohair, coal, wheat and eggs.

    0
    0
  • Except the diamonds, which go to London via Cape Town, all the exports are taken by the neighbouring territories.

    0
    0
  • The volume of trade in 1898, as represented by imports and exports, was £3,114,000 (imports £1,190,000; exports £1,923,000).

    0
    0
  • For the four years beginning on June 30, 1902, that is immediately after the close of hostilities, the imports increased from £2,460,000 to £4,053,000, the exports from £285,000 to £3,045,000.

    0
    0
  • For the fiscal year1908-1909the imports were valued at £2,945,000, the exports at £3,558,000.

    0
    0
  • Silver was raised in the 12th century, and argentiferous lead is still the most valuable ore mined; tin, iron and cobalt rank next, and coal is one of the chief exports.

    0
    0
  • The exports and most of the imports pass through Bagdad.

    0
    0
  • Cromwell's policy in this respect was continued under the Restoration, and in 1660 a committee of the privy council was appointed for the purpose of obtaining information as to the imports and exports of the country and improving trade.

    0
    0
  • is shown the excess of imports of grain over exports (+), or of exports over imports (-).

    0
    0
  • Exports of Cotton.

    0
    0
  • This factor was the rupture of communications with foreign countries, due in the earlier stages of the war to the limitation, and at one time the prohibition, of exports by neutral countries, the passing over of some of these countries to the enemy, and lastly the blockade by the enemy Powers, which increased in efficiency and made it more and more difficult to import the most essential commodities, until in the end it was almost impossible to obtain from abroad anything, needed either for the soldiers or the civilians.

    0
    0
  • The city is a port of entry, and in 1908 its imports were valued at $3,080,437, and its exports at only $75,525.

    0
    0
  • The expenditure for 1906 amounted to $5,072,406, of which $836,097 was spent on administrative establishments, $301,252 on the upkeep of existing public works; $415,175 on the construction of works and buildings, and of new roads, streets, bridges, &c. The imports in 1906 were valued at $94,54 6, 112; the exports at $90,709,225.

    0
    0
  • Of the exports, $23,122,947 went to the United Kingdom, or to British possessions or protectorates; $37,671,033 went to foreign countries; and $2,754,238 went to the Dindings, Malacca or Singapore.

    0
    0
  • The exports, chiefly to the United States, include salt, sponges and sisal hemp. Grand Turk is in cable communication with Bermuda and with Kingston, Jamaica, some 420 m.

    0
    0
  • Trade with her immediate neighbours is now insignificant, the total value of annual imports and exports being about £400,000; but seaborne commerce is in a very flourishing condition.

    0
    0
  • Bangkok, with an annual trade valued at £13,000,000, easily overtops all the rest of the country, the other ports together accounting for a total of imports and exports not exceeding £3,000,000.

    0
    0
  • Imports, principally timber, grain, cotton and linseed, increased owing to these improvements from L116,179 in 1881 to £816,698 in 1899; and exports (coal, machinery and manufactured goods) from £83,000 in 1883 to £261,873 in 1899.

    0
    0
  • The city's foreign trade is light (the value of its imports was $859,442 in 1907; of its exports $664,525), but its river traffic is heavy, amounting to about 3,000,000 tons annually, and being chiefly in general merchandise (including food-stuffs, machinery and manufactured products), ores and metals, chemicals and colours, stone and sand and brick.

    0
    0
  • Pepper, nutmegs and cloves were long the objects of the most important branch of Dutch commerce; and gutta-percha, camphor, dammar, benzoin and other forest products have a place among the exports.

    0
    0
  • The average annual value of exports during1900-1905was £22,496,468, and of imports £17,050,338.

    0
    0
  • A great proportion of the exports goes to the mother country, though a considerable quantity of rice is exported to China.

    0
    0
  • The city is an important railway centre, has extensive railway repair shops and stock-yards, and exports large quantities of live-stock, hides and wool.

    0
    0
  • Imports consist of cotton, linen and woollen fabrics, hardware, cutlery and machinery, kerosene, glass and earthenware; and the exports of cattle, sugar, tobacco, coffee, coco-nuts and fibre, dividivi and dye-woods, vegetable ivory, rubber, hides and skins, medicinal forest products, gold, silver and platinum.

    0
    0
  • The aggregate value of the exports in 1906 was $3,788,094 U.

    0
    0
  • The exports from Batavia to the other islands of the archipelago, and to the ports in the Malay Peninsula, are rice, sago, coffee, sugar, salt, oil, tobacco, teak timber and planks, Java cloths, brass wares, &c., and European, Indian and Chinese goods.

    0
    0
  • Czechoslovakia manufactures and exports agricultural machinery, plant for sugar refineries and distilleries, locomotives, railway carriages and trucks and other rolling-stock, motor-cars, tractors.

    0
    0
  • In 1919 Czechoslovak exports to Great Britain (exclusive of colonies) amounted to a value of 238 million crowns, imports to 328 millions.

    0
    0
  • The mines and marble quarries are no longer worked; and the chief exports are now fir timber for shipbuilding, olive oil, honey and wax.

    0
    0
  • Iannina had previously been one of the chief centres of the Thessalian grain trade; it now exports little except cheese, hides, bitumen and sheepskins to the annual value of about £120,000; the imports, which supply only the local demand for provisions, textile goods, hardware, &c., are worth about double that sum.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports are fish, coarse black tea, cotton, vegetable tallow, sweet potatoes, and some wheat.

    0
    0
  • Vidin exports cereals and fruit, and is locally celebrated for its gold and silver filigree.

    0
    0
  • According to consular reports the value of the exports and imports which passed through the Tabriz custom-house during the years 1867-73 averaged L593,800 and f1,226,660 (total for the year, I,820,460); the averages for the six years 1893-9 were £212,880 and £544,530.

    0
    0
  • For the year 1898-9 the present writer obtained figures directly from the books kept by the custom-house official at Tabriz, and although, as this official informed him, some important items had not been entered at all, the value of the exports and imports shown in the books exceeded that of the consular reports by about io per cent.

    0
    0
  • The total imports and exports at the time of the French occupation (1830) did not exceed £175,000.

    0
    0
  • The chief exports are sheep and oxen, most of which are raised in Morocco and Tunisia, and horses; animal products, such as wool and skins; wine, cereals (rye, barley, oats), vegetables, fruits (chiefly figs and grapes for the table) and seeds, esparto grass, oils and vegetable extracts (chiefly olive oil), iron ore, zinc, natural phosphates, timber, cork, crin vegetal and tobacco.

    0
    0
  • The exports, which comprise coffee, bananas, cocoa, cabinet-woods and dye-woods, with hides and skins, mother-of-pearl, tortoiseshell and gold, were officially valued at £1,398,000 in 1904; and in the same year the imports, including foodstuffs, dry goods and hardware, were valued at £1,229,000.

    0
    0
  • Over £1,250,000 worth of the exports consisted of coffee and bananas, and these commodities were of almost equal value.

    0
    0
  • The exports to Russia consist of raw cotton and silk, lamb-skins, fruits and carpets, and the imports of manufactured goods and sugar.

    0
    0
  • In1906-1907the imports were valued at $111,234,968 U.S. gold, and the exports at $123,512,969, of which very nearly one half consisted of precious metals.

    0
    0
  • According to an official report issued early in 1909 there had been a heavy decrease in both imports and exports, the former being returned at $36,195,469 and the latter at $54,300,896 for the six months ending the 31st of December 1908.

    0
    0
  • The exports include gold, silver, copper, coffee, henequen or sisal, ixtle and other fibres, cabinet woods, chicle, rubber and other forest products, hides and skins, chickpeas, tobacco and sugar.

    0
    0
  • Besides fruits and agricultural produce, its exports include raw silk, [[Cotton (disambiguation)|cotton, opium, ]]-water, attar of roses, wax and the dye known as Turkey red.

    0
    0
  • The exports also include hides, mangabeira rubber, piassava fibre, diamonds, cabinet woods and rum.

    0
    0
  • The value of the goods imported into the protectorate in 1906 was £118,322; the value of the exports was £77,736.

    0
    0
  • Astoria is the port of entry for the Oregon Customs District, Oregon; in 1907 its imports were valued at $21,262, and its exports at $329,103.

    0
    0
  • It is estimated that the value of the imports and exports into and from Muhamrah, excluding specie, is about £300,000 per annum, paying customs amounting to about £18,000.

    0
    0
  • Guatemala is surpassed only by Brazil and the East Indies in the quantity of coffee it exports.

    0
    0
  • The exports during the same period had an average value of £1,528,000, and ranked as follows in order of value: coffee (£1,300,000), timber, hides, rubber, sugar, bananas, cocoa.

    0
    0
  • It may be added that the net ordinary revenue of the government was in 1850 $43,592,889, and in 1909 $662,324,445; that the value of imports rose from $7.48 ~er capita in 1850 to $14.47 in 1909; and of exports from $6.23 to $18.50.

    0
    0
  • Since the English board of trade estimated the exports of British manufactured goods at from 17 to 20% of the industrial output of the United Kingdom in 1902, this would indicate a manufactured product hardly two-thirds as great as that of the true factory establishments of the United States in 1900.

    0
    0
  • The total trade of the country by land and sea, the movement inward and outward, is shown in the following table for various years since 1861: Imports by Land Exports by Land Year.

    0
    0
  • The excess of exports over imports in the decade1899-1908totalled $5,728,214,844; and in the same period there was an excess of exports of gold and silver, above imports, of $444,908,963.

    0
    0
  • Of the total exports of 1909 $1,700,743,638 represented domestic merchandise.

    0
    0
  • The remainder, or element of foreign exports, has been of similarly small relative magnitude since about 1880, but was of course much larger while the carrying trade was of importance.

    0
    0
  • From 1820 up to 1880 agricultural products made up with remarkable steadiness almost exactly four-fifths of all exports of domestic merchandise.

    0
    0
  • The following table indicates in a general way the increased value, in round millions of dollars, of the leading agricultural exports since 1860:

    0
    0
  • Classifying imports and domestic exports as of six groups: (I) crude foodstuffs and good animals; (2) foodstuffs partly or wholly prepared; (3) raw materials for use in manufacturing; (4) manufactured articles destined to serve as materials in further processes of manufacture; (5) finished manufactures; (6) miscellaneous productsthe table on p. 645 shows the distribution of imports and exports among these six classes since 182o.i It will be seen from the table that the share of the first two classes in both imports and exports has been relatively constant.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand the great increase of imports of class III., and the great decrease of class V.; and of exports the great increase of those of class IV., and decrease of those of classes III.

    0
    0
  • Europe takes, of course, a large share of the exports of finished manufacturesa little more than a third of the total in the quinquennial period 1903-1908; but North America takes but very slightly less.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, above 70% of manufactures destined to serve, as material in further processes of manufacture went, in the same years, to Europe, and from eight- to nine-tenths of the first three classes of exports.

    0
    0
  • After Europe the largest shares of exports are taken by North America, Asia and Oceania, South America and Africa in order.

    0
    0
  • The shares of the ten nations having the largest part in the trade of the country were as follows in 1909: Imports from Exports to Great Britain 247,474,104 521,281,999

    0
    0
  • New York, New Orleans, Boston, Galveston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, San Francisco and Puget Sound are, in order, the leading customs districts of the country in the value of their imports and exports.

    0
    0
  • In 1909 more than eighttenths of all imports of the country entered by, and more than seventenths of all exports went out through, the eight customs districts just named.

    0
    0
  • Of the imports and exports of I 86f two-thirds (in value) were carried in American vessels.

    0
    0
  • The merchant marine of the United States in 1900 totalled 5,164,839 net tons, which was less than that of 1860 (5,353,808), in which year American shipping attained an amount which only in recent years Exports of Domestic Merchandise.

    0
    0
  • those of laying duties on exports or imports, keeping troops or war-ships in time of peace, entering into agreements with another state or foreign power, engaging in war unless invaded.

    0
    0
  • The national government, whose revenue powers are only limited by: (a) the provision of the constitution which prohibits all duties on exports, and (b) the provision that all direct taxes must be levied in proportion to populationa provision which deprives direct taxes of nearly all their efficiency for revenue purposes.

    0
    0
  • Of the last amount, £7,124,000 represented exports and £6,517,000 imports.

    0
    0
  • The exports were: hides and skins £2,123,000, cotton goods £2,112,000, coffee £456,000, grain and pulse £329,000, tobacco £213,000 and salt £151,000.

    0
    0
  • The exports of lumber are about equally divided between the two.

    0
    0
  • In 1906 the total exports of cheese to all countries from Canada reached 215,834,543 lb of the value of $24,433,169.

    0
    0
  • With the rapid increase of population, production in Canada also greatly increased; exports, imports and revenue constantly expanded, and capital, finding abundant and profitable employment, began to flow freely into the country for further industrial development.

    0
    0
  • Brandy distilleries are numerous, and there is some trade in wood; but no local industry can rival agriculture and stock-breeding, which furnish the bulk of the exports.

    0
    0
  • Besides lead, the exports include grapes, sugar and esparto.

    0
    0
  • Its exports, which are large, include rice, coffee of excellent quality, cacao, sugar, Indian corn, horses and cattle.

    0
    0
  • The chief exports are rice, indigo, linseed and other seeds, saltpetre and tobacco.

    0
    0
  • Cotton has always been the principal source of wealth, the amount of its exports at Mobile increasing from 7000 bales in 1818 to 25,000 bales in 1821, and the total product of the state in 1840 being double that of 1830.

    0
    0
  • The exports which come next in value are opium, wood-oil, hides, beans, cotton yarn and raw silk.

    0
    0
  • The total trade in 1904 was valued at £15,401,076 (9,042,190 being exports and £(1,358,886 imports) as compared with a total of £17,183,400 in 1891 and £11,628,000 in 1880.

    0
    0
  • The trade is mostly in coal and lime and the exports are chiefly agricultural.

    0
    0
  • It has post and telegraph offices, and a population of about 7000, mostly Kurds of the Mukri tribe, and exports dried fruit, grain and tobacco.

    0
    0
  • Cane sugar and vanilla are the chief exports.

    0
    0
  • The total trade of the port increased from £3,853,593 in 1897 to £5, 6 75, 28 5 in 1905 and £7,009,758 in 1906 (the large increase being mainly due to a rise of over Li,000,000 in imports - mainly of coal, building materials and machinery), the average ratio of imports to exports being as three to two.

    0
    0
  • The imports consist principally of machinery, coal, grain, dried fish, tobacco and hides, and the exports of hemp, hides, olive oil, soap, coral, candied fruit, wine, straw hats, boracic acid, mercury, and marble and alabaster.

    0
    0
  • In 1906 the total imports and exports amounted to 1,470,000 tons including coasting trade.

    0
    0
  • Its exports include coffee, sugar, hides, cabinet woods, tobacco and cigars, tapioca, gold, diamonds, manganese and sundry small products.

    0
    0
  • Rio is also a distributing centre in the coasting trade, and many imported products, such as jerked beef (came secca), hay, flour, wines, &c., appear among the coastwise exports, as well as domestic manufactures.

    0
    0
  • The total exports for 1905 were officially valued at 62,572,033 milreis gold, or a little over one-sixth the exportation of the whole country.

    0
    0
  • The exports of coffee from Rio in 1908 amounted to $ 3,062,268 bags of 60 kilogrammes each, officially valued at about 27,846,000.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports are granite, timber and hats; and butter through Helsingborg and Gothenburg.

    0
    0
  • Buffalo is the port of entry of Buffalo Creek customs district; in 1908 its imports were valued at $6,708,919, and its exports at $26,192,563.

    0
    0
  • Since about 1880 the silk production of the world (including only exports from the East) has more than doubled, the variations owing to partial failures from some countries being more than compensated by increase from others.

    0
    0
  • The remarkable development of the comparatively new trade in spun silk goes far to compensate for the loss of the older trade of net silk, and has enabled the exports of silk manufactures from Great Britain to be at least maintained and to show some signs of expansion.

    0
    0
  • But it is highly significant that while the exports of British silk manufactures have not decreased, the imports in the meantime have shown a marked expansion.

    0
    0
  • There is a considerable import of coal, cotton, iron and breadstuffs, the chief exports being butter, fish, timber and wood pulp. During the period of emigration, owing to political troubles with Russia, over 12,000 Finns sailed from Hangs in a single year (1901), mostly for the United States and Canada.

    0
    0
  • There are wharves on both sides of the river, and the staple exports are sugar, golden-syrup and timber.

    0
    0
  • In 1906 the exports of fruits from Hawaii to the continental United States were valued at $382,295.

    0
    0
  • In 1880 the value of imports from the United States was $2,086,000, that of exports to the United States was $4,606,000; in 1907 the value of shipments of domestic merchandise from the United States to Hawaii was.

    0
    0
  • In the fiscal year 1908 the exports from Hawaii to foreign countries were valued at $597,640, ten times as much as in 1905 ($59,54 1); the imports into Hawaii from foreign countries were valued at $4,682,399 in the fiscal year 1908, as against $3,014,964 in 1905.

    0
    0
  • S.E.) at the mouth of the bay, which is seldom closed in winter, exports iron and zinc ore, timber, wood-pulp and oats.

    0
    0
  • Aidin is on the SmyrnaDineir railway, has large tanneries and sweetmeat manufactories, and exports figs, cotton and raisins.

    0
    0
  • It has an important trade with Constantinople in butter and cheese, and also exports wine, brandy, cereals and tobacco.

    0
    0
  • The average yearly values of the exports of cotton, yarn and cloth from Great Britain for the decades 1881-1890 and 1891-1900 respectively, are given by Professor Chapman in his Cotton Industry and Trade, in million pounds: 1881-1890.1891-1900 .

    0
    0
  • £7 2.7 £66.6 During the earlier decade the prices of cotton were comparatively high The whole of the cloth exports represent, of course, a corresponding home trade in yarns.

    0
    0
  • The following table, taken from the Manchester Guardian, gives in thousands of lb the amounts of cotton yarns exported from Great Britain during 1903, 1904 and 1905 respectively, according to the Board of Trade returns, together with the average value per lb for each of the countries: It should be understood, however, that in some cases the Board of Trade figures represent only an approximation to the ultimate distribution, as the exports are sometimes assigned to the intermediate country, and in particular it is understood that a considerable part of the yarn sent to the Netherlands is destined for Germany or Austria.

    0
    0
  • The exports of Mosul for 1908 were (in thousands of pounds sterling): United Kingdom 195, India 42, other countries 52, parts of Turkey 218; the imports: United Kingdom 56, India 16, other countries 35, parts of Turkey 24.

    0
    0
  • The exports include cattle, hides, skins, wool and ostrich feathers.

    0
    0
  • Philadelphia, the Atlantic port, exports chiefly petroleum, coal, grain and flour, and imports chiefly iron ore, sugar, drugs and chemicals, manufactured iron, hemp, jute and flax.

    0
    0
  • In 1909 the value of its exports, $80,650,274, was greater than that of any other Atlantic port except New York, and the value of its imports, $78,003,464, was greater than that of any except New York and Boston.

    0
    0
  • The exports from Tibet are silver, gold, salt, wool, woollen cloth, rugs, furs, drugs, musk.

    0
    0
  • Portsmouth and Norfolk form a customs district, Norfolk being the port of entry, whose exports in 1908 were valued at $11,326,817, and imports at $1,150,044.

    0
    0
  • The exports, which include beans, almonds, maize, chick-peas, wool, hides, wax, eggs, &c., were valued at 360,000 in 1900, £364,000 in 1904, and £248,000 in 1906.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports are wool, mohair and copper ore, and imports are cotton and woollen goods, indigo, coffee, sugar, petroleum, &c.

    0
    0
  • Rodosto was long a great depot for the produce of the Adrianople district, but its trade suffered when Dedeagatch became the terminus of the railway up the Maritza, and the town is now dependent on its maritime trade, especially its exports to Constantinople.

    0
    0
  • In 1906 the figures were: imports, X324,000; exports, X113,000.

    0
    0
  • Exports, mostly agricultural produce (butter, bacon, eggs); imports, iron, petroleum, coal, yarn and timber.

    0
    0
  • S.W., the port of entry of the Pearl River customs district, whose exports, chiefly timber, lumber, naval stores and charcoal, were valued at $8,392,271 in 1907.

    0
    0
  • The chief imports are Baltic timber, coal, salt and manure; and the exports, manufactured goods, grain, potatoes and slates.

    0
    0
  • The value of imports (chiefly coal, wheat, scrap-iron and cheese) for 1904 was £1,239,048, and the value of exports (chiefly macaroni and green fruit) £769,100.

    0
    0
  • Preveza exports dairy produce, valonia, hides and wool, olives and olive oil.

    0
    0
  • Its exports include timber, citrons, skins, chestnuts and gallic acid.

    0
    0
  • In 1909 the imports of the port were valued at 042,286 and the exports at $600,794.

    0
    0
  • Exports (principally coffee and wax) are valued at about £55,000 annually, and imports at about the same amount.

    0
    0
  • A dangerous bar at the mouth of the river permits the entrance only of the smaller coasting steamers, but the port is an important commercial centre, and exports considerable quantities of cotton, hides, manicoba, rubber, fruit, and palm wax.

    0
    0
  • It is the port of entry for the Vermont customs district, whose exports and imports were valued respectively in 1907 at $8,333,024 and $5,721,034.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports are wines, cereals, olive-oil, cotton goods, soap, cigarette-paper, furniture and barrels, boots, shoes and leather goods, and machinery.

    0
    0
  • Its chief exports are oranges, millet, dra and other cereals, goat-hair and skins, sheepskins, wool and fullers' earth.

    0
    0
  • It exports pistachios, almonds and coarse tobacco.

    0
    0
  • The imports are principally iron, coal, salt and timber; the exports barley, oats, cattle, pigs and potatoes.

    0
    0
  • There are exports of hides, cedar and fruit, and the adjacent district of Tabares produces cotton, tobacco, cacao, sugar cane, Indian corn, beans and coffee.

    0
    0
  • of well-wooded and mountainous country, and exports timber to a large extent.

    0
    0
  • The exports are chiefly oxen, meat, fowls and eggs for Gibraltar and sometimes for Spain, with occasional shipments of slippers and blankets to Egypt.

    0
    0
  • The city is the see of a Protestant Episcopal bishop. Wilmington is chiefly a commercial city, and ships large quantities of cotton, lumber, naval stores, rice, marketgarden produce and turpentine; in 1909 the value of its exports was $23,310,070 and the value of its imports $1,282,724.

    0
    0
  • The neighbouring country is devoted principally to raising horses, mules and cattle; and in addition to hides and leather, it exports rubber and other forest products.

    0
    0
  • The exports consist chiefly of corn, potatoes, hops, beer, wine, cloth, cotton goods, glass, fancy wares, toys, cattle, pigs and vegetables.

    0
    0
  • The principal exports from all the regencies alike are black and white pepper, bamboo (rotan), gums, caoutchouc, copra, nutmegs, mace and gambir.

    0
    0
  • The fisheries not only supply the great local demand, but allow of large exports.

    0
    0
  • An examination of its lists of exports and imports will show that Holland receives from its colonies its spiceries, coffee, sugar, tobacco, indigo, cinnamon; from England and Belgium its manufactured goods and coals; petroleum, raw cotton and cereals from the United States; grain from the Baltic provinces, Archangel, and the ports of the Black Sea; timber from Norway and the basin of the Rhine, yarn from England, wine from France, hops from Bavaria and Alsace; ironore from Spain; while in its turn it sends its colonial wares to Germany, its agricultural produce to the London market, its fish to Belgium and Germany, and its cheese to France, Belgium and Hamburg, as well as England.

    0
    0
  • The United States mine nearly all of their iron ores, Austria-Hungary, Russia and France mine the greater part of theirs, but none of these countries exports much ore.

    0
    0
  • She exports about 90% of all the iron ore which she mines, most of it to England.

    0
    0
  • The per capita consumption of iron in Great Britain, excluding exports, has been calculated as 144 lb in 1855 and 250 lb in 1890, that of the United States as 117 lb for 1855, 300 lb for 1890 and some 378 lb for 1899, and that of the United Kingdom, the United States and Germany for 1906 as about a quarter of a ton, so that the British per capita consumption is about four-fold and the American about five-fold that of 1855.

    0
    0
  • The exports rose from a total of £26,096,500 in 1883 to £62,000,000 in 1905.

    0
    0
  • It also exports wood-pulp, iron and fish.

    0
    0
  • Since the opening of the new port the traffic has considerably increased, and it exports oil, pig-lead, silver, flour, wine, marble and sandstone for paving purposes, while it imports quantities of coal, iron, cereals, phosphates, timber, pitch, petroleum, and mineral oils.

    0
    0
  • The imports consist mainly of raw material for working up in the factories of the district, while the principal exports are coal, fruit, wine, dyes, cloth, silk and other manufactured articles of various descriptions.

    0
    0
  • 2,782,200,000 Exports General Commerce.

    0
    0
  • The trade of Belgium has more than trebled as regards both imports and exports since 1870.

    0
    0
  • The following table shows the amount of exports and imports between Belgium and the more important foreign states: - In the relative magnitude of the annual value of its commerce, excluding that in transit, Belgium stands sixth among the nations of the world, following Great Britain, the United States, Germany, France and Holland.

    0
    0
  • The exports of greatest value are textiles, lace, coal, coke, briquettes, glass, machinery, railway material and fire arms.

    0
    0
  • The staple export trade is in fish and their products; other exports are butter, copper ore and hides.

    0
    0
  • The principal articles imported are textiles, hardware, wines, rice, flour, canned goods and general provisions; the exports are yerba mate, hides, hair, dried meat; wood, oranges, tobacco.

    0
    0
  • The chief exports are grain and other agricultural produce, live stock, spirits, wood and wool; the chief imports are colonial produce, iron, coal, salt, wine, beer and tobacco.

    0
    0
  • It exports great quantities of dried fruit and excellent tutun, tobacco for chibuks, or Turkish pipes.

    0
    0
  • Other important exports are sugar, copra and tobacco.

    0
    0
  • In 1906 the the total value of the exports was $23,902,986 and the total value of the imports was 21,868,257.

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  • The chief exports are iron and other ores, china clay, granite, fish and grain.

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