This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

exod

exod

exod Sentence Examples

  • See Exod.

    0
    0
  • The two classes are supposed to have been founded separately (Exod.

    0
    0
  • The two are reconciled when the God of the patriarchs reveals His name for the first time unto Moses (Exod.

    0
    0
  • 1-3 and in Exod.

    0
    0
  • The release of a Hebrew servant after six years' labour (Exod.

    0
    0
  • But in Exod.

    0
    0
  • The story of the youth of Moses is, as is commonly the case with great heroes, of secondary origin; moreover, the circumstances of his birth as related in Exod.

    0
    0
  • Kadesh (holy) was 1 Exod.

    0
    0
  • In Exod.

    0
    0
  • 1-13); a parallel account joins the name with Massah (trial, proof) where Yahweh "proved" the people (Exod.

    0
    0
  • This is apparently viewed as the goal of the three-days' journey (Exod.

    0
    0
  • In this district the defeat of the Amalekites is more naturally located (Exod.

    0
    0
  • The legislation on Mt Sinai (Horeb) which apparently occupies a very important place in tradition (Exod.

    0
    0
  • 1 Yahweh appears to have been known to them before he revealed himself to Moses, and the ancestors of the Israelites are recognized as worshippers of Yahweh, but are on another level (Exod.

    0
    0
  • 26, so far from the name Yahweh having been made known to Israel by Moses (Exod.

    0
    0
  • 1.24 (Septuagint); Exod.

    0
    0
  • 23, 24; of Moses, Exod.

    0
    0
  • Yahweh had admittedly been the God of Israel's ancestors, but his name was only now made known (Exod.

    0
    0
  • Collections of laws are found in Deuteronomy and in exilic and post-exilic writings; groups of a relatively earlier type are preserved in Exod.

    0
    0
  • pascha', of the Hebrew name of the Passover festival n4 pesach, from r "he passed over," in memory of the great deliverance, when the destroying angel "passed over the houses, of the children of Israel in Egypt when he smote the Egyptians" (Exod.

    0
    0
  • With the episcopal mitre the Jewish miznephet, translated " mitre " in the Authorized Version (Exod.

    0
    0
  • (Exod.

    0
    0
  • m'H Exod.

    0
    0
  • Being of the nature of a pilgrimage feast the booths were temporary erections for the accommodation of the pilgrims. But in early Jewish tradition, in both Yahvist and Elohist sources of the Pentateuch (Exod.

    0
    0
  • In the Elohist Book of the Covenant (Exod.

    0
    0
  • In the Yahwist Source (Exod.

    0
    0
  • C. In the Yahwistic History (Exod.

    0
    0
  • In the Secondary Sources of the Priestly Code (Exod.

    0
    0
  • The folk-etymology of the word Passover given in Exod.

    0
    0
  • But the real Arabic sacrifice of firstlings was called Fara`; it might be sacrificed at any time, as was also the case with the Hebrews (Exod.

    0
    0
  • The paschal lamb was not necessarily a firstling, but only in the first year of its life (Exod.

    0
    0
  • It has been suggested that it was originally a hag or pilgrimage feast to Jerusalem, of which there were three in the year connected with the agricultural festivals (Exod.

    0
    0
  • There was also associated in the Hebrew mind a connexion of impurity and corruption with the notion of leaven which was tabu in all sacrifice (Exod.

    0
    0
  • He shared in the Sabbath rest (Exod.

    0
    0
  • on Exod.

    0
    0
  • 2, Exod.

    0
    0
  • Such ancient hymns as Exod.

    0
    0
  • 1.7, where " I am Jehovah thy God " of Exod.

    0
    0
  • 1 The singers or Asaphites are at this time still distinguished from the Levites; the oldest attempt to incorporate them with that tribe appears in Exod.

    0
    0
  • It appeared in the English Bible in Tyndale's translation of the Pentateuch (1530), and is found in all English Protestant versions of the 16th century except that of Coverdale ('' 1 535) In the Authorized Version of 161 i it occurs in Exod.

    0
    0
  • V., and is introduced also in Exod.

    0
    0
  • 8 The latter is probably not Jhvh but Eliyeh (Exod.

    0
    0
  • The ancient explanations of the name proceed from Exod.

    0
    0
  • '15' in Exod.; Fab.

    0
    0
  • This assumption that Yahweh is derived from the verb "to be," as seems to be implied in Exod.

    0
    0
  • And, inasmuch as nowhere in the Old Testament, outside of Exod.

    0
    0
  • iii., is there the slightest indication that the Israelites connected the name of their God with the idea of " being " in any sense, it may fairly be questioned whether, if the author of Exod.

    0
    0
  • The biblical author of the history of the sacred institutions (P) expressly declares that the name Yahweh was unknown to the patriarchs (Exod.

    0
    0
  • 3), and the much older Israelite historian (E) records the first revelation of the name to Moses (Exod.

    0
    0
  • Moses is closely connected with the tribes in the vicinity of the holy mountain; according to one account, he married a daughter of the priest of Midian (Exod.

    0
    0
  • More important is the prominent part played by the Kenite (or Midianite) father-in-law of Moses, whose help and counsel are related in Exod.

    0
    0
  • Some of the older writers appealed to Scripture as supporting their systems, especially the texts Exod.

    0
    0
  • The cultivation of barley in ancient Egypt is indicated in Exod.

    0
    0
  • Exod.

    0
    0
  • 9 Exod.

    0
    0
  • And John alone tells how the bones of the dead body remained unbroken, fulfilling the ordinance as to the paschal lamb (Exod.

    0
    0
  • We are reminded of Exod.

    0
    0
  • The Hebrews had already possessed a tent-temple and oracle of this kind in the wilderness (Exod.

    0
    0
  • 25; Exod.

    0
    0
  • In the Mekilta (Exod.

    0
    0
  • It was allowed that the Sabbath need not be too rigorously kept, and this was justified by Exod.

    0
    0
  • " rule ") best known as the name of a now imperfect halakic Midrash on Exod.

    0
    0
  • (b) Shemoth (" names " Exod.

    0
    0
  • This difference is accounted for by the fact that Exod.

    0
    0
  • onwards and the rest of the Pentateuch have independent Midrashim: the Law proper was held by the Rabbis to begin at Exod.

    0
    0
  • Io), while Aaron and Miriam are also placed in the same class (Exod.

    0
    0
  • In the older account (Exod.

    0
    0
  • The ancient Jews were a striking exception; for though the frequent mention of ancestral graves on hilltops or in caves, and in connexion with sacred trees and pillars, and the resemblance of the "elohim" in Exod.

    0
    0
  • 20 and Exod.

    0
    0
  • The conception of Israel as " a kingdom of priests and an holy nation " (Exod.

    0
    0
  • of Exod.

    0
    0
  • The national traditions of Israel recognize a close relationship between Moab and Ammon, "sons" of Lot, and the "brothers" Esau (Edom) and Jacob (Israel), and Moab is represented as already a powerful people when Israel fled from Egypt (Exod.

    0
    0
  • It is mentioned in Exod.

    0
    0
  • 43), and the command in Exod.

    0
    0
  • and Mineptah (see Exod.

    0
    0
  • It is obvious that the strict injunctions in Exod.

    0
    0
  • As a whole, the economic conditions implied are pastoral and agricultural, and are relatively primitive; and the general rudimentary character of the legal ideas appears in the death penalty for the goring ox (Exod.

    0
    0
  • I the "angel of Yahweh," who, according to Exod.

    0
    0
  • 4; Exod.

    0
    0
  • PITHOM, one of the "treasure cities" stated to have been built for Pharaoh by the Hebrews in Goshen during the Oppression (Exod.

    0
    0
  • 42), and among the plagues of Egypt that of hail destroyed the flax and barley crops, " for the barley was in the ear, and the flax was bolled " (Exod.

    0
    0
  • ix.) resumes the narrative of Exod.

    0
    0
  • with Exod.

    0
    0
  • describes how Moses carried out the command of Exod.

    0
    0
  • 12 -15 in accordance with the instructions given in Exod.

    0
    0
  • 1 -35, and bears the same relation to the latter passage that Exod.

    0
    0
  • bears to Exod.

    0
    0
  • 24), (3) the altar of incense is distinguished from the altar of burnt-offering (as opposed to Exod.

    0
    0
  • As stated, these chapters form the original sequel to Exod.

    0
    0
  • According to Exod.

    0
    0
  • formed the immediate continuation of Exod.

    0
    0
  • in the original narrative of P. But it has already been pointed out (see Exodus) that Exod.

    0
    0
  • belong to a later stratum of P than Exod.

    0
    0
  • xxv.-xxix., hence it is by no means improbable that Exod.

    0
    0
  • have superseded an earlier and shorter account of the fulfilment of the commands in Exod.

    0
    0
  • viii., which bears the same relation to Exod.

    0
    0
  • 1-35 as Exod.

    0
    0
  • to Exod.

    0
    0
  • 10, the anointing of the Tabernacle in accordance with Exod.

    0
    0
  • 26 ff.: it is not enjoined in Exod.

    0
    0
  • 17 ff.) as in Exod.

    0
    0
  • Such treatment, though perfectly legitimate according to the older legislation (Exod.

    0
    0
  • 12, Exod.

    0
    0
  • Further, the structure of these chapters, which closely resembles that of the other two Hexateuchal codes (Exod.

    0
    0
  • 6 f.) appears to be a fragment from a penal code; the passage resembles Exod.

    0
    0
  • 1-4, forming a supplement to Exod.

    0
    0
  • 5-9 to Exod.

    0
    0
  • For it is difficult to harmonize the laws as to the release of Hebrew slaves with the other legislation on the same subject (Exod.

    0
    0
  • The discourse, which is spoken throughout in the name of Yahweh, is similar in character to Exod.

    0
    0
  • Baentsch, Exod.

    0
    0
  • The doubled k of the Greek form is decisive against (I) the theory that the name Maccabee was made up of the initials of the opening words of Exod.

    0
    0
  • JETHRO (or Jether, Exod.

    0
    0
  • I I), and once as Reuel (Exod.

    0
    0
  • Subsequently Jethro came to Moses (probably at Kadesh), a great sacrificial feast was held, and the priest instructed Moses in legislative procedure; Exod.

    0
    0
  • 29-31; Exod.

    0
    0
  • 20; Exod.

    0
    0
  • Moses in Exod.

    0
    0
  • As an attendant of Moses at the tent of meeting he appears in quite secondary passages (Exod.

    0
    0
  • His defeat of the Amalekites is in a narrative (Exod.

    0
    0
  • PENTECOST, a feast of the Jews, in its original meaning a "harvest feast," as consisting of the first-fruits of human toil (Exod.

    0
    0
  • in Exod.

    0
    0
  • 16 (E) and in Exod.

    0
    0
  • and xxi.-xxiv., or between Exod.

    0
    0
  • See Exod.

    0
    0
  • The two classes are supposed to have been founded separately (Exod.

    0
    0
  • That these places (in the district of Kadesh) were traditionally associated with the origin of the Levites is suggested by various Levitical stories, although it is in a narrative now in a context pointing to Horeb or Sinai that the Levites are Israelites who for some cause (now lost) severed themselves from their people and took up a stand on behalf of Yahweh (Exod.

    0
    0
  • The two are reconciled when the God of the patriarchs reveals His name for the first time unto Moses (Exod.

    0
    0
  • Of the legal passages that speak of the Sabbath all those which show affinity with the doctrine of the Scribes - regarding the Sabbath as an arbitrary sign between Yahweh and Israel, entering into details as to particular acts that are forbidden, and enforcing the observance by severe penalties, so that it no longer has any religious value, but appears as a mere legal constraint - are post-exilic (Exod.

    0
    0
  • 32-36); while the older laws only demand such cessation from daily toil, and especially from agricultural labour, as among all ancient peoples naturally accompanied a day set apart as a religious festival, and in particular lay weight on the fact that the Sabbath is a humane institution, a holiday for the labouring classes (Exod.

    0
    0
  • 1-3 and in Exod.

    0
    0
  • The release of a Hebrew servant after six years' labour (Exod.

    0
    0
  • But in Exod.

    0
    0
  • The art of the apothecary is alluded to very early in the Old Testament history (Exod.

    0
    0
  • The story of the youth of Moses is, as is commonly the case with great heroes, of secondary origin; moreover, the circumstances of his birth as related in Exod.

    0
    0
  • At the holy mount, Moses received the divine revelation and was commissioned to bring the people a three-days' journey out of Egypt to sacrifice at this spot (Exod.

    0
    0
  • Kadesh (holy) was 1 Exod.

    0
    0
  • In Exod.

    0
    0
  • 1-13); a parallel account joins the name with Massah (trial, proof) where Yahweh "proved" the people (Exod.

    0
    0
  • This is apparently viewed as the goal of the three-days' journey (Exod.

    0
    0
  • In this district the defeat of the Amalekites is more naturally located (Exod.

    0
    0
  • The legislation on Mt Sinai (Horeb) which apparently occupies a very important place in tradition (Exod.

    0
    0
  • Smith, Prophets of Israel, p. Iii); more prominence is evidently to be ascribed to the influence of the half-Arabian Jethro or Hobab, and this must be taken into consideration with what is known of Kenite and kindred clans (Exod.

    0
    0
  • 1 Yahweh appears to have been known to them before he revealed himself to Moses, and the ancestors of the Israelites are recognized as worshippers of Yahweh, but are on another level (Exod.

    0
    0
  • 26, so far from the name Yahweh having been made known to Israel by Moses (Exod.

    0
    0
  • 1.24 (Septuagint); Exod.

    0
    0
  • 23, 24; of Moses, Exod.

    0
    0
  • Yahweh had admittedly been the God of Israel's ancestors, but his name was only now made known (Exod.

    0
    0
  • Collections of laws are found in Deuteronomy and in exilic and post-exilic writings; groups of a relatively earlier type are preserved in Exod.

    0
    0
  • pascha', of the Hebrew name of the Passover festival n4 pesach, from r "he passed over," in memory of the great deliverance, when the destroying angel "passed over the houses, of the children of Israel in Egypt when he smote the Egyptians" (Exod.

    0
    0
  • With the episcopal mitre the Jewish miznephet, translated " mitre " in the Authorized Version (Exod.

    0
    0
  • m'H Exod.

    0
    0
  • Being of the nature of a pilgrimage feast the booths were temporary erections for the accommodation of the pilgrims. But in early Jewish tradition, in both Yahvist and Elohist sources of the Pentateuch (Exod.

    0
    0
  • Simon on the doctrine of transmigration as evolved from Exod.

    0
    0
  • In the Elohist Book of the Covenant (Exod.

    0
    0
  • In the Yahwist Source (Exod.

    0
    0
  • C. In the Yahwistic History (Exod.

    0
    0
  • In the Secondary Sources of the Priestly Code (Exod.

    0
    0
  • The folk-etymology of the word Passover given in Exod.

    0
    0
  • But the real Arabic sacrifice of firstlings was called Fara`; it might be sacrificed at any time, as was also the case with the Hebrews (Exod.

    0
    0
  • The paschal lamb was not necessarily a firstling, but only in the first year of its life (Exod.

    0
    0
  • It has been suggested that it was originally a hag or pilgrimage feast to Jerusalem, of which there were three in the year connected with the agricultural festivals (Exod.

    0
    0
  • There was also associated in the Hebrew mind a connexion of impurity and corruption with the notion of leaven which was tabu in all sacrifice (Exod.

    0
    0
  • He shared in the Sabbath rest (Exod.

    0
    0
  • on Exod.

    0
    0
  • 2, Exod.

    0
    0
  • Such ancient hymns as Exod.

    0
    0
  • 1.7, where " I am Jehovah thy God " of Exod.

    0
    0
  • 1 The singers or Asaphites are at this time still distinguished from the Levites; the oldest attempt to incorporate them with that tribe appears in Exod.

    0
    0
  • It appeared in the English Bible in Tyndale's translation of the Pentateuch (1530), and is found in all English Protestant versions of the 16th century except that of Coverdale ('' 1 535) In the Authorized Version of 161 i it occurs in Exod.

    0
    0
  • V., and is introduced also in Exod.

    0
    0
  • 8 The latter is probably not Jhvh but Eliyeh (Exod.

    0
    0
  • The ancient explanations of the name proceed from Exod.

    0
    0
  • '15' in Exod.; Fab.

    0
    0
  • This assumption that Yahweh is derived from the verb "to be," as seems to be implied in Exod.

    0
    0
  • And, inasmuch as nowhere in the Old Testament, outside of Exod.

    0
    0
  • iii., is there the slightest indication that the Israelites connected the name of their God with the idea of " being " in any sense, it may fairly be questioned whether, if the author of Exod.

    0
    0
  • The biblical author of the history of the sacred institutions (P) expressly declares that the name Yahweh was unknown to the patriarchs (Exod.

    0
    0
  • 3), and the much older Israelite historian (E) records the first revelation of the name to Moses (Exod.

    0
    0
  • Moses is closely connected with the tribes in the vicinity of the holy mountain; according to one account, he married a daughter of the priest of Midian (Exod.

    0
    0
  • 22 and xxxviii.), the two accounts of the golden calf (Exod.

    0
    0
  • 28) is mentioned with disapproval in the Jerusalem Talmud, 5 though it has been preserved in the Targum PseudoJonathan ad loc.° A definite rule for guidance in translating is apparently preserved in the Tosefta, 7 where it is stated that " he who translates quite literally is a liar, while he who adds anything is a blasphemer," Exod.

    0
    0
  • More important is the prominent part played by the Kenite (or Midianite) father-in-law of Moses, whose help and counsel are related in Exod.

    0
    0
  • Some of the older writers appealed to Scripture as supporting their systems, especially the texts Exod.

    0
    0
  • The cultivation of barley in ancient Egypt is indicated in Exod.

    0
    0
  • 9 Exod.

    0
    0
  • And John alone tells how the bones of the dead body remained unbroken, fulfilling the ordinance as to the paschal lamb (Exod.

    0
    0
  • We are reminded of Exod.

    0
    0
  • The Hebrews had already possessed a tent-temple and oracle of this kind in the wilderness (Exod.

    0
    0
  • 25; Exod.

    0
    0
  • In the Mekilta (Exod.

    0
    0
  • It was allowed that the Sabbath need not be too rigorously kept, and this was justified by Exod.

    0
    0
  • " rule ") best known as the name of a now imperfect halakic Midrash on Exod.

    0
    0
  • (b) Shemoth (" names " Exod.

    0
    0
  • This difference is accounted for by the fact that Exod.

    0
    0
  • onwards and the rest of the Pentateuch have independent Midrashim: the Law proper was held by the Rabbis to begin at Exod.

    0
    0
  • Io), while Aaron and Miriam are also placed in the same class (Exod.

    0
    0
  • In the older account (Exod.

    0
    0
  • The ancient Jews were a striking exception; for though the frequent mention of ancestral graves on hilltops or in caves, and in connexion with sacred trees and pillars, and the resemblance of the "elohim" in Exod.

    0
    0
  • They were usually set up under a holy tree to commemorate a divine epiphany and were mostly unwrought (Exod.

    0
    0
  • 20 and Exod.

    0
    0
  • The conception of Israel as " a kingdom of priests and an holy nation " (Exod.

    0
    0
  • of Exod.

    0
    0
  • The national traditions of Israel recognize a close relationship between Moab and Ammon, "sons" of Lot, and the "brothers" Esau (Edom) and Jacob (Israel), and Moab is represented as already a powerful people when Israel fled from Egypt (Exod.

    0
    0
  • It is mentioned in Exod.

    0
    0
  • 43), and the command in Exod.

    0
    0
  • and Mineptah (see Exod.

    0
    0
  • It is obvious that the strict injunctions in Exod.

    0
    0
  • As a whole, the economic conditions implied are pastoral and agricultural, and are relatively primitive; and the general rudimentary character of the legal ideas appears in the death penalty for the goring ox (Exod.

    0
    0
  • I the "angel of Yahweh," who, according to Exod.

    0
    0
  • 4; Exod.

    0
    0
  • PITHOM, one of the "treasure cities" stated to have been built for Pharaoh by the Hebrews in Goshen during the Oppression (Exod.

    0
    0
  • 42), and among the plagues of Egypt that of hail destroyed the flax and barley crops, " for the barley was in the ear, and the flax was bolled " (Exod.

    0
    0
  • ix.) resumes the narrative of Exod.

    0
    0
  • with Exod.

    0
    0
  • describes how Moses carried out the command of Exod.

    0
    0
  • 12 -15 in accordance with the instructions given in Exod.

    0
    0
  • 1 -35, and bears the same relation to the latter passage that Exod.

    0
    0
  • bears to Exod.

    0
    0
  • 24), (3) the altar of incense is distinguished from the altar of burnt-offering (as opposed to Exod.

    0
    0
  • As stated, these chapters form the original sequel to Exod.

    0
    0
  • According to Exod.

    0
    0
  • formed the immediate continuation of Exod.

    0
    0
  • in the original narrative of P. But it has already been pointed out (see Exodus) that Exod.

    0
    0
  • belong to a later stratum of P than Exod.

    0
    0
  • xxv.-xxix., hence it is by no means improbable that Exod.

    0
    0
  • have superseded an earlier and shorter account of the fulfilment of the commands in Exod.

    0
    0
  • viii., which bears the same relation to Exod.

    0
    0
  • 1-35 as Exod.

    0
    0
  • to Exod.

    0
    0
  • viii., unlike Exod xxxv.

    0
    0
  • 10, the anointing of the Tabernacle in accordance with Exod.

    0
    0
  • 26 ff.: it is not enjoined in Exod.

    0
    0
  • 17 ff.) as in Exod.

    0
    0
  • Such treatment, though perfectly legitimate according to the older legislation (Exod.

    0
    0
  • 12, Exod.

    0
    0
  • Further, the structure of these chapters, which closely resembles that of the other two Hexateuchal codes (Exod.

    0
    0
  • 6 f.) appears to be a fragment from a penal code; the passage resembles Exod.

    0
    0
  • 1-4, forming a supplement to Exod.

    0
    0
  • 5-9 to Exod.

    0
    0
  • For it is difficult to harmonize the laws as to the release of Hebrew slaves with the other legislation on the same subject (Exod.

    0
    0
  • The discourse, which is spoken throughout in the name of Yahweh, is similar in character to Exod.

    0
    0
  • Baentsch, Exod.

    0
    0
  • The doubled k of the Greek form is decisive against (I) the theory that the name Maccabee was made up of the initials of the opening words of Exod.

    0
    0
  • JETHRO (or Jether, Exod.

    0
    0
  • I I), and once as Reuel (Exod.

    0
    0
  • Subsequently Jethro came to Moses (probably at Kadesh), a great sacrificial feast was held, and the priest instructed Moses in legislative procedure; Exod.

    0
    0
  • 29-31; Exod.

    0
    0
  • 20; Exod.

    0
    0
  • Circumcision, already familiar from Exod.

    0
    0
  • Moses in Exod.

    0
    0
  • As an attendant of Moses at the tent of meeting he appears in quite secondary passages (Exod.

    0
    0
  • His defeat of the Amalekites is in a narrative (Exod.

    0
    0
  • PENTECOST, a feast of the Jews, in its original meaning a "harvest feast," as consisting of the first-fruits of human toil (Exod.

    0
    0
  • 16 (E) and in Exod.

    0
    0
  • and xxi.-xxiv., or between Exod.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →