Exeter sentence example

exeter
  • In 1637 he went as a gentleman-commoner to Exeter College, Oxford, where he remained about a year.
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  • He took Devizes and Laycock House, Winchester and Basing House, and rejoined Fairfax in October at Exeter, and accompanied him to Cornwall, where he assisted in the defeat of Hopton's forces and in the suppression of the royalists in the west.
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  • On the 9th of January 1646 he surprised Lord Wentworth's brigade at Bovey Tracey, and was present with Fairfax at the fall of Exeter on the 9th of April.
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  • Bristol, Exeter and other important towns have been laid, and eventually telegraphic communication between every important town in the United Kingdom will be rendered safe from interruptions caused by gales or snowstorms.
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  • Teignmouth is not mentioned in the Domesday Survey, but in 1276 what is now West Teignmouth appears as a mesne borough held by the dean and chapter of Exeter; what is now East Teignmouth continuing with the bishop, who was accused in that year of holding in his manor a market which should be held in the borough.
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  • Having decided to take orders he graduated, by special letters from the chancellor, at Exeter College, Oxford, and was ordained in 1722.
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  • A little-known book which appears to have escaped the attention of most writers on the history of modern geography was published at Oxford in 1625 by Nathanael Carpenter, fellow of Exeter College, with the title Geographie delineated forth Carpenter.
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  • In England, the royal almonry still forms a part of the sovereign's household, the officers being the hereditary grand almoner (the marquess of Exeter), the lord high almoner, the sub-almoner, and the secretary to the lord high almoner.
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  • The name of John Ford appears in the university register of Oxford as matriculating at Exeter College in 1601.
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  • The town has a public library and some old houses built in the colonial period, and is the seat of Phillips Exeter Academy (incorporated in 1781 and opened in 1783).
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  • It was founded by Dr John Phillips (1719-1795), a graduate of Harvard College, who acquired considerable wealth as a merchant at Exeter and gave nearly all of it to the cause of education.
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  • The academy is one of the foremost secondary schools in the country, and among its alumni have been Daniel Webster, Edward Everett, Lewis Cass (born in Exeter in a house still standing), John Parker Hale, George Bancroft, Jared Sparks, John Gorham Palfrey, Richard Hildreth and Francis Bowen.
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  • The government of the academy is vested in a board of six trustees, regarding whom the founder provided that a majority should be laymen and not inhabitants of Exeter.
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  • At Exeter also is the Robinson female seminary (1867), with 14 instructors and 272 students in 1906-1907.
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  • There was disagreement from the first, however, with regard to the measure of loyalty to the king, and in 1643, when Massachusetts had asserted her claim to this region and the other three New Hampshire towns had submitted to her jurisdiction, the majority of the inhabitants of Exeter also yielded, while the minority, including the founder, removed from the town.
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  • From 1776 to 1784 the state legislature usually met at Exeter.
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  • He was educated at Exeter College, Oxford, and in 1719 was ordained.
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  • He attended Phillips Exeter Academy about nine months in 1794, was further prepared for college by Dr Samuel Wood, the minister at Boscawen, and graduated at Dartmouth College in 1801.
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  • The parish church, the finest in the county, is cruciform, and has the unique feature of transeptal towers, imitated from Exeter Cathedral.
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  • The church was dedicated in 1260 by Walter Bronescombe, bishop of Exeter; and c. 1335 Bishop John Grandisson, on founding a secular college here, greatly enlarged the church; it has been thought that, by copying the Early English style, he is responsible for more of the building than is apparent.
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  • Sir Thomas Beaufort, afterwards earl of Dorset and duke of Exeter (appointed admiral of the fleet 1407, and admiral of England, Ireland and Aquitaine 1412, which latter office he held till his death in 1426), certainly had a court, with a marshal and other officers, and forms of legal process - mandates, warrants, citations, compulsories, proxies, &c. Complaints of encroachment of jurisdiction by the Admiralty Courts led to the restraining acts, 13 Ric. II.
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  • At the Restoration he was made bishop of Exeter.
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  • While still young he became a monk, and studied grammar and theology first at Exeter, then at Nutcell near Winchester, under the abbot Winberht.
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  • In 1869 he was one of the consecrating prelates when Temple became bishop of Exeter, and endeavoured to remove the prejudice against his appointment by showing that Temple was not responsible for the views of other writers in the famous Essays and Reviews (1860).
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  • With this the bishop of Exeter (Ornaments Rubric, p. 30) would seem to agree, when he says that "the customs of the present day do not fully accord with any reasonable interpretation of the rubric. The stole, now nearly universal, is only covered by the rubric if the word ' vestment ' be taken to include it (a very dubious point), and then only at Holy Communion."
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  • Tomlinson, The Prayer Book, Articles and Homilies (1897), a polemical work from the Protestant point of view, but scholarly and based on a mass of contemporary authorities to which references are given; the bishop of Exeter, The Ornaments Rubric (London, 1901), a pamphlet.
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  • Exeter Hall was used while a new chapel was being erected, but Exeter Hall could not contain Spurgeon's hearers.
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  • In the Domesday Survey it appears as a me g ne borough under Juhel of Totnes, founder of the castle and priory; it had 95 burgesses within and 15 without the borough, and rendered military service according to the custom of Exeter.
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  • The old church at St Mary Church, north of Torquay, was rebuilt in Early Decorated style; and in 1871 a tower was erected as a memorial to Dr Phillpotts, bishop of Exeter, who with his wife is buried in the churchyard.
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  • He was made dean of St Paul's in 1519, and was also dean of Exeter and dean of Salisbury.
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  • The year 1068 was spent in military expeditions against Exeter and York, in both of which the adherents of Harold had found a welcome.
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  • Ray Lankester obtained the Radcliffe Travelling Fellowship at Oxford in 1870, and became a fellow and lecturer at Exeter College in 1872.
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  • For two years he ravaged and slew; in 1003 Exeter was destroyed; Norwich and Thetford in 1004.
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  • In 1868 he became prebendary of Lincoln and examining chaplain to Bishop Christopher Wordsworth, an office which he also held for a short time in 1870 for Dr Temple, just appointed to the see of Exeter.
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  • His knowledge, his sympathy, his enthusiasm soon made themselves felt everywhere; the ruridecanal conferences of clergy became a real force, and the church in Cornwall was inspired with a vitality that had never been possible when it was part of the unwieldy diocese of Exeter.
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  • About this time (the exact chronology is uncertain) Ethelstan expelled Sihtric's brother Guthfrith, destroyed the Danish fortress at York, received the submission of the Welsh at Hereford, fixing their boundary along the line of the Wye, and drove the Cornishmen west of the Tamar, fortifying Exeter as an English city.
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  • The chief collections are those issued at Grately in Hampshire, at Exeter, at Thunresfeld, and the Judicia civitatis Lundonie.
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  • The religious element was more prominent in Orcy's gild at Abbotsbury and in the fraternity at Exeter; their ordinances exhibit much solicitude for the salvation of the brethren's souls.
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  • The Exeter gild also gave assistance when property was destroyed by fire.
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  • A few days after her birth her mother left England, and provision for her maintenance having been made by Charles she lived at Exeter under the care of Lady Dalkeith (afterwards countess of Morton) until the surrender of the city to the parliamentarians, when she was taken to Oatlands in Surrey.
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  • Ten years later he became dean of Exeter, and in 1705 he was consecrated bishop of Lincoln.
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  • According to Domesday, Ashburton was held in chief by Osbern, bishop of Exeter, and rendered geld for six hides.
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  • Entering Exeter College, Oxford, he took a second class in classics in 1831.
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  • In the cause of labour he was active for many years, and in 1872 he set an example to the clergy of all the churches by taking a prominent part in a meeting held in Exeter Hall on behalf of the newly established Agricultural Labourers' Union, Joseph Arch and Charles Bradlaugh being among those who sat with him on the platform.
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  • When later in the same year, however, Henry Phillpotts, bishop of Exeter, died, the prime minister turned again to Temple, and he accepted the bishopric of that city so dear to him from boyhood, and left Rugby for a home amongst his own people.
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  • In 1885 he was elected honorary fellow of Exeter College, Oxford.
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  • In London he was not less conspicuous as a temperance worker than he had been in Exeter, and the artisan classes instinctively recognized him as their friend.
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  • Until its sale in the 19th century, the site of Dawlish belonged to Exeter cathedral, having been given to the chapter by Leofric, bishop of Exeter, in 1050.
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  • Immediately opposite are the traces of a supposed British camp, and of the Roman road from Exeter to Cornwall.
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  • He was president of the state in1786-1787and in 1789, and in 1786 suppressed an insurrection at Exeter immediately preceding the Shays Rebellion in Massachusetts.
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  • He assisted the king in his studies, received from him the monasteries of Congresbury and Banwell, and sometime later "Exeter and its diocese in Saxonland and Cornwall."
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  • The only child of this marriage, Thomas, the future earl of Exeter, was born in May 1542, and in February 1543 Cecil's first wife died.
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  • The chapels of the colleges at Oxford and Cambridge are sometimes of large dimensions and architecturally of great importance, that of Christ Church being actually the cathedral of Oxford; among others may be mentioned the chapel of Merton College, and the new chapel of Exeter College, both in Oxford, and the chapel of King's College, Cambridge, which is roofed over with perhaps the finest fan-vault in England.
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  • The archaeologist George Oliver of Exeter was, according to Foley's Records of the English Province, the last of the secular priests of England who vowed obedience to the Society before its suppression.
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  • Of this edition one copy is in the University library, Cambridge, a second in Exeter College, Oxford, and a fragment in the British Museum.
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  • The Piscataqua is a tidal estuary fed chiefly by the Salmon Falls, Lamprey and Exeter rivers.
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  • The beginning of the new era was marked by the founding of Phillips Exeter Academy (1781), and later several other similar schools were opened.
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  • The financial condition at the close of the War of Independence was alarming, and in September 1785 a mob at Exeter demanded relief through the issue of more paper currency.
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  • Puritan Massachusetts was naturally hostile to the Antinomians at Exeter as well as to the Anglicans at Strawberry Banke.
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  • Although Exeter, in 1639, Dover, in 1640, and Strawberry Banke, not later than 1640, adopted a plantation covenant, these settlements were especially weak from lack of a superior tribunal, and appeals had been made to Massachusetts as early as 1633.
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  • Dover submitted in 1641, Strawberry Banke (Portsmouth) soon afterwards and Exeter in 1643.
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  • Six states had ratified the Federal constitution when the New Hampshire convention met at Exeter on the 13th of February 1788, to accept or reject that instrument, and so great was the opposition to it among the delegates from the central part of the state that after a discussion of ten days the leaders in favour of ratification dared not risk a decisive vote, but procured an adjournment in order that certain delegates who had been instructed to vote against it might consult their constituents.
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  • As a means of relief a number of citizens demanded of the legislature the issue of paper money equal in amount to the state's debt, and as this was refused, an armed mob numbering about 200 surrounded the meeting-house in Exeter in which the legislature was in session, towards evening on the loth of September 1786.
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  • Although the Sarum Use prevailed far the most widely, yet there were separate Uses of York and Hereford, and also to a less degree of Lincoln, Bangor, Exeter, Wells, St Paul's, and probably of other dioceses and cathedral churches as well.
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  • It was included in the bishop of Exeter's manor of Pawton, which had been annexed to the see of Crediton upon its formation by Edward the Elder in 909.
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  • He became vicar of Polebrook, Northamptonshire, in 1666, prebendary of Exeter in 1667, and in the following year prebendary of St Paul's and bishop of Chester.
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  • The fifth is that known to the English as the Fosse, which joins Lincoln and Leicester with Cirencester, Bath and Exeter.
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  • After preparing a small volume of miscellanies, which was published by subscription, he studied dentistry with Anthony Norris Groves in Exeter.
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  • Subsequently he was chaplain, first to the royalist Sir Robert Shirley of Eatington (1629-1656), and then at the Exeter House chapel.
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  • On the 2 9 th of November 1538 he was created Baron Audley of Walden; and soon afterwards presided as lord steward at the trials of Henry Pole, Lord Montacute, and of the unfortunate marquess of Exeter.
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  • He graduated at Exeter College, Oxford, and became preacher at Lincoln's Inn.
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  • Benjamin Wills Newton, head of the community there, who had been a fellow of Exeter College, Oxford, was accused of departing from the testimony of the Brethren by reintroducing the spirit of clericalism.
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  • The son was educated at Phillips Academy, Exeter, at Harvard University, at Heidelberg, Göttingen and Berlin.
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  • After holding the rich living of Stanhope, Durham from 1820, and the deanery of Chester from 1828, he was consecrated bishop of Exeter in 1831, holding with the see a residentiary canonry at Durham.
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  • Though accused of avarice and pluralism, Phillpotts was generous in his gifts to the church, founding the theological college at Exeter and spending large sums on the restoration of the cathedral.
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  • But in 876 part of the Danes managed to slip past him and occupied Wareham; whence, early in 877, under cover of treacherous negotiations, they made a dash westwards and seized Exeter.
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  • Alfred had been on his way to relieve his son at Thorney when he heard that the Northumbrian and East Anglian Danes were besieging Exeter and an unnamed fort on the coast of North Devon.
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  • Alfred at once hurried westwards and raised the siege of Exeter; the fate of the other place is not recorded.
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  • On his return he resumed his office as commissioner of the Great Seal, was appointed a commissioner of the treasury with a salary of 1000, and was returned to the parliament of 1654 for each of the four constituencies of Bedford, Exeter, Oxford and Buckinghamshire, electing to sit for the latter constituency.
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  • He was a tutor of Exeter College from 1869 to 1890.
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  • He was also a fellow of Brasenose College, honorary fellow of Exeter, a fellow of the British Academy and of other learned societies, and a governor of Harrow School.
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  • In June 1852 he matriculated at Exeter College, Oxford, but, as the college was full, he did not go into residence till January 1853.
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  • In January 1883, within a week of his election to an honorary fellowship at Exeter, Morris was enrolled among its members.
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  • But without an intimate knowledge of Fox's political experience and capacity he would hardly have made him his principal secretary, and soon afterwards lord privy seal and bishop of Exeter (1487).
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  • The ecclesiastical preferment was merely intended to provide a salary not at Henry's expense; for Fox never saw either Exeter or the diocese of Bath and Wells to which he was translated in 1492.
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  • In 1897 Crediton was made the seat of a suffragan bishopric in the diocese of Exeter.
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  • The Inquisitio Eliensis, the "Exon Domesday" (so called from the preservation of the volume at Exeter), and the second volume of Domesday Book, also all contain the full details which the original returns supplied.
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  • In 1549 he was placed on a commission to examine Anabaptists, and in 1551 he was appointed chancellor to Bishop Ridley, select preacher at Canterbury, and a commissioner for the reform of the canon law; in 1552 Coverdale made him archdeacon of Exeter.
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  • Chrysoprase, mined near Porterville and near Visalia (Tulare county), is used partly for gems, but more largely (like the vesuvianite found near Exeter, in the same county) for mosaic work; and there are ledges of fine rose quartz in the Coahuila mountains of Riverside county and near Lemon Cove, Tulare county.
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  • He addressed the Garfield Memorial Meeting at Exeter Hall, London, on the 24th of September 1881.
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  • He studied at Phillips Exeter Academy in1810-1811and at the College of Montreal in 1811-1812, and as a boy took part in the War of 1812, becoming a second lieutenant in March 1814.
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  • St Peter's church, originally consecrated as a chapel by Leofric, bishop of Exeter, in 1073, is a beautiful Perpendicular building.
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  • He was educated at Exeter College, Oxford.
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  • The author has borrowed some 70 lines from the beginning of a poetical rendering of the Prayer of Azarias and the Song of the Three Children, of which there is a copy in the Exeter Book.
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  • After a visit to Germany he was a tutor at Amherst in 1839-1842, and was minister of the First (Congregational)Church, Exeter, New Hampshire, in 18 451852.
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  • This was done, and, recognizing the difficulties of the situation, the king gave him leave to travel abroad, and allowed him still to retain his revenues as dean of Exeter.
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  • He was educated at Phillips Exeter Academy, joined his father at Marietta, Ohio, about 1799, studied law there in the office of Return Jonathan Meigs (1765-1825), and was admitted to the bar at the age of twenty.
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  • The Sunday market established by the count of Mortain at his castle of Trematon, which ruined the bishop of Exeter's market at St Germans, was probably held at Saltash a short distance from the castle.
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  • Having been made prebendary of Exeter, of Wells and of York, he was consecrated bishop of Hereford in 1370, was translated to the see of London in 1375, and became archbishop of Canterbury in 1381, succeeding Simon of Sudbury in both these latter positions.
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  • In 1382 the archbishop's visitation led to disputes with the bishops of Exeter and Salisbury, and Courtenay was only partially able to enforce the payment of a special tax to meet his expenses on this occasion.
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  • He was closely associated with William of Wykeham, and while the latter was in power as chancellor, Brantingham was lord treasurer (1369-1371, and 1377-1381), being made bishop of Exeter in 1370.
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  • He died in 1394 and was buried in Exeter cathedral.
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  • He was educated at Balliol College, Oxford, and was from his childhood destined for the clerical profession, in which through the great influence of his family he obtained rapid advancement, becoming bishop of Exeter in 1458.
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  • On the 8th of March 1372 Wykeham resigned the chancellorship, and Bishop Brantingham of Exeter the treasurership, and laymen were appointed in their places, though Sir Robert Thorp, who became chancellor, was master of Pembroke Hall at Cambridge, and as much a cleric as Wykeham had been when he was dean of St Martin-le-Grand and surveyor of Windsor Castle.
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  • He advanced to Exeter, but was unable to master the town.
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  • In 1747 he was elected fellow of Exeter College, and in 1750 he took his degree of M.A.
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  • Exeter, Wroxeter and perhaps Uttoxeter show the suffix in slightly different form.
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  • Numerous additional main lines - Reading to Newbury, Weymouth and the west, a new line opened in 1906 between Castle Cary and Langport effecting a great reduction in mileage between London and Exeter and places beyond; Didcot, Oxford, Birmingham, Shrewsbury, Chester with connexions northward, and to North Wales; Oxford to Worcester, and Swindon to Gloucester and the west of England; South Welsh system (through route from London via Wootton Bassett or via Bristol, and the Severn tunnel), Newport, Cardiff, Swansea, Milford.
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  • Of the sisters of Edward IV., the eldest, Anne, who married the duke of Exeter, left only one daughter by her second husband, Sir Thomas St Leger; but the second, Elizabeth, married John de la Pole, duke of Suffolk, and had several children.
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  • But Alfred blockaded them first in Wareham and then in Exeter.
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  • On hearing of this disaster the vikings in Exeter surrendered the place on being granted a free departure.
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  • The campaigning ranged from Appledore in Kent to Exeter, from Chester to Shoeburyness; but wherever the invaders transferred themselves, either the king, or his son Edward, or his son-in-law Ethelred, the ealdorman of Mercia, was promptly at hand with a competent army.
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  • Their opponents were led by kings whose orders were punctually obeyed from Shrewsbury to Dover and from London to Exeter.
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  • Several more of Edwards scanty band of friends the earl of Arundel and the bishop of Exeter and otherswere also slain.
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  • This might have been more tolerable if the Lancastrian party had shown any governing power; but both while Somerset was their leader, down to his death in the first battle of St Albans, and while iii 1456-1459 Exeter, Wiltshire, Shrewshury and Beaumont were the queens trusted agents, the condition of England was de.
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  • This is an error; they were protracted for twelve years after the accession of Henry VII., and did not really end till the time of Blackheath Field and the Early siege of Exeter (1497).
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  • He rallied the wrecks of the west country rebels, and presently appeared before the gates of Exeter with nearly 8000 men.
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  • Elizabeth, married to John Holand, duke of Exeter, who was beheadedbyHenry IV.; afterwards to Sir John Cornwall, created Baron Fanhope.
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  • About the beginning of the 10th century, however, the experiments of Messrs Settle and Padfield at Exeter, Messrs Woodall and Duckham at Bournemouth, and Dr Bueb in Germany showed such encouraging results that the idea of the vertical retort again came to the front, and several systems were proposed and tried.
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  • Peirce (1673-1726) of Exeter, was to leave dissenting congregations to determine their own orthodoxy; the General Baptists had already (1700) condoned defections from the common doctrine.
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  • He spent one year as a teacher in Phillip's Academy, Exeter, New Hampshire, and then began the study of law in the office of John Quincy Adams. In 1809 Adams was appointed minister to Russia, and Everett accompanied him as his private secretary, remaining attached to the American legation in Russia until 1811.
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  • In 1667 Locke moved from Christ Church to Exeter House, Lord Ashley's London residence, to become his confidential secretary.
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  • Exeter House afforded every opportunity for society.
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  • The foundation of the monumental work of his life was laid when he was at Exeter House.
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  • Cox was a fine orator, and a speech made in Exeter Hall in 1833, in which he put the responsibility for slavery in America on the British government, made a great impression.
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  • After his first English expedition Sweyn was content to blackmail England instead ofravaging it, till the ruthless massacre of the Danes on St Brice's day, the 3rd of November 1002, by Ethelred the Unready (Sweyn's sister was among the victims) brought the Danish king to Exeter (1003).
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  • Having taken his degree at Oxford (from Trinity College) in 1838, he was elected to a fellowship at Exeter College in 1840, of which from 1842 to 1846 he was fellow and tutor.
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  • He had already, in August 1549, at some risk, gone down with Lord Russell to turn the hearts of the rebels by preaching and persuasion, and two years later he was appointed bishop of Exeter by letters patent, on the compulsory retirement of his predecessor, Veysey, who had reached an almost mythical age.
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  • Conscientious objections were probably responsible for his non-restoration to the see of Exeter, and his refusal of that of Llandaff in 1563.
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  • He had little fight in him, however, and after a futile siege of Exeter and an advance to Taunton he stole away and took sanctuary at Beaulieu in Hampshire.
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  • It was on the initiative of Portuguese living in England that Queen Elizabeth, in 1588, granted a patent to "certain merchants of Exeter and others of the west parts and of London for a trade to the river of Senega and Gambra in Guinea."
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  • Educated at Exeter College, Oxford, he entered the church, where his advance was rapid.
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  • Educated at Exeter College, Oxford, Peter became dean of Windsor, then dean of Exeter; in 1478 bishop of Exeter; and in 1487 bishop of Winchester in succession to William of Waynflete.
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  • Eliduc is more elaborately planned than any of these, and the action is divided between Exeter and Brittany.
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  • Red House Hotel, Exeter and Devon Family run with a warm & friendly atmosphere.
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  • In third place, the Exeter Colleges Guild produced some reasonable ringing although the leading was a little adrift; they made 18 faults.
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  • At the time of his election to the see of Exeter, he was also archdeacon of St. David's.
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  • In addition, he moved the foundry to a new site near the Exeter canal basin at Water Lane.
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  • Matt bateS, aged 16 Lives in Exeter, Devon.
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  • A long time ago I did a stint of work in an Exeter high street bookshop.
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  • London exported more wool broadcloth than Exeter, Southampton, Hull and Bristol added together.
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  • It introduced them to digital camerawork, animation and editing in Final Cut Pro we ran schools workshops during Animated Exeter 2002.
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  • Dr. John Milles resigned a canonry in Exeter Cathedral in Aug. 1705.
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  • The other main car park in Exeter is Haven Banks Car Parks positioned on the south side of the river.
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  • The conservatory Center is a professional company in Exeter who can provide you with cane conservatory furniture.
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  • Exeter was sunk by a torpedo from a Japanese destroyer.
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  • In 1625 a large flood caused devastation from Tiverton down to Exeter.
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  • Arrangements are in place with consortia of solicitors ' firms in Bath, Swindon and Exeter for the presentation of " in-house " courses.
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  • Shortly afterward the local goldsmith John Elston seems to have brought London craftsmen, skilled in making complex objects, to Exeter.
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  • Charles Dickens writer 1835 Charles Dickens visited Exeter several times, the first to attend the hustings for the Exeter City Council elections.
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  • Exeter ' s sports facilities are of a high standard and have benefited from multi-million pound investment with further development program under way.
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  • Exeter were on the offensive for most of the half, dominating the midfield.
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  • Went to Exeter university and lived next-door to Wilf.
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  • She went on to the Guildhall for lunch before watching a pageant of 150 years of policing in Exeter.
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  • Exeter Ship Canal Two alien weeds, parrots feather and floating marsh pennywort, have invaded Exeter Ship Canal.
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  • Kenneth A. NEWING (1931-40) has been appointed a prebendary of Exeter Cathedral.
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  • The electronic journals from established publishers, for which the University of Exeter has access, may be consulted via the links below.
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  • He was then recaptured in 2004 to become User Support Manager at Exeter.
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  • Hotel Receptionist A Hotel Receptionist is required for an extremely reputable company on the outskirts of Exeter.
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  • Exeter BSAC is part of the British Sub-Aqua Club (BSAC ), the largest scuba diving club in the world.
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  • There are trip workings to several private sidings in the Exeter area.
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  • United found themselves embroiled in a titanic struggle against... Exeter City.
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  • A few features Exeter Cathedral has the longest unbroken stretch of Gothic stone vaulting in the world.
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  • Shilhay - the heart of the woolen industry The heart of Exeter's woolen industry was situated at or near to Shilhay.
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  • Heather Coleman in Exeter has a wonderfully zany site but (but beware the brain behind the fluff ).
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  • It was taken with Henry and handed to the Yorkist, George Neville, bishop of Exeter, brother of the kingmaker, earl of Warwick, in London on 25th July following.
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  • Teignmouth (Tennemue, Tengemue) possessed a church of St Michael as early as 1044, when what is now East Teignmouth was granted by Edward the Confessor to Leofric, bishop of Exeter, and an allusion to salterers in the same grant proves the existence of the.
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  • The son was educated at Phillips Academy, Exeter, at Harvard University, at Heidelberg, Göttingen and Berlin.
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  • Grimm, in Die deutsche Heldensage (2nd ed., Berlin, 1867), quotes the account given by Jordanes, references in Beowulf, in the Wanderer's Song, Exeter Book, in Parcival, in Dietrichs Flucht, the account given in the Quedlinburg Chronicle, by Ekkehard in the Chronicon Urspergense, by Saxo Grammaticus, &c. See also Vigfusson and Powell, Corpus poeticum boreale, vol.
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  • You are going to Exeter with me.
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  • The academy at Exeter was a famous school for preparing boys for college.
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  • There were no railroads at that time, and Exeter was nearly fifty miles away.
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  • But our neighbor, Johnson, is sending the nag to Exeter for the use of a lady who is to ride back with me.
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  • But won't it look rather funny for me to ride to Exeter on a sidesaddle?
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  • And so they set out on their journey to Exeter.
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  • It took them two days to reach Exeter.
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  • Patients will be recruited from leg ulcer clinics in Sheffield and Exeter.
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  • Just one example of this is in Exeter where a diabetic retinopathy screening service has been set up.
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  • Exeter BSAC is part of the British Sub-Aqua Club (BSAC), the largest scuba diving club in the world.
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  • The former Exeter City star striker Tony Kellow was a landlord in the late 1980's.
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  • The sequence was uncovered by excavation by Exeter Archeology in 1976-8.
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  • The living is a vicarage in the patronage of the Bishop of Exeter.
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  • Exeter University vise chancellor has denied the accusation made by Professor Roger Burt.
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  • She was born in Exeter in 1733, her dad was a wool merchant, not very successful, he went bust.
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  • Shilhay - the heart of the woolen industry The heart of Exeter 's woolen industry was situated at or near to Shilhay.
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  • Heather Coleman in Exeter has a wonderfully zany site but (but beware the brain behind the fluff).
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  • Exeter Hospital is located roughly 15 miles away from Portsmouth.
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