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ewing

ewing

ewing Sentence Examples

  • His father, George Ewing, settled at Lancaster, Fairfield county, Ohio, in 1792.

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  • Ewing, Progress of Australia in the 10th Century; G.

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  • Ewing, Proc. Roy.

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  • THOMAS EWING (1789-1871), American lawyer and statesman, was born near West Liberty, Ohio (disambiguation)|Ohio county, Virginia, on the 28th of December 1789.

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  • His son, Hugh Boyle Ewing (1826-1905), served throughout the Civil War in the Federal armies, rising from the rank of colonel { 1861) to that of brigadier-general (1862) and brevet majorgeneral (1865), and commanding brigades at Antietam and Vicksburg and a division at Chickamauga; and was minister of the United States to the Netherlands in 1866-1870.

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  • Another son, Thomas Ewing (1829-1896), studied at Brown University in1852-1854(in 1894, by a special vote, he was placed on the list of graduates in the class of 1856); he was a lawyer and a freestate politician in Kansas in 1857-1861, and was the first chiefjustice of the Kansas supreme court (1861-1862).

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  • Maurice, Dean Stanley, Bishop Ewing, Dr John Brown and Thomas Carlyle.

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  • Ewing, A Journey in the Hauran (with a large collection of inscriptions); Palestine Exploration Fund Quarterly Statement, 1895; W.

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  • Ewing (Phil.

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  • Ewing introduced the method (Phil.

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  • This last method of arrangement is called by Ewing the " one-pole method, because the magnetometer deflection is mainly caused by the upper pole of the rod (Magnetic Induction, p. 40).

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  • A plan of the apparatus as arranged by Ewing for the latter purpose is shown diagrammatically in fig.

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  • 10, shows the result of a typical experiment made upon a piece of soft iron (Ewing, Phil.

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  • The effect of the ends of the wire is, as Ewing remarks, to shear the diagram in the horizontal direction through the angle which the sloping line makes with the vertical.

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  • 1881, 13, 141; Ewing, Phil.

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  • For a simple proof, see Ewing, Magnetic Induction (1900), p. 99.

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  • Ewing's hysteresis-tester, 2 which is specially intended for testing the sheet iron used in transformers.

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  • - Some typical induction curves, copied from a paper by Ewing (Proc. Inst.

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  • Ewing and H.

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  • 2 An interesting collection of W - B curves embodying the results of actual experiments by Ewing and Klaassen on different specimens of metal is given in fig.

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  • The results of some comparative tests published by Ewing (Proc. Inst.

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  • An experiment by Ewing showed that by the operation of stretching an annealed iron wire beyond the limits of elasticity the permeability under a magnetizing force of about 3 units was reduced by as much as 75%.

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  • Sankey were found by Ewing to give the following results, which, however, are regarded as being unusually favourable.

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  • per cycle at an induction of 8000, being 1 6 times the loss shown by Ewing's specimen at the same induction.

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  • to watts per lb with a frequency of ioo is o 000589 (Ewing).

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  • The third column shows the relative amount of hysteresis deduced by Ewing as a general mean from actual tests of many samples (Journ.

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  • Ewing, Phil.

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  • Ewing (Magnetic Induction, § 194) has devised an arrangement in which two similar test bars are placed side by side; each bar is surrounded by a magnetizing coil, the two coils being connected to give opposite directions of magnetization, and each pair of ends is connected by a short massive block of soft iron having holes bored through it to fit the bars, which are clamped in position by set-screws.

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  • Ewing has described an arrangement in which the test bar has a soft-iron pole piece clamped to each of its ends; the pole pieces are joined by a long well-fitting block of iron, which is placed upon them (like the " keeper " of a magnet), and the induction is measured by the force required to detach the block.

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  • In Ewing's magnetic balance (Journ.

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  • An excellent instrument of the class is Ewing's permeability bridge.

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  • Du Bois's results, which, as given in his papers, show the relation of H to the magnetic moment per unit of mass, have been reduced by Ewing to the usual form, and are indicated in fig.

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  • Ewing and W.

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  • The annexed table gives the saturation values of I for the particular metals examined by Ewing and Low: Wrought iron .

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  • The behaviour of nickel in weak fields has been observed by Ewing (Phil.

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  • Ewing has also made a careful study (Proc. Roy.

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  • Ewing draws attention to a curious consequence of this time-lag.

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  • Later researches have however thrown much new light upon a class of phenomena which cannot fail to have an important bearing upon the complete theory of 1 The same phenomenon is exhibited in a less marked degree when soft iron is magnetized in stronger fields (Ewing, Phil.

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  • Ewing, C. G.

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  • The following table shows the values of I and H corresponding to the Villari critical point in some of Ewing's experiments: The effects of pulling stress may be observed either when the wire is stretched by a constant load while the magnetizing force is varied, or when the magnetizing force is kept constant while the load is varied.

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  • Ewing and G.

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  • The effects of longitudinal pressure are opposite to those of traction; when the cyclic condition has been reached, pressure reduces the magnetization of iron in weak fields and increases it in strong fields (Ewing, Magnetic Induction, 1900, 223).

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  • Thomson), and was subsequently investigated by Ewing and Cowan.

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  • Ewing has also examined the effects produced by longitudinal compression upon the susceptibility and retentiveness of nickel, and found, as was to be expected, that both were greatly increased by pressure.

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  • Ewing and Cowan looked carefully for it, especially in weak fields, but failed to discover anything of the kind.'

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  • Ewing.

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  • Ewing's independent experiments showed that the magnetization curve for a cobalt rod under a load of 16.2 kilogrammes per square mm.

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  • The effect of tension was subsequently studied by Nagaoka and Honda, who in 1902 confirmed, mutatis mutandis, the results obtained by Chree and Ewing for cast cobalt, while for annealed cobalt it turned out that tension always caused diminution of magnetization, the diminution increasing with increasing fields.

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  • Its nature is made clear by Ewing and Cowan's curves (Phil.

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  • Ewing has shown that it is diminished and may even be reversed by tensile stress.

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  • Ewing (Proc. Roy.

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  • Supposing Ewing's hypothesis to be correct, it is clear that if the magnetization of a piece of iron were reversed by a strong rotating field instead of by a field alternating through zero, the loss of energy by hysteresis should be little or nothing, for the molecules would rotate with the field and no unstable movements would be possible.'

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  • In one case the hysteresis loss per cubic centimetre per cycle was 16,100 ergs for B =1 5,900, and only 1200 ergs for B = 20,200, the highest induction obtained in the experiment; possibly it would have vanished before B had reached 21,000.2 These experiments prove that actual friction must be almost entirely absent, and, as Baily remarks, the agreement of the results with the previously suggested deduction affords a strong verification of Ewing's form of the molecular theory.

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  • The susceptibility is therefore constant and independent of the field, while its negative sign indicates that the substance is diamagnetic. There being no resistance, the induced current will continue to circulate 1 This deduction from Ewing's theory appears to have been first suggested by J.

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  • Ewing's Experimental Researches of 1885; throughout the whole of his work special attention was directed to that curious lagging action to which the author applied the now familiar term " hysteresis."

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  • Ewing, Magnetic 1 Phil.

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  • - (Ewing & Rosenhain, Phil.

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  • Important memoirs by Ewing and Rosenhain, and by C. T.

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  • Thomas Ewing, a close friend of the father, sometime a senator of the United States and a member of the national cabinet.

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  • In 1847 he served on the staff of the general commanding the division of the Pacific. In 1850 he married Ellen Boyle, daughter of Thomas Ewing, then secretary of the interior.

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  • One or two chapters on the subject are also generally included in treatises on the steam engine, or other heat engines, such as those of Rankine, Perry or Ewing.

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  • The borough of South Trenton was annexed in 1850; the borough of Chambersburg and the township of Millham in 1888; the borough of Wilbur in 1898; and parts of the townships of Ewing and Hamilton in 1900.

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  • Ewing, Memoir on Earthquake Measurement (Tokyo, 1883); Reports of the British Association (1887-1902); E.

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  • Ewing (acting).

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  • Ewing, Public Services of Jacob Dolson Cox (Washington, 1902), a Johns Hopkins University dissertation; and W.

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  • He chose for his cabinet Daniel Webster as secretary of state, Thomas Ewing as secretary of the treasury, John Bell as secretary of war, George E.

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  • The state supports the following charitable and correctional institutions all under the inspection of a State Department of Charities and Correction (1905); hospitals for the insane at Trenton and Morris Plains; a training-school for feeble-minded children (partly supported by the state) and a home for feeble-minded women at Vineland; a sanatorium for tuberculous diseases at Glen Gardner; a village for epileptics, with a farm of 700 acres, near Skillman, Somerset county; a state home (reform school) for boys near Jamesburg, Middlesex county, and for girls in Ewing township, near Trenton; a state reformatory for criminals sixteen to thirty years of age, near Rahway; a state prison at Trenton; a home for disabled soldiers at Kearney,' Hudson county; a home for disabled soldiers, sailors and their wives at Vineland"; and a school for the deaf at Trenton.

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  • Ewing before the Society of Arts (Journal of the Society of Arts, vol.

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  • The difficulty of using Auditory Training Units with headphones has been overcome with the use of insert earphones supplied by the Ewing Foundation.

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  • elder brother, James Ewing, married a stone mason's daughter, Jemima Rough Phillip, in Dundee.

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  • Almost all Ewing's sarcoma tumors have a change in their genetic makeup.

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  • The first Professor of Engineering was James Alfred Ewing, a native Dundonian who invented the continuous seismograph.

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  • translocation breakpoint causing Ewing's Sarcoma.

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  • Ewing, Progress of Australia in the 10th Century; G.

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  • Ewing, Proc. Roy.

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  • THOMAS EWING (1789-1871), American lawyer and statesman, was born near West Liberty, Ohio (disambiguation)|Ohio county, Virginia, on the 28th of December 1789.

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  • His father, George Ewing, settled at Lancaster, Fairfield county, Ohio, in 1792.

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  • His son, Hugh Boyle Ewing (1826-1905), served throughout the Civil War in the Federal armies, rising from the rank of colonel { 1861) to that of brigadier-general (1862) and brevet majorgeneral (1865), and commanding brigades at Antietam and Vicksburg and a division at Chickamauga; and was minister of the United States to the Netherlands in 1866-1870.

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  • Another son, Thomas Ewing (1829-1896), studied at Brown University in1852-1854(in 1894, by a special vote, he was placed on the list of graduates in the class of 1856); he was a lawyer and a freestate politician in Kansas in 1857-1861, and was the first chiefjustice of the Kansas supreme court (1861-1862).

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  • Maurice, Dean Stanley, Bishop Ewing, Dr John Brown and Thomas Carlyle.

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  • Ewing, A Journey in the Hauran (with a large collection of inscriptions); Palestine Exploration Fund Quarterly Statement, 1895; W.

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  • Ewing (Phil.

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  • Ewing introduced the method (Phil.

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  • This last method of arrangement is called by Ewing the " one-pole method, because the magnetometer deflection is mainly caused by the upper pole of the rod (Magnetic Induction, p. 40).

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  • A plan of the apparatus as arranged by Ewing for the latter purpose is shown diagrammatically in fig.

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  • 10, shows the result of a typical experiment made upon a piece of soft iron (Ewing, Phil.

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  • The effect of the ends of the wire is, as Ewing remarks, to shear the diagram in the horizontal direction through the angle which the sloping line makes with the vertical.

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  • 14 shows diagrammatically a convenient arrangement described by Ewing (see Proc. Inst.

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  • 1881, 13, 141; Ewing, Phil.

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  • For a simple proof, see Ewing, Magnetic Induction (1900), p. 99.

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  • Ewing's hysteresis-tester, 2 which is specially intended for testing the sheet iron used in transformers.

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  • - Some typical induction curves, copied from a paper by Ewing (Proc. Inst.

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  • Ewing and H.

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  • 2 An interesting collection of W - B curves embodying the results of actual experiments by Ewing and Klaassen on different specimens of metal is given in fig.

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  • The results of some comparative tests published by Ewing (Proc. Inst.

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  • An experiment by Ewing showed that by the operation of stretching an annealed iron wire beyond the limits of elasticity the permeability under a magnetizing force of about 3 units was reduced by as much as 75%.

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  • Ewing has also studied the effect of vibration in conferring upon iron an apparent or spurious permeability of high value; this effort also is most conspicuous when the magnetizing force is weak.

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  • Sankey were found by Ewing to give the following results, which, however, are regarded as being unusually favourable.

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  • per cycle at an induction of 8000, being 1 6 times the loss shown by Ewing's specimen at the same induction.

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  • to watts per lb with a frequency of ioo is o 000589 (Ewing).

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  • The third column shows the relative amount of hysteresis deduced by Ewing as a general mean from actual tests of many samples (Journ.

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  • Ewing, Phil.

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  • Ewing (Magnetic Induction, § 194) has devised an arrangement in which two similar test bars are placed side by side; each bar is surrounded by a magnetizing coil, the two coils being connected to give opposite directions of magnetization, and each pair of ends is connected by a short massive block of soft iron having holes bored through it to fit the bars, which are clamped in position by set-screws.

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  • Ewing has described an arrangement in which the test bar has a soft-iron pole piece clamped to each of its ends; the pole pieces are joined by a long well-fitting block of iron, which is placed upon them (like the " keeper " of a magnet), and the induction is measured by the force required to detach the block.

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  • In Ewing's magnetic balance (Journ.

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  • An excellent instrument of the class is Ewing's permeability bridge.

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  • Du Bois's results, which, as given in his papers, show the relation of H to the magnetic moment per unit of mass, have been reduced by Ewing to the usual form, and are indicated in fig.

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  • Ewing and W.

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  • The annexed table gives the saturation values of I for the particular metals examined by Ewing and Low: Wrought iron .

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  • Mag., 1890, 2 9, 293) with an electromagnet specially designed for the production of strong fields, confirm Ewing's results for iron, nickel and cobalt.

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  • The behaviour of nickel in weak fields has been observed by Ewing (Phil.

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  • Ewing has also made a careful study (Proc. Roy.

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  • Ewing draws attention to a curious consequence of this time-lag.

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  • Later researches have however thrown much new light upon a class of phenomena which cannot fail to have an important bearing upon the complete theory of 1 The same phenomenon is exhibited in a less marked degree when soft iron is magnetized in stronger fields (Ewing, Phil.

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  • Ewing, C. G.

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  • The following table shows the values of I and H corresponding to the Villari critical point in some of Ewing's experiments: The effects of pulling stress may be observed either when the wire is stretched by a constant load while the magnetizing force is varied, or when the magnetizing force is kept constant while the load is varied.

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  • Ewing and G.

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  • The effects of longitudinal pressure are opposite to those of traction; when the cyclic condition has been reached, pressure reduces the magnetization of iron in weak fields and increases it in strong fields (Ewing, Magnetic Induction, 1900, 223).

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  • Thomson), and was subsequently investigated by Ewing and Cowan.

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  • Ewing has also examined the effects produced by longitudinal compression upon the susceptibility and retentiveness of nickel, and found, as was to be expected, that both were greatly increased by pressure.

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  • Ewing and Cowan looked carefully for it, especially in weak fields, but failed to discover anything of the kind.'

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  • Ewing's independent experiments showed that the magnetization curve for a cobalt rod under a load of 16.2 kilogrammes per square mm.

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  • The effect of tension was subsequently studied by Nagaoka and Honda, who in 1902 confirmed, mutatis mutandis, the results obtained by Chree and Ewing for cast cobalt, while for annealed cobalt it turned out that tension always caused diminution of magnetization, the diminution increasing with increasing fields.

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  • Its nature is made clear by Ewing and Cowan's curves (Phil.

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  • Ewing has shown that it is diminished and may even be reversed by tensile stress.

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  • Ewing (Proc. Roy.

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  • Supposing Ewing's hypothesis to be correct, it is clear that if the magnetization of a piece of iron were reversed by a strong rotating field instead of by a field alternating through zero, the loss of energy by hysteresis should be little or nothing, for the molecules would rotate with the field and no unstable movements would be possible.'

    0
    0
  • In one case the hysteresis loss per cubic centimetre per cycle was 16,100 ergs for B =1 5,900, and only 1200 ergs for B = 20,200, the highest induction obtained in the experiment; possibly it would have vanished before B had reached 21,000.2 These experiments prove that actual friction must be almost entirely absent, and, as Baily remarks, the agreement of the results with the previously suggested deduction affords a strong verification of Ewing's form of the molecular theory.

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  • Ewing has himself also shown how satisfactorily this theory accords with many other obscure and complicated phenomena, such as those presented by coercive force, differences of magnetic quality, and the effects of vibration, temperature and stress; while as regards simplicity and freedom from arbitrary assumptions it leaves little to be desired.

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  • The susceptibility is therefore constant and independent of the field, while its negative sign indicates that the substance is diamagnetic. There being no resistance, the induced current will continue to circulate 1 This deduction from Ewing's theory appears to have been first suggested by J.

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  • Ewing's Experimental Researches of 1885; throughout the whole of his work special attention was directed to that curious lagging action to which the author applied the now familiar term " hysteresis."

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  • Ewing, Magnetic 1 Phil.

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  • - (Ewing & Rosenhain, Phil.

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  • Important memoirs by Ewing and Rosenhain, and by C. T.

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  • Thomas Ewing, a close friend of the father, sometime a senator of the United States and a member of the national cabinet.

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  • In 1847 he served on the staff of the general commanding the division of the Pacific. In 1850 he married Ellen Boyle, daughter of Thomas Ewing, then secretary of the interior.

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  • One or two chapters on the subject are also generally included in treatises on the steam engine, or other heat engines, such as those of Rankine, Perry or Ewing.

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  • ADLAI EWING STEVENSON (1835-), American political leader, was born in Christian county, Kentucky, on the 23rd of October 1835..

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  • Adlai Ewing Stevenson >>

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  • The borough of South Trenton was annexed in 1850; the borough of Chambersburg and the township of Millham in 1888; the borough of Wilbur in 1898; and parts of the townships of Ewing and Hamilton in 1900.

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  • When the frame of this arrangement is rapidly displaced through a small horizontal range to the right and left of the direction in which the rod points, the weight b by its inertia tends to remain at rest, and the motion of the frame, which is that of the earth, is magnified in the ration op to bp. This apparatus, of which there are many types, was first introduced into seismometry by Professor Ewing.

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  • Ewing, Memoir on Earthquake Measurement (Tokyo, 1883); Reports of the British Association (1887-1902); E.

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  • Ewing (acting).

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  • Ewing (B.A.

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  • Ewing (b.

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  • Ewing, Public Services of Jacob Dolson Cox (Washington, 1902), a Johns Hopkins University dissertation; and W.

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  • 1840); and Adlai Ewing Stevenson (b.

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  • He chose for his cabinet Daniel Webster as secretary of state, Thomas Ewing as secretary of the treasury, John Bell as secretary of war, George E.

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  • The state supports the following charitable and correctional institutions all under the inspection of a State Department of Charities and Correction (1905); hospitals for the insane at Trenton and Morris Plains; a training-school for feeble-minded children (partly supported by the state) and a home for feeble-minded women at Vineland; a sanatorium for tuberculous diseases at Glen Gardner; a village for epileptics, with a farm of 700 acres, near Skillman, Somerset county; a state home (reform school) for boys near Jamesburg, Middlesex county, and for girls in Ewing township, near Trenton; a state reformatory for criminals sixteen to thirty years of age, near Rahway; a state prison at Trenton; a home for disabled soldiers at Kearney,' Hudson county; a home for disabled soldiers, sailors and their wives at Vineland"; and a school for the deaf at Trenton.

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  • Ewing before the Society of Arts (Journal of the Society of Arts, vol.

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  • The figure below gives a summary of primary tumor site in a series of over 900 people diagnosed with Ewing 's sarcoma of bone.

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  • The first Professor of Engineering was James Alfred Ewing, a native Dundonian who invented the continuous seismograph.

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  • Subsequently, I was awarded an Imperial Cancer Research Trust fellowship to clone the translocation breakpoint causing Ewing 's Sarcoma.

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  • Ewing's sarcoma is the second most common form of childhood bone cancer.

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  • Accounting for fewer than 5 percent of bone tumors in children, Ewing's sarcoma usually begins in the soft tissue (the marrow) inside bones of the leg, hips, ribs, and arms.

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  • More than 80 percent of patients who have Ewing's sarcoma are white, and the disease most frequently affects children between the ages five and nine and young adults between ages 20 and 30.

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  • About 27 percent of all cases of Ewing's sarcoma occur in children under the age of ten, and 64 percent occur in adolescents between the ages of ten and 20.

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  • Chest and abdominal CAT scans are used to determine whether Ewing's sarcoma has spread to the lungs, liver, or lymph nodes.

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  • This technique is effective in identifying cells that are found in Ewing's sarcoma but are not present in other malignant tumors.

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  • Radiation therapy is used often to treat Ewing's sarcoma.

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  • Patients who have received treatment for Ewing's sarcoma are examined often-at gradually lengthening intervals-after completing therapy.

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  • Two-thirds of all children diagnosed with Ewing's sarcoma live for more than five years after the disease is detected.

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  • More than 80 percent of patients whose Ewing's sarcoma is confined to a small area and surgically removed live, for at least five years.

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  • More than 70 percent of patients live five years or more with a small Ewing's sarcoma that cannot be removed, but only three out of five patients with large, unremovable tumors survive that long.

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  • Ewing's Sarcoma: A Medical Dictionary, Bibliography, and Annotated Research Guide to Internet References.

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  • Ethan Ewing, President of Bills.com, explains what mortgage lenders look for in an application, and how to increase your chances for an approval.

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  • Ethan Ewing has served as president of Bills.com since joining the firm in 2006.

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  • Ewing and women were delighted with the wicked Alexis, despite the change in settings to more luxurious surroundings and big business, it was still the characters that had fans tuning in.

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  • Patrick Duffy - Dallas's Bobby Ewing brought Brooke's estranged father back to town.

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  • The series revolved around the oil-rich Ewing clan.

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  • The series focused on the Ewing family headed by patriarch Jock and his wife Ellie.

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  • Though not seen on screen initially, Gary Ewing would spinoff into his own prime time drama Knots Landing with wife Valene.

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  • Other residents of Southfork included J.R.'s many times wife Sue Ellen, their son John Ross as well as Pam Barnes Ewing, Bobby's sometime wife and their son Christopher.

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  • Over the years, many storylines focused on control of Ewing Oil, oil fields and the up and down price of crude oil.

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  • When Jim Davis passed away in 1981, the series acknowledged his passing with the death of Jock Ewing.

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  • At the end of season six, J.R. has angered so many people that another shooting occurs at Ewing Oil, only the victim turns out to be Bobby.

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  • The resultant season deals with the struggles of the Ewing family to go on after losing Bobby.

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  • The actress appeared for just a short time in 1970 as Jane Whitney before going on to make waves as Gary Ewing's ex-wife Valene on the prime time soap operas Dallas and Knots Landing throughout the late 70s and 80s.

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  • If you can get past the title, Making Candles & Soaps For Dummies by Kelly Ewing is a great primer for the beginning crafter who wants to learn to create complimentary scented soaps and candles.

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