Europe sentence example

europe
  • We're in northern Europe, so you can't go wrong with sweaters.
    95
    54
  • When you come home from Europe I hope you will be all well and very happy to get home again.
    54
    33
  • Once again, war raged in Europe and around the world and left sixty million people dead.
    56
    38
  • Antoine probably wasn't the main threat in Europe.
    9
    4
  • But in the Crusades we already see an event occupying its definite place in history and without which we cannot imagine the modern history of Europe, though to the chroniclers of the Crusades that event appeared as merely due to the will of certain people.
    10
    5
    Advertisement
  • I've never been to Europe, or Africa, or anywhere yet.
    34
    32
  • The Twelfth Army is on its way back from Europe.
    3
    1
  • You are taking a much deserved vacation in Europe.
    3
    1
  • And that that same technology would allow his questions to be spread across Europe, thereby igniting the Protestant Reformation?
    13
    11
  • But as soon as the necessity for a general European war presented itself he appeared in his place at the given moment and, uniting the nations of Europe, led them to the goal.
    4
    2
    Advertisement
  • Did the Tugendbund which saved Europe" (they did not then venture to suggest that Russia had saved Europe) "do any harm?
    4
    2
  • People ceased to kill one another, and this event was accompanied by its justification in the necessity for a centralization of power, resistance to Europe, and so on.
    4
    2
  • He watched her go, suspecting he'd missed more than he thought during the few months he spent with Jule in Europe.
    3
    2
  • You'll have some time here with us to adjust before Jule yanks you to Europe.
    3
    2
  • Something was really wrong in Europe, and he needed to figure out what, before the European front was overrun by vamps.
    5
    4
    Advertisement
  • He didn't know where the leaks were coming from in Europe, and he definitely didn't know where they were coming from in Arizona.
    4
    3
  • She didn't know where exactly, but by the man's pale skin, she guessed Europe, maybe one of the Slavic countries.
    7
    6
  • The largest statue was Andre, their eldest brother who had recently become dead-dead, standing over Europe.
    2
    1
  • I thought you were in Europe.
    4
    3
  • Prehistoric tumuli are found abundantly in almost all parts of Europe and Asia from Britain to Japan.
    3
    2
    Advertisement
  • His attack on Thuringia ended in his defeat at Lucka in 1307, and, in the same year, the death of his son Rudolph weakened his position in eastern Europe.
    2
    1
  • The principal rivers entering the Mediterranean directly are the Nile from Africa, and the Po, Rhone and Ebro from Europe.
    1
    0
  • Rome was full of anti-revolutionary and anti-Napoleonic strangers from all parts of Europe.
    1
    0
  • These Hebrew translations were, in their turn, rendered into Latin (by Buxtorf and others) and in this form the works of Jewish authors found their way into the learned circles of Europe.
    1
    0
  • That province was under the able government of Ali Vardi Khan, who peremptorily forbade the foreign settlers at Calcutta and Chandernagore to introduce feuds from Europe.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • He was educated in Coventry, became a successful merchant, traveled widely throughout Europe and for several years was the financial agent of Charles I.
    3
    2
  • The Trias does not belong, as might have been expected, to the Alpine or Mediterranean type; but resembles that of Germany and northern Europe.
    1
    0
  • In the aeneolithic necropolis of Anghelu Ruju, near Alghero, of 63 skulls, 53 belong to the" Mediterranean " dolico-mesocephalic type and i o to a Eurasian brachycephalic type of Asiatic origin, which has been found in prehistoric tombs of other parts of Europe.
    1
    0
  • The death without direct heirs of Duke John William in 1609 led to serious complications in which almost all the states of Europe were concerned; however, by the treaty of Xanten in 1614, Cleves passed to the elector of Brandenburg, being afterwards incorporated with the electorate by the great elector, Frederick William.
    2
    1
  • The whole genus is parasitical, and contains about twenty species, widely distributed in the warmer parts of the old world; but only the mistletoe proper is a native of Europe.
    2
    1
    Advertisement
  • On that occasion all Europe united to do him honour, many learned societies sent delegates to express their congratulations, the king of Italy gave him his own portrait on a gold medallion, and among the numerous addresses he received was one from Kaiser Wilhelm II., who took the opportunity of presenting him with the Grand Gold Medal for Science.
    2
    1
  • The ordinary domesticated cats of Europe are, however, mainly of African origin, although they have largely crossed, especially in Germany (and probably also in Great Britain), with the wild cat.
    1
    0
  • As to the introduction of domesticated cats into Europe, the opinion is very generally held that tame cats from Egypt were imported at a relatively early date into Etruria by Phoenician traders; and there is decisive evidence that these animals were established in Italy long before the Christian era.
    1
    0
  • Apart from the above-mentioned division of the striped members of both groups into two types according to the pattern of their markings, the domesticated cats of western Europe are divided into a short-haired and a long-haired group. Of these, the former is the one which bears the closest relationship to the wild cats of Africa and of Europe, the latter being an importation from the East.
    1
    0
  • As to long-haired cats, there appear originally to have been two closely-allied strains, the Angora and the Persian, of which the former has been altogether replaced in western Europe by the latter.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • The conquest of Kazan was an epoch-making event in the history of eastern Europe.
    1
    0
  • It was upon Livonia that his eyes were fixed, which was comparatively near at hand and promised him a seaboard and direct communication with western Europe.
    1
    0
  • Its importance is due to its command of the point where the chief trade route from Persia and Central Asia to Europe, over the table-land of Armenia by Bayezid and Erzerum, descends to the sea.
    1
    0
  • After that, most of Europe will be corresponding more or less to international borders, so I'll wait for further comment from Engels before going further.
    1
    0
  • The Alexander romance found its way into Europe through the medium of Latin, but originated mainly from the versions of the pseudo-Callisthenes, not from the more sober narrative of Quintus Curtius.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • Albania is perhaps the least-known region in Europe; and though more than a hundred years have passed since Gibbon described it as "a country within sight of Italy, which is less known than the interior of America," but little progress has yet been made towards a scientific knowledge of this interesting land and its inhabitants.
    1
    0
  • The Albanians are apparently the most ancient race in southeastern Europe.
    1
    0
  • The open grate still holds favour in England, though in America and on the continent of Europe it has been superseded by the closed stove.
    1
    0
  • The different editions of the Descriptio and Constructio, as well as the reception of logarithms on the continent of Europe, and especially by Kepler, whose admiration of the invention almost equalled that of Briggs, belong to the history of logarithms (q.v.).
    1
    0
  • Scotland had produced nothing, and was perhaps the last country in Europe from which a great mathematical discovery would have been expected.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • Of these eighty churches, twelve were in the United Kingdom, twenty on the continent of Europe, sixteen in North America, three in South America, ten in Asia, nine in Africa, six in Australia, two in New Zealand, one in Jamaica and one in Melanesia.
    1
    0
  • He gave its Church a trained ministry, its homes an educated people who could give a reason for their faith, and the whole city an heroic soul which enabled the little town to stand forth as the citadel and city of refuge for the oppressed Protestants of Europe."
    1
    0
  • Though under thirty years of age, he became all over Europe, and in an exceptional degree in France, the leader, organizer and consolidator of the Reformation.
    1
    0
  • Presbyterianism in the United States is a reproduction and further development of Presbyterianism in Europe.
    1
    0
  • At Rome he married a beautiful but unprincipled woman, Lorenza Feliciani, with whom he travelled, under different names, through many parts of Europe.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • Nearly all the mammals of Europe also occur in northern Asia, where, however, the Palaearctic fauna is enriched by numerous additional species.
    1
    0
  • Though it isn't so much a time as a state of mind, historians plot the Renaissance as moving around Europe for a couple of centuries.
    4
    3
  • When the conquest of the city seemed inevitable, a great "brain drain" of scholars, artists, teachers, theologians, and the wealthy emigrated to Western Europe, especially to Italy.
    3
    2
  • In much of Europe, because of deep fear and suspicion of GMO crops, their importation is forbidden.
    2
    1
  • Last year, my second year at Radcliffe, I studied English composition, the Bible as English composition, the governments of America and Europe, the Odes of Horace, and Latin comedy.
    3
    2
  • During the next two years neither Mr. Anagnos, who was in Europe for a year, nor Miss Sullivan wrote anything about Helen Keller for publication.
    5
    4
  • Prussia has always declared that Buonaparte is invincible, and that all Europe is powerless before him....
    3
    2
  • It is only necessary for one powerful nation like Russia--barbaric as she is said to be--to place herself disinterestedly at the head of an alliance having for its object the maintenance of the balance of power of Europe, and it would save the world!
    3
    2
  • God grant that the Corsican monster who is destroying the peace of Europe may be overthrown by the angel whom it has pleased the Almighty, in His goodness, to give us as sovereign!
    4
    3
  • He cannot endure the notion that Buonaparte is negotiating on equal terms with all the sovereigns of Europe and particularly with our own, the grandson of the Great Catherine!
    4
    3
  • On the twelfth of June, 1812, the forces of Western Europe crossed the Russian frontier and war began, that is, an event took place opposed to human reason and to human nature.
    5
    4
  • Yes, I will throw you back beyond the Dvina and beyond the Dnieper, and will re- erect against you that barrier which it was criminal and blind of Europe to allow to be destroyed.
    2
    1
  • May the ruin he hopes to bring upon us recoil on his own head, and may Europe delivered from bondage glorify the name of Russia!
    2
    1
  • We will show Europe how Russia rises to the defense of Russia!
    2
    1
  • They have yielded up all Europe to him, and have now come to teach us.
    2
    1
  • Men leave their customary pursuits, hasten from one side of Europe to the other, plunder and slaughter one another, triumph and are plunged in despair, and for some years the whole course of life is altered and presents an intensive movement which first increases and then slackens.
    2
    1
  • Kutuzov did not understand what Europe, the balance of power, or Napoleon meant.
    2
    1
  • With the present complex forms of political and social life in Europe can any event that is not prescribed, decreed, or ordered by monarchs, ministers, parliaments, or newspapers be imagined?
    10
    9
  • Leaving England, he travelled through Europe as far as Rome, where he was arrested in 1789.
    0
    0
  • An interest and importance belong to this sea as forming part of the chief highway between Europe and India.
    0
    0
  • The cereals of Europe are a source of increasing wealth to the nation, and alfalfa promises new prosperity for pastoral industries.
    0
    0
  • A considerable percentage of these arrivals and departures represents seasonal labourers, who come out from Europe solely for the Argentine wheat harvest and should not be classed as immigrants.
    0
    0
  • Telegraphic communication with Europe is effected by cables laid along the Uruguayan and Brazilian coasts, and by the Brazilian land lines to connect with transatlantic cables from Pernambuco.
    0
    0
  • The export, moreover, of live sheep and of frozen mutton to Europe has become an important factor in the trade of Argentina.
    0
    0
  • In August 1534 the adelantado, or governor, sailed from San Lucar, at the head of the largest and wealthiest expedition that had ever left Europe for the New World.
    0
    0
  • Much satisfaction was shown in Europe at the fall of President Celman, for investors had suffered heavily by the way in which the resources of Argentina had been dissipated by that the uprising of public opinion against his financial methods signified a more honest conduct of the national affairs in the future.
    0
    0
  • He had been absent from Argentina on a journey to Europe, and on his return in April 1891, a popular reception was given to him at which 50,000 persons attended.
    0
    0
  • Flora and Fauna.The flora of southern France and the Mediterranean is distinct from that of the rest of the country, which does not differ in vegetation from western Europe generally.
    0
    0
  • This law naturally made a deep impression on military Europe, not merely because the period of color service was reducedGermany had taken this step years beforebut because of the almost entire absence of the usual exemptions.
    0
    0
  • The infantry, which wasthe first in Europe to be armed with the magazine rifle, still carries this, the Lebel, rifle which dates from 1886.
    0
    0
  • After the peace of Westphalia Stralsund was ceded with the rest of Western Pomerania to Sweden; and for more than a century and a half it was exposed to attack and capture as the tete - de - pont of the Swedes in continental Europe.
    0
    0
  • The Galapagos Islands are of some commercial importance to Ecuador, on account of the guano and the orchilla moss found on them and exported to Europe.
    0
    0
  • Volunteers came from all parts of Europe, and it is said that among them was Sir Richard Grenville, afterwards famous for his fight in the "Revenge" off Flores in the Azores.
    0
    0
  • Here are the oldest and most celebrated copper mines in Europe.
    0
    0
  • Fossil remains of members of this family have also been found in Europe in strata of the Oligocene period.
    0
    0
  • Under the heading of Multituberculata will be found a brief account of certain extinct mammals from the Mesozoic formations of Europe and North America which have been regarded as more or less nearly related to the monotremes.
    0
    0
  • Strutt, made him known over Europe; and his powers rapidly matured until, at the death of Clerk Maxwell, he stood at the head of British physicists, Sir George Stokes and Lord Kelvin alone excepted.
    0
    0
  • Amadou is prepared on the continent of Europe, chiefly in Germany, but the fungus is a native of Britain.
    0
    0
  • On some of these buildings are still seen the arms of the popes and of some of the royal and noble houses of Europe.
    0
    0
  • The genus is associated with one long extinct in Europe.
    0
    0
  • Immigrants from Europe, and to some extent from North America and China, poured into Melbourne, where the arrivals in 1852 averaged 2000 persons in a week.
    0
    0
  • In 1873 he became interested in a project for uniting Europe and Asia by a railway to Bombay, with a branch to Peking.
    0
    0
  • This middle kingdom formed a long strip stretching across Europe from the North Sea to Naples, and embraced the whole of the later Netherlands with the exception of the portion on the left bank of the Scheldt, which river was made the boundary of West Francia.
    0
    0
  • To the Netherlands, as to the rest of western Europe, the result of the crusades was in the main advantageous.
    0
    0
  • They first brought the products and arts of the Orient into western Europe; and in the Netherlands, by the impulse that they gave to commerce, they were one of the primary causes of the rise of the chartered towns.
    0
    0
  • In honour of this great deliverance, the state of Holland founded the university, which was speedily to make the name of Leiden illustrious throughout Europe.
    0
    0
  • Large quantities of fruits - apples, pears, quinces, peaches, nectarines, apricots, grapes and melons - were exported by special trains to central Europe, where the Turkestan crop was received a short time before the south European supplies ripened.
    0
    0
  • The first hint to reach Europe concerning the existence of habitable lands to the eastward of the Ganges is to be found in the writings of Pomponius Mela
    0
    0
  • Although the first definite endeavour to locate the Golden Chersonese thus dates from the middle of the 2nd century of our era, the name was apparently well known to the learned of Europe at a somewhat earlier period, and in his Antiquities of the Jews, written during the latter half of the 1st century, Josephus says that Solomon gave to the pilots furnished to him by Hiram of Tyre commands " that they should go along with his stewards to the land that of old was called Ophir, but now the Aurea Chersonesus, which belongs to India, to fetch gold."
    0
    0
  • The importance of the Malay Peninsula, as has been noted, consisted in the privilege which its locality conferred upon it of being the distributing centre of the spices brought thither from the Moluccas en route for India and Europe.
    0
    0
  • After studying at the university of Prague he travelled through Europe, and among other countries he visited England, where he became acquainted with James Hope (afterwards Hope-Scott) and other leaders of the Tractarian party.
    0
    0
  • Finding himself overruled by the war party in the cabinet, on the 1st of April 1861, Seward suggested a war of all America against most of Europe, with himself as the director of the enterprise.
    0
    0
  • The oaks are widely distributed over the temperate parts of Europe, Asia, North Africa and North America.
    0
    0
  • The cultivation of this tree in Europe forms one of the most important branches of the forester's art.
    0
    0
  • An important product of oak woods is the bark that from a remote period has been the chief tanning material of Europe.
    0
    0
  • Esculus is still employed in southern Europe.
    0
    0
  • On rich loams and the alluvial soils of river-valleys, when well drained, the tree attains a large size, often rivalling the giant oaks of Europe; trunks of 3 or 4 ft.
    0
    0
  • It is one of the most frequented watering-places of Europe, lying on the outskirts of the Kaiserwald at an altitude of 2093 ft., and is 40 m.
    0
    0
  • In 1653 he had made the astonishing proposal to the Dutch that England and Holland should divide the habitable globe outside Europe between them, that all states maintaining the Inquisition should be treated as enemies by both the proposed allies, and that the latter "should send missionaries to all peoples willing to receive them, to inculcate the truth of Jesus Christ and the Holy Gospel."
    0
    0
  • On the other hand, Cromwell could justly boast "there is not a nation in Europe but is very willing to ask a good understanding with you."
    0
    0
  • He raised England to a predominant position among the Powers of Europe, and anticipated the triumphs of the elder Pitt.
    0
    0
  • At a time when throughout the rest of Europe armies were manoeuvring against one another with no more than a formal result, the English and Scots were fighting decisive battles; and Cromwell's battles were more decisive than those of any other leader.
    0
    0
  • In 1869 he visited Europe, painting much in Italy.
    0
    0
  • In 1841-1843 he was in Europe on behalf of the Tyler administration, and he is said to have been instrumental in causing the appointment of Lord Ashburton to negotiate in Washington concerning the boundary dispute between Maine and Canada.
    0
    0
  • When he was in Europe he went to the bank to handle the conversion of his money into the local currency.
    0
    0
  • North of the fiftieth parallel the depths diminish towards the north-east, two long submarine ridges of volcanic origin extend north-eastwards to the southwest of Iceland and to the Faeroe Islands, and these, with their intervening valleys, end in a transverse ridge connecting Greenland, through Iceland and the Faeroe Islands, with Northwestern Scotland and the continental mass of Europe.
    0
    0
  • Unlike any other buildings in Abyssinia, the castles and palaces of Gondar resemble, with some modifications, the medieval fortresses of Europe, the style of architecture being the result of the presence in the country of numbers of Portuguese.
    0
    0
  • In 1813-14 Rich spent some time in Europe, and on his return to Bagdad devoted himself to the study of the geography of Asia Minor, and collected much information in Syrian and Chaldaean convents concerning the Yezidis.
    0
    0
  • He returned to Hungary with the tidings that the Tatars contemplated the immediate conquest of Europe.
    0
    0
  • It is very common on the coasts of Europe and eastern North America, but its flesh is much less esteemed than that of the true Gadi.
    0
    0
  • The form of Morse recorder almost universally used in Europe makes the record in ink- ink, and hence is sometimes called the "ink-writer.".
    0
    0
  • In the case of inland telegraphs and of cable communication with the continent of Europe government control has entirely superseded private companies.
    0
    0
  • He also repeated the suggestion which Lindsay had already made that it might be possible to signal in this manner by conduction currents through the Atlantic Ocean from the United States to Europe.
    0
    0
  • Another type of microphone which was used in Europe much more than in the United States was the multiple-contact instrument.
    0
    0
  • The hair imported into Europe is chiefly used in the manufacture of small brushes used by painters, while the thick hide is formed into a very durable leather.
    0
    0
  • Matthias consolidated his position by alliances with the dukes of Saxony and Bavaria, with the Swiss Confederation, and the archbishop of Salzburg, and was henceforth the greatest potentate in central Europe.
    0
    0
  • Though Matthias's policy was so predominantly occidental that he soon abandoned his youthful idea of driving the Turks out of Europe, he at least succeeded in making them respect Hungarian territory.
    0
    0
  • There is no other instance in Europe of a basin of similar extent equally clearly characterized—the perfectly level character of the plain being as striking as the boldness with which the lower slopes of the mountain ranges begin to rise on each side of it.
    0
    0
  • The birds are similar to those of central Europe; in the mountains vultures, eagles, buzzards, kites, falcons and hawks are found.
    0
    0
  • The relations between the new emperor and the pope were ill defined; and this proved the source of infinite disasters to Italy and Europe in the sequel.
    0
    0
  • It was Hildebrands policy throughout three papacies, during which he controlled the counsels of the Vatican, and before he himself assumed the tiara, to prepare the mind of Italy and Europe for a mighty change.
    0
    0
  • After a prolonged struggle of thirty years, they wrested the whole island from tile Saracens; and Reger, dying in 1101, bequeathed to his son Roger a kingdom in Calabria and Sicily second to none in Europe for wealth and magnificence.
    0
    0
  • In 1075 he caused the investiture of ecclesiastica dignitaries by secular potentates of any degree to be condemned These two reforms, striking at the most cherished privileges ant most deeply-rooted self-indulgences of the aristocratic caste ii Europe, inflamed the bitterest hostility.
    0
    0
  • He at last abandoned the contest which had distracted Europe.
    0
    0
  • Ranking as one of the five Italian powers, she was also destined to defend Western Christendom against the encroachments of the Turk in Europe.
    0
    0
  • Quarrelling with the Venetians In 1508, he combined the forces of all Europe by the league of Cambray against them; and, when he had succeeded in his first purpose of humbling them even to the dust, he turned round in 1510, uttered his famous resolve to expel the barbarians from Italy, and pitted the Spaniards against the French.
    0
    0
  • Leo for a while relied on Francis; for the vast power of Charles V., who succeeded to the empire in 1519, as in 1516 he had succeeded to the crowns of Spain and Lower Italy, threatened the whole of Europe.
    0
    0
  • The Turks were threatening western Europe, and Luther was inflaming Germany.
    0
    0
  • The affairs of Europe during the years when Habsburg and Bourbon fought their domestic battles with the blood of noble races may teach grave lessons to all thoughtful men of our days, but none bitterer, none fraught with more insulting recollections, than to the Italian people, who were haggled over like dumb driven cattle in the mart of chaffering kings.
    0
    0
  • That they had created modern civilization for Europe availed them nothing.
    0
    0
  • Of free commonwealths there now survived only Venice, which, together with Spain, achieved for Europe the victory of Lepanto in 1573; Genoa, which, after the ineffectual Fieschi revolution in 1547, abode beneath the rule of the great Doria family, and held a feeble sway in Corsica; and the two insignificant republics of Lucca and San Marino.
    0
    0
  • Emmanuel Philibert, duke of Savoy, represented the oldest and not the least illustrious reigning house in Europe, and his descendants were destined to achieve for Italy the independence which no other power or prince had given her since the fall of ancient Rome.
    0
    0
  • The destinies of Italy were decided in the cabinets and on the battlefields of northern Europe.
    0
    0
  • Humiliating to human nature in general as are the annals of the 18th-century campaigns in Europe, there is no point of view from which they appear in a light so tragi-comic as from that afforded by Italian history.
    0
    0
  • After this marriage Philip broke the peace of Europe by invading Sardinia.
    0
    0
  • The War of the Polish Succession which now disturbed Europe is only important in Italian history because the treaty of Vienna in 1738 settled the disputed affairs of the duchies Polish of Parma and Tuscany.
    0
    0
  • In the pontificate of Clement XIII they ruled the Vatican, and almost succeeded in embroiling the pope with the concerted Bourbon potentates of Europe.
    0
    0
  • He retired to the island of Sardinia, while the French despoiled Piedmont, thereby adding fuel to the resentment rapidly growing against them in every part of Europe.
    0
    0
  • The heroism of the prisoners, and Silvio Pellicos account of his imprisonment (Le mie Prigioni), did much to enlist the sympathy of Europe for the Italian cause.
    0
    0
  • Events in Rome produced widespread excitement throughout Europe.
    0
    0
  • Urged by a peremptory message from Napoleon, Cavour saw the necessity of bowing to the will of Europe, of disbanding the volunteers and reducing the army to a peace footing.
    0
    0
  • The affair of Mentana caused considerable excitement throughout Europe, and the Roman question entered on an acute stage.
    0
    0
  • The political conditions of Europe favored the realization of Italian desires.
    0
    0
  • The movement was strongly supported by King Humbert, whose intrepidity in visiting the most dangerous spots at Busca and Naples while the epidemic was at its height, reassuring the panic-stricken inhabitants by his presence, excited the enthusiasm of his people and the admiration of Europe.
    0
    0
  • News of the occupation reached Europe simultaneously with the tidings of the fall of Khartum, an event which disappointed Italian hopes of military co-operation with Great Britain in the Sudan.
    0
    0
  • Ardently devoted to the service of humanity, he projected a scheme for a general concourse of all the savants in Europe, and started in London a paper, Journal du Lycee de Londres, which was to be the organ of their views.
    0
    0
  • Since then it has been discovered in other botanic gardens in various parts of Europe, its two most recent appearances being at Lyons (1901) and Munich (1905), occurring always in tanks in which the Victoria regia is cultivated, a fact which indicates that tropical South America is its original habitat.
    0
    0
  • It is a re markable fact that all specimens of Limnocodium hitherto seen have been males; it may be inferred from this either that only one polypstock has been introduced into Europe, from which all the medusae seen hitherto have been budded, or perhaps that the female medusa is a sessile gonophore, as in Pennaria.
    0
    0
  • Trier contains more important Roman remains than any other place in northern Europe.
    0
    0
  • The recursus ad principem, in some form or other of appeal or application to the sovereign or his lay judges, was at the end of the middle ages well known over western Europe.
    0
    0
  • Over the rest of western continental Europe and in the colonies of Spain, Portugal and France, ecclesiastical jurisdiction remained generally in the state which we have already described the court of the cardinal vicar-general consists of such vicargeneral and four other prelates (Smith, ubi supra).
    0
    0
  • She reinforced her story with A Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin, in which she accumulated a large number of documents and testimonies against the great evil; and in 1853 she made a journey to Europe, devoting herself especially to creating an entente cordiale between Englishwomen and Americans on the question of the day.
    0
    0
  • Amber has indeed a very wide distribution, extending over a large part of northern Europe and occurring as far east as the Urals.
    0
    0
  • Some of the amber districts of the Baltic and North Sea were known in prehistoric times, and led to early trade with the south of Europe.
    0
    0
  • It has even been supposed that amber passed from Sicily to northern Europe in early times - a supposition said to receive some support from the fact that much of the amber dug up in Denmark is red; but it must not be forgotten that reddish amber is found also on the Baltic, though not being fashionable it is used rather for varnish-making than for ornaments.
    0
    0
  • Both these allied forms occur throughout central and southern Europe, but, though now abundant in England, it is doubtful whether they are there indigenous.
    0
    0
  • The cotton-wood timber, though soft and perishable, is of value in its prairie habitats, where it is frequently the only available wood either for carpentry or fuel; it has been planted to a considerable extent in some parts of Europe, but in England a form of this species known as P. monilifera is generally preferred from its larger and more rapid growth.
    0
    0
  • On the continent of Europe the dispensing of prescriptions is confined to pharmacists (pharmaciens and apothe- hers).
    0
    0
  • A member of all the chief archaeological societies in Europe, he was given hon.
    0
    0
  • The watercress blocks the rivers of New Zealand into which it has been introduced from Europe.
    0
    0
  • Sequoia (which had already appeared in the American Upper Cretaceous) and the deciduous cypress (Taxodium distichum) are found in Europe.
    0
    0
  • While Europe and probably North America were occupied by a warm temperate flora, tropical types had been driven southward, while the adaptation of others to arctic conditions had become accentuated.
    0
    0
  • This was accompanied in Europe by a drastic weeding out of Miocene types, ultimately leaving the flora pretty much as it now exists.
    0
    0
  • The glacial period effected in Europe a wholesale extermination of temperate types accompanied by a southern extension of the arctic flora.
    0
    0
  • While it has been customary to describe the Miocene flora of Europe as of a North American type, it would be more accurate to describe the latter as having in great measure preserved its Miocene character.
    0
    0
  • Amongst broadleaved trees Juglans has a similar Holarctic range, descending to the West Indies; so has Aesculus, were it not lacking in Europe; it becomes tropical in South America and Malaya.
    0
    0
  • Taking the whole arctic flora at 762 species, Hooker found that 616 occurred in arctic Europe, and of these 586 are Scandinavian.
    0
    0
  • That the arctic flora was driven south into Central Europe cannot be contested in the face of the evidence collected by Nathorst from deposits connected with the boulderclay.
    0
    0
  • At the close of the glacial epoch the north Asiatic flora spread westwards into Europe and intermingled with the surviving vegetation.
    0
    0
  • Some species, such as Anemone alpine, which are wanting in the Arctic flora of the Old World, he thinks must have reached Europe by way of Greenland from north-east America.
    0
    0
  • In the former that of Europe and of Central Asia are continuous.
    0
    0
  • This confirms the theory of Christ that Europe was restocked mainly from Asia after the close of the glacial epoch, the south being closed to it.
    0
    0
  • Its eastern limit in Europe is a line from Konigsberg to the Caucasus; thence through China it is continued by varietal forms to Japan.
    0
    0
  • These were abundant in Tertiary Europe, as they are now in Japan, and represent perhaps a cooler element in the flora than that indicated above.
    0
    0
  • Maximowiczfinds that 40% of the plants of Manchuria are common to Europe and Asia, but the proportion falls sharply to i6% in the case of Japan.
    0
    0
  • Hemsley remarks that the northerr genus Erica, which covers thousands of square miles in Europe with very few species, is represented by hundreds of species in I comparatively small area in South Africa.
    0
    0
  • There is an interestini connection with Europe through the so-called Iberian flora.
    0
    0
  • Fagus, starting from the northern hemisphere, has more than held its own in Europe and Asia, but has all but died out in North America, finding conditions favorable for a fresh start in Australasia.
    0
    0
  • He also pointed out reasons for accepting a division of the land into three continents - Europe, Asia and Africa.
    0
    0
  • But not until the voyage of Magellan shook the scales from the eyes of Europe did modern geography begin to advance.
    0
    0
  • The first book, of fourteen short chapters, is concerned with the general properties of the globe; the remaining six books treat in considerable detail of the countries of Europe and of the other continents.
    0
    0
  • At the least there should be some consideration of four separate systems of discovery - the Eastern, in which Chinese and Japanese explorers acquired knowledge of the geography of Asia, and felt their way towards Europe and America; the Western, in which the dominant races of the Mexican and South American plateaus extended their knowledge of the American continent before Columbus; the Polynesian, in which the conquering races of the Pacific Islands found their way from group to group; and the Mediterranean.
    0
    0
  • The great Phoenician colony of Carthage, founded before 800 B.C., perpetuated the commercial enterprise of the parent state, and extended the sphere of practical trade to the ocean shores of Africa and Europe.
    0
    0
  • The Greco-Persian wars had made the remoter parts of Asia Minor more than a name to the Greek geographers before the time of Alexander the Great, but the campaigns of that conqueror from 329 to 325 B.C. opened up the greater Asia to the knowledge of Europe.
    0
    0
  • The conqueror also intended to open up trade by sea between Europe and India, and the narrative of his general Nearchus records this famous voyage of discovery, the detailed accounts of the chief pilot Onesicritus being lost.
    0
    0
  • But it was the military genius of Rome, and the ambition for universal empire, which led, not only to the discovery, but also to the survey of nearly all Europe, and of large tracts in Asia and Africa.
    0
    0
  • The Northmen of Denmark and Norway, whose piratical adventures were the terror of all the coasts of Europe, and who established themselves in Great Britain and Ireland, in France and The Sicily, were also geographical explorers in their rough but Nothmen.
    0
    0
  • At length the long period of barbarism which accompanied and followed the fall of the Roman empire drew to a close in Europe.
    0
    0
  • Among these was Benjamin of Tudela, who set out from Spain in i 160, travelled by land to Constantinople, and having visited India and some of the eastern islands, returned to Europe by way of Egypt after an absence of thirteen years.
    0
    0
  • He returned to Europe possessed of a vast store of knowledge respecting the eastern parts of the world, and, being afterwards made a prisoner by the Genoese, he dictated the narrative of his travels during his captivity.
    0
    0
  • This great event was preceded by the general Portu- utilization in Europe of the polarity of the magnetic guese ex- needle in the construction of the mariner's compass.
    0
    0
  • Until then the Venetians held the carrying trade of India, which was brought by the Persian Gulf and Red sea into Syria and Egypt, the Venetians receiving the products of the East at Alexandria and Beirut and distributing them over Europe.
    0
    0
  • The great and splendidly illustrated collections of voyages and travels of Theodorus de Bry and Hulsius served a similar useful purpose on the continent of Europe.
    0
    0
  • In 1579 Christopher Burroughs built a ship at Nizhniy Novgorod and traded across the Caspian to Baku; and in 1598 Sir Anthony and Robert Shirley arrived in Persia, and Robert was afterwards sent by the shah to Europe as his ambassador.
    0
    0
  • The result was a more accurate map of China than existed, at that time, of any country in Europe.
    0
    0
  • Since the war of 1870 many geographical societies have been established on the continent of Europe.
    0
    0
  • South America and North America follow this type most closely; Eurasia (the land mass of Europe and Asia) comes next, while Africa and Australia are farther removed from the type, and the structure of Antarctica and Greenland is unknown.
    0
    0
  • Lofty lines of fold mountains form the " backbones " of North America in the Rocky of Mountains and the west coast systems, of South America in the Cordillera of the Andes, of Europe in the Pyrenees, Alps, Carpathians and Caucasus, and of Asia in the mountains of Asia Minor, converging on the Pamirs and diverging thence in the Himalaya and the vast mountain systems of central and eastern Asia.
    0
    0
  • These facts have led some naturalists to include the Palaearctic and Nearctic regions in one, termed Holarctic, and to suggest transitional regions, such as the Sonoran, between North and South America, and the Mediterranean, between Europe and Africa, or to create sub-regions, such as Madagascar and New Zealand.
    0
    0
  • Many of the great historic movements of peoples were doubtless due to the gradual change of geographical or climatic conditions; and the slow desiccation of Central Asia has been plausibly suggested as the real cause of the peopling of modern Europe and of the medieval wars of the Old World, the theatres of which were critical points on the great natural lines of communication between east and west.
    0
    0
  • In Europe and Asia frontiers are usually strongly fortified and strictly watched in times of peace as well as during war.
    0
    0
  • It is, however, to be noticed that absolute monarchies are confined to the east of Europe and to Asia, Japan being the only established constitutional monarchy east of the Carpathians.
    0
    0
  • Limited monarchies are (with the exception of Japan) peculiar to Europe, and in these the degree of democratic control may be said to diminish as one passes eastwards from the United Kingdom.
    0
    0
  • Republics, although represented in Europe, are the peculiar form of government of America and are unknown in Asia.
    0
    0
  • In this respect a country is either centralized, like the United Kingdom or France, 1 For the history of territorial changes in Europe, see Freeman, Historical Geography of Europe, edited by Bury (Oxford), 190; and for the official definition of existing boundaries, see Hertslet, The Map of Europe by Treaty (4 vols., London, 1875, 1891); The Map of Africa by Treaty (3 vols., London, 1896).
    0
    0
  • Brontornis, and remind us of the Eocene Gastornis of Europe.
    0
    0
  • In the fens of East Anglia have been found two humeri, one of them immature, of a true Pelecanus, a bird now no longer inhabiting middle Europe.
    0
    0
  • There are a raven (Corvus), a coot (Fulica), the well-known Sandwich island goose (Bernicla sandvicensis), now very commonly domesticated in Europe; and some flycatchers and thrushlike birds.
    0
    0
  • Nearly 20 more are properly Palaearctic, but occasionally occur in America, and about 50 are Nearctic, which from time to time stray to Europe or Asia.
    0
    0
  • The Palaearctic Subregion is, broadly speaking, Europe and Asia, with the exception of India and China.
    0
    0
  • Though Japan is far removed from western Europe, and though a few generic forms and still fewer families inhabit the one without also frequenting the other, yet there is a most astonishing similarity in a large portion of their respective birds.
    0
    0
  • We have homely genera, even among the true Passeres, occurring there - such as Alauda, Acrocephalus, Motacilla and Pratincola, while the Cisticola madagascariensis is only distinguishable from the well-known fan-tailed warbler, C. schoenicola of Europe, Africa and India by its rather darker coloration.
    0
    0
  • To the Ratitae belong possibly also the imperfectly known Diatryma, Eocene of New Mexico, Gastornis and Dasornis, Eocene of Europe, Genyornis, Pleistocene of Australia.
    0
    0
  • Europe, Judah Hadassi composed his Eshkol ha-Kopher, a great theological compendium in the form of a commentary on the Decalogue.
    0
    0
  • He was distinguished in his profession as a physician, and wrote a number of medical works in Arabic (including a commentary on the aphorisms of Hippocrates), all of which were translated into Hebrew, and most of them into Latin, becoming the text-books of Europe in the succeeding centuries.
    0
    0
  • It is an inhabitant of the rivers and streams of Europe north of the Alps, but it is most abundant in those of France and Germany.
    0
    0
  • Meanwhile believers in Enfantin and his new religion were multiplying in all parts of Europe.
    0
    0
  • To this quality is perhaps to be attributed the fact that a people who did so much, who settled and conquered in so large a part of Europe, has practically vanished from the face of the earth.
    0
    0
  • The coming of the Norman ruled that these lands should be neither Saracen nor Greek, nor yet Italian in the same sense as northern Italy, but that they should politically belong to the same group of states as the kingdoms and principalities of feudal Europe.
    0
    0
  • In Sicily the Normans found the two most outwardly civilized of the nations of Europe, the two which had as yet carried the arts to the highest pitch.
    0
    0
  • But it took firm root on Norman soil; it made its way to England at an early stage of its growth, and from that time it went on developing and improving on both sides of the Channel till the artistic revolution came by which, throughout northern Europe, the Romanesque styles gave way to the Gothic. Thus the history of architecture in England during the 11th and 12th centuries is a very different story from the history of the art in Sicily during the same time.
    0
    0
  • The appointment was hailed with enthusiasm in Russia, and at that juncture Prince Chancellor Gorchakov was unquestionably the most powerful minister in Europe.
    0
    0
  • The tension thus produced between the two statesmen was increased by the political complications of 18 751878 in south-eastern Europe, which began with the Herzegovinian insurrection and culminated at the Berlin congress.
    0
    0
  • The agricultural plebeian of old Rome and the feudal noble of contemporary Europe were both of them at Venice impossible characters.
    0
    0
  • In many parts of western Europe the right of private war long remained the privilege of every noble, as it had once been the privilege of every freeman.
    0
    0
  • In the modern states of western Europe the existing nobility seems to have for the most part had its origin in personal service to the prince.
    0
    0
  • But in no part of Europe can the existing nobility trace itself to this immemorial nobility of primitive days; the nobility of medieval and modern days springs from the later nobility of office.
    0
    0
  • The nobles of modern Europe are rather thegnas than eorlas.
    0
    0
  • The device of hereditary coat-armour, a growth of the 12th century, did much to define and mark out the noble class throughout Europe.
    0
    0
  • No attempt has been here made to trace Out the history of nobility in the various countries and, we must add, cities of Europe.
    0
    0
  • The authoritative manual for the royal houses and the "higher nobility" of Europe is the Almanach de Gotha, published yearly.
    0
    0
  • He accompanied the sultan Abd-ul-Aziz on his journey to Egypt and Europe, when the freedom of the city of London was conferred on him.
    0
    0
  • As the whole coastline of Liberia thus fronts the sea route from Europe to South Africa it is always likely to possess a certain degree of strategical importance.
    0
    0
  • Alembert's fame spread rapidly throughout Europe and procured for him more than one opportunity of quitting the comparative retirement in which he lived in Paris for more lucrative and prominent positions.
    0
    0
  • The disorders of the 14th century, however, the numerous earthquakes, and the Black Death, which had spread over the greater part of Europe, produced a condition of ferment and mystic fever which was very favourable to a recrudescence of morbid forms of devotion.
    0
    0
  • On the other hand, there are Arctic species like the ground-beetle, Pelophila borealis, and south-western species like the boring weevil, Mesites Tardyi, common in Ireland, and represented in northern or western Britain, but unknown in eastern Britain or in Central Europe.
    0
    0
  • A large number of beetles inhabit the deep limestone caves of Europe and North America, while many genera and some whole families are at home nowhere but in ants' nests.
    0
    0
  • Arneth was an indefatigable worker, and, as director of the archives, his broad-minded willingness to listen to the advice of experts, as well as his own sound sense, did much to promote the more scientific treatment and use of public records in most of the archives of Europe.
    0
    0
  • The theatre, the largest in South-eastern Europe, was completed in 1906.
    0
    0
  • It contains breweries, tanneries, sugar, tobacco, cloth, and silk factories, and exports skins, cloth, cocoons, cereals, attar of roses, "dried fruit, &c. Sofia forms the centre of a railway system radiating to Constantinople (300 m.), Belgrade (206 m.) and central Europe, Varna, Rustchuk and the Danube, and Kiustendil near the Macedonian frontier.
    0
    0
  • In Europe there is good reason to suppose that it includes Shetland; but it is on the north-western coast of the Continent, from Jutland to the extreme north of Norway, that the greatest number are reared.
    0
    0
  • The use of the name in its most comprehensive sense dates only from the expansion of the empire in the 19th century; to the historian who writes of the earlier growth of the empire, Russia means, at most, Russia in Europe, or Muscovy, as it was usually called until the 18th century, from Moscow, its ancient capital.
    0
    0
  • Only in the Urals, the Caucasus, the Timan Mountains, the region of the Donets coalfield, and the Kielce Hills is there any sign of the great folding from which nearly the whole of the rest of Europe has suffered at one time or another.
    0
    0
  • Europe was deposited.
    0
    0
  • Europe, represented in Poland and in the Urals, is missing in N.W.
    0
    0
  • Europe generally, the principal coal seams occur in the Upper Carboniferous, while the Lower Carboniferous is mainly composed of marine deposits, with, however, the first bed of coal near its summit.
    0
    0
  • The work achieved by Russian savants, especially in biology, physiology and chemistry, and in the sciences descriptive of the vast territory of Russia, is well known to Europe.
    0
    0
  • Europe in respect of length, they are far behind them as regards the volumes of water which they discharge.
    0
    0
  • Europe, and it attains its maximum velocity in winter.
    0
    0
  • Europe, make their appearance.
    0
    0
  • Europe have held their ground; while in the Urals only a few - now Siberian, but formerly also European - are met with.
    0
    0
  • Europe, except the carp, are met with in the lakes and rivers in immense quantities, the characteristic feature of the region being its wealth in Coregoni and in Salmonidae generally.
    0
    0
  • Europe, with this difference that it makes its appearance without See Collection of Materials on the Village Community, vol.
    0
    0
  • Europe, including Great Britain.
    0
    0
  • In short, they became a considerable power in eastern Europe, and might be regarded as one of the claimants for the inheritance of the decrepit East Roman Empire.
    0
    0
  • The nucleus of the invading horde was a small pastoral tribe in Mongolia, the chief of which, known subsequently to Europe as Jenghiz Khan, became a mighty conqueror and created a vast empire stretching from China, across northern and central Asia, to the shores of the Baltic and the valley of the Danube - a heterogeneous state containing many nationalities held together by purely administrative ties and by an enormous military force.
    0
    0
  • When they first appeared in Europe they were idolaters or Shamanists, and as such they had naturally no religious fanaticism; but even when they adopted Islam they remained as tolerant as before, and the khan of the Golden Horde (Berkai) who first became a Mussulman allowed the Russians to found a Christian bishopric in his capital.
    0
    0
  • According to Siegmund von Herberstein (1486-1566), an Austrian envoy who visited Moscow at that period, no sovereign in Europe was obeyed like the grand-prince of Muscovy, and his court was remarkable for barbaric luxury.
    0
    0
  • When the two became united under one ruler towards the end of the 14th century they formed a broad strip of territory stretching from the Baltic to the Black Sea and separating Russia from central Europe.
    0
    0
  • F o i Notwithstanding the efforts of the Poles and the Military Orders to exclude Russia from the shores of the Baltic and keep her in a state of isolation, she was coming slowly into closer relations with central and western Europe.
    0
    0
  • Peter had endeavoured to import from western Europe the essentials of good government and such of the useful arts as were required for the development of the natural resources of the country; Catherine did likewise, but she did not restrict herself to purely utilitarian aims in the narrower sense of the term.
    0
    0
  • Thus Poland disappeared for a time from the map of Europe.
    0
    0
  • It was intended that Russia should take what remained of the northern coast of the Black Sea, Austria should annex the Turkish provinces contiguous to her territory, the Danubian principalities and Bessarabia should be formed into an independent kingdom called Dacia, the Turks should be expelled from Europe, the Byzantine empire should be resuscitated, and the grand-duke Constantine, second son of the Russian heir-apparent, should be placed on the throne of the Palaeologi.
    0
    0
  • During the first years of the French Revolution Catherine's sympathy with philosophic liberalism rapidly evaporated, and the European sovereigns to the democratic movement; but she carefully abstained from joining the Coalition, and waited patiently for the moment when the complications in western Europe would give her an opportunity of solving independently the Eastern Question in accordance with Russian interests.
    0
    0
  • Having obtained these important concessions the tsar imagined for a moment that in any further territorial changes he would be consulted and his advice allowed due weight, and he seems even to have indulged in the hope that the affairs of Europe might be directed by himself and his new ally.
    0
    0
  • This naturally caused profound disappointment and dissatisfaction in the liberal section of the educated classes and especially among the young officers of the regiments which had spent some years in western Europe.
    0
    0
  • For this purpose Russian diplomacy became more active in south-eastern Europe.
    0
    0
  • As another means of opposing Western influence in south-eastern Europe, Prince Lobanov inclined to the policy of protecting rather than weakening the Ottoman empire.
    0
    0
  • This type, which is often known as the Vignoles rail, after Charles Blacker Vignoles (1793-1875), who re-invented it in England in 1836, is in general use in America and on the continent of Europe.
    0
    0
  • This total was divided nearly evenly between the countries of Europe and the rest of the world.
    0
    0
  • In Europe the average route-mile capital is £27,036, and Table IX.
    0
    0
  • In those parts of the continent of Europe where railways are owned and administered by state authority, the necessity for such agreements is frankly admitted.
    0
    0
  • On practice concerning rates in continental Europe, see Ulrich, Des Eisenbahntarifwesen (Berlin, 1886).
    0
    0
  • This governmental sanction has been obtainable only with difficulty, and after the exercise of numerous legal forms, in Great Britain and on the continent of Europe.
    0
    0
  • The laws regulating original outputs for capital were strictly drawn in Great Britain and on the continent of Europe; in America they were drawn very loosely.
    0
    0
  • Such train ferries arc common in America, especially on the Great Lakes, and exist at several places in Europe, as in the Baltic between Denmark and Sweden and Denmark and Germany, and across the Straits of Messina.
    0
    0
  • On the continent of Europe the standard gauge is generally adopted, though in France there are many miles of 4 ft.
    0
    0
  • Another method, which was introduced into America from Europe about 1890, is that of the summit or " hump."
    0
    0
  • The arrangements for arresting sparks in American practice and on the continent of Europe are somewhat elaborate.
    0
    0
  • The Stephenson link motion is used almost universally in England and America, but it has gradually been displaced by the Walschaert gear on the continent of Europe, and to some extent in England by the Joy gear.
    0
    0
  • A famous type of compound locomotive developed on the continent of Europe is the four-cylinder De Glehn, some of which have been tried on the Great Western railway.
    0
    0
  • Still used by several railways in Great Britain for express passenger service, but going out of favour; it is also found in France, and less often in Germany, Italy, and elsewhere in Europe.
    0
    0
  • It has been extensively introduced, both in Great Britain and the continent of Europe, for passenger traffic, and is now the most numerous and popular class.
    0
    0
  • It is used to a limited extent both in Great Britain and on the continent of Europe, but is much more common in America.
    0
    0
  • This is the standard goods engine of Great Britain and the continent of Europe.
    0
    0
  • It is used largely in America for goods traffic. In Europe it is in considerable favour for goods andpassenger traffic on heavy gradients.
    0
    0
  • The type has been introduced in Europe, especially in Germany, where the advantages of a partial-adhesion type in increased stability and a larger boiler are becoming appreciated.
    0
    0
  • Compound locomotives have been tried, as stated in § 17, but the tendency in England is to revert to the simple engine for all classes of work, though on the continent of Europe and in America the compound locomotive is largely adopted, and is doing excellent work.
    0
    0
  • In the United Kingdom, as in Europe generally, the vehicles used on passenger trains include firstclass carriages, second-class carriages, third-class carriages, composite carriages containing compartments for two or more classes of passengers, dining or restaurant carriages, sleeping carriages, mail carriages or travelling post offices, luggage brake vans, horse-boxes and carriage-trucks.
    0
    0
  • On the continent of Europe there are occasionally four classes, but though the local fares are often appreciably lower than in Great Britain, only first and second class, sometimes only first class, passengers are admitted to the fastest trains, for which in addition a considerable extra fare is often required.
    0
    0
  • Similarly in Europe they are often the property of the International Sleeping Car Company (Compagnie Internationale des Wagons-Lits), and the supplementary fares required from those who travel in them add materially to the cost of a journey.
    0
    0
  • On the continent of Europe the typical sleeping car has transverse compartments with two berths, one placed above the other.
    0
    0
  • The principal types to be found in the United Kingdom and on the continent of Europe are open wagons (the lading often protected from the weather by tarpaulin sheets), mineral wagons, covered or box wagons for cotton, grain, &c., sheep and cattle trucks, &c. The principal types of American freight cars are box cars, gondola cars, coal cars, stock cars, tank cars and refrigerator cars, with, as in other countries, various special cars for special purposes.
    0
    0
  • The gondola or flat car corresponds to the European open wagons and is used to carry goods not liable to be injured by the weather; but in the United States the practice of covering the load with tarpaulins is unknown, and therefore the proportion of box cars is much greater than in Europe.
    0
    0
  • On the continent of Europe the average carrying capacity is rather higher; though wagons of less than io tons capacity are in use, many of those originally rated at io tons have been rebuilt to hold 15, and the tendency is towards wagons of 15-20 tons as a standard, with others for special purposes holding 40 or 45 tons.
    0
    0
  • But goods and mineral trains so fitted are rare, and the same is the case on the continent of Europe, where, however, such brakes are generally employed on passenger trains.
    0
    0
  • On the continent of Europe many countries have encouraged railways which are light in that sense.
    0
    0
  • After visiting Amboyna, the Moluccas and other isles of the Malay archipelago, he returned to Malacca in July 1547, and found three Jesuit recruits from Europe awaiting him.
    0
    0
  • After a short stay at Singapore, whence he despatched several letters to India and Europe, the ship at the end of August 1552 reached Changchuen-shan (St John Island) off the coast of Kwang-tung, which served as port and rendezvous for Europeans, not then admitted to visit the Chinese mainland.
    0
    0
  • This seems to have prevailed all over Europe in 1853.
    0
    0
  • Valdemar was now, after the king of England, the most powerful potentate in the north of Europe.
    0
    0
  • Pertz made frequent journeys of exploration to the leading libraries and public record offices of Europe, publishing notes on the results of his explorations in the Archiv.
    0
    0
  • After completing his education on the Continent of Europe, he obtained a clerkship in the War Office in 1857.
    0
    0
  • The American hornbeam, blue or water beech, is Carpinus americana (also known as C. caroliniana); the common hophornbeam, a native of the south of Europe, is a member of a closely allied genus, Ostrya vulgaris, the allied American species, 0.
    0
    0
  • Excluding some varieties of domestic dogs, wolves are the largest members of the genus, and have a wide geographical range, extending over nearly the whole of Europe and Asia, and North America from Greenland to Mexico, but are not found in South America or Africa, where they are replaced by other members of the family.
    0
    0
  • These differences have given rise to a supposed multiplicity of species, expressed by the names C. lycaon (Central Europe), C. laniger and C. niger (Tibet), the C. occidentalis, C. nubilus, C. mexicanus, &c., of North America, and the great blackish-brown Alaskan C. pambasileus, the largest of them all.
    0
    0
  • When at last in the autumn he was in condition to travel, it was determined that he should pass the winter at St Michael's and in the spring obtain medical advice in Europe.
    0
    0
  • In the Latin elegiacs of the Stultifera Navis (1497) of Jacob Locher the book was read throughout Europe.
    0
    0
  • It was well established in Portugal before the middle of the 17th century, and has since been cultivated generally in the south of Europe, but is nowhere believed to be indigenous.
    0
    0
  • Thus the later part of the Decline and Fall, while the narrative of certain episodes will always be read with profit, does not convey a true idea of the history of the empire or of its significance in the history of Europe.
    0
    0
  • The root appears more or less disguised in a vast number of river names all over the Celtic area in Europe.
    0
    0
  • On the other side the right wing was commanded by the duke of Ferrara, who had like Navarro organized a mobile field artillery (the artillery material of this prince was thought to be the best conditioned in Europe).
    0
    0
  • He was now one of the most powerful sovereigns of Europe, for besides ruling over Provence and Anjou and the kingdom of the Two Sicilies, he was imperial vicar of Tuscany, lord of many cities of Lombardy and Piedmont, and as the pope's favourite practically arbiter of the papal states, especially during the interregnum between the death of Clement IV.
    0
    0
  • It has a wide geographical distribution, being found in Europe (including England), Asia Minor, Burma, Straits Settlements, Java, China, Formosa, Egypt; west, south and Central Africa; Australia, South America, West Indies, United States and Canada, but is generally confined to local centres in those countries.
    0
    0
  • In 1613, at the instigation of Pope Paul V., Suarez wrote a treatise dedicated to the Christian princes of Europe, entitled Defensio catholicae fidei contra anglicanae sectae errores.
    0
    0
  • It propagated and spread with extraordinary rapidity, so that by Dominic's death in 1221, only five or six years after the first practical steps towards the execution of the idea, there were over 500 friars and 60 friaries, divided into 8 provinces embracing the whole of western Europe.
    0
    0
  • He established himself firmly in Tyre (refusing admission to Guy, the king of Jerusalem); and from it he both sent appeals for aid to Europe - which largely contributed to cause the Third Crusade - and despatched reinforcements to the crusaders, who, from 1188 onwards, were engaged in the siege of Acre.
    0
    0
  • But the dispersion of the Jews was proceeding in directions which carried masses from the Asiatic inland to the Mediterranean coasts and to Europe.
    0
    0
  • There were Jews in the Byzantine empire, in Rome, in France and Spain at very early periods, but it is with the Arab conquest of Spain that the Jews of Europe began to rival in culture and importance their brethren of the Persian gaonate.
    0
    0
  • They were allowed to hold land and were encouraged to become - what their ubiquity qualified them to be - the merchant princes of Europe.
    0
    0
  • This ordinance may be regarded as the beginning of the Synodal government of Judaism, which was a marked feature of medieval life in the synagogues of northern and central Europe from the 12th century.
    0
    0
  • If fugitives are for the next half-century to be met with in all parts of Europe, yet, especially in the Levant, there grew up thriving Jewish communities often founded by Spanish refugees.
    0