Eugene sentence example

eugene
  • In another annual called the Gem appeared the poem on the story of "Eugene Aram," which first manifested the full extent of that poetical vigour which seemed to advance just in proportion as his physical health declined.
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  • The French armies were more than once defeated by Prince Eugene of Savoy, who drove them out of Italy in 1707.
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  • On the 7th of June he appointed his step-son, Eugene Beauharnais, to be viceroy.
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  • While Massna pursued the Austrians into their own lands at the close of I8o5, Italian forces under Eugene and Gouvion St Cyr (q.v.) held their ground against allied forces landed at Naples.
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  • It is said that out of 27,000 Italians who entered Russia with Eugene, only 333 saw their country again.
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  • Eugene Beauharnais, viceroy of the kingdom of Italy, showed both constancy and courage; but after the battle of Leipzig (October 1619, 1813) his power crumbled away under the assaults of the now victorious Austrians.
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  • On the 16th of April 1814 Eugene, on hearing of Napoleons overthrow at Paris, signed an armistice at Mantua by which he was enabled to send away the French troops beyond the Alps and entrust himself to the consideration of the allies.
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  • A little farther down the river is St Robert's cave, which is supposed to have been the residence of the hermit, and in 1744 was the scene of the murder of Daniel Clarke by Eugene Aram, whose story is told in Lytton's wellknown novel.
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  • On the 7th of June he issued a decree conferring the dignity of viceroy on Eugene de Beauharnais, his stepson; but everything showed that Napoleon's will was to be law; and the great powers at once saw that Napoleon's promise to keep the crowns of France and Italy separate was meaningless.
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  • In order to strengthen this compact, he arranged a marriage between the daughter of the king of Bavaria and Eugene Beauharnais; and he united the daughter of the Elector of Wurttemberg in marriage to Jerome Bonaparte, who had now divorced his wife, formerly Miss Paterson of Baltimore, at his brother's behests.
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  • Eugene Beauharnais had been established at Milan.
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  • If Prussian towns "behaved badly" (he wrote on the 4th of March), they were to be burnt; Eugene was not to spare even Berlin.
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  • Among the churches of this period we may mention San Geminiano, designed by Sansovino, and destroyed at the beginning of the 19th century to make room for the ball-room built by Napoleon for Eugene Beauharnais.
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  • The last duke of Elbeuf was Charles Eugene of Lorraine, prince de Lambesc, who distinguished himself in 1789 by his energy in repressing risings of the people at Paris.
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  • Serajevo was burned in 1697 by Eugene of Savoy, who similarly deported 40,000 Christians.
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  • Konigsberg thus became untenable, and Murat fell back to Posen, where on the 10th of January he handed over his command to Eugene Beauharnais and returned to Paris.
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  • In 1717 Prince Eugene of Savoy conquered it for Austria, which kept it until 1739, improving the fortifications and giving great impulse to the commercial development of the town.
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  • The Rozsdk (Zombor, 1875) is a translation by Eugene Pavlovits from the Servian of Jovan Jovanovits.
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  • The Szerelem iskoldja (School of Love), by Eugene Rakosy, although in some parts exquisitely worded, did not meet with the applause accorded to his Ripacsos Pista Dolmdnya (1874).
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  • The principal contributors to the " Transactions " of this section of the academy were--for anatomy and physiology, Coloman Balogh, Eugene Jendrassik, Joseph Lenhossek and Lewis Thanhoffer; for zoology, John Frivaldszky, John Kriesch and Theodore Margo; for botany, Frederick Hazslinszky, Lewis Juranyi and Julius Klein; for mineralogy and geology, Joseph Szabo, Max Hantken, Joseph Krenner, Anthony Koch and Charles Hoffman; for physics, Baron Lorando Eotviis, Coloman Szily and Joseph Sztoczek; for chemistry, Charles Than and Vincent Wartha; for meteorology, Guido Schenzl.
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  • The Banat was conquered by the Turks in 1552, and remained a Turkish sanjak (province) till 1716, when Prince Eugene of Savoy liberated it from the Turkish yoke.
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  • The surprise of the French garrison on the 2nd of February 1702, by the Imperialists under Prince Eugene, was a celebrated incident of the War of the Spanish Succession.
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  • It remained in their hands until 1716, when it was liberated by Prince Eugene of Savoy.
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  • On the fall of Napoleon he took part in Murat's campaign against Eugene Beauharnais, and later in that against Austria, and was severely wounded at the battle of the Panaro (1815).
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  • His wife, a daughter of Eugene Burnouf, was for many years his collaborator.
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  • St Michael's in the Renaissance style, erected for the Jesuits in 15831 595, contains the monument of Eugene Beauharnais by Thorwaldsen.
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  • In 1817 it was given, with the duchy of Leuchtenberg, as a mediatized domain under the Bavarian crown, by the king of Bavaria to his son-in-law Eugene de Beauharnais, ex-viceroy of Italy, henceforth styled duke of Leuchtenberg.
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  • Subsequently St John received the congratulations of the French minister, Torcy, on the occasion of the French victory over Prince Eugene at Denain.
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  • The French invaded Piedmont, but were totally defeated at the siege of Turin by Victor Amadeus and Prince Eugene of Savoy (1706), and eventually driven from the country.
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  • While it is best known for the great victory gained by Marlborough and Eugene over the French under Vendome in 1708, Oudenarde has many features of interest.
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  • The French army under the duke of Burgundy and Marshal Vendome, after an abortive attempt to invest Oudenarde, took up a defensive position north of the town when Marlborough and Eugene, after a forced march, arrived with the main Allied army.
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  • But he miscalculated both the endurance of Cadogan's men (amongst whom the Prussians were conspicuous for their tenacity) and the rapidity with which in Marlborough's and Eugene's hands the wearied troops of the Allies could be made to move.
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  • Nevertheless, he became more anxious than ever to emancipate himself from French thraldom, and his first sign of independence was his visit to Venice in 1687, where he conferred on political affairs with Prince Eugene of Savoy and other personages, without consulting Louis.
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  • At first the French were successful and captured several Piedmontese fortresses, but after besieging Turin, which was skilfully defended by the duke, for several months, they were completely defeated by Victor and Prince Eugene of Savoy (1706), and eventually driven out of the other towns they had captured.
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  • In 1716 it witnessed a signal defeat inflicted on the Turks by Prince Eugene.
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  • It was the scene of the defeat of the French and Bavarians under Marshals Tallard and Marsin, on the 13th of August 1704, by the English and the Austrians under the duke of Marlborough and Prince Eugene.
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  • The imperialist army of Eugene and the allies under Marlborough (52,000 strong) encamped 5 m.
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  • On the 2nd-13th of August 1704 Eugene and Marlborough set their forces in motion towards the hostile camps; several streams had to be crossed on the march, and it was seven o'clock (five hours after moving off) when the British of Marlborough's left wing, next the Danube, deployed opposite Blenheim, which Tallard thereupon garrisoned with a large force of his best infantry, aided by a battery of 24-pounder guns.
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  • Marlborough and Eugene on their part were to attack respectively Tallard and Marsin.
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  • The right wing under Eugene had to make a difficult march over broken ground before it could form up for battle, and Marlborough waited, with his army in order of battle between Unterglau and Blenheim, until his colleague should be ready.
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  • Eugene was now closely engaged with the elector of Bavaria, and both sides were losing heavily.
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  • But Eugene carried out his holding attack successfully.
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  • Wheeling to their left the pursuers drove hundreds of fugitives into the Danube, and Eugene was now pressing the army of Marsin towards Marlborough, who re-formed and faced northward to cut off its retreat.
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  • Tallard was already a prisoner, but in the dusk and confusion Marsin slipped through between the duke and Eugene.
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  • His brother Alexandre, vicomte de Beauharnais, married Josephine Tascher de la Pagerie (afterwards the wife of Napoleon Bonaparte) and had two children by her - Eugene de Beauharnais and Hortense, who married Louis Bonaparte, king of Holland, and became mother of Napoleon III.
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  • The house of Beauharnais is still represented in Russia by the dukes of Leuchtenberg, descendants of Prince Eugene.
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  • His second son was General Eugene Cavaignac.
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  • His brother and Augustus, after fighting with great distinction against the Turks both by land and sea (Prince Eugene decorated him with a sword of honour for his valour at the siege of Belgrade), had returned home to marry Sophia Sieniawska, whose fabulous dowry won for her husband the sobriquet of "the Family Croesus."
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  • In this celebrated campaign the American generals rivalled if they did not excel the exploits of Marlborough, Eugene and Villars, under allied conditions.
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  • At the grammar school, founded in the reign of Henry VIII., but occupying modern buildings, Eugene Aram was usher.
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  • After completing his studies at Abo, he entered the army and served for several years in the Netherlands, in Hungary under Prince Eugene, and in Flanders under Waldeck (1690-1695).
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  • On the 19th of June 1823 he married the princess Josephine, daughter of Eugene de Beauharnais, duke of Leuchtenberg, and granddaughter of the empress Josephine.
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  • His Soil, Antoine Francois Eugene Merlin (1778-1854), was a well-known general in the French army, and served through most of Napoleon's campaigns.
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  • They were to be supported by five bombarding monitors ("Marshal Soult," "Lord Clive," "Prince Eugene," "General Crawford," M24 and M26) and covered by five British destroyers ("Swift," "Faulknor," "Matchless," "Mastiff" and "Afridi"), with three British destroyers and six French torpedo boats attending on the monitors ("Mentor," "Lightfoot," "Zubian," "Lestin," "Capitaine Mehl," "Francis Gamier," "Roux," "Bouclier").
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  • Bourke managed to get out and reach the monitor "Prince Eugene" in safety.
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  • Quinet published a prose epic on the subject in 1833, and Eugene Sue, in his best-known work, Le Juif errant (1844), introduces the Wandering Jew in the prologues of its different sections and associates him with the legend of Herodias.
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  • In the War of the Spanish Succession, which broke out in 1702, Dutch troops took part in the campaigns of Marlborough and Eugene, and had their, share in winning the great victories of Blenheim (1704), Ramillies (1706), Oudenarde (1708) and Malplaquet (1709).
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  • The marquis de Prie, who (as deputy for Prince Eugene) was the imperial governor from 1719 to 1726, encountered on the part of local authorities and town gilds vigorous resistance to his attempt to rule the Netherlands as an Austrian dependency, and he was driven to take strong measures to assert his authority.
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  • Eugene van Bemmel (1824-1880) established an excellent historical tradition in his Histoire de la Belgique (1880), reproducing textually the original authorities, and also edited a Belgian Encyclopaedia (1873-1875), the Patria Belgiaa.
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  • On the death of his successor Charles Eugene Delaunay (1816-1872), he was reinstated by Thiers, but with authority restricted by the supervision of a council.
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  • The other children were Louise, consort of Leopold I., king of the Belgians; Marie, who married Prince Alexander of Wurttemberg and died in 1839; Louis Charles, duc de Nemours; Clementine, married to the duke of Coburg-Kohary; Francois Ferdinand, prince de Joinville; Henri Eugene, duc d'Aumale; Antoine Philippe, duc de Montpensier, who married the Infanta, younger sister of Queen Isabella of Spain.
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  • The last of the long series of young men who sat at Godwin's feet was Edward Lytton Bulwer, afterwards Lord Lytton, whose early romances were formed after those of Godwin, and who, in Eugene Aram, succeeded to the story as arranged, and the plan to a considerable extent sketched out, by Godwin, whose age and failing health prevented him from completing it.
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  • In 1716, in alliance with Venice, he declared war on the Turks; Eugene's victory at Peterwardein involved the conquest of the banat of Temesvár, and was followed in 1717 by the capture of Belgrade.
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  • The eldest son of the duke of Maine, Louis Auguste de Bourbon (1700-1755), prince of Dombes, served in the army of Prince Eugene against the Turks (1717), took part in the War of the Polish Succession (1733-1734), and in that of the Austrian Succession (1742-1747).
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  • Abteilung, pp. 216-226 and 440-442; Ludwig Braunfels, Kritischer Versuch fiber den Roman Amadis von Gallien (Leipzig, 1876); Theophilo Braga, Historia das novelas portuguezas de cavalleria (Porto, 1873), Curso de litteratura e arte portugueza (Lisboa, 1881), and Questoes de litteratura e arte portugueza (Lisboa,1885); Marcelino Menendez y Pelayo, Origenes de la novela (Madrid, 1905); Eugene Baret, De l'Amadis de Gaule et de son influence sur les me urs et la litterature au X VI e et au X VII e siecle (Paris, 1873).
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  • It is situated on the right bank of the river Theiss, and is historically known for the decisive victory won in its vicinity by Prince Eugene of Savoy over the Turks on the nth of September 1697.
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  • Conrad believed that the effect of the attack would be decisive, and Krauss, then chief of the staff to the Archduke Eugene, agreed, but was of opinion that a double attack should be made, on both the Julian and Trentino fronts.
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  • Krauss, as chief-of-staff of the Archduke Eugene, was opposed to the disposition of the two armies and to the limitation of the attack to the hill country.
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  • But the original plan, prepared in all its details by Conrad and his staff, was not modified; it would seem that the Archduke Eugene and his chief-of-staff had little freedom of action.
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  • The Austrians under Prince Eugene occupied it in 1706, the French in 1733 and the French and Spaniards in 1743 and the Austrians were again in possession from 1746 till 1796.
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  • He was, however, no longer alone; Diaz, Eugene Tourneux, Rousseau, and other men of note supported him by their confidence and friendship, and he had by his side the brave Catherine Lemaire, his second wife, a woman who bore poverty with dignity and gave courage to her husband through the cruel trials in which he penetrated by a terrible personal experience the bitter secrets of the very poor.
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  • HiS SOn, Jacques Marie Eugene Godefroi Cavaignac (18J3-1905), French politician, was born in Paris on the 21st of May 1853.
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  • It was followed by La Curee (1874), Le Ventre de Paris (1874), La Conquete de Plassans (1875), La Faute de l'Abbe Mouret (1875), Son Excellence Eugene Rougon (1876) - all books unquestionably of immense ability, and in a measure successful, but not great popular successes.
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  • From papers in the possession of the imperial family he compiled Memoires du prince Eugene (1858-1860) and Refutation des memoires du duc de Raguse (1857), part of which was inserted by authority at the end of volume ix.
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  • Her husband died soon after; and calling herself the Princesse Marie de Solms, she spent her time in various fashionable places and dabbled in literature, Eugene Sue and Francois Ponsard being prominent in her court of admirers.
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  • Originally destined for the church, Eugene was known at court as the petit abbe, but his own predilection was strongly for the army.
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  • Prince Eugene's next employment was in a service that required diplomatic as well as military skill (1689).
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  • He returned to Italy in time to take part in the battle of Staff arda, which resulted in the defeat of the coalition at the hands of the French marshal Catinat; but in the spring of 1691 Prince Eugene, having secured reinforcements, caused the siege of Coni to be raised, took possession of Carmagnola, and in the end completely defeated Catinat.
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  • He followed up his success by entering Dauphine, where he took possession of Embrun and Gap. After another campaign, which was uneventful, the further prosecution of the war was abandoned owing to the defection of the duke of Savoy from the coalition, and Prince Eugene returned to Vienna, where he soon afterwards received the command of the army in Hungary, on the recommendation of the veteran count Riidiger von Starhemberg, the defender of Vienna in 1683.
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  • But Eugene rejected these offers with indignation, and proceeded to operate against the Turks commanded by Kara Mustapha.
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  • His attack was vigorous and daring, and the victory was one of the most complete and important ever won by the Austrian arms. Formerly it was often stated that the battle of Zenta was fought against express orders from the court, that Eugene was placed under arrest for violating these orders, and that a proposal to bring him before a council of war was frustrated only by the threatening attitude of the citizens of Vienna.
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  • The incapable duke of Villeroi, who succeeded to the command of which Catinat had been deprived, ventured to attack Eugene at Chiari, and was repulsed with great loss.
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  • By means of a stratagem, however, Eugene penetrated into the city during the night, at the head of 2000 men, and, though he found it impossible to hold the town, succeeded in carrying off Villeroi as a prisoner.
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  • Both armies having gone into winter quarters, Eugene returned to Vienna, where he was appointed president of the council of war.
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  • But since Prince Eugene had quitted Italy, Vendome, who commanded the French army in that country, had obtained various successes against the duke of Savoy, who had once more joined Austria.
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  • The emperor deemed the crisis so serious that he recalled Eugene and sent him to Italy to the assistance of his ally.
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  • Vendome at first opposed great obstacles to the plan which the prince had formed for carrying succours into Piedmont; but after a variety of marches and counter-marches, in which both commanders displayed signal ability, the two armies met at Cassano (August 16, 1705), where a deadly engagement ensued, and Prince Eugene received two severe wounds which forced him to quit the field.
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  • Vendome, however, was recalled, and La Feuillade (who succeeded him) was incapable of long arresting the progress of such a commander as Eugene.
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  • With equal courage and address, Eugene profited by the misunderstandings between the French generals; and on the 7th of September 1706 he attacked the French army in its entrenchments and gained a victory which decided the fate of Italy.
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  • In the heat of the battle Eugene received a wound, and was thrown from his horse.
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  • This monarch immediately despatched Eugene to Holland, and to the different courts of Germany, in order to forward the necessary preparations for the campaign of the following year, 1708 (see Spanish Succession, War Of The).
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  • The campaign was opened by the victory of Oudenarde, to which the perfect union of Marlborough and Eugene on the one hand, and the misunderstanding between Vendome and the duke of Burgundy on the other, seem to have equally contributed.
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  • The French immediately abandoned the Low Countries, and, remaining in observation, made no attempt whatever to prevent Eugene's army, covered by that of Marlborough, making the siege of Lille.
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  • The French governor, Boufflers, made a glorious defence, and Eugene paid a flattering tribute to his valour in inviting him to prepare the articles of capitulation himself, with the words "I subscribe to everything beforehand, well persuaded that you will not insert anything unworthy of yourself or of me."
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  • After this important conquest, Eugene and Marlborough proceeded to the Hague, where they were received in the most flattering manner by the public, by the states-general, and above all, by their esteemed friend the pensionary Heinsius.
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  • The events of this year were very different to those of previous campaigns, and the bloody battle of Malplaquet, though a victory for Marlborough and Eugene, led to little result, and this at the cost of enormous losses.
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  • Their army accordingly went into winter quarters, and Prince Eugene returned to Vienna, whence the emperor almost immediately despatched him to Berlin.
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  • The defection of the English, however, did not induce Prince Eugene to abandon his favourite plan of invading France.
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  • But the Dutch, having been surprised and beaten in the lines of Denain, where Prince Eugene had placed them at too great a distance to receive timely support in case of an attack, he was obliged to raise the siege of Landrecies, and to abandon the project which he had so long cherished.
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  • Abandoned first by England and then by Holland, the emperor, notwithstanding these desertions, still wished to maintain the war in Germany; but Eugene was unable to relieve either Landau or Freiburg, which were successively obliged to capitulate; and seeing the Empire thus laid open to the armies of France, and even the Austrian hereditary states themselves exposed to invasion, the prince counselled his master to make peace.
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  • Sensible of the prudence of this advice, the emperor immediately entrusted Eugene with full powers to negotiate a treaty of peace, which was concluded at Rastadt on the 6th of March 1714.
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  • On his return to Vienna, Prince Eugene was employed for a time in political matters, and at this time he exchanged the government of the Milanese for that of the Austrian Netherlands.
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  • In the spring of 1716 the emperor, having concluded an offensive alliance with Venice against Turkey, appointed Eugene to command the army of Hungary; and at Peterwardein he gained (5th of August 1716) a signal victory over a Turkish army of more than twice his own strength.
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  • Eugene won another victory in this campaign at Temesvar.
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  • After having besieged the city for a month Eugene found himself in a most critical, if not hopeless situation.
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  • Accordingly on the morning of the 16th of August 1717 Prince Eugene ordered a general attack, which resulted in the total defeat of the enemy with an enormous loss, and in the capitulation of the city six days afterwards.
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  • As the government of the Netherlands, up to 1724 held by Eugene, had now for some reason been bestowed on a sister of the emperor, the prince was appointed vicar-general of Italy, with a pension of 300,000 florins.
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  • During the years of peace between the treaty of Passarowitz and the War of the Polish Succession, Eugene occupied himself with the arts and with literature, to which he had hitherto been able to devote little of his time.
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  • Prince Eugene, having now attained his seventy-first year, no longer possessed the vigour and activity necessary for a general in the field, and he welcomed the peace which was concluded on the 3rd of October 1735.
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  • Of a character cold and severe, Prince Eugene had almost no other passion than that of glory.
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  • Prince Eugene was a man of the middle size, but, upon the whole, well made; the cast of his visage was somewhat long, his mouth moderate and almost always open; his eyes were black and animated, and his complexion such as became a warrior.
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  • She was the subject of an Irish poem, of which an English version was written by James Mangan from a prose translation by Eugene O'Curry.
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  • The Rhine campaigns were entirely unimportant, and are remembered only for the last appearance in the field of Prince Eugene and Marshal Berwick - the latter was killed at the siege of Philippsburg - and the baptism of fire of the young crown prince of Prussia, afterwards Frederick the Great.
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  • Boudin the elder now established himself as stationer and frame-maker; this time in the greater seaport town of Havre; and Eugene helped in the little business, and, in stolen hours, produced certain drawings.
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  • Accordingly, his representative, Prince Eugene, met the French marshal Villars at Rastatt in November 1713, and here, after negotiations had been broken off and again resumed, peace was made on the 7th of March 1714, Charles VI.
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  • Ranuccio Farnese served Eugene IV.
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  • Prince Eugene relieved Turin from a French siege, and followed up the blow by driving the besiegers out of Italy.
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  • Charles Eugene (1728-1793), who came of age in 1744, was.
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  • But Charles Eugene did not keep his promises, although in his old age he made a few further concessions.
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  • During Frederick Eugene's short reign the French invaded Wurttemberg, compelled the duke to withdraw his troops from the imperial army and to pay a sum of money.
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  • Her only daughter Frederica had contracted in 1748 an unhappy marriage with Charles Eugene, duke of Wurttemberg.
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  • His life was written in 1875 by Eugene Rambert, who re-edited the Chrestomathie in 1876.
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  • He appeared to the people as the avenger of 1840 and 1815, and the birth to him of a son, Eugene Louis Jean Joseph, on the 16th of March 1856, assured the future of the dynasty.
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  • The successes of Prince Eugene in 1697 led two years later to the peace of Carlowitz, by which the Turks ceded the greater part of Slavonia and Hungary to Austria; and the remainder was surrendered in 1718 by the treaty of Passarowitz.
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  • Eugene de Beauharnais, Napoleons stepson, was transferred to Frankfort, and Murat carefully watched until the time should come to take him to Russia and instal him as king of Poland.
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  • He entered into secret relations with Eugene Beauharnais, Napoleons envoy at Madrid, and went so far as to demand the hand of a Bonaparte princess.
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  • The marriage of his widow Josephine to Napoleon Bonaparte in March 1796 was at first resented by Eugene and his sister Hortense; but their step-father proved to be no less kind than watchful over their interests.
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  • Bonaparte brought hint back to France in the autumn of 1799, and it is known that the intervention of Eugene and Hortense helped to bring about the reconciliation which then took place between Bonaparte and Josephine.
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  • The services rendered by Eugene at the time of the coup d'etat of Brumaire (1799) and during the Consulate (1799-1804) served to establish his fortunes, despite the efforts of some of the Bonapartes to destroy the influence of the Beauharnais and bring about the divorce of Josephine.
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  • After the proclamation of the Empire, Eugene received the title of prince, with a yearly stipend of 200,000 francs, and became general of the chasseurs d cheval of the Guard.
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  • A year later, when the Italian republic became the kingdom of Italy, with Napoleon as king, Eugene received the title of viceroy, with large administrative powers.
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  • On the whole the government of Eugene gave general satisfaction in the kingdom of Italy; it comprised the districts between the Simplon Pass and Rimini, and also after the peace of Presburg (December 1805), Istria and Dalmatia.
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  • In the campaign of 1809 Eugene commanded the army of Italy, with General (afterwards Marshal) Macdonald as his adlatus.
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  • The battle of Sacile, where he fought against the Austrian army of the Archduke John, did not yield proofs of military talent on the part of Eugene or of Macdonald; but on the retreat of the enemy into Austrian territory (owing to the disasters of their main army on the Danube) Eugene's forces pressed them vigorously and finally won an important victory at Raab in the heart of the Austrian empire.
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  • Then, joining the main army under Napoleon, in the island of Lobau in the Danube, near Vienna, Eugene and Macdonald acquitted themselves most creditably in the great battle of Wagram (6th July 1809).
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  • In 1810 Eugene received the title of grand-duke of Frankfort.
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  • He and they distinguished themselves especially at the battles of Borodino and Malojaroslavitz; and on several occasions during the disastrous retreat which ensued, Eugene's soldierly constancy and devotion to Napoleon shone out conspicuously in 1813-1814, especially by contrast with the tergiversations of Murat.
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  • On the downfall of the Napoleonic regime Eugene retired to Munich, where he continued to reside, with the title duke of Leuchtenberg and prince of Eichstadt.
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  • The senate assembled on the 19th and Prina's party moved that delegates should be despatched to Vienna to request that Eugene Beauharnais should be raised to the throne of a free Italian kingdom.
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  • The first railway outlet, the Union Pacific, reached Eugene, now North Topeka, in 1865.
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  • There were three couples and me with four dive masters between us, so I had Eugene's undivided attention.
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  • Eugene McAteer, Manchester Prisons don't prevent crime Does anyone seriously believe that increasing sentences will solve the problem of knife crime?
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  • Eugene speed end of each speed date.
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  • Gumm, immortal Granny, looks after surviving grandsons Farish, Danny, Eugene and Curtis, a retarded infant radiating inappropriate love.
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  • Not to be outdone by his Irish team mate Eugene Hughes made his entrance into the seniors event with a break of 102.
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  • Subjects range from a Sutton Hoo Helmet, to recollections of childhood, from a talking typewriter to Eugene Shoemaker.
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  • After the defeat of the Turkish power by Prince Eugene it was proposed to abolish the military constitution of the frontier, but the change was successfully resisted by the inhabitants of the district; in fact a new Slavonian frontier district was established in 1702, and Maria Theresa extended the organization to the march-lands of Transylvania (the Szekler frontier in 1764, the Wallachian in 1766).1 As a reward for the service it rendered the government in the suppression of the Hungarian insurrection in 1848, the Military Frontier was erected in 1849 into a crown-land, with a total area of 15,182 sq.
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  • By an arrangement with Bavaria, they were able to march through Tirol and down the valley of the Adige in force, and overpowered the troops of Eugene whose position was fatally compromised by the defection of Murat and the dissensions among the Italians.
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  • Eugene, with Lauriston's, Macdonald's and Regnier's corps, on the lower Saale, Ney in front of Weimar, holding the defile of Kdsen; the Guard at Erfurt, Marmont at Gotha, Bertrand at Saalfeld, and Oudinot at Coburg, and during the next few days the whole were set in motion towards Merseburg and Leipzig, in the now stereotyped Napoleonic order, a strong advanced guard of all arms leading, the remainder - about twothirds of the whole - following as " masse de manoeuvre," this time, owing to the cover afforded by the Elbe on the left, to the right rear of the advanced guard.
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  • Aulard, Histoire politique de la Revolution francaise (Paris, 1903); Mortimer-Ternaux, Histoire de la Terreur (1862-1881), a work based on and comprising documents, but written with strong royalist bias; Eugene Despois, Le Vandalisme revolutionnaire (1868), for the scientific work of the Convention.
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  • The Italian MS. was found by the Deist, John Toland, in a private collection at Amsterdam (see his Nazarenus, 1718); subsequently it came into the possession of Prince Eugene of Savoy, and finally was obtained with Eugene's library by the imperial library at Vienna.
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  • Eugene Demolder (b.1862) also created a mythical city as a setting for his prose conies in the Legende d'Yperdamme (1897).
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  • In 1716, in alliance with Venice, he declared war on the Turks; Eugene's victory at Peterwardein involved the conquest of the banat of Temesvár, and was followed in 1717 by the capture of Belgrade.
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  • The generalship of his new opponent, and the fact that the French army had been largely reinforced, while reinforcements had not been sent from Vienna, forced Prince Eugene to confine himself to a war of observation.
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  • Prince Eugene had only thirty thousand men; but his antagonist the duke of Orleans, though full of zeal and courage, wanted experience, and Marshal Marsin, his adlatus, held powers from Louis XIV.
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  • In the Italian campaigns of 1796-1797 Eugene served as aide-de-camp to Bonaparte, and accompanied him to Egypt in the same capacity.
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  • The college authorities did not allow Miss Sullivan to read the examination papers to me; so Mr. Eugene C. Vining, one of the instructors at the Perkins Institution for the Blind, was employed to copy the papers for me in American braille.
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  • The college authorities would not permit Miss Sullivan to read the examination papers to me; so Mr. Eugene C. Vining, one of the instructors at the Perkins Institution for the Blind, was employed to copy the papers for me in braille.
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  • Prince Eugene of Wurttemberg fired from a hill over the French crowds that were running past, and demanded reinforcements which did not arrive.
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  • Smaller cities like Eugene, Oregon are also taking real national leadership roles in the arena of solar incentives.
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  • Clint Walker was born Norman Eugene Walker on May 30, 1927, in Hartford, Illinois.
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  • The family of the boy suspected that it was the use of the Ouija board that eventually led to the possession of the child, which required an exorcism performed by Father Eugene Gallagher.
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  • Chirolla has studied with Roy Eugene Davis since 1984, who learned his craft from Paramahansa Yogananda, author of Autobiography of a Yogi.
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  • Eugene soon found that his chief duty was to enforce the wifi of Napoleon.
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