Etymology sentence example

etymology
  • The etymology of the word Pali is uncertain.
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  • The etymology may be wrong, but this is the popular sense of the word.
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  • This etymology, however, is not much in favour now.
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  • In etymology he endeavoured to find a Roman explanation of words where possible (according to him frater was =fere alter).
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  • World Wide Words An excellent site giving the etymology of abracadabra (always a favorite of mine) to zorbing.
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  • On the other hand, there are some lexemes for which we have an exact etymology.
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  • Heru was known to the Greeks as Horus, suggesting a compelling etymology for the word " horizon.
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  • For example, we will provide an etymology for each word, regardless of whether it has a cognate form in English.
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  • I work in a place of scholarship and it does not surprise me in the least that Greek etymology makes this a leisure center.
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  • One possible etymology of the name Adam is that which makes it signify Earth.
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  • This has all the credentials of a ' folk etymology ' myth.
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  • Professor Paul Haupt may be termed the father of Sumerian etymology, as he was really the first to place this study on a scientific basis in his Sumerian Family Laws and Akkadian and Sumerian Cuneiform Texts.
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  • But, when unsupported by direct evidence, even the most tempting etymology is an unsafe guide.
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  • Webster gives the etymology gad well =go about well.
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  • This tendency to evolve the whole myth of Prometheus from a belief that he is personified fire, or the fire-god, has been intensified by Kuhn's ingenious and plausible etymology of the name l po n 0EUs.
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  • Its etymology has genus of carnivorous mammals (see Carnivora).
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  • The etymology of place-names suggests that the original population was Celtic, but this conjecture cannot be verified in any historical records.
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  • The connexion that has been suggested between the names of Mordecai and Esther and those of the Assyrian deities Marduk and Ishtar would be a further strong confirmation of the proposed etymology and derivation of the feast (see Esther).
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  • It is obvious that if the derivation be correct, the significance of the name, which in itself denotes only " He falls" or "He fells," must be learned, if at all, from early Israelitish conceptions of the nature of Yahweh rather than from etymology.
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  • Verrius Flaccus in the Augustan age, had busied themselves with lexicography and etymology.
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  • The names of their fathers are alike, and "Lugman" means devourer, swallower, a meaning which might be got out of Balaam by a popular etymology.
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  • It is doubtful whether this root meant originally to " cover " or " wipe out "; but probably it is used as a technical term without any consciousness of its etymology.
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  • The etymology of this last name has been much disputed, but there seems now to be little doubt that it is derived from the Old High German chara, meaning suffering or mourning.
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  • At the same time, the significance which the word " viking " has had in our language is due in part to a false etymology, connecting the word with " king "; the effect of which still remains in the customary pronunciation vi-king instead of vik-ing, now so much embedded in the language that it is a pedantry to try and change it.
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  • Worms was known in Roman times as Borbetomagus, which in the Merovingian age became Wormatia, afterwards by popular etymology connected with Wurm, a dragon.
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  • The etymology is doubtful; connexions with a word meaning "entrusted," or with the Hebrew matmon, treasure, have been suggested.
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  • The uncertain etymology of the word is discussed in the Ency.
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  • There was, indeed, a native Irish legend, worthless from the standpoint of etymology, to account for the origin of the name.
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  • The town, according to the whimsical etymology shown on the corporation seal, takes its name from hirondelle (a swallow).
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  • The etymology of the word is equally obscure.
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  • The etymology suggested is from KwF oaav, to wail, in allusion to the cries of the dead.
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  • Etymology was pressed into the service, and the wildest conjectures as to the meaning of names did duty as a basis for mythological explanations.
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  • The fifth, sixth and seventh books give Varro's views on the etymology of Latin words.
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  • The etymology of the word " Berlin " is doubtful.
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  • English place-names are of diverse origin and often extremely corrupt in their modern form, so that the real etymology of the names can often be discovered only by a careful comparison of the modern form with such ancient forms as are to be found in charters, ancient histories, and other early documents.
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  • The article " Aphrodite " 1 No satisfactory etymology of the name has been given; although the first part is usually referred to iu pos (" the sea foam "), it is equally probable that it is of Eastern origin.
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  • The tradition which assigns the first employment of the Greek word 4aAoa041a to Pythagoras has hardly any claim to be regarded as authentic; and the somewhat self-conscious modesty to which Diogenes Laertius attributes the choice of the designation is, in all probability, a piece of etymology crystallized into narrative.
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  • It derived its name, according to the etymology of the Pundits, from a prince of the Mahabharata, to whose portion it fell on the primitive partition of the country among the Lunar race of Delhi.
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  • No satisfactory etymology of the name has been given, the least improbable perhaps being that which connects it with the Doric a714XXa ("assembly"), 1 so that Apollo would be the god of political life (for other suggested derivations, ancient and modern, see C. Wernicke in Pauly-Wissowa's Realencyclopddie).
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  • Klein (1734) to denote the tests of the Echini or sea-urchins; its later use for the animals themselves, or for the whole phylum, was an error in both history and etymology.
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  • The Grail is here surrounded with the atmosphere of awe and reverence familiar to us through the 1 The etymology of the 0.
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  • The copious additional information given by later writers is all by way either of interpretation of local legends in the light of Ephorus's theory, or of explanation of the name "Pelasgoi"; as when Philochorus expands a popular etymology "stork-folk" (w€Xaa'yoi-- it €Xap'yoi) into a theory of their seasonal migrations; or Apollodorus says that Homer calls Zeus Pelasgian "because he is not far from every one of us," 6TL Tiffs ryes 7rEXas EaTCV.
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  • In both words the etymology reveals the origin of the vestment, which is no more than a glorified survival of an article of clothing worn by all and sundry in ordinary life, the type of which survives, e.g.
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  • For Pallas, he prefers the old etymology from, raXXw (to "shake"), rather in the sense of "earth-shaker" than "` lance-brandisher."
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  • The etymology of rivus and ripa is disputed; some scholars refer both to the root ri-, to drop, flow; others take ripa to be from the root seen in Gr.
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  • The etymology of the word has been much discussed.
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  • The still later form of the legend, a product of the Hellenistic period, is due to a mistaken etymology of the name.
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  • P. Peters agrees (pp. 191 ff.) that the best test is the etymology of the names of the letters.
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  • Enough, however, remains to show that Aristarchus had a clear notion of the chief problems of philology (except perhaps those concerning etymology).
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  • Hutton here gives a variant etymology for the word, which may be therefore taken as partly derived from &-yvwanros (the "unknown" God), and partly from an antithesis to "gnostic"; but the meaning remains the same in either case.
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  • About the beginning of November he begins to wander south or east into the forest land, and in the winter he may visit, not only ' The most probable etymology is the Finnish lappu, and in this.
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  • Zeus or Hera throws Hephaestus or Ate out of heaven, as in the Iroquois myth of the tossing from heaven of Ataentsic. There is, as usual, no agreement as to the etymology of the name of Hephaestus.
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  • Odin would thus (if we admit the etymology) be the swift goer, the " ganger," and it seems superfluous to make him (with Grimm) " the all-powerful, all-permeating being," a very abstract and scarcely an early conception.
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  • The etymology of the word has been a matter of considerable dispute.
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  • The commonly accepted etymology is from the Breton gwaz, Welsh gwas, a lad or a servant.
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  • If you set out to discuss etymology, you are likely to find yourself also discussing semantics.
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  • Finally an idea of the rivalry which exists between Adun villages may be given by studying the popular etymology of the village names.
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  • However, there is not a simple correlation between language (or name etymology) and script.
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  • However, its etymology does not imply absolute indeterminacy.
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  • The word "mentor" is now used in the sense of a wise and trustworthy adviser, a meaning probably connected with the etymology of the name, from the root mon-, seen, in Lat.
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  • Swift may have learned that Esther means "star" from the Elementa linguae persicae of John Greaves or from some Persian scholar; but he is more likely to have seen the etymology in the form given from Jewish sources in Buxtorf's Lexicon, where the interpretation takes the more suggestive form "Stella Veneris."
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  • The website has other features which are all related to the English language (or other available languages) or etymology of words.
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  • Aptitude testing revealed that Bretherton could best serve his country by studying etymology and exterminating, and that became the catalyst for his future career as an exterminator and reality TV star.
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  • Among the numerous conjectures which have been made as to the etymology of the term Africa ('Acppucii) may be quoted that which derives it from the Semitic radical.
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  • These are (1) the origin of the cuneiform signs, (2) the etymology of the phonetic values, and (3) the elucidation of the many and varied primitive sign-meanings.
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  • Until further light has been thrown on the nature of Sumerian, this language should be regarded as standing quite alone, a prehistoric philological remnant, and its etymology should be studied only with reference to the Sumerian inscriptions themselves.
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  • The popular etymology of the name Tabriz from tab=fever, riz = pourer away (verb, rikhtan = pour away, flow; German rieseln?), hence "fever-destroying," is erroneous and was invented in modern times.
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  • It is certain that the snakes have been evolved as a specialized branch from some Lacertilian stock, and that both "orders" are intimately related, but it is significant that it is only through the degraded members of the 1 For the etymology of this word, see Crocodile.
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  • By this party, as appears from this tradition, the Ghuzz were not considered to be genuine Turks, but to be Turkmans (that is, according to a popular etymology, resembling Turks).
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  • The etymology of the name may be Saxon, but there is no evidence of a Saxon settlement, and the place is not mentioned in Domesday.
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  • But there is an initial difficulty about the Greek rendering itself, as no satisfactory etymology of Bar-nabas in this sense has as yet been suggested.
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  • Popular etymology identified the symbol with the initial letter of centum, " hundred."
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  • The etymology of the word is uncertain, but it has been taken to be connected with a root meaning "to twist."
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  • The etymology of the word Tophet is obscure; it is possibly of Aramaic origin and means,"fire-place," cf.
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  • This Greek word corresponds to New the idea suggested by the etymology of at-one-ment, the re-uniting in amity of those at variance, a sense which the word had in the 17th century but has since lost.
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  • This etymology makes the word mean " pious."
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  • Agglomerations of consonants are often met with as initials, giving the appearance of telescoped words - an appearance which historical etymology often confirms. IVlany of these initial consonants are silent in the dialects of the central provinces, or have been resolved into a simpler one of another character.
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  • The most plausible etymology connects the name with the Assyrian guru, either in the sense of "turn" of office at the beginning of the New Year or in that of "pebble" used for votes or lots.
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  • However, it is practically certain, both from the etymology of the word Purim and from the resemblance of the festivals, that the feast, as represented in the Book of Esther, was borrowed from the Persians, who themselves appeared to have adapted it from the Babylonians.
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  • All that can be said at present about this difficult etymology is that in the non-Semitic Babylonian the medial m represented quite evidently an indeterminate nasal which could also be indicated by the combination rig.
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  • No satisfactory etymology of the name has been suggested.
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  • Even to the present day the legend has 1 It is probable that the story of the piercing of his feet is a subsequent invention to explain the name, or is due to a false etymology (from oih&o), 01St rovs in reality meaning the "wise" (from oTSa), chiefly in reference to his having solved the riddle, the syllable - irovs having no significance.
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  • The etymology of the word Mahratta (Maratha) is uncertain.
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  • The etymology of the name (for which several derivations have been proposed) and the origin of the town are equally uncertain, and there is not a single monument of antiquarian interest upon which to found a conjecture.
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  • Popular etymology has given the word its present form, as if it meant "wing-flapper," from "lap," a fold or flap of a garment.
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  • The more probable etymology, however, is that of Hallaglun, or Halligland, i.e.
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  • This principle is that of popular etymology, i.e.
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  • Perhaps the etymology ought to be sought in quite another direction, namely, in the likeness to Suomi.
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  • It is probable then that there is a triple popular etymology in the various forms of writing the name Assur; viz.
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  • The name Rhine, which is apparently of Celtic origin, is of uncertain etymology, the most favoured derivations being either from der Rinnende (the flowing), or from Rein (the clear), the latter being now the more generally accepted.
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  • But opposed to this etymology is the fact that the word cagot is first found in the for of Beam not earlier than 1551.
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  • Popular etymology has connected the word with "good"; this is exemplified by the corruption of "God be with you" into "good-bye."
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  • In fact, as well as in Celtic etymology, it was " the town in the forest."
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