Etymological sentence example

etymological
  • The process of etymological change, as given by Steinthal, was this.
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  • His chief studies, however, were philological; and in 1829 he published An Etymological Glossary of English Words of Foreign Derivation.
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  • This etymological study of Sumerian is attended with incalculable difficulties, because nearly all the Sumerian texts which we possess are written in an idiom which is quite evidently under the influence of Semitic. With the exception of some very ancient texts, the Sumerian literature, consisting largely of religious material such as hymns and incantations, shows a number of Semitic loanwords and grammatical Semitisms, and in many cases, although not always, is quite patently a translation of Semitic ideas by Semitic priests into the formal religious Sumerian language.
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  • Payne begins, in workmanlike fashion, by recounting the etymological history of the title.
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  • This work in twenty-one books (KaOoXLKit 7rpocrcp5La) included also an account of the etymological part of grammar.
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  • Within fine arts, this etymological nuance has been elaborated into a full-fledged aesthetic distinction between the naked and the nude, a distinction most famously articulated by Kenneth Clark.
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  • Kuhn, is the etymological equivalent of the Sanskrit Saranyu, who, having turned herself into a mare, is pursued by Vivasvat, and becomes the mother of the two Asvins, the Indian Dioscuri, the Indian and Greek myths being regarded as identical.
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  • The reason of this will appear more clearly in the sequel; it is enough to observe at present that, before our English word was formed, the original idea of a presbyter had been overlaid with others derived from pre-Christian priesthoods, so that it is from these and not from the etymological force of the word that we must start in considering historically what a priest is.
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  • Etymological strictness would require it to denote exclusively the narrow strip of coast-land once occupied by the Philistines, from whose name it is derived.
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  • It is possible, though not certain, that the occurrence of the word kalu (priest) in Babylonian, which has no etymological connexion with Kaldu, may have contributed paronomastically towards the popular use of the term "Chaldaeans" for the Babylonian Magi.
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  • This aspirate, expressed by j, often has no etymological origin; for example, Jimdalo, a nickname applied to Andalusians, is simply the word Andaluz pronounced with the strong aspiration.
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  • They are agglutinative in nature, show hardly any signs of syntactical growth though every indication of long etymological growth, give expression to only the most direct and the simplest thought, and are purely colloquial and wanting in the modifications always necessary for communication by writing.
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  • In his dictionary, again, he recast the lexicological materials independently, and enriched lexicography itself, especially by his numerous etymological explanations.
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  • It is clear that in the original form of the tradition the name of the foundling was Scyld or Sceldwea, and that his cognomen'Scefing (derived from sceaf, a sheaf) was misinterpreted as a patronymic. Sceaf, therefore, is no genuine personage of tradition, but merely an etymological figment.
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  • The occupants of Edom during practically the whole period of Biblical history were the Bedouin tribes which claimed 1 A curious etymological speculation connects the name with the story of Esau's begging for Jacob's pottage, Gen.
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  • This etymological connexion, suggested by Jensen (Kosmologie, 84), brings the festival of Purim into close relation with the Babylonian New Year festival known as Zagmuku, in which one of the most prominent ceremonials was the celebration of the assembly of the gods under the presidency of Marduk (Merodach) for the purpose of determining the fates of the New Year.
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  • The etymological sense of one who " dictates " - i.e.
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  • He had not based his case against the Transvaal on the letter of the Conventions, and regarded the employment of the word "suzerainty" merely as an "etymological question," but he realized keenly that the spectacle of thousands of British subjects in the Transvaal in the condition of "helots" (as he expressed it) was undermining the prestige of Great Britain throughout South Africa, and he called for "some striking proof" of the intention of the British government not to be ousted from its predominant position.
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  • In fact the first introduction of Christianity and the success of all missionary enterprise involve freethinking (in its etymological sense) on the part of those converted.
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  • On the name " Canaan " Winckler remarks, 4 " There is at present no prospect of an etymological explanation."
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  • If we insist upon the literal and etymological meaning of the word, the Renaissance was a re-birth; and it is needful to inquire of what it was the re-birth.
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  • If such a coincidence appears incredible, we may doubt whether the belief that is common to Greeks and Cahrocs and Ahts was produced, in Greek minds by an etymological confusion, in Australia, America and so forth by some 6 Cf.
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