This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

Ethics sentence examples

ethics
  • Ethics is in much the same position.

    682
    189
  • Ethics have gone out the door and greed is in.

    191
    104
  • The metaphysics of Aristotle, the ethics of Spinoza, the philosophical works of Cicero, and many kindred works, were also frequent subjects of study.

    65
    50
  • Most modern text-books on ethics devote some attention to the matter - notably F.

    59
    39
  • Ethics here stands to sociology in a close relation, similar, in many respects, to that which we find in Hegel and in Comte.

    59
    166
  • In ethics he anticipated much of the teaching of Tolstoy; in doctrine he often appealed to the authority of Wycliffe; and in some of his views it is possible to trace the influence of the Waldenses.

    49
    41
  • His great work was the Theologia moralis et dogmatica, a compendium in catechetical form of Roman Catholic doctrine and ethics which has been much used as a students' text-book.

    48
    34
  • In ethics empiricism begins by recognizing that man possesses sensations, and so is liable to pleasures and pains.

    43
    37
  • Really, he urged, there could be only one substance - Descartes himself had dropped a passing hint to that effect - and the bold deductive reasoning of Spinoza's Ethics, in process if not in result, betrays its kinship to the ontological argument, with its affirmation of what must be.

    38
    26
  • His work embraces in its scope many psychological and more strictly metaphysical discussions, but it is chiefly in connexion with ethics that Tucker's speculations are remembered.

    35
    27
  • In reasserting and amplifying the empirical conclusions of his predecessors, especially in the sphere of ethics, Mill's chief function was the introduction of the humanist element.

    29
    24
  • Perhaps in the department of thought where it is most in earnest - in ethics - it is an idealism.

    29
    26
  • Against this work and the Ethics of Spinoza the orthodox Cartesians (who were in the majority), no less than sceptical hangers-on like Bayle, raised an all but universal howl of reprobation, scarcely broken for about a century.

    28
    23
  • In them is foreshadowed all that he afterwards worked out in metaphysics, psychology, ethics and aesthetics.

    23
    26
  • This ethical teaching, which is indefinitely higher and purer than that of the Old Testament, is yet its true spiritual child, and helps to bridge the chasm that divides the ethics of the Old and New Testaments.

    22
    17
  • As a means to the realization of this ideal, Origen introduces the whole ethics of Stoicism.

    22
    26
  • In "God as perfection" Martineau handles the basis of ethics without reference to his own modification of the intuitionalist position (Types of Ethical Theory), according to which "good."

    21
    23
  • When Otto Ritschl interprets values hedonistically - recoiling from Hegel's idealism the whole way to empiricism - he brings again to our minds the doubt whether hedonist ethics can serve as a foundation for any religious belief.

    20
    25
  • After his reception into the Church of Rome, Ward gave himself up to ethics, metaphysics and moral philosophy.

    19
    24
  • A cosmopolitan on principle, and a convinced disbeliever in the ethics of his day, he comes very near to modern empiricism and especially to the modern Hedonist school.

    18
    15
  • He wrote with conspicuous success in almost every branch of literature - history, romance, ethics, poetry and the drama; and his influence on the Young Turk party of later days was profound.

    16
    18
  • Hence, early empiricism makes ethics simply a calculus of pleasures ("hedonism").

    16
    20
  • Free will is shaping itself towards discussion in Aristotle's Ethics, but is hardly yet a formulated problem.

    16
    20
  • In ethics the distinction he drew between natural and theological virtues is common to him with the rest of the schoolmen.

    15
    18
  • On ethics, Locke says very little, although that little is hedonist and determinist.

    15
    19
  • Bradley (Ethical Studies, p. 2) quotes an even plainer attack on the conceptions as well as the terminology of ethics in a Westminster Review article (Oct.

    14
    18
  • In ethics, he is a hard determinist and hedonist, though not without qualifications (man's boundless desire for "gain and glory") and peculiarities.

    14
    18
  • The former is divided into four parts, Ontosophy, Cosmosophy, Theosophy, Psychosophy, supplemented by a treatise on ethics and a dissertation on first causes.

    14
    18
  • During his reign the atmosphere of Roman society was heavily charged with the popular Greek philosophy to which, ethics apart, Christianity was diametrically opposed.

    13
    17
  • Carrying on the same analytical method into the special department of moral philosophy, Green held that ethics applies to the peculiar conditions of social life that investigation into man's nature which metaphysics began.

    13
    17
  • The great object of 17th-century moralists had been to find some general principle from which the whole of ethics could be deduced; common-sense, by turning its back on abstract principles of every kind, forced the philosophers to come down to the solid earth, and start by inquiring how the world does make up its mind in fact.

    11
    15
  • The custom of marriages between brothers and sisters, agreeable to old Persian as to old Egyptian ethics, was instituted in Egypt by the second Ptolemy when he married his full sister Arsinoe Philadelphus.

    10
    13
  • The one exception is a prophetic writing, the apocryphal Book of Eldad and Modad, A careful study of practical Christian ethics at Rome as implied in the Shepherd, will be found in E.

    3
    1
  • The fundamental differences between pagan and Christian ethics depend not on any difference in the value set on rightness of heart, but on different views of the essential form or conditions of this inward rightness.

    2
    1
  • Sidgwick, Lectures on the Ethics of Green, Spencer and Martineau (1902); and J.

    1
    0
  • It is true, nevertheless, that love as a prelude to marriage finds only a small place in Japanese ethics.

    1
    0
  • Lastly, when we once have freed ourselves from the antipathy engendered by his severance of ethics from the field of politics, when we have once made proper allowance for his peculiar use of phrases like frodi onorevoli or scelleratezze gloriose, nothing is left but admiration for his mental attitude.

    1
    0
  • The particular work which provided the starting-point 'of an article was in many cases merely the occasion for the exposition, always brilliant and incisive, of the author's views on politics, social subjects, ethics or literature.

    1
    0
  • He excelled in logic, the theory of knowledge, ethics and physics.

    1
    0
  • 505 B) to identify the form of good, without which nothing is good, with the gentlemanly thing (KaXov Kai ayaObv), without which any possession is worthless, he inspired into the author of the Eudemian Ethics the very limit (ipos) of good fortune and gentlemanliness with which it concludes, only without Plato's elevation of the good into the form of the good.

    1
    0
  • The introduction to this translation, published under the title of Buddhist Psychology, contains the fullest account that has yet appeared of the psychological conceptions on which Buddhist ethics are throughout based.

    1
    0
  • The Ritschl school, and others too, have made an earnest effort to incorporate Christ's words in Dogmatic and no longer shunt them into systems of " Christian Ethics."

    1
    0
  • Before Mahomet the ethics of the Arabs were summed up in muruwwa (custom).

    1
    1
  • The questions which lived in the earlier and more formative period of his life concerned mainly the idea of the church, the historical interpretation of the documents which described the persons who had created the Christian religion, especially the person and work of its founder; but those most alive in his later and maturer time chiefly related to the philosophy of religion and ethics.

    1
    1
  • Still more manifestly in his Ethics and Politics Aristotle makes it clear that it is the common or universal will that gives substance and reality to the individual.

    1
    1
  • At the same time, it is certain that the main outlines of the characteristic: physical doctrine, which is after all the foundation of their ethics and logic, were the work of Zeno.

    1
    1
  • And so, when we pass from the ontology to the ethics of Platonism, we find that, though the highest life is only to be realized by turning away from concrete human affairs and their material environment, still the sensible world is not yet an object of positive moral aversion; it is rather something which the philosopher is seriously concerned to make as harmonious, good and beautiful as possible.

    1
    1
  • Accordingly the ethics of Plotinus represent, we may say, the moral idealism of the Stoics cut loose from nature.

    1
    1
  • Before, however, we take a brief survey of the progress of systematic ethics from Ambrose to Thomas Aquinas, it may be well to examine the chief features of the new moral consciousness that had spread through Graeco-Roman civilization, and was awaiting philosophic synthesis.

    1
    1
  • Out of this contrast there ultimately grew an essentially different opposition between faith and knowledge or reason, according to which the theological basis of ethics was contrasted with the philosophical; the theologians maintaining sometimes that the divine law is essentially arbitrary, the expression of will, not reason; more frequently that its reasonableness is inscrutable, and that actual human reason should confine itself to examining the credentials of God's messengers, and not the message itself.

    1
    1
  • prompting to them, we have to notice another form in which the inwardness of Christian morality manifests itself, which, though less distinctive, should yet receive attention in any comparison of Christian ethics with the view of GraecoRoman philosophy.

    1
    1
  • The distinctive features of Christian ethics are obedience, unworldliness, benevolence, purity and humility.

    1
    1
  • This development appears when we compare the different postSocratic systems of ethics.

    1
    1
  • Again, - just as the Stoics held wisdom to be indispensable to real rectitude of conduct, while at the same time they included under the notion of wisdom a grasp of physical as well as ethical truth, so the similar emphasis laid on inwardness in Christian ethics caused orthodoxy or correctness of religious belief to be regarded as essential to goodness, and heresy as the most fatal of vices, corrupting as it did the very springs of Christian life.

    1
    1
  • had surmounted a similar perplexity in the region of ethics.

    1
    1
  • At the same time it cannot be broadly said that Christianity took a decisive side in the metaphysical controversy on free-will and necessity; since, just as in Greek philosophy the need of maintaining freedom as the ground of responsibility clashes with the conviction that no one deliberately chooses his own harm, so in Christian ethics it clashes with the attribution of all true human virtue to supernatural grace, as well as with the belief in divine foreknowledge.

    1
    1
  • Finally in the exposition of Christian Justice the Stoic doctrine of the natural union of all human interests is elevated to the full height and intensity of evangelical philanthropy; the brethren are reminded that the earth was made by God a common possession of all, and are bidden to administer their means for the common benefit; Ambrose, we should observe, is thoroughly aware of the fundamental union of these different virtues in Christianity, though he does Cicero's works are unimportant in the history of ancient ethics, as their philosophical matter was entirely borrowed from Greek treatises now lost; but the influence exercised by them (especially by the De officiis) over medieval and even modern readers was very considerable.

    1
    1
  • Scholastic ethics, like scholastic philosophy, attained its completest result in the teaching of Thomas Aquinas.

    1
    1
  • His distinction among moral virtues of the justice that renders others their due from the virtues that control the appetites and passions of the agent himself, represents his interpretation of the Niconiachean Ethics; while his account of these latter virtues is a simple transcript of Aristotle's, just as his division of the non-rational element of the soul into " concupiscible " and " irascible " is the old Platonic one.

    1
    1
  • It is against this part of his doctrines that the most important criticism, in ethics, of his rival Duns Scotus (c. 1266-1308) was directed.

    1
    1
  • It was to be foreseen that a similar assertion of independence would make itself heard in ethics also; and, indeed, amid the clash of dogmatic convictions, and the variations of private judgment, it was natural to seek for an ethical method that might claim universal acceptance from all sects.

    1
    1
  • C. Modern Ethics.

    1
    1
  • Thus the ordinary rules of social behaviour are only hypothetically obligatory; they are actualized by the establishment of a " common power " 1 This influence was not exercised in the region of ethics.

    1
    1
  • He explains that though absolute good is discerned by the intellect, the " sweetness and flavour " of it is apprehended, not by the intellect proper, but by what he calls a " boniform faculty "; and it is in this sweetness and flavour that the motive to virtuous conduct lies; ethics is the " art of living well and happily," and true happiness lies in " the pleasure which the soul derives from the sense of virtue."

    1
    1
  • Yet Locke's ethical opinions have been widely misunderstood; since from a confusion between " innate ideas " and " intuitions," 'which has been common in recent ethical discussion, it has been supposed that the founder of English empiricism must necessarily have been hostile to " intuitional " ethics.

    1
    1
  • We might give, as a fair illustration of Locke's general conception of ethics, a system which is frequently represented as diametrically opposed to Lockism; namely, that expounded in Clarke's Boyle lectures on the Being 'Clarke.

    1
    1
  • His writings, said to have numbered four hundred and fifty-three, were in the style of Aristotle, and dealt with philosophy, ethics and music. The empirical tendency of his thought is shown in his theory that the soul is related to the body as harmony to the parts of a musical.

    0
    0
  • Thus it might be argued that there can be no logical combination of elements from Christian ethics, with its divine sanction, and purely intuitional or evolutionary ethical theories, where the sanction is essentially different in quality.

    0
    0
  • He studied theology at Breslau, Berlin and Halle, where he eventually became professor ordinarius; and is known as the author of a treatise on Christian ethics (Handbuck der christlichen Sitten'ehre, 1860-1863, 3rd ed.

    0
    0
  • Sidgwick, Methods of Ethics, pp. 345-349.

    0
    0
  • Hall's International Law, and more at length in an interesting paper contributed by John Westlake to the International Journal of Ethics, October 1896, which its author has reprinted privately.

    0
    0
  • " These writings contained," says Haureau, " the text of the Organon, the Physics, the Metaphysics, the Ethics, the De anima, the Parva naturalia and a large number of other treatises of Aristotle, accompanied by continuous commentaries.

    0
    0
  • The education of a mandarin includes local history, cognizance of the administrative rites, customs, laws and prescriptions of the country, the ethics of Confucius, the rules of good breeding, the ceremonial of official and social life, and the practical acquirements necessary to the conduct of public or private business.

    0
    0
  • In 1879-1882 he lectured on theology at Andover Theological Seminary, and in 1883 at Harvard, where in 1895-1896 he conducted a graduate seminary in ethics.

    0
    0
  • His contributions to theological literature included treatises on Christian ethics and dogmatics, on moral philosophy, on baptism, and a sketch of the life of Jakob Boehme, who exercised so marked an influence on the mind of the great English theologian of the 18th century, William Law.

    0
    0
  • Adoption, for example, as a practice for improving the happiness of families and the welfare of society, is capable of being weighed, and can in truth only be weighed, by utilitarian considerations, and has been commended 1 For Comte's place in the history of ethical theory see Ethics.

    0
    0
  • Even though she be cognisantas she often isof her husbands extra-marital relations, she abates nothing of the duty which she has been taught to regard as the first canon of female ethics.

    0
    0
  • Undesignedly it conveys a wonderfully realistic picture of aristocratic life and social ethics in KiOto at the beginning of the 11th century.

    0
    0
  • iii., Ecclesiastical Institutions, 1885, completed 1896.1879, The Data of Ethics (part i.

    0
    0
  • of Principles of Ethics in 2 vols.; part iv., Justice, 1891; parts ii.

    0
    0
  • and iii., Inductions of Ethics and Ethics of Individual Life, 1892; parts v.

    0
    0
  • In the later heresy of Manichaeism there were affinities to Gnosticism, but it was a mixture of many elements, Babylonian-Chaldaic theosophy, Persian dualism and even Buddhist ethics (p. 126).

    0
    0
  • Two treatises are sometimes erroneously attributed to him, one on the Emotions, the other a commentary on Aristotle's Ethics (really by Constantine Palaeocappa in the 16th century, or by John Callistus of Thessalonica).

    0
    0
  • But, generally speaking, there was no heart in preaching, sermons were unimpassioned, stilted and formal presentations of ethics and apologetics, seldom delivered extempore.

    0
    0
  • He also wrote Fichte's Science of Knowledge (1884); Poetry, Comedy and Duty (1888); Religions before Christianity (1883); Ethics for Young People (1891); The Gospel of Paul (1892).

    0
    0
  • The publication in 1896 of Manning's Life, by Purcell, was the occasion for some controversy on the ethics of biography.

    0
    0
  • The creed in all its forms lies behind worship, which it preserves from idolatry, and behind ethics, to which it supplies a motive power which the pre-Christian system so manifestly lacked.

    0
    0
  • Just as there is a faculty which apprehends beauty in the sphere of art, so there is in the sphere of ethics a faculty which determines the value of actions.

    0
    0
  • Shaftesbury's philosophical activity was confined to ethics, aesthetics and religion.

    0
    0
  • For metaphysics, properly so called, and even psychology, except so far as it afforded a basis for ethics, he evidently had no taste.

    0
    0
  • Whewell's History of Moral Philosophy in England, Jouffroy's Introduction to Ethics (Channing's translation), Sir Leslie Stephen's English Thought in the Eighteenth Century, Martineau's Types of Ethical Theory, Windelband's History of Philosophy (Eng.

    0
    0
  • Crantor paid especial attention to ethics, and arranged "good" things in the following order - virtue, health, pleasure, riches.

    0
    0
  • We have hardly yet discovered that political economy has unavoidable points of contact with ethics.

    0
    0
  • He was colour-blind to commonplace morality, and we are angry with him because he merged the hues of ethics in one grey monotone of politics.

    0
    0
  • This seems to have been interpreted by its author and by the Sophists in general in a subjective sense, with the result that it became the motto of a sceptical and individualistic movement in contemporary philosophy and ethics.

    0
    0
  • Harris; 4 (b) of confident application to the central problems of logic, ethics and politics, fine art and religion, and as a principle of constructive criticism and interpretation chiefly in T.

    0
    0
  • (c) Ethics - F.

    0
    0
  • Dewey, Ethics (1891); W.

    0
    0
  • Sorley, Ethics of Naturalism (2nd ed., 1904); J.

    0
    0
  • Mackenzie, Manual of Ethics (4th ed., 1900); J.

    0
    0
  • Muirhead, Elements of Ethics (3rd ed., 1910).

    0
    0
  • See also ETHICS and METAPHYSICS.

    0
    0
  • In ethics Diihring follows Comte in making sympathy the foundation of morality.

    0
    0
  • In ethics Gioja follows Bentham generally, and his large treatise Del merito e delle recompense (1818) is a clear and systematic view of social ethics from the utilitarian principle.

    0
    0
  • the already full, operative existence of eternal beauty, truth and goodness, of infinite Personality and Spirit independently of our action, and not, as in ethics, the simple possibility and obligation for ourselves to produce such-like things.

    0
    0
  • If the dead man was John the presbyter - if this John had in youth just seen Jesus and the Zebedean, and in extreme old age had still seen and approved the Gospel - to attribute this Gospel to him, as is done here, would not violate the literary ethics of those times.

    0
    0
  • Sometimes they are headed like the chapters of a treatise on ethics: "De la tristesse," "De 1'oisivete," "De la peur," "De l'amitie."

    0
    0
  • In philosophy he followed Reinhard in ethics and the monadology of Leibnitz, though he was also influenced by Kant.

    0
    0
  • This is a compilation of ritual, ethics and mysticism, and had a profound influence on Jewish life.

    0
    0
  • The literature on the subject is considerable, but the two classics are perhaps The Ethics of Diet, by Howard Williams, and The Perfect Way in Diet, by Dr Anna Kingsford.

    0
    0
  • Ravaisson-Mollien has discovered a number of fragments by him, among which the most important is the De Essentia Dei et de Substantia Dei; a Liber Sententiarum, consisting of discussions on ethics and Scriptural interpretation, is also ascribed to Champeaux.

    0
    0
  • The third and fourth books, like the larger part of the second, treat of ethics; the third, of virtues and vices, in pairs; the fourth, of more general ethical and political subjects, frequently citing extracts to illustrate the pros and cons of a question in two successive chapters.

    0
    0
  • The Letters contain a discussion of many of the principal problems in psychology and ethics.

    0
    0
  • Sidgwick, Methods of Ethics and Outlines of the History of Ethics; J.

    0
    0
  • Among modern writers, James Seth (Ethical Princ., 1894) resumes Aristotle's position, and places Eudaemonism as the mean between the Ethics of Sensibility (hedonism) and the Ethics of Rationality, each of which overlooks the complex character of human life.

    0
    0
  • His university lectures and published works ranged over the wide fields of church history in its various branches, particularly the literature and the controversies of the church, dogmatics, ethics and pastoral theology.

    0
    0
  • Here in 1 754 he became professor extraordinarius of theology, and three years later received an ordinary professorship. He lectured on dogmatics, church history, ethics, polemics, natural theology, symbolics, the epistles of Paul, Christian antiquities, historical theological literature, ecclesiastical law and the fathers, and took an active interest in the work of the Gottinger Societdt In 1766 he was appointed professor primarius.

    0
    0
  • The pre-Socratic philosophy took its stand on natural science, to the exclusion of ethics and religion.

    0
    0
  • The systems of Plato and Aristotle sought to adjust the rival claims of physics and ethics (although the supremacy of the latter was already acknowledged); but the popular religions were thrown overboard.

    0
    0
  • This appears not only in its philosophical method, but also - though less prominently - in its metaphysic. And, fifthly, Neoplatonism adopted the ethics of Stoicism; although it was found necessary to supplement them by a still higher conception of the functions of the spirit.

    0
    0
  • Neoplatonism perceived that neither sense perception nor rational cognition is a sufficient basis or justification for religious ethics; consequently it broke away from rationalistic ethics as decidedly as from utilitarian morality.

    0
    0
  • The religious ethics of Philo - a compound of Stoic, Platonic and Neopythagorean elements - already bear the peculiar stamp which we recognize in Neoplatonism.

    0
    0
  • In the ethics of Plotinus all the older schemes of virtue are taken over and arranged in a graduated series.

    0
    0
  • His course of lectures was divided into four parts-(1) natural theology; (2) ethics; (3) a treatment of that branch of morality which relates to justice, a subject which he handled historically after the manner of Montesquieu; (4) a study of those political regulations which are founded, not upon the principle of justice, but that of expediency, and which are calculated to increase the riches, the power and the prosperity of a state.

    0
    0
  • Smith conceived the entire subject he had to treat in his public lectures as divisible into four heads, the first of which was natural theology, the second ethics, the third jurisprudence; whilst in the fourth "he examined those political regulations which are founded upon expediency, and which are calculated to increase the riches, the power, and the prosperity of a state."

    0
    0
  • Ethics in the present work.

    0
    0
  • In ethics he made contributions to the science in regard to the place and functions of volition and attention, the separate and underived character of the moral sentiments, and the distinction between the virtues of perfect and imperfect obligation.

    0
    0
  • The distinction between the laws and dispositions of matter, as between the ethics and objects of theology, he was the first to indicate and enforce, and he laid great emphasis on the superior authority as witnesses for the truth of Revelation of the Scriptural as compared with the Extra-Scriptural writers, and of the Christian as compared with the non-Christian testimonies.

    0
    0
  • 7)80vij, pleasure, from 7)81us, sweet, pleasant), in ethics, a general term for all theories of conduct in which the criterion is pleasure of one kind or another.

    0
    0
  • Thus we pass from Egoistic to Universalistic hedonism, Utilitarianism, Social Ethics, more especially in relation to the still broader theories of evolution.

    0
    0
  • One of the most important contributions to the discussion is that of Sir Leslie Stephen (Science of Ethics), who elaborated a theory of the "social organism" in relation to the individual.

    0
    0
  • A criticism of the various hedonistic theories will be found in the article Ethics (ad fin.).

    0
    0
  • Mackenzie, Manual of Ethics (3rd ed., 1897); J.

    0
    0
  • Muirhead, Elements of Ethics (1892); J.

    0
    0
  • Sidgwick, Methods of Ethics (6th ed., 1901); Jas.

    0
    0
  • Seth, Ethical Principles (3rd ed., 1898); other works quoted under Ethics.

    0
    0
  • In philosophical terminology this word is used in two main senses: (I) in ethics, for the view that man is not responsible for his actions, which have, therefore, no moral value; (2) in psychology, for all actions which are not the result of collation or conscious endeavour.

    0
    0
  • for "highest good"), in ethics, the ideal of human attainment.

    0
    0
  • If, however, we abandon intuitional ethics, it is reasonable to argue that the term summum bonum ceases to have any real significance inasmuch as actions are not intrinsically good or bad, while the complete sceptic strives after no systematic ideal.

    0
    0
  • Aristotle in his Ethics stigmatizes as "extremely unloving" (Xiav a4xXov) the denial that ancestors are interested in or affected by the fortunes of their descendants; and in effect ancestor-worship is the staple of most religions, ancient or modern, civilized or savage.

    0
    0
  • Under such circumstances ethics becomes a doctrine of abstinence in regard to all elements which have their source within the sphere of darkness.

    0
    0
  • On the basis of such a cosmical philosophy, ethics can only have a dualistic ascetic character.

    0
    0
  • Manichaean ethics is not merely negative, however, since it is necessary to cherish, strengthen and purify the elements of light, as well as free oneself from the elements of darkness.

    0
    0
  • The aim is not self-destruction, but self-preservation; and yet the ethics of Manichaeism appears in point of fact as thoroughly ascetic. The Manichaean had, above all, to refrain from sensual enjoyment, shutting himself up against it by three seals - the signaculum oris, manus and sinus.

    0
    0
  • According to Kessler, Mani made use of the teaching of Buddha, at least as far as ethics was concerned.

    0
    0
  • This is also true of the ethics and the asceticism of the two systems. There is not a single point in Manichaeism which demands for its explanation an appeal to Buddhism.

    0
    0
  • Throughout his philosophy he endeavours to connect metaphysics with ethics and the theory of education.

    0
    0
  • The ethics of these principles were worked out in Discours sur le bonheur, La Volupte, and L' Art de jouir, in which the end of life is found in the pleasures of the senses, and virtue is reduced to self-love.

    0
    0
  • Aristotle, however, always revered Plato's memory (Nic. Ethics, i.

    0
    0
  • Having witnessed the unjust exactions of a democracy at Athens, the dwindling population of an oligarchy at Sparta, and the oppressive selfishness of new tyrannies throughout the Greek world, he condemned the actual constitutions of the Greek states as deviations (7rapec- (3do as) directed merely to the good of the government; and he contemplated a right constitution (607) 7roAtTeia), which might be either a commonwealth, an aristocracy or a monarchy, directed to the general good; but he preferred the monarchy of one man, pre-eminent in virtue above the rest, as the best of all governments (Nicomachean Ethics, viii.

    0
    0
  • This is indeed a doctrine of Platonic ethics from which Aristotle in his later days never swerved.

    0
    0
  • Thus we find that at first, under the influence of his master, Aristotle held somewhat ascetic views on soul and body and on goods of body and estate, entirely opposed both in psychology and in ethics to the moderate doctrines of his later writings.

    0
    0
  • [According to Zeller, an abstract of the Nicomachean and the Eudemian Ethics, tending to follow the latter, but possibly an early draft of the Nicomachean Ethics.] 3 'H9LKa EbSi) pea or 7rpos Ebbnp.ov: Ethica ad Eudemum: On the same subject.

    0
    0
  • [Usually supposed to be written by Eudemus, but possibly an early draft of the Nicomachean Ethics.] 4.1 and vices.

    0
    0
  • of pleasure in the Nicomachean Ethics, vii.

    0
    0
  • the Nicomachean Ethics, the Eudemian Ethics and the Magna Moralia; or, strangest of all, a consecutive treatise and other discourses amalgamated, e.g.

    0
    0
  • in De Interp. 13, 22 a 22; Nicomachean Ethics, ii.

    0
    0
  • 7; Eudemian Ethics, ii.

    0
    0
  • Thus the Nicomachean Ethics begins by identifying the good with happiness (euSaeµovia), and happiness with virtuous action.

    0
    0
  • The probability is that the Nicomachean Ethics is a collection of separate discourses worked up into a tolerably systematic treatise; and the interesting point is that these discourses correspond to separate titles in the list of Diogenes Laertius (7rep1 KaXou, irepi Sucalcwv, irepi q5tXias, 7repi )Sovfjs, and 7repi ijlovwv).

    0
    0
  • Again, in developing his discourses into larger treatises he might fall into dislocations; although it must be remembered that these are often inventions of critics who do not understand the argument, as when they make out that the treatment of reciprocal justice in the Ethics (v.

    0
    0
  • Or he might himself, without double versions, repeat the same argument with a different shade of meaning; as when in the Nic. Ethics (vii.

    0
    0
  • He also availed himself of his pupils' co-operation, as we may judge from his description in the Ethics (x.

    0
    0
  • How otherwise, we wonder, could one man writing alone and with so few predecessors compose the first systematic treatises on the psychology of the mental powers and on the logic of reasoning, the first natural history of animals, and the first civil history of one hundred and fifty-eight constitutions, in addition to authoritative treatises on metaphysics, biology, ethics, politics, rhetoric and poetry; in all penetrating to the very essence of the subject, and, what is most wonderful, describing more facts than any other man has ever done on so many subjects ?

    0
    0
  • On these principles, we regard as early genuine philosophical works of Aristotle, (I) the Categories; (2) the De Interpretatione; (3) the Eudemian Ethics and Magna Moralia; (4) the Rhetoric to Alexander.

    0
    0
  • The Eudemian Ethics and Magna Moralia in relation to the Nicomachean Ethics.

    0
    0
  • A - Z) are common to the two treatises, and by the consequent question whether, on the hypothesis of different authorship, the common books, as we may style them, were written for the Nicomachean by Aristotle, or for the Eudemian Ethics by Eudemus, or some by one and some by the other author.

    0
    0
  • These considerations make it probable that the author of all three treatises was Aristotle himself; while the analysis of the treatises favours the hypothesis that he wrote the Eudemian Ethics and the Magna Moralia more or less together as the rudimentary first drafts of the mature Nicomachean Ethics.

    0
    0
  • As the Platonic philosophy was primarily moral, and its metaphysics a theory of the moral order of the universe, Aristotle from the first must have mastered the Platonic ethics.

    0
    0
  • It is probable that when, after Plato's death and the accession of Speusippus in 347, Aristotle with Xenocrates left Athens to visit his former pupil Hermias, the three discussed this moderate system of Ethics in which the two philosophers nearly agreed.

    0
    0
  • The good of Ethics is human good; and human good is happiness, not the universal good or form of the good to which Plato subordinated human happiness.

    0
    0
  • As then we find this identification of pleasure with activity in the Metaphysics and in the De Anima, as well as in the Nicomachean Ethics, the Eudemian Ethics and the Magna Moralia, the only logical conclusion, from which there is no escape, is that, so far as the treatment of pleasure goes, any Aristotelian treatise which defines it as activity is genuine.

    0
    0
  • It is because the Nicomachean Ethics contains a second discourse on pleasure (x.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, the distinction between activity and pleasure in the tenth book is really fatal to the consistency of the whole Nicomachean Ethics, which started in the first book with the identification of happiness and virtuous activity.

    0
    0
  • It is further remarkable that the Nicomachean Ethics proceeds to a different conclusion.

    0
    0
  • The treatise concludes with the means of making men virtuous; contending that virtue requires habituation, habituation law, law legislative art, and legislative art politics: Ethics thus passes into Politics.

    0
    0
  • The Eudemian Ethics proceeds to its conclusion (E.E.

    0
    0
  • 8-10) on these points is unlike the Nicomachean, and like the Eudemian Ethics in discussing good fortune and gentlemanliness, but it discusses them in a more worldly way.

    0
    0
  • Thereupon it proceeds to a discourse on friendship, which in the Nicomachean and Eudemian Ethics is discussed in an earlier position, but breaks off unfinished.

    0
    0
  • From this point the Eudemian Ethics and the Magna Moralia become more like one another than like the Nicomachean Ethics.

    0
    0
  • They also become less like one another than before: for the treatment of good fortune, gentlemanliness, and their limit is more theological in the Eudemian Ethics than in the Magna Moralia.

    0
    0
  • All three are great works, contributing to the origin of the independent science of Ethics.

    0
    0
  • But the Eudemian Ethics and the Magna Moralia are more rudimentary than the Nicomachean Ethics, which as it were seems to absorb them except in the conclusion.

    0
    0
  • They are, in short, neither independent works, nor mere commentaries, but Aristotle's first drafts of his Ethics.

    0
    0
  • In the Ethics to Eudemus, as Porphyry properly called the Eudemian Ethics, Aristotle in the first four books successively investigates happiness, virtue, the voluntary and the particular moral virtues, in the same order and in the same letter and spirit as in his Ethics to Nicomachus.

    0
    0
  • They are all such rudiments as Aristotle might well polish into the more developed expositions in the first four books of the Nicomachean Ethics.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, nobody would have gone back afterwards on his masterly treatment of happiness, in the first book, or of virtue in the second, or of the voluntary in the third, or of the particular virtues in the third and fourth, to write the sketchy accounts of the Eudemian Ethics.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, there are still more fundamental points in which the first three books of the Eudemian Ethics are a very inadequate preparation for the common books.

    0
    0
  • After this, it can never be said that the earlier books of the Eudemian Ethics are so good a preparation as those of the Nicomachean Ethics for the distinction between prudence (Opov j ats) and wisdom (a001a), which is the main point of the common books, and one of Aristotle's main points against Plato's philosophy.

    0
    0
  • Curiously enough, although little is made of it, this distinction, absent from the earlier books, is present in the final book H of the Eudemian Ethics (cf.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile, however, the truth about the Eudemian Ethics in general is that it was an earlier rudimentary sketch written by Aristotle, when he was still struggling, without quite succeeding, to get over Plato's view that there is one philosophical knowledge of universal good, by which not only the dialectician and mathematician must explain the being and becoming of the world, but also the individual and the statesman guide the life of man.

    0
    0
  • Indeed, the final proof that the Eudemian Ethics is earlier than the Nicomachean is the very fact that it is more under Platonic influence.

    0
    0
  • In the first place, the reason why the account of prudence begins by confusing the speculative with the practical is that the Eudemian Ethics starts from Plato's Philebus, where, without differentiating speculative and practical knowledge, Plato asks how far good is prudence (cbpovoacs), how far pleasure (7)Sovi 7); and in the Eudemian Ethics Aristotle asks the same question, adding virtue (ap€r,) in order to correct the Socratic confusion of virtue with prudence.

    0
    0
  • Secondly, the Eudemian Ethics, while not agreeing with Plato's Republic that the just can be happy by justice alone, does not assign to the external goods of good fortune (Eutu X ia) the prominence accorded to them in the Nicomachean Ethics as the necessary conditions of all virtue, and the instruments of moral virtue.

    0
    0
  • But gentlemanliness is no longer called perfect virtue, as in the Eudemian Ethics: its place has been taken by justice, which is perfect virtue to one's neighbour, by prudence which unites all the moral virtues, and by wisdom which is the highest virtue.

    0
    0
  • Because, then, it is very like, but more rudimentary and more Platonic, we conclude that the Eudemian is an earlier draft of the Nicomachean Ethics, written by Aristotle when he was still in process of transition from Plato's ethics to his own.

    0
    0
  • The Magna Moralia contains similar evidence of being earlier than the Nicomachean Ethics.

    0
    0
  • In dealing with justice, it does not make it clear, as the Nicomachean Ethics (Book v.) does, that even universal justice is virtue towards another (M.M.

    0
    0
  • In dealing with what the Nicomachean Ethics (Book vi.) calls intellectual virtues, but the Magna Moralia (i.

    0
    0
  • 5) is more consistent than that of the Eudemian Ethics.

    0
    0
  • In these points it is a better preparation for the Nicomachean Ethics.

    0
    0
  • In dealing with continence and incontinence, the same doubts and solutions occur as in the Nicomachean Ethics (Book vii.

    0
    0
  • Z), but sometimes confusing doubts and solutions together, instead of first proposing all the doubts and then supplying the solutions as in the Nicomachean Ethics.

    0
    0
  • Such rudimentary and imperfect sketches would be quite excusable in a first draft, but inexcusable and incredible after the Nicomachean Ethics had been written.

    0
    0
  • It is also Platonic, like the Endemian Ethics, in making little of external goods in the account of good fortune (ii.

    0
    0
  • Indeed, in some respects it is more like the Eudemian, though in the main more like the Nicomachean Ethics.

    0
    0
  • 3, 1184 b 5-6); but does not make so much of it as the distinction between prudence and wisdom blurred in the Eudemian but defined in the Nicomachean Ethics.

    0
    0
  • In the second book, it runs parallel to the Eudemian Ethics in placing good fortune and gentlemanliness (ii.

    0
    0
  • 8-9), where the Nicomachean Ethics places the speculative and the practical life; but it omits the theological element by denying that good fortune is divine grace, and by submitting gentlemanliness to no standard but that of right reason, when the irrational part of the soul does not hinder the rational part, or intellect (vows), from doing its work.

    0
    0
  • Because, then, the Magna Moralia is very like the Nicomachean Ethics, but more rudimentary, nearer to the Platonic dialogues in style and to a less degree in matter, and also like the Eudemian Ethics, we conclude that it is also like that treatise in having been written as an earlier draft of the Nicomachean Ethics by Aristotle himself.

    0
    0
  • The hypothesis that the Eudemian Ethics, and by consequence the Magna Moralia, are later than Aristotle has arisen from a simple misconception, continued in a Scholium attributed to Aspasius, who lived in the 2nd century A.D.

    0
    0
  • Nicomachean means " addressed to Nicomachus," and Eudemian " addressed to Eudemus "; but, as Cicero thought that the Nicomachean Ethics was written by Nicomachus, so the author of the Scholium thought that the Eudemian Ethics, at least so far as the first account of pleasure goes, was written by Eudemus.

    0
    0
  • He only thought so, however, because Aristotle could not have written both accounts of pleasure; and, taking for granted that Aristotle had written the second account of pleasure in the Nicomachean Ethics (Book x.), he concluded that the first account (Book vii.) was not the work of Aristotle, but of Eudemus (Comm.

    0
    0
  • But we have seen that Aristotle wrote the first three books of the Eudemian as an earlier draft of the Nicomachean Ethics; so that, even so far as they form a better introduction, this will not prove the common books to be by Eudemus.

    0
    0
  • Book E) must be rather founded on the first four books of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics.

    0
    0
  • In the Nicomachean as in the Eudemian Ethics the limit above moral virtue is right reason, or prudence, which is right reason on such matters; and above prudence wisdom, for which prudence gives its orders; while wisdom is the intelligence and science of the most venerable objects, of the most divine, and of God.

    0
    0
  • While the Eudemian Ethics in a more theological vein emphasizes God, the object of wisdom as the end for which prudence gives its orders, the Nicomachean Ethics in a more humanizing spirit emphasizes wisdom itself, the speculative activity, as that end, and afterwards as the highest happiness, because activity of the divine power of intellect, because an imitation of the activity of God, because most dear to God.

    0
    0
  • This is too fine a distinction to found a difference of authorship. Beneath it, and behind the curious hesitation which in dealing with mysteries Aristotle shows between the divine and the human, his three moral treatises agree that wisdom is a science of things divine, which the Nicomachean Ethics (vi.

    0
    0
  • 35) regards as that which is concerned with the eternal and the divine, and the Eudemian Ethics (H 15) elevates into the service and contemplation of God.

    0
    0
  • Surely, the harmony of these three moral gospels proves that Aristotle wrote them, and wrote the Eudemian Ethics and the Magna Moralia as preludes to the Nicomachean Ethics.

    0
    0
  • the Categories earlier than some parts of the Metaphysics, because under the influence of Platonic forms it talks of inherent attributes, and allows secondary substances which are universal; the De Interpretatione earlier than the Analytics, because in it the Platonic analysis of the sentence into noun and verb is retained for the proposition; the Eudemian Ethics and the Magna Moralia earlier than the Nicomachean Ethics, because they are rudimentary sketches of it, and the one written rather in the theological spirit, the other rather in the dialectical style, of Plato; and the Rhetoric to Alexander earlier than the Rhetoric, because it contains a rudimentary theory of the rational evidences afterwards developed into a logic of rhetoric in the Rhetoric and Analytics.

    0
    0
  • Ethics and Politics.

    0
    0
  • Plato and Speusippus in the Ethics, Eudoxus and Callippus in the Metaphysics, he was writing these passages after the deaths of these persons; but he might have been also writing the Ethics and the Metaphysics both beforehand and afterwards.

    0
    0
  • The commentators themselves were doubtful about the order: Boethus proposed to begin with Physics, and some of the Platonists with Ethics or Mathematics; while Andronicus preferred to put Logic first as Organon (Scholia, 25 b 34 seq.).

    0
    0
  • 1, 641 a 35), in the Nicomachean Ethics (i.

    0
    0
  • Ethics, about the good of the individual.

    0
    0
  • E 2), and would in the classification include not only metaphysics and mathematics, but also physics, ethics, economics, politics, necessary and fine art; or in short.

    0
    0
  • I' 2-3, K 3), more frequently he extends it to all three speculative philosophies (E 1, 1026 a 18, T peis Eta, cbxXoc04 iac OEcepujru ai, paOu,uaruo i, 4 wotei j, No- Ao-ycK r j), and to all three practical philosophies, as we see from the constant use of the phrase " political philosopher " in the Ethics; and in short applies it to all sciences except productive science or art.

    0
    0
  • number in arithmetic, magnitude in geometry, stars in astronomy, a man's good in ethics; concentrates itself on the causes and appropriate principles of its subject, especially the definition of the subject and its species by their essences or formal causes; and after an inductive intelligence of those principles proceeds by a deductive demonstration from definitions to consequences: philosophy is simply a desire of this definite knowledge of causes and effects.

    0
    0
  • Such is the great mind of Aristotle manifested in the large map of learning, by which we have now to determine the order of his extant philosophical writings, with a view to studying them in their real order, which is neither chronological nor traditional, but philosophical and scientific. Turning over the pages of the Berlin edition, but passing over works which are perhaps spurious, we should put first and foremost speculative philosophy, and therein the primary philosophy of his Metaphysics (980 a 211093 b 29); then the secondary philosophy of his Physics, followed by his other physical works, general and biological, including among the latter the Historia Animalium as preparatory to the De Partibus Animalium, and the De Anima and Parva Naturalia, which he called " physical " but we call " psychological" (184 a 10-967 b 27); next, the practical philosophy of the Ethics, including the Eudemian Ethics and the Magna Moralia as earlier and the Nicomachean Ethics as later (1094-124 9 b 25), and of the Politics (1252-1342), with the addition of the newly discovered Athenian Constitution as ancillary to it; finally, the productive science, or art, of the Rhetoric, including the earlier Rhetoric to Alexander and the later Rhetorical Art, and of the Poetics, which was unfinished (1354-end).

    0
    0
  • Aristotle, who made this great discovery, must have had great difficulty in developing the new investigation of reasoning processes out of dialectic, rhetoric, poetics, grammar, metaphysics, mathematics, physics and ethics; and in disengaging it from other kinds of learning.

    0
    0
  • He really left the Peripatetics to combine his scattered discourses and treatises into a system, to call it logic, and logic Organon, and to put it first as the instrument of sciences; and it was the Stoics who first called logic a science, and assigned it the first place in their triple classification of science into logic, physics, ethics.

    0
    0
  • Among all the eight passages mentioned above, the most valuable is that from the Eudemian Ethics (A 8), which discriminates extraneous discourses and philosophical (Kai ie rois i wTEpLKOLS XIyocs Kai iv roas Kara 4cXoac41av, 1217 b 22-23); and it is preceded (A 6, 1216 b 35-37 a 17), by a similar distinction between foreign discourses (h¦Xorpioc Aoyoc) and discourses appropriate to the thing (oiKEioc Aoyoc Tor, 7rpayp,aros), which marks even better the opposition intended between dialectic and philosophy.

    0
    0
  • the Categories, the Eudemian Ethics, the Magna Moralia, the Rhetoric to Alexander.

    0
    0
  • the Metaphysics, the Nicomachean Ethics, the Rhetoric; and above all teach his whole system as far as possible in the real order of his classification of science.

    0
    0
  • (2) Practical philosophy, ethics and politics.

    0
    0
  • Ethics then is a kind of Politics.

    0
    0
  • But in Ethics a man's individual good is his own happiness; and his happiness is no mere state, but an activity of soul according to virtue in a mature life, requiring as conditions moderate bodily and external goods of fortune; his virtue is (I) moral virtue, which is acquired by habituation, and is a purposive habit of performing actions in the mean determined by right reason or prudence; requiring him, not to exclude, but to moderate his desires; and (2) intellectual virtue, which is either prudence of practical, or wisdom of speculative intellect; and his happiness is a kind of ascending scale of virtuous activities, in which moral virtue is limited by prudence, and prudence by wisdom; so that the speculative life of wisdom is the happiest and most divine, and the practical life of prudence and moral virtue secondary and human.

    0
    0
  • To turn from Ethics to Politics, the good of the individual on a small scale becomes on a large scale the good of the citizen and the state, whose end should be no far-off form of good, and no mere guarantee of rights, but the happiness of virtuous action, the life according to virtue, which is the general good of the citizen.

    0
    0
  • Such is Aristotle's practical philosophy, contained in his matured Nicomachean Ethics, and his unfinished Politics.

    0
    0
  • Such is Aristotle's productive science or art, contained in his Rhetoric and Poetics, compared with his Ethics and Politics.

    0
    0
  • Wimmer (1868), the Ethics by K.

    0
    0
  • Cope's Rhetoric, Dr Henry Jackson's Nicomachean Ethics, v., S.

    0
    0
  • Cardwell in his edition of the Nicomachean Ethics (1828) had the wisdom to found his text on the Laurentian Manuscript (Kb); E.

    0
    0
  • Grant edited the Nicomachean Ethics; E.

    0
    0
  • Stewart has written Notes on the Nicomachean Ethics; Professor J.

    0
    0
  • Burnet has issued an annotated edition of the Nicomachean Ethics, and W.

    0
    0
  • Bywater, who as an Aristotelian scholar has done much for the improvement of Bekker's text, especially of the Nicomachean Ethics and the Poetics; and F.

    0
    0
  • He became vicar-general of Orleans in 1861, professor of ethics at the Sorbonne in 1862, and, on the death of Barante, a member of the French Academy in 1867, where he occupied the seat formerly held by Voltaire.

    0
    0
  • of Ethics (5th ed., 1902); A.

    0
    0
  • The list of Wundt's works is long and comprehensive, including physiology, psychology, logic and ethics.

    0
    0
  • straight road to ethics lies through ethnic psychology, whose especial business it is to consider the history of custom and of ethical ideas from the psychological standpoint.

    0
    0
  • We must look for ethics to supply the corner-stone of metaphysics, and psychology is a necessary propaedeutic. The System der Philosophie (1899; 3rd ed., 1907) contained the results of Wundt's work up to that date, both in the domain of science and in the more strictly philosophic field.

    0
    0
  • In this theory there can strictly be no "causation"; one thing is observed to succeed another, but observations cannot assert that it is "caused" by that thing; it is post hoc, but not propter hoc. The idea of necessary connexion is a purely mental idea, an a priori conception, in which observation of empirical data takes no part; empiricism in ethics likewise does away with the idea of the absolute authority of the moral law as conceived by the intuitionalists.

    0
    0
  • In the year 1866 he published a little book about girls, and written for girls, a mixture of morals, theology, economics and geology, under the title of Ethics of the Dust; and this was followed by a more important and popular work, The Crown of Wild Olive.

    0
    0
  • For the philosophic application see Aristotle and Ethics.

    0
    0
  • Joachim's Study of the Ethics of Spinoza, 1901, p. 72).

    0
    0
  • Green's Prolegomena to Ethics can see how awkward is the Hegelian transition from " one spiritual principle" to different men's individual freedom of choice between good and evil.

    0
    0
  • Green (Prolegomena to Ethics, 1883) T N Green.

    0
    0
  • The argument, therefore, for one substance in Spinoza's Ethics, and for one absolute, the Real, which is one substantially, in Bradley's Appearance and Reality, breaks down, so far as it is designed to prove that there is only one substance, or only one Real.

    0
    0
  • In his teaching he laid stress on ethics; and his most important works, of which only insignificant fragments are preserved, were on this subject.

    0
    0
  • The Jewish Law is viewed not as a code of ethics or "works of righteousness," as by Paul, but as a system of religious rites (vii.

    0
    0
  • The philosophical importance of Price is entirely in the region of ethics.

    0
    0
  • Notices of Price's ethical system occur in Mackintosh's Progress of Ethical Philosophy, Jouffroy's Introduction to Ethics, Whewell's History of Moral Philosophy in England; Bain's Mental and Moral Sciences.

    0
    0
  • See also ETHICS, and T.

    0
    0
  • Intellectually in agreement with the Megarian dialectic, he followed the practical ethics of the Cynics both in theory and in practice.

    0
    0
  • In 1881 he declined an invitation to be the sole preacher to the university and professor of Christian ethics.

    0
    0
  • He was largely instrumental in the foundation of ecoles normales in provincial towns, and himself gave courses of lectures on psychology and practical ethics in their early days.

    0
    0
  • Commentaries on books 1 -4, 7 (in part), and 8 of the Nicomachean Ethics are preserved; that on book 8 was printed with those of Eustratius and others by Aldus Manutius at Venice in 1536.

    0
    0
  • His principal works are, The Rise and Progress of Religion in the Soul (1745), which best illustrates his religious genius, and has been widely translated; The Family Expositor (6 vols., 1739-1756), Life of Colonel Gardiner (1747); and a Course of Lectures on Pneumatology, Ethics and Divinity (1763).

    0
    0
  • For the first of these the reader is referred to the article Ethics, where Theology Hume's views are placed in relation to those of his pre- and ethics.

    0
    0
  • In Hume's theory of knowledge we have the final expression of what may be called psychological individualism or atomism, while his ethics and doctrine of religion are but the logical consequences of this theory.

    0
    0
  • determinare, to prescribe or limit), in ethics, the name given to the theory that all moral choice, so called, is the determined or necessary result of psychological and other conditions.

    0
    0
  • In the Bible the philosophical-religious problem is nowhere discussed, but Christian ethics as set forth in the New Testament assumes throughout the freedom of the human will.

    0
    0
  • For the history of the free-will controversy see the articles, Will, Predestination (for the theological problems), Ethics.

    0
    0
  • For his ethical theories see Ethics.

    0
    0
  • According to Aristotle (Ethics x.

    0
    0
  • The Epicurean philosophy is traditionally divided into the three branches of logic, physics and ethics.

    0
    0
  • Ethics had been based upon logic and metaphysics.

    0
    0
  • Sidgwick, History of Ethics (5th ed., 5902).

    0
    0
  • The Stoics discovered that their "perfect man" was not to be found in the luxurious, often morbid society of the Graeco-Roman world; that something more than dialectic ethics was needed to reawaken a sense of responsibility.

    0
    0
  • 38-40) All books concerned with the religious sciences and with ethics are submitted to preliminary censorship, and in, addition to this ecclesiastics have to obtain a personal authorization for all their books and for the acceptance of the editorship of a periodical (Nos.

    0
    0
  • By his Analysis of the Mind and' his Fragment on Mackintosh Mill acquired a position in the history of psychology and ethics.

    0
    0
  • The Fragment on Mackintosh is a severe exposure of the flimsiness and misrepresentations of Sir James Mackintosh's famous Dissertation on the Progress of Ethical Philosophy (1830), and discusses the foundations of ethics from the author's utilitarian point of view.

    0
    0
  • At the same time Christian ethics incorporated much of the current popular philosophy, especially large Stoical elements.

    0
    0
  • If only those passages had been preserved which had a permanent value for the theology, the ethics, or the jurisprudence of the Moslems, a few fragments would have been amply sufficient.

    0
    0
  • Ethics alone he considered worthy of study, and in that only general and theoretical questions.

    0
    0
  • This relation to a "good" must not, however, be construed as a doctrine of ethics in the narrower sense; nor is its "utilitarianism" to be confused with the hedonism of the British associationists.

    0
    0
  • The lofty ethics (e.g.

    0
    0
  • Melanchthon, however, for whom ethics possessed a special interest, laid more stress on the law.

    0
    0
  • Yet the shrewd common-sense, the biting humour, the power of graphic description and the imaginative " mysticism " give them a unique attraction for many even who do not fully sympathize with the implied philosophy or with the Puritanical code of ethics.

    0
    0
  • This practically includes most of the psychology and ethics of Buddhism.

    0
    0
  • Here are brought together from ten to twenty stanzas on each of twenty-six selected points of Buddhist self-training or ethics.

    0
    0
  • The above works are our authority for the philosophy and ethics of the earliest Buddhists.

    0
    0
  • The philosophical basis of the old ethics is overshadowed by new 1 See Journal of the Pali Text Society, 1896, pp. 87-92.

    0
    0
  • This silence may be due in part to a current opinion that women were more hedged in and guarded by social arrangements and less exposed to temptation than men; but it is chiefly the result of the fact that the Old Testament (like most ancient and modern works on practical ethics) addresses itself almost exclusively to men (certain classes of women are denounced in Amos iv.

    0
    0
  • Both of them were intent on forcing the theologians into the daylight, and grudged them any aid they might expect from Kant's postulation of God and immortality to crown the edifice of ethics.

    0
    0
  • century was disgraced, in Palestine, by a feverish " scramble " for sacred sites, in which the most rudimentary ethics of Christianity were forgotten in the all-mastering desire to oust rival sects and orders.

    0
    0
  • Ethics >>

    0
    0
  • He was an assistant in philosophy at Columbia in 1885-1886, tutor in 1886-1889, adjunct professor of philosophy, ethics and psychology in 1889-1890, becoming full professor in 1890, and dean of the faculty of philosophy in 1890-1902.

    0
    0
  • It may have been that the sophists' preference of seeming to reality, of success to truth, had a mischievous effect upon the morality of the time; but it is clear that they had no common theory of ethics, and there is no warrant for the assumption that a sophist, as such, specially interested himself in ethical questions.

    0
    0
  • of the same new collection, recognized most important fragments of the Ethics of Epicurus, and these he published in 1879 in Nos.

    0
    0
  • The course on moral philosophy embraced, besides ethics proper, lectures on political philosophy or the theory of government, and from 1800 onwards a separate course of lectures was delivered on political economy, then almost unknown as a science to the general public. Stewart's enlightened political teaching was sufficient, in the times of reaction succeeding the French Revolution, to draw upon him the undeserved suspicion of disaffection to the constitution.

    0
    0
  • Stewart's philosophical views are mainly the reproduction of his master Reid (for his ethical views see Ethics).

    0
    0
  • But in 1890 a great stir was created by the publication, under his editorship, of Lux Mundi, a series of essays by different writers, being an attempt "to succour a distressed faith by endeavouring to bring the Christian Creed into its right relation to the modern growth of knowledge, scientific, historic, critical; and to modern problems of politics and ethics."

    0
    0
  • While the authority of Augustine received lip-homage, the doctrine of the Roman Catholic Church became more Pelagian, and in the Tridentine decrees and still more in the ethics of the Jesuits, in spite of the opposition of Jansenism, Pelagianism at last triumphed.

    0
    0
  • Sidgwick's Methods of Ethics (6th ed., 1901), p. 384; A.

    0
    0
  • Confucian ethics are the basis of morality and social order.

    0
    0
  • 384, and from it the sutras and images of northern Buddhism were carried to Japan, as well as Chinese letters and ethics.

    0
    0
  • libertas, freedom), in ethics, the doctrine which maintains the freedom of the will, as opposed to necessitarianism or determinism.

    0
    0
  • arithmetic of number, geometry of magnitude, astronomy of stars, politics of government, ethics of goods.

    0
    0
  • The Politicus and Philebus are guaranteed by the use made of them in Aristotle's Ethics.

    0
    0
  • Despite the fact that their philosophic interests lay rather in ethics and physics, their activity The in what they classified as the third department of specula Stoics.

    0
    0
  • we are more dependent in physics, less so in ethics.

    0
    0
  • and Ethics, i.

    0
    0
  • Bain's Moral Science (593-598); Windelband's History of Ethics (Eng.

    0
    0
  • Robertson, Pioneer Humanists (1907); P. Sakmann, Bernard de Mandeville and die Bienenfabel-Controverse (Freiburg i/Br., 1897), and compare articles Ethics, Shaftesbury, Hobbes.

    0
    0
  • Here you find articles in the encyclopedia on topics related to ethics.

    0
    0
  • See also Ethics.

    0
    0
  • Herein he identified metaphysics and ethics, combining the good with the truly existent and evil with the non-existent.

    0
    0
  • In ethics the term is used, like indeterminism, to denote the theory that mental change cannot always be ascribed to previously ascertained psychological states, and that volition is not causally related to the motives involved.

    0
    0
  • Aristotle in his Ethics defines, as the barbarian's ideal of life, "the living as one likes."

    0
    0
  • Green, Prolegomena to Ethics (Oxford, 1883); Franz Cumont, Les Religions orientales dans le paganisme romain (Paris, 1907); Porphyrius, De Abstinentia; Plutarchus, De Carnium Esu.

    0
    0
  • The last writer who, though not a political utilitarian, may be regarded as belonging to the school of Mill is Henry Sidgwick, whose elaborate Methods of Ethics (1874) may be regarded as closing this line of thought.

    0
    0
  • The main doctrine of evolutional or biological ethics is stated with admirable clearness in the third chapter of Darwin's Descent of Man (pub.

    0
    0
  • The most famous of the systematic exponents of evolutional utilitarianism is, of course, Herbert Spencer, in whose Data of Ethics (1819) the facts of morality are viewed in relation with his vast conception of the total process of cosmic evolution.

    0
    0
  • The best feature of the Data of Ethics is its anti-ascetic vindication of pleasure as man's natural guide to what is physiologically healthy and morally good.

    0
    0
  • For the rest, Spencer's doctrine is valuable more as stimulating to thought by its originality and width of view than as offering direct solutions of ethical problems. Following up the same line of thought, Leslie Stephen with less brilliance but more attention to scientific method has worked out in his Science of Ethics (1882) the conception of morality as a function of the social organism: while Professor S.

    0
    0
  • See also ETHICS.

    0
    0
  • Like Protagoras, he professed to train his pupils for domestic and civic affairs; but it would appear that, while Protagoras's chief instruments of education were rhetoric and style, Prodicus made ethics prominent in his curriculum.

    0
    0
  • In ethics he was a pessimist.

    0
    0
  • 3 These documents, even after due weight is given to all consideraions urged in their favour,4 seem to confirm the view already taken of Bacon's theory of government, and at the same time show that his sympathies with the royal party tended to blind him to the true character of certain courses of action, which can only be justified by a straining of political ethics.

    0
    0
  • In the sphere of ethics he is similarly regarded as a forerunner of the empirical method.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, if those in authority perpetrate in the name of what their society holds sacred, and therefore with its full approval, acts that to the modern mind are cruel, silly or revolting, it is bad science and bad ethics to speak of vice and degradation, unless it can be shown that the community in which these things occur is thereby brought nearer to elimination in the struggle for existence.

    0
    0
  • - Polytheism is here on the way to monotheism, and this tendency receives significant support from the recognition of an order in nature which is the ground and framework of social ethics.

    0
    0
  • Ethics and Eschatology.

    0
    0
  • Anthropologists have, it is true, taken widely different views of the relation of ethics and religion, and the stage at which an effective alliance between them might be recognized.

    0
    0
  • 11 The mythological embodiments of the connexion of law in nature with the social and moral order have already been briefly noted: a few words may be said in conclusion on another product of the union of religion and ethics, viz.

    0
    0
  • Assuming the proper fulfilment of the ritual of death, ethics gradually extends its control over the future.

    0
    0
  • Eschatology has again and again expressed the alliance between ethics and religion.

    0
    0
  • Kelly, Kant's Ethics and Schopenhauer's criticism (1910).

    0
    0
  • The short appendix, in which the attempt is made to present the chief points of the argument in geometrical form, is a forerunner of the Ethics, and was probably written somewhat later than the rest of the book.

    0
    0
  • The term "Nature" is put more into the foreground in the Treatise, a point which might be urged as evidence of Bruno's influence - the dialogues, moreover, being specially concerned to establish the unity, infinity and selfcontainedness of Nature 2; but the two opposed Cartesian attributes, thought and extension, and the absolutely infinite substance whose attributes they are - substance constituted by infinite attributes - appear here as in the Ethics.

    0
    0
  • The earlier differs from the later exposition in allowing an objective causal relation between thought and extension, for which there is substituted in the Ethics the idea of a thoroughgoing parallelism.

    0
    0
  • Although the systematic framework of the thought and the terminology used are both derived from the Cartesian philosophy, the intellectual milieu of the time, the early work enables us, better than the Ethics to realize that the inspiration and starting-point of his thinking is to be found in the religious speculations of his Jewish predecessors.

    0
    0
  • It was apparently intended by the author as an analytical introduction to the constructive exposition of his system, which he presently essayed in the Ethics.

    0
    0
  • Spinoza meanwhile concentrated his attention upon the Ethics, and we learn from the correspondence with his Amsterdam friends that a considerable part of book i.

    0
    0
  • The first years at Voorburg continued to be occupied by the composition of the Ethics, which was probably finished,.

    0
    0
  • In 1675 we learn from his correspondence that he entertained the idea of publishing the Ethics, and made a journey to Amsterdam to arrange matters with the printer.

    0
    0
  • - The contents of the Opera posthuma included the Ethics, the Tractatus politicos and the De intellectus emendatione (the last two unfinished), a selection from Spinoza's correspondence, and a Compendium of Hebrew Grammar.

    0
    0
  • Elwes, appeared in 1883, and translations of the Ethics and the De intellectus emendatione were published in 1883 and 1895 by W.

    0
    0
  • Joachim's Study of the Ethics of Spinoza (1901) and R.

    0
    0
  • Both Roman Catholic and Protestant authorities agree that the expression was connected with the new habit of distinguishing dogmatics from Christian ethics or moral theology, though A.

    0
    0
  • Accordingly his ethics also were thoroughly dualistic. By the " works of the Demiurge," which the Christian is to flee, he meant the whole " service of the perishable."

    0
    0
  • In his ethics, as in his theology, Butler had constantly in view a' certain class of adversaries, consisting partly of the philosophic few, partly of the fashionably educated many, who all participated in one common mode of thinking.

    0
    0
  • Cudworth and Clarke had tried to place ethics on a nobler footing, but their speculations were too abstract for Butler and not sufficiently "applicable to the several particular relations and circumstances1 of life."

    0
    0
  • Ultimately, this view of nature, as the sphere of the realization of final causes, rests on a theological basis; but Butler does not introduce prominently into his ethics the specifically theological groundwork, and may be thought willing to ground his principle on experience.

    0
    0
  • Every one, he seems to think, knows what virtue is, and a philosophy of ethics is complete if it can be shown that such a course of action harmonizes with human nature.

    0
    0
  • It has received very small consideration at the hands of German historians of ethics.

    0
    0
  • His De Conscientia, ejus Jure et Casibus (1632), an attempt to bring Christian ethics into clear relation with particular cases of conduct and of conscience, was a new thing in Protestantism.

    0
    0
  • Nevertheless, in some departments of theory, too, and notably in ethics and jurisprudence, Stoicism has dominated the thought of after ages to a degree not easy to exaggerate.

    0
    0
  • Reading the Ephesian doctrine with the eyes of a Cynic, and the Cynic ethics in the light of Heracliteanism, he came to formulate his distinctive theory of the universe far in advance of either.

    0
    0
  • If the recognition of physics and logic as two studies coordinate with ethics is sufficient to differentiate the mature Zeno from the Cynic author of the Republic, no less than from his own heterodox disciple Aristo, the Cleanthes.

    0
    0
  • It was left for Cleanthes to discover this motive cause in a conception familiar to Zeno, as to the Cynics before him, but restricted to the region of ethics - the conception of tension or effort.

    0
    0
  • Herein lies the key to the entire system of the Stoics, as Cleanthes's epoch-making discovery continually received fresh applications to physics, ethics and epistemology.

    0
    0
  • So absolutely is the " rare and priceless wisdom " for which we strive identical with virtue itself that the three main divisions of philosophy current at the time and accepted by Zeno - logic, physics and ethics - are defined as the most generic or comprehensive virtues.

    0
    0
  • Accordingly Aristo, holding to Cynicism when Zeno himself had got beyond it, rejected two of these parts of philosophy as useless and out of reach - a divergence which excluded him from the school, but strictly consistent with his view that ethics alone is scientific knowledge.

    0
    0
  • Of the three divisions logic is the least important; ethics is the outcome of the whole, and historically the all-important vital element; but the foundations of the whole system are best discerned in the science of nature, which deals pre-eminently with the macrocosm and the microcosm, the universe and man, including natural theology and an anthropology or psychology, the latter forming the direct introduction to ethics.

    0
    0
  • A critical account of it will be found in the article Ethics.

    0
    0
  • The result of this theory of ethics is of great value as emphasizing the importance of a systematic view of conduct, but it fails to resolve satisfactorily the great Socratic paradox that evil is the result of ignorance.

    0
    0
  • For even though they attempt to substantiate the idea of responsibility by maintaining that ignorance is voluntary, they cannot find any answer to the question whether some men may not be without the capacity to choose learning (but see Ethics: Stoics).

    0
    0
  • The special objects of attack were the Stoic theory of knowledge, their theology and their ethics.

    0
    0
  • It is clear that the activity of these teachers was chiefly directed to ethics: they elaborated fresh definitions of the chief good, designed either to make yet clearer the sense of the formulas of Chrysippus or else to meet the more urgent objections of the New Academy.

    0
    0
  • He wrote only upon ethics, where historical knowledge would be of use.

    0
    0
  • But in ethics his innovations were more suggestive and fertile.

    0
    0
  • Books of direction were written by Sextius in Greek (as afterwards by Seneca in Latin), almost the only Roman who had the ambition to found a sect, though in ethics he mainly followed Stoicism.

    0
    0
  • In ethics, if there is no novelty of doctrine, there is a surprising change in the mode of its application.

    0
    0
  • Other peculiarities of the later Stoic ethics are due to the condition of the times.

    0
    0
  • His philosophy, however, is yet more concentrated upon practice than Seneca's, and in ethics.

    0
    0
  • With him even the " physical basis " of ethics takes the form of a religious dogma - the providence of God and the perfection of the world.

    0
    0
  • His ethics, too, have a religious character.

    0
    0
  • Founding ethics on the native and cultivable capacity in men to appreciate worth in men and actions, and, like the ancient Greek thinkers whom he followed, associating the apprehension of morality with the apprehension of beauty, he makes morality wholly independent of scriptural enactment, and still more, of theological forecasting of future bliss or agony.

    0
    0
  • He composed, it is said, nearly 500 treatises on various subjects, including logic, ethics and grammar.

    0
    0
  • Ethics.

    0
    0
  • True happiness consists in taking advantage of what one has and being content with it (see Ethics).

    0
    0
  • In 1832 he returned to Tubingen and became repetent in the university, lecturing on logic, history of philosophy, Plato, and history of ethics, with great success.

    0
    0
  • at Cairo, 1893; the Bidayat ulHidaya (Bulaq, 1870, and often at Cairo); a compendium of ethics, Mizan ul-`Amal, translated into Hebrew, ed.

    0
    0
  • Goldenthal (Paris, 1839); a more popular treatise on ethics, the Kimiya us-Sa'ada, published at Lucknow, Bombay and Constantinople, ed.

    0
    0
  • Beginning with metaphysics and ethics and passing on to mathematics, he turned to chemistry at the end of 17 9 7, and within a few months of reading Nicholson's and Lavoisier's treatises on that science had produced a new theory of light and heat.

    0
    0
  • In ethics, egoistic doctrines disregard the ultimate problems of selfhood, and assume the self to consist of a man's person and those things in which he is or ought to be directly interested.

    0
    0
  • A practical theory of ethics seeks to establish a particular moral ideal; if it is an absolute criterion, then the altruist would place first the attainment of that ideal by others, while the egoist would seek it for himself.

    0
    0
  • As a matter of fact, however, egoism has been no less prominent in intuitional ethics.

    0
    0
  • Thus Christian ethics may be said to insist equally on duty to self and duty to others, while crudely egoistic systems become unworkable if a man renders himself obnoxious to his fellows.

    0
    0
  • The first group includes his Exponabilia (1503), his commentary on Petrus Hispanus (1505-1506), his Inclitarum artium libri (1506, &c.), his commentary on Joannes Dorp (1504, &c.), his Insolubilia (1516, &c.), his introduction to Aristotle's logic (1521, &c.), his commentary on the ethics (1530), and, chief of all, his commentary on Peter Lombard's Sentences (1509, &c.); the second consists of a commentary on Matthew (1518) and another on the Four Gospels (1529); the last is represented by his famous Historia Majoris Britanniae tam Angliae quam Scotiae J.

    0
    0
  • The same turn for detail is observable in his ethics, where, to judge from the imperfect evidence of the Characters, he elaborated still farther Aristotle's portraiture of the virtues See Gellius, Noct.

    0
    0
  • The Eudemian Ethics (which, with the possible exception of the three books common to this treatise and the Nicomachean Ethics, there need be no.

    0
    0
  • he translated the Ethics, Politics and Economics of Aristotle.

    0
    0
  • In ethics, again, the revolt against absolute standards limits us to the relative, and morals are investigated on the basis of history, as largely conditioned by economic environment and the growth of intellectual freedom.

    0
    0
  • Whatever the titles of his discourses, "Literary Ethics," "Man the Reformer," "The Present Age," "The Method of Nature," "Representative Men," "The Conduct of Life," their theme was always the same, namely, "the infinitude of the private man."

    0
    0
  • While the gospel is pre-eminently the divine gift of "wisdom," "wisdom" is not personified, but conceived primarily as a system of humanitarian ethics, i.

    0
    0
  • Perhaps it may be accounted for by the order of the compend of Christian ethics the writer was following.

    0
    0
  • Ethics or moral science treats of man's duty or rules of conduct toward his fellow-men.

    0
    0
  • Outside of his dialectic, it was in ethics that Abelard showed greatest activity of philosophical thought; laying very particular stress upon the subjective intention as determining, if not the moral character, at least the moral value, of human action.

    0
    0
  • The Dissertation on the Nature of True Virtue, posthumously published, is justly regarded as one of the most original works on ethics of the 18th century, and is the more remarkable as reproducing, with no essential modification, ideas on the subject written in the author's youth in the notes on the Mind.

    0
    0
  • Logic, ethics and physics, psychology, theory of knowledge and metaphysics are all fused together by Plato in a semi-religious synthesis.

    0
    0
  • To this correspond the Platonic confusion of logic and ethics and the attempt to substitute a theory of concepts for a metaphysic of reality.

    0
    0
  • He became the founder of logic, psychology, ethics and aesthetics as separate sciences; while he prefixed to all such (comparatively) special inquiries the investigation of the ultimate nature of existence as such, or of those first principles which are common to, and presupposed in, every narrower field of knowledge.

    0
    0
  • Subsidiary to metaphysics, as the central inquiry, stand the sciences of logic and ethics, to which may be added aesthetics, constituting three normative sciences - sciences, that is, which do not, primarily, describe facts, but rather prescribe ends or set forth ideals.

    0
    0
  • It is evident, however, that if logic deals with conceptions which may be considered constitutive of knowledge as such, and if ethics deals with the harmonious realization of human life, which is the highest known form of existence, both sciences must have a great deal of weight in the settling of the general question of metaphysics.

    0
    0
  • This is not unnatural, seeing that it is only so far as they bear on the one central question of the nature of existence that philosophy spreads its mantle over psychology, logic or ethics.

    0
    0
  • Similarly, logic, so far as it is an art of thought or a doctrine of fallacies, and ethics, so far as it is occupied with a natural history of impulses and moral sentiments, do neither of them belong, except by courtesy, to the philosophic province.

    0
    0
  • Of ethics (q.v.) it may also be said that many of the topics commonly embraced under that title are not strictly philosophical in their nature.

    0
    0
  • If we exclude such questions in the interest of systematic correctness, and seek to determine for ethics a definite subject-matter, the science may be said to fall into two departments.

    0
    0
  • The second of these departments is really the proper subject-matter of ethics considered as a separate science; but it is often conspicuous by its absence from ethical treatises.

    0
    0
  • It is only under the head of casuistry that ethics has been much cultivated as a separate science.

    0
    0
  • The first department of ethics, on the other hand, is the branch of the subject in virtue of which ethics forms part of philosophy.

    0
    0
  • As described above, it ought rather to be called, in Kant's phrase, the metaphysic of ethics.

    0
    0
  • The connexion of ethics with metaphysics will be patent as a matter of fact, if it be remembered how Plato's philosophy is summed up in the idea of the good, and how Aristotle also employs the essentially ethical notion of end as the ultimate category by which the universe may be explained or reduced to unity.

    0
    0
  • In Plato and Aristotle ethics and politics are indissolubly connected.

    0
    0
  • The difficulty already hinted at, which individualistic systems of ethics experience in connecting particular duties with the abstract principle of duty is a proof of the failure of their method.

    0
    0
  • afvth6cs), though it cannot attain to truth, may, nevertheless, in virtue of a certain acquired tact, frame " definitions " (Xoyoe), (c) In regard to his theory of ethics: (7) he denied that pleasure was a good, but seemingly was not prepared to account it an evil.

    0
    0
  • In his writings, which were numerous, he seems to have covered nearly the whole of the Academic programme; but metaphysics and ethics were the subjects which principally engaged his thoughts.

    0
    0
  • Valuing philosophy chiefly for its influence upon conduct, Xenocrates bestowed especial attention upon ethics.

    0
    0
  • Meagre as these statements are, they suffice to show that in ethics, as elsewhere, Xenocrates worked upon Platonic lines.

    0
    0
  • It rises in the realm of physical speculation, passes over into the territory of ethics and theology, and makes its way through at least three well-defined stages.

    0
    0
  • of Macedon (1789), rather a panegyric than a critical history; translations of Aristotle's Rhetoric (1823) and Ethics and Politics (1786-1797); of the Orations of Lysias and Isocrates (1778); and History of the World from Alexander to Augustus (1807), which, although deficient in style, was commended for its learning and research.

    0
    0
  • In this work Jacob ben Asher codified Rabbinic law on ethics and ritual, and it remained a standard work of reference until it was edited with a commentary by Joseph Qaro, who afterwards simplified the code into the more popular Shulhan Aruch.

    0
    0
  • Maha-vira treated ethics as corollary and subordinate to his metaphysics, with which he was chiefly concerned."

    0
    0
  • Positively, the school build upon foundations laid in ethics by Kant and in philosophy of religion by Schleiermacher; so also R.

    0
    0
  • Danaeus (Daneau), a French Protestant, has the merit of publishing for the first time on Christian Ethics<