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erudition

erudition

erudition Sentence Examples

  • He was a man of erudition, but he owed his fame chiefly to his personality.

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  • The noticeable barrenness of Italian literature at this period is referable to the fact that men of genius and talent devoted themselves to erudition and struggled to express their thoughts and feelings in a speech which was not natural.

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  • Resolute in recognizing erudition as the chief concern of man, he sighed over the folly of popes and princes, who spent their time in wars and ecclesiastical disputes when they might have been more profitably employed in reviving the lost learning of antiquity.

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  • and a subtle erudition, it is not surprising that we get the following definition: the end is to live in contemplation of the reality and order of the universe, promoting it to the best of our power, and never led astray by the irrational part of the soul.

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  • Classical erudition had been adapted to the needs of modern thought.

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  • The contempt of aesthetics and erudition is characteristic of the most typical members of what is known as the Cartesian school, especially Malebranche.

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  • He had strong sense with profound erudition, was one of the best writers of his time and an excellent preacher.

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  • The former, while his erudition in respect to the history of philosophical opinion has rarely been equalled, was not a clear thinker.

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  • In erudition, literary power, and force and versatility of intellect he far surpassed ev2ry contemporary.

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  • His moderation, good sense, wisdom, temper, firmness and erudition made him as successful in this position as he had been when professor of theology, and he speedily surrounded himself with a band of scholarly young men.

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  • Nicholas himself was a man of vast erudition, and his friend Aeneas Silvius (later Pope Pius II.) said of him that "what he does not know is outside the range of human knowledge."

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  • Penetrated by the conviction that ignorance was the worst of the inveterate evils of old Russia, a pitiless enemy of superstition of every sort, a reformer by nature, overflowing with energy and resource, and with a singularly lucid mind armed at all points by a farreaching erudition, Prokopovich was the soul of the reforming party after the death of Peter the Great.

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  • Nor were there wanting men who dedicated their powers to Hebrew and Oriental erudition, laying, together with the Grecians, a basis for those Biblical studies which advanced the Reformation.

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  • His incisive style, his fearless and often ruthless criticism, and his wide and penetrating erudition, make him a redoubtable adversary in the field of polemic. The Bulletin critique, founded by him, for which he wrote numerous articles, has contributed powerfully to spread the principles of the historical method among the French clergy.

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  • His incisive style, his fearless and often ruthless criticism, and his wide and penetrating erudition, make him a redoubtable adversary in the field of polemic. The Bulletin critique, founded by him, for which he wrote numerous articles, has contributed powerfully to spread the principles of the historical method among the French clergy.

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  • Not a little of the laborious erudition of Varro and other ancient scholars has survived in his pages.

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  • Bochart was a man of profound erudition; he possessed a thorough knowledge of the principal Oriental languages, including Hebrew, Syriac, Chaldaic and Arabic; and at an advanced age he wished to learn Ethiopic. He was so absorbed in his favourite study, that he saw Phoenician and nothing but Phoenician in everything, even in Celtic words, and hence the number of chimerical etymologies which swarm in his works.

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  • Greek, Latin and Hebrew erudition soon found itself at home on Teutonic soil.

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  • Bochart was a man of profound erudition; he possessed a thorough knowledge of the principal Oriental languages, including Hebrew, Syriac, Chaldaic and Arabic; and at an advanced age he wished to learn Ethiopic. He was so absorbed in his favourite study, that he saw Phoenician and nothing but Phoenician in everything, even in Celtic words, and hence the number of chimerical etymologies which swarm in his works.

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  • Bayle's erudition, despite the low estimate placed upon it by Leclerc, seems to have been very considerable.

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  • The bibliography of Voltaire is a very large subject, and it has been the special occupation of a Rumanian diplomatist of much erudition and judgment, Georges Bengesco, Bibliographic de Voltaire (4 vols., Paris, 1882-90).

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  • But how is intelligence, as opposed to erudition, possible?

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  • The Landrecht, a work of vast labour and erudition, combines the two systems of German and Roman law supplemented by the law of nature; it was the first German code, but only came into force in 1794, after Frederick's death.

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  • His knowledge of the ancient authors was wide, but his taste was not select, and his erudition was superficial.

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  • Schlozer's activity was enormous, and he exercised great influence by his lectures as well as by his books, bringing historical study into touch with political science generally, and using his vast erudition in an attempt to solve practical questions in the state and in society.

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  • His extensive and exact legal erudition, and the skill with which he argued the intricate libel case of Lord Cromwell (4 Rep. 13), and the celebrated real property case of Shelley (1 Rep. 94, 104), soon brought him a practice never before equalled, and caused him to be universally recognized as the greatest lawyer of his day.

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  • Lambertini (Pope Benedict XIV.), De servorum Dei beatificatione et beatorum canonizatione (Bologna, 1 7341738), several times reprinted, and more remarkable for erudition and knowledge of canon law than for historical criticism; Al.

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  • His knowledge of the ancient authors was wide, but his taste was not select, and his erudition was superficial.

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  • This is the reassertion of a principle which the middle ages had lost sight of - that knowledge, if it is to have any value, must be intelligence, and not erudition.

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  • These numbers are valuable as an exhibition not so much of events as of the feelings of the Parisian people; they are adorned, moreover, by the erudition, the wit and the genius of the author, but they are disfigured, not only by the most biting personalities and the defence and even advocacy of the excesses of the mob, but by the entire absence of the forgiveness and pity for which the writer was afterwards so eloquently to plead.

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  • As a philosopher, he can advance no claim to originality, his laborious treatise on Platonic theology being little better than a mass of ill-digested erudition.

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  • To him Damasus entrusted the revision of the Latin text of the Bible and other works of religious erudition.

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  • It presented in an attractive style what were then the latest results of scholarly research, but was criticized as wanting in erudition.

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  • He turns away contemptuously from the mere curiosities of literature, and is never tempted to make a display of trivial erudition.

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  • The French Th i s period is marked by a many-sided erudition period.

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  • What is true in this remark lies partly in the fact that scholarship in Aldo's days had flown beyond the Alps, where a new growth of erudition, on a basis different.

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  • His heart was in the work of Heeren, easily the greatest of historical critics then living, and the forerunner of the modern school; it was from this master that Bancroft caught his enthusiasm for minute pains-taking erudition.

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  • His commentaries are of permanent value, not only because of the author's originality, but also because of his erudition.

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  • He was the author of a number of Biblical commentaries (no longer extant), which are said to have been characterized by great erudition.

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  • He was a scholar of much erudition, with great power of administrative organization, simple, generous and kindly in character.

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  • Its touch on classical mythology is original, rarely imitative or pedantic. The art of the Renaissance was an apocalypse of the beauty of the world and man in unaffected spontaneity, without side thoughts for piety or erudition, inspired by pure delight in loveliness and harmony for their own sakes.

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  • The lack of printed books in the first period of the Revival, and the comparative rarity of Greek erudition among students, combined with the intense enthusiasm aroused for the new gospel of the classics, gave special value to the personal teaching of these professors.

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  • His incommensurable and indescribable masterpiece of mingled humour, wisdom, satire, erudition, indecency, profundity, levity, imagination, realism, reflects the whole age in its mirror of hyperAristophanic farce.

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  • This became the centre of fashion as well as of erudition in the southern capital, and subsisted long after its founder's death.

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  • The example of Stoicism, as Cudworth points out, shows that corporealism may be theistic. Into the history of atomism Cudworth plunges with vast erudition.

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  • But he accompanied this with numerous other books, chiefly of erudition, such as the Vico, the Mdmoires de Luther ecrits par lui-meme, the Origines du droit franQ21s, and somewhat later the Proces des templiers.

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  • Such Cynic crudity Chrysippus rightly judged to be out of keeping with the requirements of a great dogmatic school, and he laboured on all sides after thoroughness, erudition and scientific completeness.

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  • The principal feature of Klaproth's erudition was the vastness of the field which it embraced.

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  • This singular romance is diversified by, or, to speak more properly, it is the vehicle of the most bewildering abundance of digression, burlesque amplification, covert satire on things political, social and religious, miscellaneous erudition of the literary and scientific kind.

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  • Whether Pope had really understood the tendency of his own work has always been doubtful, but there is no question that he was glad of an apologist, and that Warburton's jeu d'esprit in the long run did more for his fortunes than all his erudition.

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  • His claim to greatness rests upon his vast erudition and his sound judgment.

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  • Without attempting a complete list of Petrarch's works, it may be well to illustrate the extent of his erudition and his activity as a writer by a brief enumeration of the most important.

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  • This work, though never completed, was extended through many volumes, bespeaking an inexhaustible energy and a vast erudition.

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  • Editio princeps (Milan, 1475); Casaubon (1603) showed great critical ability in his notes, but for want of a good MS. left the restoration of the text to Salmasius (1620), whose notes are a most remarkable monument of erudition, combined with acuteness in verbal criticism and general vigour of intellect.

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  • But gradually he devoted less of his time to practice and more to lecturing in the Harvard Law School, to editing court reports and to contributions to law journals, especially on historical and biographical lines, in which his erudition was unsurpassed.

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  • Many of his speeches were monuments of erudition, but the wealth of detail, of allusion, and of quotation, often from the Greek and Latin, sometimes detracted from their effect.

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  • The erudition of Calmet's exegetical writings won him a reputation that was not confined to the Roman Catholic Church, but they have failed to stand the test of modern scholarship. The most noteworthy are: - Commentaire de la Bible (Paris, 23 vols.,1707-1716), and Dictionnaire historique, geographique, critique, chronologique et litteral de la Bible (Paris, 2 vols., 1720).

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  • His inaugural lecture on "The Study of History," afterwards published with notes displaying a vast erudition, made a great impression in the university, and the new professor's influence on historical study was felt in many important directions.

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  • There is but little attempt to give any dramatic character to the dialogue; in each book some one of the personages takes the leading part, and the remarks of the others serve only as occasions for calling forth fresh displays of erudition.

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  • The author develops the Platonic theory of pre-existence, and shows that true education consists not in mere erudition, but rather in the formation of character.

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  • Rabbinic erudition could not forget the repression of vicious desires in the tenth commandment, the stress laid in Deuteronomy on the necessity of service to God, or the inculcation by later prophets of humility and faith.

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  • In that year appeared also the first volume of Bishop Finn Jonsson's Historia Ecclesiastica Islandiae, a work of high value and much erudition, containing not only ecclesiastical but civil and literary history, illustrated by a well-chosen mass of documents, 870-1740.

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  • The students of the university he taught in daily lectures, passing in review the weightiest and lightest authors of antiquity, and pouring forth a flood of miscellaneous erudition.

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  • His erudition was large but ill-digested; his knowledge of the ancient authors, if extensive, was superficial; his style was vulgar; he had no brilliancy of imagination, no pungency of epigram, no grandeur of rhetoric. Therefore he has left nothing to posterity which the world would not very willingly let die.

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  • "By protracted vigils," says Beza, "he secured indeed a solid erudition and an excellent memory; but it is probable he at the same time sowed the seeds of that disease (dyspepsia) which occasioned him various illnesses in after life, and at last brought upon him premature death."

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  • Their staple consists of Byzantine erudition; and their value depends chiefly on what they have preserved of older criticism.

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  • A scholar and a man of considerable erudition, he showed a strong preference for historical studies; and about the time when he was preferred to the deanery he began to collect materials for the history of his own times.

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  • Frazer's ideas are to be found in a work of immense erudition, The Golden Bough (London, 1900).

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  • His extraordinary general erudition, and the skill and success with which he sought to revive the study of the old Greek physicians, gained him a great reputation, and ultimately the office of physician to the court.

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  • 18), who speaks of him as a wonder of erudition.

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  • Mabillon produced in all some twenty folio volumes and as many of lesser size, nearly all works of monumental erudition (the chief are named in the article Maurists).

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  • draughtys read more widely than I ever suspected and her erudition saved several trips to drafty library halls.

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  • erudition of the author.

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  • He possessed great erudition and piety, and was eminent as a writer.

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  • This short book covers a lot of ground, displaying formidable erudition and intellectual agility.

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  • Naomi Baron certainly thinks there is, and she brings considerable erudition from what seems to be an Eng.

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  • I liked the distinctive approach of the KTP, combining academic erudition with business related skills.

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  • How has this rather profound erudition impacted both on your own poetry and your skills as a translator and editor?

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  • A massive work of great erudition, some 1100 other works being referred to in the text.

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  • These were no mechanical, clerical tasks; each element of Scott's work required considerable erudition.

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  • The title Vidyasagar, meaning " Ocean of Learning ", was given him in recognition of his vast erudition.

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  • He was a man whose unassuming character belied his extraordinary erudition and unfailing kindness.

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  • The rigid distinction among science and history of science is based on the idea of the latter as pure literary erudition.

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  • He loved to participate in hair-splitting theological discussions and by the measure of his own erudition, he proceeded to gage Sri Ramakrishna.

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  • The review aims to include historiography, erudition, philosophies of history, methodologies of historical research and didactics of history.

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  • The book covers the background to the case with great erudition but avoids tedium and dry recitation of facts.

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  • These were delivered in his renowned style with erudition, punctuated by a disarming slight stutter.

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  • His diverse experience, combined with his exuberant personality, erudition and often trenchant views make him a compelling and entertaining speaker.

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  • The contempt of aesthetics and erudition is characteristic of the most typical members of what is known as the Cartesian school, especially Malebranche.

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  • Thus Descartes is a type of that spirit of science to which erudition and all the heritage of the past seem but elegant trifling.

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  • This is the reassertion of a principle which the middle ages had lost sight of - that knowledge, if it is to have any value, must be intelligence, and not erudition.

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  • But how is intelligence, as opposed to erudition, possible?

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  • He described him as "a companionable, brilliant soul, with piercing eyes, the body of an Aesop - a man of keen insight, exquisite taste and wide erudition.

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  • He was a man of erudition, but he owed his fame chiefly to his personality.

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  • During the period between 1540 and 1543 the archbishop was engaged at the head of a commission in the revision of the " Bishop's Book " (1537) or Institutions of a Christian Man, and the preparation of the Necessary Erudition (1543) known as the " King's Book," which was a modification of the former work in the direction of Roman Catholic doctrine.

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  • His moderation, good sense, wisdom, temper, firmness and erudition made him as successful in this position as he had been when professor of theology, and he speedily surrounded himself with a band of scholarly young men.

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  • These numbers are valuable as an exhibition not so much of events as of the feelings of the Parisian people; they are adorned, moreover, by the erudition, the wit and the genius of the author, but they are disfigured, not only by the most biting personalities and the defence and even advocacy of the excesses of the mob, but by the entire absence of the forgiveness and pity for which the writer was afterwards so eloquently to plead.

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  • Gesner brought an amount of erudition, hitherto unequalled, to bear upon his subject; and, making due allowance for the times in which he wrote, his judgment must in most respects be deemed excellent.

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  • It is sufficient here to remark that the author, even then a man of great erudition, must have been aware of the turn which taxonomy was taking; but, not being able to divest himself of the older notion that external characters were superior to those furnished by the study of internal structure, and that Comparative Anatomy, instead of being a part of zoology, was something distinct from it, he seems to have endeavoured to form a scheme which, while not running wholly counter to the teachings of Comparative Anatomists, should yet rest ostensibly on external characters.

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  • Resolute in recognizing erudition as the chief concern of man, he sighed over the folly of popes and princes, who spent their time in wars and ecclesiastical disputes when they might have been more profitably employed in reviving the lost learning of antiquity.

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  • As a philosopher, he can advance no claim to originality, his laborious treatise on Platonic theology being little better than a mass of ill-digested erudition.

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  • Bayle's erudition, despite the low estimate placed upon it by Leclerc, seems to have been very considerable.

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  • Schlozer's activity was enormous, and he exercised great influence by his lectures as well as by his books, bringing historical study into touch with political science generally, and using his vast erudition in an attempt to solve practical questions in the state and in society.

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  • He was a good palaeographer, and excelled in textual criticism, in examination of authorship, and other such matters, while his vast erudition and retentive memory made him second to none in interpretation and exposition.

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  • To him Damasus entrusted the revision of the Latin text of the Bible and other works of religious erudition.

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  • In 1894 he published his Manuel de diplomatique, a monument of lucid and wellarranged erudition, which contained the fruits of his long experience of archives, original documents and textual criticism; and his pupils, especially those at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes,.

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  • The bibliography of Voltaire is a very large subject, and it has been the special occupation of a Rumanian diplomatist of much erudition and judgment, Georges Bengesco, Bibliographic de Voltaire (4 vols., Paris, 1882-90).

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  • It presented in an attractive style what were then the latest results of scholarly research, but was criticized as wanting in erudition.

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  • The latters magnum opus, Kojikiden (Exposition of the Record of Ancient Matters), declared by Chamberlain to be perhaps the most admirable work of which Japanese erudition can boast, consists of 44 large volumes, devoted to elucidating the Kojiki and resuscitating the ShintO cult as it existed in the earliest days.

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  • The newspapers sacrificed theiraudience to their erudition and preferred classicism to circulation.

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  • Krug, was distinguished for its erudition, and came out down to 1831.

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  • The writings of Cassiodorus evince great erudition, ingenuity and labour, but are disfigured by incorrectness and an affected artificiality, and his Latin partakes much of the corruptions of the age.

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  • He turns away contemptuously from the mere curiosities of literature, and is never tempted to make a display of trivial erudition.

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  • In fact, allusions to the necessary studies of a gentleman meet us constantly, reminding us of the unlikely erudition of the schoolboy in Macaulay.

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  • The king's ardent desire that diversities of minds and opinions should be done away with and unity be " charitably established " was further promoted by publishing in 1543 A Necessary Doctrine and Erudition for any Christian Man, set forth by the King's Majesty of England, in which the tenets of medieval theology, except for denial of the supremacy of the bishop of Rome and the unmistakable assertion of the supremacy of the king, were once more restated.

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  • In these lectures Duchesne touches cleverly upon the most delicate problems, and, without any elaborate display of erudition, presents conclusions of which account must be taken.

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  • These books show marvellous erudition; but some of the judgments expressed in them are warped by prejudice; they are diffuse in style and overloaded with computations.

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  • Their erudition was, however, marred by speculative extravagances.

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  • One of his lost works is the principal source of the erudition of Isidore of Seville (d.

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  • The French Th i s period is marked by a many-sided erudition period.

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  • In the 17th century the erudition of France is best represented by "Henricus Valesius," Du Cange and Mabillon.

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  • These contributions to the literature of Shakespeare are full of curious matter, but on the whole display a great waste of erudition, in seeking to show that papers which had been proved forgeries might nevertheless have been genuine.

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  • Bokhara has for ages been looked upon as the centre of Mussulman erudition in central Asia.

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  • A brilliant examination for the degree of bachelor procured him, in 1588, admittance on the foundation to the university of Tubingen, where he laid up a copious store of classical erudition, and imbibed Copernican principles from the private instructions of his teacher and life-long friend, Michael Maestlin.

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  • Not a little of the laborious erudition of Varro and other ancient scholars has survived in his pages.

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  • Gregory XI., though equally distinguished for his erudition and pure morals, his piety, modesty and wisdom, was fated to Gregory Xl., pay dearly for the weakness of his predecessor in 1370-1378.

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  • He was endowed with a certain scholastic erudition, and enjoyed the reputation of being a good Latinist.

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  • He is best known as the editor of the Archives et correspondence de la maison d'Orange (12 vols., 1835-1845), a great work of patient erudition, which procured for him the title of the "Dutch Gachard."

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  • (2) An application from the editor of the Encyclopaedia Britannica - who might, 1 suppose, as in Macaulay's time, almost command the services of the most eminent scholars and historians of the country - to me, a mere poet, proposing that I should contribute to that great repository of erudition the biography of Mary Queen of Scots.

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  • To his modesty Bossuet bears witness, when he told him to stand up sometimes, and not be always on his knees before a critic. Gibbon vouches for his learning, when (in the 47th chapter) he speaks of "this incomparable guide, whose bigotry is overbalanced by the merits of erudition, diligence, veracity and scrupulous minuteness."

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  • Whatever the students of this century may think of his scholarship, they must allow that only vast erudition and thorough familiarity with the Greek language could have enabled him to accomplish what he did.

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  • Four treatises from his pen on Roman antiquities deserve to be commemorated for their erudition no less than for the elegance of their Latinity.

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  • What is true in this remark lies partly in the fact that scholarship in Aldo's days had flown beyond the Alps, where a new growth of erudition, on a basis different.

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  • His extensive and exact legal erudition, and the skill with which he argued the intricate libel case of Lord Cromwell (4 Rep. 13), and the celebrated real property case of Shelley (1 Rep. 94, 104), soon brought him a practice never before equalled, and caused him to be universally recognized as the greatest lawyer of his day.

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  • His heart was in the work of Heeren, easily the greatest of historical critics then living, and the forerunner of the modern school; it was from this master that Bancroft caught his enthusiasm for minute pains-taking erudition.

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  • His commentaries are of permanent value, not only because of the author's originality, but also because of his erudition.

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  • Lambertini (Pope Benedict XIV.), De servorum Dei beatificatione et beatorum canonizatione (Bologna, 1 7341738), several times reprinted, and more remarkable for erudition and knowledge of canon law than for historical criticism; Al.

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  • Nicholas himself was a man of vast erudition, and his friend Aeneas Silvius (later Pope Pius II.) said of him that "what he does not know is outside the range of human knowledge."

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  • The Landrecht, a work of vast labour and erudition, combines the two systems of German and Roman law supplemented by the law of nature; it was the first German code, but only came into force in 1794, after Frederick's death.

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  • Penetrated by the conviction that ignorance was the worst of the inveterate evils of old Russia, a pitiless enemy of superstition of every sort, a reformer by nature, overflowing with energy and resource, and with a singularly lucid mind armed at all points by a farreaching erudition, Prokopovich was the soul of the reforming party after the death of Peter the Great.

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  • Erudition would be tested by the power of writing, at leisure, a dissertation on some subject selected by the examiners or the candidate or, in the case of a teacher, by the delivery of a lecture on the subject.

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  • He was the author of a number of Biblical commentaries (no longer extant), which are said to have been characterized by great erudition.

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  • The former, while his erudition in respect to the history of philosophical opinion has rarely been equalled, was not a clear thinker.

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  • He had strong sense with profound erudition, was one of the best writers of his time and an excellent preacher.

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  • He was a scholar of much erudition, with great power of administrative organization, simple, generous and kindly in character.

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  • Lastly, the Jansenist " hermitage " a.t Port Royal contributed the historian Tillemont, whose bigotry Edward Gibbon declares to be overbalanced by his erudition, veracity and scrupulous minuteness.

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  • Nor were there wanting men who dedicated their powers to Hebrew and Oriental erudition, laying, together with the Grecians, a basis for those Biblical studies which advanced the Reformation.

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  • The noticeable barrenness of Italian literature at this period is referable to the fact that men of genius and talent devoted themselves to erudition and struggled to express their thoughts and feelings in a speech which was not natural.

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  • Its touch on classical mythology is original, rarely imitative or pedantic. The art of the Renaissance was an apocalypse of the beauty of the world and man in unaffected spontaneity, without side thoughts for piety or erudition, inspired by pure delight in loveliness and harmony for their own sakes.

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  • A similar criticism, conducted less on lines of erudition than of persiflage and irony, ransacked the moral abuses of the church and played around the very foundations of Christianity.

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  • One mass of Greek and Roman erudition, including history and metaphysics, law and science, civic institutions and the art of war, mythology and magistracies, metrical systems and oratory, agriculture and astronomy, domestic manners and religious rites, grammar and philology, biography and numismatics, formed the miscellaneous subject-matter of this so-styled rhetoric. Notes taken at these lectures supplied young scholars with hints for further exploration; and a certain tradition of treating antique authors for the display of general learning, as well as for the elucidation of their texts, came into vogue, which has determined the method of scholarship for the last three centuries in Europe.

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  • The lack of printed books in the first period of the Revival, and the comparative rarity of Greek erudition among students, combined with the intense enthusiasm aroused for the new gospel of the classics, gave special value to the personal teaching of these professors.

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  • Greek, Latin and Hebrew erudition soon found itself at home on Teutonic soil.

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  • His incommensurable and indescribable masterpiece of mingled humour, wisdom, satire, erudition, indecency, profundity, levity, imagination, realism, reflects the whole age in its mirror of hyperAristophanic farce.

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  • Classical erudition had been adapted to the needs of modern thought.

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  • This became the centre of fashion as well as of erudition in the southern capital, and subsisted long after its founder's death.

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  • The example of Stoicism, as Cudworth points out, shows that corporealism may be theistic. Into the history of atomism Cudworth plunges with vast erudition.

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  • In erudition, literary power, and force and versatility of intellect he far surpassed ev2ry contemporary.

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  • Small and slight in person and never robust in health, Robertson Smith was yet a man of ceaseless and fiery energy; of an intellect extraordinarily alert and quick, and as sagacious in practical matters as it was keen and piercing in speculation; of an erudition astonishing both in its range and in its readiness; of a temper susceptible of the highest enthusiasm for worthy ends, and able to inspire others with its own ardour; endowed with the warmest affections, and with the kindest and most generous disposition, but impatient of stupidity and ready to blaze out at whatever savoured of wrong and injustice.

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  • But he accompanied this with numerous other books, chiefly of erudition, such as the Vico, the Mdmoires de Luther ecrits par lui-meme, the Origines du droit franQ21s, and somewhat later the Proces des templiers.

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  • Such Cynic crudity Chrysippus rightly judged to be out of keeping with the requirements of a great dogmatic school, and he laboured on all sides after thoroughness, erudition and scientific completeness.

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  • and a subtle erudition, it is not surprising that we get the following definition: the end is to live in contemplation of the reality and order of the universe, promoting it to the best of our power, and never led astray by the irrational part of the soul.

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  • The principal feature of Klaproth's erudition was the vastness of the field which it embraced.

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  • This singular romance is diversified by, or, to speak more properly, it is the vehicle of the most bewildering abundance of digression, burlesque amplification, covert satire on things political, social and religious, miscellaneous erudition of the literary and scientific kind.

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  • Whether Pope had really understood the tendency of his own work has always been doubtful, but there is no question that he was glad of an apologist, and that Warburton's jeu d'esprit in the long run did more for his fortunes than all his erudition.

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  • His claim to greatness rests upon his vast erudition and his sound judgment.

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  • Without attempting a complete list of Petrarch's works, it may be well to illustrate the extent of his erudition and his activity as a writer by a brief enumeration of the most important.

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  • This work, though never completed, was extended through many volumes, bespeaking an inexhaustible energy and a vast erudition.

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  • Editio princeps (Milan, 1475); Casaubon (1603) showed great critical ability in his notes, but for want of a good MS. left the restoration of the text to Salmasius (1620), whose notes are a most remarkable monument of erudition, combined with acuteness in verbal criticism and general vigour of intellect.

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  • But gradually he devoted less of his time to practice and more to lecturing in the Harvard Law School, to editing court reports and to contributions to law journals, especially on historical and biographical lines, in which his erudition was unsurpassed.

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  • Many of his speeches were monuments of erudition, but the wealth of detail, of allusion, and of quotation, often from the Greek and Latin, sometimes detracted from their effect.

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  • The erudition of Calmet's exegetical writings won him a reputation that was not confined to the Roman Catholic Church, but they have failed to stand the test of modern scholarship. The most noteworthy are: - Commentaire de la Bible (Paris, 23 vols.,1707-1716), and Dictionnaire historique, geographique, critique, chronologique et litteral de la Bible (Paris, 2 vols., 1720).

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  • His inaugural lecture on "The Study of History," afterwards published with notes displaying a vast erudition, made a great impression in the university, and the new professor's influence on historical study was felt in many important directions.

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  • There is but little attempt to give any dramatic character to the dialogue; in each book some one of the personages takes the leading part, and the remarks of the others serve only as occasions for calling forth fresh displays of erudition.

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  • The author develops the Platonic theory of pre-existence, and shows that true education consists not in mere erudition, but rather in the formation of character.

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  • Rabbinic erudition could not forget the repression of vicious desires in the tenth commandment, the stress laid in Deuteronomy on the necessity of service to God, or the inculcation by later prophets of humility and faith.

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  • In that year appeared also the first volume of Bishop Finn Jonsson's Historia Ecclesiastica Islandiae, a work of high value and much erudition, containing not only ecclesiastical but civil and literary history, illustrated by a well-chosen mass of documents, 870-1740.

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  • The students of the university he taught in daily lectures, passing in review the weightiest and lightest authors of antiquity, and pouring forth a flood of miscellaneous erudition.

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  • His erudition was large but ill-digested; his knowledge of the ancient authors, if extensive, was superficial; his style was vulgar; he had no brilliancy of imagination, no pungency of epigram, no grandeur of rhetoric. Therefore he has left nothing to posterity which the world would not very willingly let die.

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  • "By protracted vigils," says Beza, "he secured indeed a solid erudition and an excellent memory; but it is probable he at the same time sowed the seeds of that disease (dyspepsia) which occasioned him various illnesses in after life, and at last brought upon him premature death."

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  • Their staple consists of Byzantine erudition; and their value depends chiefly on what they have preserved of older criticism.

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  • A scholar and a man of considerable erudition, he showed a strong preference for historical studies; and about the time when he was preferred to the deanery he began to collect materials for the history of his own times.

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  • Frazer's ideas are to be found in a work of immense erudition, The Golden Bough (London, 1900).

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  • His extraordinary general erudition, and the skill and success with which he sought to revive the study of the old Greek physicians, gained him a great reputation, and ultimately the office of physician to the court.

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  • 18), who speaks of him as a wonder of erudition.

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  • Mabillon produced in all some twenty folio volumes and as many of lesser size, nearly all works of monumental erudition (the chief are named in the article Maurists).

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  • The book covers the background to the case with great erudition but avoids tedium and dry recitation of facts.

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  • These were delivered in his renowned style with erudition, punctuated by a disarming slight stutter.

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  • His diverse experience, combined with his exuberant personality, erudition and often trenchant views make him a compelling and entertaining speaker.

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  • At the very least, these areas of poetic education will provide a student with a lifetime's worth of cultural references that will enrich his conversation with erudition and elegance.

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  • Gesner brought an amount of erudition, hitherto unequalled, to bear upon his subject; and, making due allowance for the times in which he wrote, his judgment must in most respects be deemed excellent.

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  • He was a good palaeographer, and excelled in textual criticism, in examination of authorship, and other such matters, while his vast erudition and retentive memory made him second to none in interpretation and exposition.

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  • The latters magnum opus, Kojikiden (Exposition of the Record of Ancient Matters), declared by Chamberlain to be perhaps the most admirable work of which Japanese erudition can boast, consists of 44 large volumes, devoted to elucidating the Kojiki and resuscitating the ShintO cult as it existed in the earliest days.

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  • The writings of Cassiodorus evince great erudition, ingenuity and labour, but are disfigured by incorrectness and an affected artificiality, and his Latin partakes much of the corruptions of the age.

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  • In fact, allusions to the necessary studies of a gentleman meet us constantly, reminding us of the unlikely erudition of the schoolboy in Macaulay.

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  • The king's ardent desire that diversities of minds and opinions should be done away with and unity be " charitably established " was further promoted by publishing in 1543 A Necessary Doctrine and Erudition for any Christian Man, set forth by the King's Majesty of England, in which the tenets of medieval theology, except for denial of the supremacy of the bishop of Rome and the unmistakable assertion of the supremacy of the king, were once more restated.

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  • In these lectures Duchesne touches cleverly upon the most delicate problems, and, without any elaborate display of erudition, presents conclusions of which account must be taken.

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  • In the 17th century the erudition of France is best represented by "Henricus Valesius," Du Cange and Mabillon.

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  • Bokhara has for ages been looked upon as the centre of Mussulman erudition in central Asia.

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  • A brilliant examination for the degree of bachelor procured him, in 1588, admittance on the foundation to the university of Tubingen, where he laid up a copious store of classical erudition, and imbibed Copernican principles from the private instructions of his teacher and life-long friend, Michael Maestlin.

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  • He was endowed with a certain scholastic erudition, and enjoyed the reputation of being a good Latinist.

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  • He is best known as the editor of the Archives et correspondence de la maison d'Orange (12 vols., 1835-1845), a great work of patient erudition, which procured for him the title of the "Dutch Gachard."

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  • (2) An application from the editor of the Encyclopaedia Britannica - who might, 1 suppose, as in Macaulay's time, almost command the services of the most eminent scholars and historians of the country - to me, a mere poet, proposing that I should contribute to that great repository of erudition the biography of Mary Queen of Scots.

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  • Whatever the students of this century may think of his scholarship, they must allow that only vast erudition and thorough familiarity with the Greek language could have enabled him to accomplish what he did.

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  • Four treatises from his pen on Roman antiquities deserve to be commemorated for their erudition no less than for the elegance of their Latinity.

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  • Erudition would be tested by the power of writing, at leisure, a dissertation on some subject selected by the examiners or the candidate or, in the case of a teacher, by the delivery of a lecture on the subject.

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  • One mass of Greek and Roman erudition, including history and metaphysics, law and science, civic institutions and the art of war, mythology and magistracies, metrical systems and oratory, agriculture and astronomy, domestic manners and religious rites, grammar and philology, biography and numismatics, formed the miscellaneous subject-matter of this so-styled rhetoric. Notes taken at these lectures supplied young scholars with hints for further exploration; and a certain tradition of treating antique authors for the display of general learning, as well as for the elucidation of their texts, came into vogue, which has determined the method of scholarship for the last three centuries in Europe.

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  • Their erudition was, however, marred by speculative extravagances.

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  • These contributions to the literature of Shakespeare are full of curious matter, but on the whole display a great waste of erudition, in seeking to show that papers which had been proved forgeries might nevertheless have been genuine.

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  • The newspapers sacrificed theiraudience to their erudition and preferred classicism to circulation.

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  • Krug, was distinguished for its erudition, and came out down to 1831.

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