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equus

equus Sentence Examples

  • The zebra (Equus grevyi) is found in Ogaden and places to the south, the wild ass in the northern regions.

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  • C, Horse (Equus caballus), X s.

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  • Among the titles of his tragedies are Aegisthus, Lycurgus, Andromache or Hector Proficiscens, Equus Trojanus, the last named being performed at the opening of Pompey's theatre (55).

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  • admixture of Mongolian species, such as Canis corsac, Felis manul, Spermophilus dauricus, the jerboa (Dipus jaculus), two hamsters (Cricetus songarus and C. furunculus), three new voles (Arvicolae), the Tolai hare, Ogotona hare (Lagomys ogotona), Aegocerus argali, Antilope gutturosa and Equus hemionus (jighitai).

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  • EQUITES (" horsemen" or "knights," from equus, " horse"), in Roman history, originally a division of the army, but subsequently a distinct political order, which under the empire resumed its military character.

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  • The right of bestowing the equus publicus was vested in the emperor; once given, it was for life, and was only forfeitable through degradation for some offence or the loss of the equestrian fortune.

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  • A few elephants, giraffes and zebras (equus burchelli - the true zebra is extinct) are still found in the north and north-eastern districts and in the same regions lions and leopards survive in fair numbers.

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  • p. 45) as having branch roads to Equus Tuticus and Potentia, and Kiepert's maps annexed to the volume, do not agree with one another.

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  • This series of feet represents the evolutionary succession from the Eocene Hypohippus (I) to the modern Equus (6) seen in front and in side view.

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  • Equus Modern caballus.

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  • Equus, Pleistocene and recent.

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  • The reindeer now occurs only as a fossil; the sable, mentioned in the annals, has migrated eastwards; the wild horse, described by the annals as intermediate between the horse and the ass - probably similar to the Equus przewalskii of central Asia - is reputed to have been met with in the 13th century in the basin of the Warta, and two centuries later in the forests of Lithuania.

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  • The wild ass, Gorkhar of Persia (Equus onager), is frequent on the sandy tracts in the south-west.

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  • The wild ass (Equus hemionus) is confined to the sandy deserts of Sind and Cutch, where, from its speed and timidity, Wild ass.

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  • The latter species (Equus zebra) inhabits the mountainous regions of the Cape Colony, where, owing to the advances of civilized man into its restricted range it has become very scarce, and is even threatened with extermination, but it exists in the form of a local race in Angola.

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  • The second species, Burchell's zebra (Equus burchelli), is represented by a large number of local races, ranging from the plains north of the Orange river to north-east Africa.

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  • Equus zebra is the smaller of the two (about 4 ft.

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  • Typically, Burchell's zebra, or the bonte-quagga (Equus burchelli), is a rather larger and more robust animal, with FIG.

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  • - The True or Mountain Zebra (Equus zebra).

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  • Among other remarkable discoveries were those of the wild camel, ancestor of the domesticated species, and of the early type of horse, now known by his name (Equus prjewalskii).

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  • 744 - which seems to connect it with the locative of aequum " a plain," so that it would mean "dwellers in the plain"; but in the historical period they certainly lived mainly in the hills), we should know whether they were to be grouped with the q or the p dialects, that is to say, with Latin on the one hand, which preserved an original q, or with the dialect of Velitrae, commonly called Volscian (and the Volsci were the constant allies of the Aequi), on the other hand, in which, as in the Iguvine and Samnite dialects, an original q is changed into p. There is no decisive evidence to show whether the q in Latin aequus represents an Indo-European q as in Latin quis, Umbro-Volsc. pis, or an Indo-European k + u as in equus, Umb.

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  • Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus.

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  • ross), a name properly restricted to the domesticated horse (Equus caballus) and its wild or halfwild representatives, but in a zoological sense used as a general term for all the members of the family Equidae.

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  • - The horse (Equus caballus) is distinguished from the others by the long hairs of the tail being more abundant and growing quite or nearly from the base as well as the end and sides, and also by possessing a small bare callosity on the inner side of the hind leg, just below the "hock" or heel joint, in addition to the one on the inner side of the fore-arm above the carpus or " knee," common to all the genus.

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  • The kiang has also larger and more horse-like hoofs, and the tail is haired higher up, thus approximating to Equus caballus przewalskii.

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  • Among the striped species, or zebras and quaggas of Africa, the large Grevy's zebra (Equus grevyi) of Somaliland and Abyssinia stands apart from the rest by the number and narrowness of its stripes, which have an altogether peculiar arrangement on the hind-quarters, the small size of the callosities on the fore-legs, the mane extending on to the withers and enormous rounded ears, thickly haired internally.

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  • Salensky, " On Equus przewalskii," Mein.

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  • equus, Gr.

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  • The controversy depends upon the consideration of a wealth of detail, which should be studied in Ridgeway's book; but zoological authorities are sceptical as to the suggested species, Equus caballus libycus.

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  • The Normans brought with them their own word haquenee, or hacquenee, a French derivative from the Latin equus, a horse, whence the name hackney.

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  • All the existing members of the family, such as the domesticated horse (Equus caballus) and its wild or half-wild relatives, the asses and the zebras, are included in the typical genus.

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  • sivalensis), occurs in the Lower Pliocene, and may have been the ancestor of the Arab stock, which shows traces of the depression in front of the orbit characteristic of the earlier forms. In North America species of Equus occur in the Pleistocene and from that continent others reached South America during the same epoch.

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  • e, Equus (Pleistocene).

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  • If this be so, we have the development of a monodactyle foot in this genus independently of Equus.

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  • The vertebrae are simpler in structure than in Equus.

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  • The titles of his tragedies - Achilles, Aegisthus, Equus Trojanus, Hermione, Tereus - are all suggestive of subjects which were treated by the later tragic poets of Rome.

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  • The zebra (Equus grevyi) is found in Ogaden and places to the south, the wild ass in the northern regions.

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  • C, Horse (Equus caballus), X s.

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  • Among the titles of his tragedies are Aegisthus, Lycurgus, Andromache or Hector Proficiscens, Equus Trojanus, the last named being performed at the opening of Pompey's theatre (55).

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  • admixture of Mongolian species, such as Canis corsac, Felis manul, Spermophilus dauricus, the jerboa (Dipus jaculus), two hamsters (Cricetus songarus and C. furunculus), three new voles (Arvicolae), the Tolai hare, Ogotona hare (Lagomys ogotona), Aegocerus argali, Antilope gutturosa and Equus hemionus (jighitai).

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  • EQUITES (" horsemen" or "knights," from equus, " horse"), in Roman history, originally a division of the army, but subsequently a distinct political order, which under the empire resumed its military character.

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  • The right of bestowing the equus publicus was vested in the emperor; once given, it was for life, and was only forfeitable through degradation for some offence or the loss of the equestrian fortune.

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  • Genera: Equus, Hippopotamus, Sus, Rhinoceros.

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  • A few elephants, giraffes and zebras (equus burchelli - the true zebra is extinct) are still found in the north and north-eastern districts and in the same regions lions and leopards survive in fair numbers.

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  • p. 45) as having branch roads to Equus Tuticus and Potentia, and Kiepert's maps annexed to the volume, do not agree with one another.

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  • The Quaternary period includes an older stage containing fragments of fossils from the underlying formations; a later stage containing the bones of Hippopotamus, Elephas, Rhinoceros, Camelus, Equus; and finally the vast accumulations of sand which began to be formed in prehistoric times.

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  • This series of feet represents the evolutionary succession from the Eocene Hypohippus (I) to the modern Equus (6) seen in front and in side view.

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  • Equus Modern caballus.

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  • Equus, Pleistocene and recent.

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  • The evolution consists first in progressive increase in size; second, in the acceleration of the median digit and retardation of the lateral digits, the latter becoming more and more elevated from the ground until finally in Equus (6) they are the lateral splints, which in the embryonic condition have vestigial cartilages attached representing the last traces of the lateral phalanges.

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  • QUAGGA, or Couagga, an animal of the genus Equus (see Horse), nearly allied to Burchell's zebra, formerly met with in vast herds on the great plains of South Africa between the Cape Colony and the Vaal river, but now completely extinct.

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  • The crest is very high, surmounted by a standing mane, banded The Quagga (Equus quagga).

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  • The reindeer now occurs only as a fossil; the sable, mentioned in the annals, has migrated eastwards; the wild horse, described by the annals as intermediate between the horse and the ass - probably similar to the Equus przewalskii of central Asia - is reputed to have been met with in the 13th century in the basin of the Warta, and two centuries later in the forests of Lithuania.

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  • The wild ass, Gorkhar of Persia (Equus onager), is frequent on the sandy tracts in the south-west.

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  • The wild ass (Equus hemionus) is confined to the sandy deserts of Sind and Cutch, where, from its speed and timidity, Wild ass.

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  • The latter species (Equus zebra) inhabits the mountainous regions of the Cape Colony, where, owing to the advances of civilized man into its restricted range it has become very scarce, and is even threatened with extermination, but it exists in the form of a local race in Angola.

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  • The second species, Burchell's zebra (Equus burchelli), is represented by a large number of local races, ranging from the plains north of the Orange river to north-east Africa.

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  • Equus zebra is the smaller of the two (about 4 ft.

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  • Typically, Burchell's zebra, or the bonte-quagga (Equus burchelli), is a rather larger and more robust animal, with FIG.

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  • - The True or Mountain Zebra (Equus zebra).

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  • Among other remarkable discoveries were those of the wild camel, ancestor of the domesticated species, and of the early type of horse, now known by his name (Equus prjewalskii).

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  • 744 - which seems to connect it with the locative of aequum " a plain," so that it would mean "dwellers in the plain"; but in the historical period they certainly lived mainly in the hills), we should know whether they were to be grouped with the q or the p dialects, that is to say, with Latin on the one hand, which preserved an original q, or with the dialect of Velitrae, commonly called Volscian (and the Volsci were the constant allies of the Aequi), on the other hand, in which, as in the Iguvine and Samnite dialects, an original q is changed into p. There is no decisive evidence to show whether the q in Latin aequus represents an Indo-European q as in Latin quis, Umbro-Volsc. pis, or an Indo-European k + u as in equus, Umb.

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  • Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus.

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    0
  • ross), a name properly restricted to the domesticated horse (Equus caballus) and its wild or halfwild representatives, but in a zoological sense used as a general term for all the members of the family Equidae.

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  • - The horse (Equus caballus) is distinguished from the others by the long hairs of the tail being more abundant and growing quite or nearly from the base as well as the end and sides, and also by possessing a small bare callosity on the inner side of the hind leg, just below the "hock" or heel joint, in addition to the one on the inner side of the fore-arm above the carpus or " knee," common to all the genus.

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  • (I) The northern, or dun type, represented by the dun ponies of Norway (Equus caballus typicus), the closely allied Celtic pony (E.

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  • The first and largest has two races, the chigetai (Equus hemionus) of Mongolia, and the kiang (E.

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  • The kiang has also larger and more horse-like hoofs, and the tail is haired higher up, thus approximating to Equus caballus przewalskii.

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  • Among the striped species, or zebras and quaggas of Africa, the large Grevy's zebra (Equus grevyi) of Somaliland and Abyssinia stands apart from the rest by the number and narrowness of its stripes, which have an altogether peculiar arrangement on the hind-quarters, the small size of the callosities on the fore-legs, the mane extending on to the withers and enormous rounded ears, thickly haired internally.

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  • Salensky, " On Equus przewalskii," Mein.

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  • equus, Gr.

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  • The controversy depends upon the consideration of a wealth of detail, which should be studied in Ridgeway's book; but zoological authorities are sceptical as to the suggested species, Equus caballus libycus.

    0
    0
  • The Normans brought with them their own word haquenee, or hacquenee, a French derivative from the Latin equus, a horse, whence the name hackney.

    0
    0
  • All the existing members of the family, such as the domesticated horse (Equus caballus) and its wild or half-wild relatives, the asses and the zebras, are included in the typical genus.

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    0
  • sivalensis), occurs in the Lower Pliocene, and may have been the ancestor of the Arab stock, which shows traces of the depression in front of the orbit characteristic of the earlier forms. In North America species of Equus occur in the Pleistocene and from that continent others reached South America during the same epoch.

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  • e, Equus (Pleistocene).

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  • If this be so, we have the development of a monodactyle foot in this genus independently of Equus.

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  • The vertebrae are simpler in structure than in Equus.

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  • In February 2007, Daniel Radcliffe starred in the play Equus, playing stable boy Alan Strang.

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