Equal sentence examples

equal
  • She is quite equal to Marya Antonovna.

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  • His kiss was ardent and she returned it with equal passion.

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  • "My pleasure," she responded with equal sincerity.

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  • Only this was equal to a hundred thunderstorms.

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  • "You've said quite enough for one evening," she answered with equal composure.

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  • For simplicity, he assumes I + and I_ each equal 0.25 X106 electrostatic units.

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  • She nodded with equal sincerity.

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  • Lisa waited for his reply in tense silence, but his response filled her with equal anger and pain.

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  • I pointed this out to everybody with provoking persistency, but no one seemed equal to the task of providing the doll with eyes.

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  • He accepted it with equal caution.

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  • Now, madam, these triangles are equal; please note that the angle ABC...

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  • She'd never be able to trust someone with everything or find her equal the way Damian and Dusty had found theirs.

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  • Tammy hurled herself across the room into his arms and started lavishing him with kisses and hugs that he returned with equal enthusiasm.

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  • He would perhaps have placed alder branches over the narrow holes in the ice, which were four or five rods apart and an equal distance from the shore, and having fastened the end of the line to a stick to prevent its being pulled through, have passed the slack line over a twig of the alder, a foot or more above the ice, and tied a dry oak leaf to it, which, being pulled down, would show when he had a bite.

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  • Alex had already set aside a trust fund for both Jonathan and Destiny, and Carmen was listed as an equal partner in everything.

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  • Let me see you equal the sorcery I am about to perform.

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  • Boris was now a rich man who had risen to high honors and no longer sought patronage but stood on an equal footing with the highest of those of his own age.

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  • "I love you too," Yancey mimicked with equal enthusiasm, and kissed her on the cheek.

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  • Falafel, black bean burgers and tempeh share equal ranking on the menu with chicken wings, locally raised beef and salmon.

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  • The life insurance World Wide provided its employees was equal to one year's pay, hardly enough to leave a rich widow.

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  • Prince Bagration and Tushin looked with equal intentness at Bolkonski, who spoke with suppressed agitation.

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  • He cannot endure the notion that Buonaparte is negotiating on equal terms with all the sovereigns of Europe and particularly with our own, the grandson of the Great Catherine!

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  • Alex drove his white Dodge truck home and she followed him in her new white Buick Le Sabre feeling equal amounts of joy and guilt.

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  • They are close to being equal, with the exception that Jonny is a teenager and can't control his power yet.

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  • These natural philosophers suggested that equal volumes of all gaseous substances must contain, at the same temperature and pressure, the same number of molecules.

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  • According to one story, Archimedes was puzzled till one day, as he was stepping into a bath and observed the water running over, it occurred to him that the excess of bulk occasioned by the introduction of alloy could be measured by putting the crown and an equal weight of gold separately into a vessel filled with water, and observing the difference of overflow.

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  • "Memon has shifted another handful of men to the north, but nothing to equal what we were told," he said, reading with a frown.

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  • While Jefferson's "all men are created equal" statement was not meant by him to include slaves, we have broadened the application of the principle and should continue to do so.

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  • Hippolyte spluttered again, and amid his laughter said, And you were saying that the Russian ladies are not equal to the French?

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  • Apparently, evil is equal opportunity.

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  • The quality, and presentation of the dishes are equal to restaurants that charge twice the price.

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  • He returned her kiss with equal passion, pulling away only when they both were short of breath.

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  • Natalie pushed at Matthew, struggling to find equal place in mama's arms.

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  • If the faces be all equal equilateral triangles the solid is termed the "regular" tetrahedron.

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  • She met his regard with equal composer, in spite of the fact that the conversation was beginning to make her feel extremely uncomfortable.

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  • Her arms were crossed, and though she smiled at Lon, Sofia could see her level of comfort was equal to hers among the giants that towered even above a supermodel.

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  • Many of the bikers knew one another and there were groups traveling together, but there was equal representation of couples and solo bikers.

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  • Sometimes, a night in the underworld was equal to seconds in the mortal world, sometimes a night and sometimes, a few nights.

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  • The men watched the silent battle in equal silence, their assessing looks warning her they were looking for something.

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  • Maybe he felt she had equal rights to the money he had accumulated before they were married, but she didn't — especially not now.

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  • If nothing else, it would put them on equal ground.

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  • The retreat of the British force gave Chauncey time to complete this vessel, the "General Pike," which was so far superior to anything under Yeo's command that she was said to be equal in effective strength to the whole of the British flotilla.

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  • The results obtained from equal weights of rain and snow seem of the same order.

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  • Tikhon with equal accuracy would split logs with blows at arm's length, or holding the head of the ax would cut thin little pegs or carve spoons.

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  • He was one of those people who came instantly wide awake and fell asleep with equal speed.

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  • Yully, the third woman who would become her sister, was just as unique with a heart equal to that of any of the women.

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  • He doubted it to be true - -a queen intent on mating with her equal would say what she needed to in order to convince a slave not to wed her.

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  • porreus, is pervaded with a garlic flavour to an equal extent with the last.

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  • The distance between the centres of the two spectrographs shall be equal to the distance between the optical axes of the two viewing microscopes.

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  • After the first year or so of elementary work she met her pupil on equal terms, and they read and enjoyed good books together.

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  • What if an equal ado were made about the ornaments of style in literature, and the architects of our bibles spent as much time about their cornices as the architects of our churches do?

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  • The one that might one day consider him an equal worth trusting with her heart.

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  • But besides this, even if, admitting the remaining minimum of freedom to equal zero, we assumed in some given case--as for instance in that of a dying man, an unborn babe, or an idiot--complete absence of freedom, by so doing we should destroy the very conception of man in the case we are examining, for as soon as there is no freedom there is also no man.

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  • The one hundred and twenty-five dollars annually subscribed for a Lyceum in the winter is better spent than any other equal sum raised in the town.

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  • Yet a single glass of its water held up to the light is as colorless as an equal quantity of air.

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  • It struck him as a surprise that Alexander treated Bonaparte as an equal and that the latter was quite at ease with the Tsar, as if such relations with an Emperor were an everyday matter to him.

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  • He was armed with a musketoon (which he carried rather as a joke), a pike and an ax, which latter he used as a wolf uses its teeth, with equal ease picking fleas out of its fur or crunching thick bones.

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  • The historian evidently decomposes Alexander's power into the components: Talleyrand, Chateaubriand, and the rest--but the sum of the components, that is, the interactions of Chateaubriand, Talleyrand, Madame de Stael, and the others, evidently does not equal the resultant, namely the phenomenon of millions of Frenchmen submitting to the Bourbons.

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  • Cynthia, who'd followed the men to the door, was the first to smother the young girl in hugs and kisses, and an ample dose of tears with the others joining in with equal enthusiasm.

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  • To the former he owes his appreciation of exact investigation and a complete knowledge of the aims of science, to the latter an equal admiration for the great circle of ideas which had been diffused by the teaching of Fichte, Schelling and Hegel.

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  • The upper and lower margins of the end of the trunk form two nearly equal prehensile lips.

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  • Taking i volt equal 1/300 of an electrostatic unit, we find M =0.000265.

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  • Her wealth made it certain that he would be the richest man in France, and he determined to play a part equal to that of his great-grandfather, the regent, whom he resembled in character and debauchery.

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  • What if equal pains were taken to smooth and polish their manners?

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  • The French losses were almost equal to ours, but very early we said to ourselves that we were losing the battle, and we did lose it.

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  • He took a potato, drew out his clasp knife, cut the potato into two equal halves on the palm of his hand, sprinkled some salt on it from the rag, and handed it to Pierre.

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  • However, I should never have broken a horse or bull and taken him to board for any work he might do for me, for fear I should become a horseman or a herdsman merely; and if society seems to be the gainer by so doing, are we certain that what is one man's gain is not another's loss, and that the stable-boy has equal cause with his master to be satisfied?

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  • Every morning was a cheerful invitation to make my life of equal simplicity, and I may say innocence, with Nature herself.

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  • Partly because of the depressing memories associated with Bald Hills, partly because Prince Andrew did not always feel equal to bearing with his father's peculiarities, and partly because he needed solitude, Prince Andrew made use of Bogucharovo, began building and spent most of his time there.

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  • If a man has faith, he will co-operate with equal faith everywhere; if he has not faith, he will continue to live like the rest of the world, whatever company he is joined to.

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  • To find component forces equal to the composite or resultant force, the sum of the components must equal the resultant.

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  • My intelligence and resourcefulness is without equal.

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  • In the course of three days, the goddess had almost learned to see him as an equal while her human side no longer in denial about her destiny.

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  • Thrilled, she realized he'd just granted her something he'd never given anyone else: the position as his equal.

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  • But this beautiful edifice was not my destination nor were its inhabitants my social equal.

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  • He treated her as an equal, a partner in a relationship with a wild god, one who respected her enough to let her decide.

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  • Let him find out the hard way that his daughter had finally found a man who was her father's equal.

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  • The Two Minima Occur, The One From 5 To 7 A.M., The Other From 7 To 8 P.M.; They Are Nearly Equal.

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  • This is at least of the order observed, which is all that can be expected from a calculation which assumes I + and I_ equal.

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  • 22, 23) gives them equal rights with the homeborn.

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  • Any line cuts off equal distances between the curve and the asymptotes.

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  • Many who followed the study of vegetable structure did not at that time give an equal prominence to this view.

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  • per hour, is equal to 58.6 ft.

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  • In 1796, on the refusal of Washington to accept another election, Adams was chosen president, defeating Thomas Jefferson; though Alexander Hamilton and other Federalists had asked that an equal vote should be cast for Adams and Thomas Pinckney, the other Federalist in the contest, partly in order that Jefferson, who was elected vice-president, might be excluded altogether, and partly, it seems, in the hope that Pinckney should in fact receive more votes than Adams, and thus, in accordance with the system then obtaining, be elected president, though he was intended for the second place on the Federalist ticket.

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  • The play of the beam is limited by a stop S and a screw R, the latter being so adjusted that when the end Y of the beam is held down the two air-gaps are of equal width.

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  • Again, it is quite certain that the spiritual matters upon which concordats bear do not concern the two powers in the same manner and in the same degree; and in this sense concordats are not perfectly equal agreements.

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  • But with these reservations it must unhesitatingly be said that concordats are bilateral or synallagmatic contracts, from which results an equal mutual obligation for the two parties, who enter into a juridical engagement towards each other.

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  • AMICABLE NUMBERS, two numbers so related that the sum of the factors of the one is equal to the other, unity being considered as a factor.

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  • The industries are equal in importance to the transit trade, and embrace metalworking, ironfounding and machine building, the manufacture of electric plant, celluloid, automobiles, furniture, cables and chemicals, sugar refining, cigar and tobacco making, and brewing.

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  • In 1831, from a study of the specific heats of compounds, he formulated "Neumann's law," which expressed in modern language runs: "The molecular heat of a compound is equal to the sum of the atomic heats of its constituents."

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  • The proceeds were invested in such a way at Paris as to bring him in a yearly income of between 6000 and 7000 francs (equal now to more than L500).

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  • No theologian save Augustine has had an equal influence on the theological thought and language of the Western Church, a fact which was strongly emphasized by Leo XIII.

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  • north of Bagdad, rejoined it below Kut-elAmara, an equal distance to the south.

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  • But the day showed the ' B attle of Macedonian army equal to the task.

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  • What was remarkable in this organ was that it had one stop which was an equal minor third lower, a' 411.4'.

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  • granted to the Bohemian Protestants, in 1609, the "Majestatsbrief," or patent of equal rights, the revocation of which helped to precipitate the Thirty Years' War.

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  • If the asymptotes be perpendicular, or, in other words, the principal axes be equal, the curve is called the rectangular hyperbola.

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  • The geometry of the rectangular hyperbola is simplified by the fact that its principal axes are equal.

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  • These are ecclesiastically of equal rank, though differentiated, according to their duties, as ministers who preach and administer the sacraments, and as elders who are associated with the ministers in the oversight of the people.

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  • Only thus could a plurality of rulers of equal rank act in an efficient and orderly way.

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  • elders or bishops, are the highest permanent officers in the Church and are of equal rank; (3) that an outward and visible Church is one in the sense that a smaller part is controlled by a larger and all the parts by the whole.'9 Though Presbyterians are unanimous in adopting the general system of church polity as here outlined, and in claiming New 1 Phil.

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  • It is consistent with this view to argue the absolute parity of ministers and elders, conceding to all presbyters" equal right to teach, to rule, to administer the sacraments, to take part in the ordination of ministers, and to preside in church courts."The practice of the Presbyterian churches of the present day is in accord with the first-named theory.

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  • In 1789 all citizens were made equal before the law, and the position of Presbyterianism improved till 1791.

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  • Rosas met the allies at the head of a body of troops fully equal in numbers to their own, but was crushingly routed, February 3rd, at Monte Caseros, about io m.

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  • A constituent congress, in which each province had equal representation, was duly gress had (May 1, 1853) appointed Urquiza president of the confederation, and he established the seat of government at Parana.

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  • To secure election a candidate must at the first voting poll an absolute majority and a number of votes equal to one-fourth of the number of electors.

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  • They are composed of employers and workmen in equal numbers and are established by decree of the council of state, advised by the minister of justice.

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  • From the receveur is demanded a security equal to five times his total income.

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  • The colonial representatives enjoy equal rights with those elected for constituencies in France.

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  • The electoral districts so formed are expected to be equal in proportion to the number of inhabitants; but this method has led to much abuse in the past, through the making of unequal districts for partisan purposes.

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  • Their length is nearly equal to that of the longest pair of the ordinary form hitherto recorded, while the tip-to-tip interval is nearly double that of any other known specimen.

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  • Among the public edifices are the capitol, which occupies a whole square, the university, of nearly equal size, the cathedral, pantheon, masonic temple (built by the state in the spendthrift days of Guzman Blanco), national library, opera-house, and a number of large churches.

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  • The upper incisors are nearly equal and vertical, with the first slightly longer, narrower, and separated from the rest.

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  • Fore-feet with five toes, all having strong pointed, compressed claws, the second, third and fourth nearly equal, the fifth somewhat and the first considerably shorter.

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  • Fore feet with two or three of the middle toes of nearly equal size, and provided with strong, sharp, slightly curved claws, the other toes rudimentary.

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  • Hind feet with one or two phalanges, in the first toe forming a distinct tubercle visible externally; the second and third toes very slender, of equal length, joined as far From Gould.

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  • Fore feet with the functional toes reduced to two, the second and third, of equal length, with closely united metacarpals and short, sharp, slightly curved, compressed claws.

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  • Hind-feet with a very short nailless first toe, the second, third and fourth toes partially united by integument, of nearly equal length, the fifth distinct and rather shorter; all four with long and curved nails.

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  • Boron fluoride also combines with ammonia gas, equal volumes of the two gases giving a white crystalline solid of composition BF 3 NH 3 i with excess of ammonia gas, colourless liquids BF 3.2NH 3 and BF 3.3NH 3 are produced, which on heating lose ammonia and are converted into the solid form.

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  • This is equal to 1 m.

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  • For the period of thirty years during which the mine was worked the production of ore amounted to 234,648 tons, equal to 51,622 tons of copper, valued at £4,749,924.

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  • Several companies are devoting all their energies to zinc extraction, and the output is now equal to about 5% of the world's production.

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  • per inhabitant, from indirect taxation £2: 4: 6, and the total revenue from all sources £35,699,782, equal to £8: 16: 2 per inhabitant.

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  • The federal government has no public debt, but each of the six states has contracted debts which aggregate £237,000,000, equal to about £58, 8s.

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  • Physically the typical Australian is the equal of the average European in height, but is inferior in muscular development,.

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  • When that system was abolished, the social conditions of New South Wales, Victoria, and South Australia became more equal.

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  • Such was the growth of infant Victoria in five years; that of Adelaide or South Australia, in the same period, was nearly equal to it.

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  • The constitution was accepted by Victoria, South Australia and Tasmania by popular acclamation, but in New South Wales very great opposition was shown, the main points of objection being the financial provisions, equal representation in the Senate, and the difficulty in the way of the larger states securing an amendment of the constitution in the event of a conflict with the smaller states.

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  • In him Orange was to find an adversary who was not only a great general but a statesman of insight and ability equal to his own.

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  • Railway transportation is supplied to Vermont by parallel lines crossing diagonally every part of the state at about equal intervals and running in general in a N.W.

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  • The powers of the two houses are equal except that revenue measures must originate in the House of Representatives.

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  • The censors, being elected on a general ticket, were always more progressive than the convention, which was chosen on the principle of equal township representation.

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  • The county is situated mostly in the basin of the Erne, which divides the county into two nearly equal sections.

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  • The wood is hard, heavy and of fine grain, quite equal to the best British oak for indoor use, but of very variable durability where exposed to weather.

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  • humanity, good life, equal and honest dealing with men of different opinion," Cromwell thought, would convert the whole island to Protestantism.

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  • In 17 9 4 the United Irishmen, persuaded that their scheme of universal suffrage and equal electoral districts was not likely to be accepted by any party in the Irish parliament, began to found their hopes on a French invasion.

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  • If the wind blows into the mouth of a tube it causes an increase of pressure inside and also of course an equal increase in all closed vessels with which the mouth is in airtight communication.

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  • Thus if the instrument depends on the pressure or suction effect alone, and this pressure or suction is measured against the air pressure in an ordinary room, in which the doors and windows are carefully closed and a newspaper is then burnt up the chimney, an effect may be produced equal to a wind of io m.

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  • In order to see whether the heat came out of the chips he compared the capacity for heat of the chips abraded by the boring bar with that of an equal quantity of the metal cut from the block by a fine saw, and obtained the same result in the two cases, from which he concluded that "the heat produced could not possibly have been furnished at the expense of the latent heat of the metallic chips."

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  • Rumford then turned up a hollow cylinder which was cast in one piece with a brass six-pounder, and having reduced the connexion between the cylinder and cannon to a narrow neck of metal, he caused a blunt borer to press against the hollow of the cylinder with a force equal to the weight of about ro,000 lb, while the casting was made to rotate in a lathe.

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  • In this experiment a great noise was produced, corresponding to a loss of energy, and Joule endeavoured to determine the amount of energy necessary to produce an equal amount of sound from the string of a violoncello and to apply a corresponding correction.

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  • On repeating the experiment when the two vessels were placed in different calorimeters, it was found that heat was absorbed by the vessel containing the compressed air, while an equal quantity of heat was produced in the calorimeter containing the exhausted vessel.

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  • If the looped lines are both in good condition and free from leakage, the current sent out on line r will be exactly equal to the current received back on line 2; and as these currents will have equal but opposite effects on the galvanometer needle, no deflection of the latter will be produced.

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  • 23, representing the " differential " method, B is the sending battery, B 1 a resistance equal to that of the battery, R a rheostat and C an adjustable condenser.

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  • Now if the values of the rheostat and condenser are adjusted so as to make the rise and fall of the outgoing current through both windings of the relay exactly equal, then no effect is produced on the armature of the relay, as the two currents neutralize each other's magnetizing effect.

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  • Thus for a dash the interval between the positive and the negative current is equal to the time the paper takes to travel over twice the space between two successive holes.

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  • ance coil of some 2000 turns of insulated copper wire, enclosed in a laminated iron circuit, and connected at intervals to a number of terminals so that equal increments of inductance may be obtained.

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  • International service regulations have been drawn up which possess equal authority with the convention and constitute what may be regarded as the law relating to international telegraphy.

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  • At a later date other experimentalists found, however, that an equal thickness of sea-water interposed between a primary and secondary circuit completely prevented similar inductive intercommunication.

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  • If, then, a long copper bar which forms part of this circuit is placed in proximity to the transmitting antenna and the handle moved, some position can be found in which the natural time period of the cymometer circuit is made equal to the actual time period of the telegraphic antenna.

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  • The consonants are for the most part reproduced pretty distinctly, but not the vowels as yet in an equal degree."

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  • Pupin showed that by placing inductance coils in circuit, at distances apart of less than half the length of the shortest component wave to be transmitted, a non-uniform conductor could be made approximately equal to a uniform conductor.

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  • In 1906 there were 30,551, equal to 7.2 per cent., more telephone stations in the United Kingdom than in the ten European countries of Austria, Hungary, Belgium, Denmark, Holland, Italy; Norway, Portugal, Russia, Sweden and Switzerland, having a combined population of 288 millions as against a population of 42 millions in the United Kingdom.

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  • This is the highest point in the northern Apennines, and belongs to a group of summits of nearly equal altitude; the range which is continued thence between Tuscany and what are now known as the Emilian provinces presents a continuous ridge from the mountains at the head of the Val di Mugello (due north of Florence) to the point where they are traversed by the celebrated Furlo Pass.

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  • Hence this part of the country has a cold winter climate, so that while the mean summer temperature of Milan is higher than that of Sassari, and equal to that of Naples, and the extremes reached at Milan and Bologna are a good deal higher than those of Naples, the mean winter temperature of Turin is actually lower than that of Copenhagen.

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  • Products are usually divided in equal proportions between the owner and the tiller.

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  • Taking into account the variations in wages and in the price of wheat, it may be calculated that the number of hours of work requisite to earn a sum equal to the price of a cwt.

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  • Although in some industrial centres the working-class movement has assumed an importance equal to that of other countries, there is no general working-class organization comparable to the English trade unions.

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  • On an equal footing with govern ment schools 6,417 7,208 76&

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  • On an equal footing -..

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  • On an equal footing.

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  • On an equal footing - -.

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  • The Italian sees (exclusive of Rome and of the suburbicarian sees) have a total annual revenue of 206,000 equal to an average of 800 per see.

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  • Parliament consists of two chambers, the senate and the Chamber of Deputies, which are nominally on an equal footing, though practically the elective chamber ~s the more important.

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  • Currency.The lira (plural lire) of 100 centesimi (centimes) is equal in value to the French franc. The total coinage (exclusive of Eritrean currency) from the 1st of January 1862 to the end of 1907 was 1,104,667,116 lire (exclusive of recoinage), divided as follows: gold, 427,516,970 lire; silver, 570,097,025 lire; nickel, 23,417,000 lire; bronze, 83,636,121 lire.

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  • They were in January 1908 equal in value to the metallic currency of gold and silver.

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  • A race was formed strong enough to keep the empire itself in check, strong enough, except for its own internecine contests, to have formed a nation equal to its happier neighbors.

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  • Meanwhile the podest still subsists; but he is no longer equal to the task d maintaining an equilibrium of forces.

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  • In the next year Matteo, being judged incompetent to rule, was assassinated by order of his brothers, who made an equal partition of their subject citiesBernab residing in Milan, Galeazzo in Pavia.

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  • Instead of opposing Francesco Sforza in Milan, he lent him his prestige and influence, foreseeing that the dynastic future of his own family and the pacification of Italy might be secured by a balance of power in which Florence should rank on equal terms with Milan and Naples.

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  • But DAzeglio was not equal to the situation, and he, too, resigned in November 1852; whereupon the king appointed Cavour prime minister, a position which with short intervals he held until his death.

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  • In Bonghis mordant phrase, the foreign policy of Italy during this period may be said to have been characterized by enormous intellectual impotence counterbalanced by equal moral feebleness.

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  • It may be asked, Why can God not create a triangle whose three angles shall not be equal to two right angles?

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  • Many regard Magna Carta as giving equal rights to all Englishmen.

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  • (I) True fission or longitudinal division of an individual into two equal and similar daughter-individuals is not common but occurs in Gastroblasta, where it has been described in detail by Arnold Lang [30].

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  • C. 32) creates yet a new court of first instance for the trial of clerical offences against morality in the shape of a consistory court, which is not the old court of that name, but is to comprehend the chancellor and five assessors (three clergymen and two laymen chosen from a prescribed list), with equal power with the chancellor on questions of fact.

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    0
  • Mill in his Utility of Religion as almost equal in ethical elevation to the Sermon on the Mount.

    0
    0
  • The celebrated Gascoigne's powder, which was sold as late as the middle of the 19th century in the form of balls like sal prunella, consisted of equal parts of crabs' eyes," the black tips of crabs' claws, Oriental pearls, Oriental bezoar and white coral, and was administered in jelly made of hart's horn, but was prescribed by physicians chiefly for wealthy people, as it cost about forty shillings per ounce.

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    0
  • The subject of patent medicines is but little understood by the general public. Any medicine, the composition of which is kept secret, but which is advertised on the label for the cure of diseases, must in Great Britain bear a patent medicine stamp equal to about one-ninth of its face value.

    0
    0
  • These show that a definite intake of carbon dioxide is always accompanied by an exhalation of an equal volume of oxygen.

    0
    0
  • Every plant is constrained to carry Out its functions of germination, growth, nutrition, reproduction, &c., between certain limits of temperature, and somewhere between the extremes of these limits each function finds ao optimum temperature at which the working of the living machinery is at its best, and, other things being equal, any great departure from this may induce pathological conditions; and many disasters are due to the failure to provide such suitable temperaturese.g.

    0
    0
  • As they pass into this position they undergo a longitudinal splitting by which the chromatin in each chromosome becomes divided into equal halves.

    0
    0
  • It is clear, however, that an equal quantitative division and distribution of the chromatin to the daughter cells is brought about; and if, as has been suggested, the chromatin consists of minute particles or units which are the carriers of the hereditary characteristics, the nuclear division also probably results in the equal division and distribution of one half of each of these units to each daughter cell.

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    0
  • Buffon remarked that the same temperature might have been expected, all other circumstances being equal, to produce the same beings in different parts of the globe, both in the animal and vegetable kingdoms. Yet lawns in the United States are destitute of the common English daisy, the wild hyacinth of the woods of the United Kingdom is absent from Germany, and the foxglove from Switzerland.

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    0
  • The Ptolemies in Egypt showed equal anxiety to extend the bounds of geographical knowledge.

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    0
  • The Dutch nation, as soon as it was emancipated from Spanish tyranny, displayed an amount of enterprise, which, for a long time, was fully equal to that of the British.

    0
    0
  • m., the volume of water below sea-level 323,800,000, and the total volume of the water equal to about hth of the volume of the whole globe.

    0
    0
  • Although the apparent crust-waves are neither equal in size nor symmetrical in form, this complementary relationship between them is always discernible.

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    0
  • An elevation of great extent which rises at a very gentle angle from a surrounding depression is termed a " rise," one which is relatively narrow and steep-sided a " ridge," and one which is approximately equal in length and breadth but steep-sided a " plateau," whether it springs direct from a depression or from a rise.

    0
    0
  • A snow-capped mountain ridge or an arid desert forms a barrier between different forms of life which is often more effective than an equal breadth of sea.

    0
    0
  • Density of population is measured by the average number of people residing on a unit of area; but in order to compare one part of the world with another the average should, strictly speaking, be taken for regions of equal size or of equal population; and the portions of the country which are permanently uninhabitable ought to be excluded from the calculation.'

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    0
  • The phosphate thus produced forms an efficacious turnip manure, and is quite equal in value to that produced from any other source.

    0
    0
  • After every deduction it remains true that no contemporary showed equal genius as a colonial statesman, or in this 'department rendered equal service to his country.

    0
    0
  • In young birds both oviducts are almost equal in size, but the right soon degenerates into an insignificant strand.

    0
    0
  • Eight times the mean motion of Venus is so nearly equal to thirteen times that of the earth that the difference amounts to only the 2.

    0
    0
  • This value, although considerably in excess of that previously found by different methods, was held by Airy, from the care and completeness with which the observations were carried out and discussed, to be "entitled to compete with the others on, at least, equal terms."

    0
    0
  • The plebs, like the English commons, contained families differing widely in rank and social position, among them those families which, as soon as an artificial barrier broke down, joined with the patricians to form the new older settlement, a nobility which had once been the whole people, was gradually shorn of all exclusive privilege, and driven to share equal rights with a new people which had grown up around it.

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    0
  • It is customary to ascribe to Offa a policy of limited scope, namely the establishment of Mercia in a position equal to that of Wessex and of Northumbria.

    0
    0
  • This area is divided into nearly two equal parts - one, the Lei river coal-fields, yielding anthracite, and the other the Siang river coal-fields, yielding bituminous coal.

    0
    0
  • The total valuation is then divided into three equal parts, representing three groups of electors very unequal in number, each of which elects an equal number of delegates to the municipal duma.

    0
    0
  • In several university towns there are free teaching establishments for women, supported by subscription, with programmes and examinations equal to those of the universities.

    0
    0
  • But the breeding of horses and sheep is of equal importance with agriculture.

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    0
  • 2 9 public generally, as the tsar's equal in rank and dignity.

    0
    0
  • Napoleon, who could brook no equal, was nourishing the secret hope that his confederate might be used as a docile subordinate in the realization of his own plans, and the confederate soon came to suspect that he was being duped.

    0
    0
  • 5), originated by Joseph Locke in 1837, and first laid on the Grand Junction railway, the two tables were equal.

    0
    0
  • The first efforts at railway legislation were governed by the equal mileage principle; that is, the attempt was made to make rates proportionate to the distance.

    0
    0
  • This rate increases as the distance increases, but not in equal proportion; while the rates from large trade centres to other trade centres at a great distance are not higher than those to intermediate points somewhat less remote; if the law permits, there is a tendency to make them actually a little lower.

    0
    0
  • Its primary purpose was to embody in statutory form the commonlaw principle of equal treatment under like circumstances, and to provide machinery for enforcement.

    0
    0
  • The number killed (811) is equal to about three in every thousand trainmen employed.

    0
    0
  • The number of passengers (36) killed in train accidents in 1907 was equal to o 0759 per million passengers carried and o o024 per million kilometres travelled by passengers, or 0.1503 per million kilometres travelled by trains.

    0
    0
  • Other things being equal, that route is best which will serve the district most conveniently and secure the highest revenue; and the most favourable combination of curves and gradients is that by which the annual cost of conveying the traffic which the line will be called on to carry, added to the annual interest on the capital expended in construction, will be made a minimum.

    0
    0
  • An endeavour is made so to plan the works of a railway that the quantity of earth excavated in cuttings shall be equal to the quantity required for the embankments; but this is not always practicable, and it is sometimes advantageous to obtain the earth from some source close to the embankment rather than incur the expense of hauling it from a distant cutting.

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    0
  • or groups of sidings, equal in length at least to the longest train run on the line, branching out from a single main track and often again converging to a single track at the other end; the precise design,..

    0
    0
  • Thus if R is equal to 10,000 lb when the velocity is 44 ft.

    0
    0
  • Assuming the wheels to roll along the rail without slipping, this couple will be equivalent to the couple formed by the equal opposite and parallel forces, F 1 acting in the direction shown, from the axle-box on to the frame, and F 1 =µ0, acting along the rail.

    0
    0
  • The couple T is necessarily accompanied by an equal and opposite couple acting on the frame, which couple endeavours to turn the frame in the opposite direction to that in which the axle rotates.

    0
    0
  • If there are several driving-axles in a train, the product Tw must be estimated for each separately; then the sum of the products will be equal to RV.

    0
    0
  • Also let l be the length of the stroke in feet and let a be the area of one cylinder in square inches, then, assuming two cylinders of equal size, I.H.P. =2 planl550 (8) The I.H.P. at any instant is equal to the total rate at which energy is required to overcome the tractive resistance R.

    0
    0
  • The sum of all these components of resistance is at any instant equal to the resistance represented by R.

    0
    0
  • per hour, which is equal to 22 ft.

    0
    0
  • 465)/32 = 28,720 ib, and the corresponding horse-power which must be developed in the cylinders is, from (20), f V/550, and this is with f and V equal to the above values, 1149.

    0
    0
  • The value of is variable, but is between 7 and 8, and for approximate calculations may be taken equal to unity.

    0
    0
  • This high mean pressure cannot be maintained for long, because as the speed increases the demand for steam per unit of time increases, so that cut-off must take place earlier and earlier in the stroke, the limiting steady speed being attained when the rate at which steam is supplied to the cylinders is adjusted by the cut-off to be equal to the maximum rate at which the boiler can produce steam, which depends upon the maximum rate at which coal can be burnt per square foot of grate.

    0
    0
  • If h is the water heat at the lower temperature, h l the water heat at the higher temperature, and L the latent heat at the higher temperature, the heat supply per pound of steam is equal to h1 - h2+L1, which, from the steam tables, with the values of the temperatures given, is equal to 1013 B.Th.U.

    0
    0
  • That is to say, the engine actually utilized 61% of the energy which it was possible to utilize by means of a perfect engine working with the same initial pressure against a back pressure equal to;the atmosphere.

    0
    0
  • Thar equal to 148930 foot pounds 4 2.37 cubic feet.

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    0
  • As a general classification the commissioners have divided the schemes that have come before them into three classes: (A) those which like ordinary railways take their own line across country; (B) those in connexion with which it is proposed to use the public roads conjointly with the ordinary road traffic; and (Neutral) which includes inclined railways worked with a rope, and lines which possess the conditions of A and B in about equal porportions.

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    0
  • In numerous instances clear evidence of recent movements along the fault planes has been discovered; and frequent earthquakes testify with equal force to the present uplift of the mountain blocks.

    0
    0
  • It is doubtful whether even the genius of Valdemar would have proved equal to such a stupendous task.

    0
    0
  • The wood, which in Indian temples is burnt as incense, is yellowish-red, close-grained, tough, hard, readily worked, durable, and equal in quality to that of the deodar.

    0
    0
  • It was a characteristic of equal importance that Dr Lightfoot, like Dr Westcott, never discussed these subjects in the mere spirit of controversy.

    0
    0
  • The combined areas of the valleys and the area occupied by the mountains are about equal.

    0
    0
  • It can be shown that unless a quantity of meteors in collective mass equal to our moon were to plunge into the sun every year the supply of heat could not be sustained from this source.

    0
    0
  • Experiments in protection on a larger scale, and under more ordinary conditions, have been carried out with equal success by Professor Celli and other Italian authorities.

    0
    0
  • The number of persons was 78, and they were divided into two equal groups of 39 each.

    0
    0
  • Power by its very nature belongs to no one man but to a multitude of men; and the reason is obvious, since all men are born equal.

    0
    0
  • Acting on the queen's explicit instructions, Essex, after some ill-managed operations, had a meeting with Tyrone at a ford on the Lagan on th 7th of September 1599, when a truce was arranged; but Elizabeth was displeased by the favourable conditions allowed to the O'Neill and by Essex's treatment of him as an equal.

    0
    0
  • Berthelot, on the other hand, assumed that the heat-capacity of an aqueous solution is equal to that of an equal volume of water, and calculated his results on this assumption, which involves much the same uncertainty as that of Thomsen.

    0
    0
  • of water from o° C. to C., and is approximately equal to ioo cal.

    0
    0
  • The oxygen contained in the compound was deducted, together with the equivalent amount of hydrogen, and the heat of combustion of the compound was then taken to be equal to the heats of combustion of the elements in the residue.

    0
    0
  • The arguments of conservative writers involve concessions which, though often overlooked by their readers, are very detrimental to the position they endeavour to support, and the objections they bring against the theory of the introduction of new law-books (under a Josiah or an Ezra) apply with equal force to the promulgation of Mosaic teaching which had been admittedly ignored or forgotten.

    0
    0
  • Under Vespasian and Titus the Jews enjoyed freedom of conscience and equal political rights with non-Jewish subjects of Rome.

    0
    0
  • Already under Charlemagne this development is noticeable; in his generous treatment of the Jews this Christian emperor stood in marked contrast to his contemporary the caliph Harun al-Rashid, who persecuted Jews and Christians with equal vigour.

    0
    0
  • In the 17th century a considerable number of Jews had made a home in the English colonies, where from the first they enjoyed practically equal Tights with the Christian settlers.

    0
    0
  • The Leibzoll (body-tax) was also abolished, in addition to the special law-taxes, the passport duty, the nightduty and all similiar imposts which had stamped the Jews as outcast, for they were now (Dec. 19) to have equal rights with the Christian inhabitants."

    0
    0
  • In Australia the Jews from the first were welcomed on perfectly equal terms. The oldest congregation is that of Sydney (1817); the Melbourne community dates from 1844.

    0
    0
  • In 1904 the financial and legal administration was put into the hands of the British High Commissioner for the Western Pacific. The native king is assisted by a legislative assembly consisting, in equal numbers, of hereditary nobles and popular (elected) representatives.

    0
    0
  • Its territory is divided into two nearly equal parts by the eastern branch of the Sierra Madre Occidental, the northern part belonging to the great central plateau region, and the southern to an extremely broken region formed by the diverging branches of the Sierra Madre, with their wooded terraces and slopes and highly fertile valleys.

    0
    0
  • There are separate schools for whites and blacks, and the equipment and service are approximately equal, although the whites pay about nine-tenths of the school taxes.

    0
    0
  • The Senate is composed of fifty members elected biennially by senatorial districts as nearly as possible equal to one another in population, and the House of Representatives (in the Constitution of 1776 called the House of Commons) of one hundred and twenty, elected biennially and chosen by counties' according to their population, each county having at least one representative, no matter how small its population.

    0
    0
  • These riotous proceedings provoked the second military expedition of the governor, and on the 16th of May 1771, with a force of about r000 men and officers, he met about twice that number of Regulators on the banks of the Alamance, where, after two hours of fighting, with losses on each side nearly equal, the ammunition of the Regulators was exhausted and they were routed.

    0
    0
  • When the state constitution of 1776 was adopted the counties were so nearly equal in population that they were given equal representation in the General Assembly, but the equality in population disappeared in the general westward movement, and in 1790 the West began to urge a new division of the state into representative districts according to population and taxation.

    0
    0
  • five slaves to be counted equal to three whites.

    0
    0
  • Turning, therefore, to a globe, Asia, viewed as a whole, will be seen to have the form of a great isosceles spherical triangle, having its north-eastern apex at East Cape (Vostochnyi), in Bering Strait; its two equal sides, in length about a quadrant of the sphere, or 6500 m., extending on the west to the southern point of Arabia, and on the east to the extremity of the Malay peninsula; and the base between these points occupying about 60° of a great circle, or 4 500 m., and being deeply indented by the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal on either side of the Indian peninsula.

    0
    0
  • In no other period of the world's history, of equal length of time, has so much scientific enterprise been directed towards the field of General Asiatic inquiry.

    0
    0
  • The great summer heat, by expanding the air upwards, disturbs the level of the planes of equal pressure, and causes an outflow of the upper strata from the heated area.

    0
    0
  • In northern Asia there is a generally equal rainfall of 19 to 29 in.

    0
    0
  • This sudden development of the Japanese is perhaps the most important event of the second half of the 19th century, since it marks the rise of an Asiatic power capable of competing with Europe on equal terms. Their history is so different from that of the rest of Asia that it is not surprising if the result is different.

    0
    0
  • Much the same, however, might have been said of Europe until two centuries ago, and the scientific knowledge of the Arabs under the earlier Caliphates was equal or superior to that of any of their contemporaries.

    0
    0
  • contains a great deal of additional matter, which can rarely be treated as of equal historical value with the preceding.

    0
    0
  • As a piece of writing the vivid narratives are without an equal.

    0
    0
  • His character is perhaps best described by a writer who says "his strength was not equal to his goodness."

    0
    0
  • The interior of the province is also thickly sprinkled with lakes, the combined area of which is equal to about one-twentieth of the entire surface.

    0
    0
  • per, Peristomium, probably equal pr.t, Prostomial tentacle.

    0
    0
  • The government of the church is chiefly according to the congregational principle, and the women have an equal voice with the men; but annual meetings, attended by the bishops, teachers and other delegates from the several congregations are held, and at these sessions the larger questions involving church polity are considered and decided by a committee of five bishops.

    0
    0
  • He surrendered all his offices and all his preferments except the archbishopric of York, receiving in return a pension of 1000 marks (equal to six or seven thousand pounds a year in modern currency) from the bishopric of Winchester, and retired to his see, which he had never before visited.

    0
    0
  • But his pride was equal to his abilities.

    0
    0
  • What is called Atholl brose is a compound, in equal parts, of whisky and honey (or oatmeal), which was first commonly used in the district for hoarseness and sore throat.

    0
    0
  • In general his object is to reduce the final equation to a simple one by making such an assumption for the side of the square or cube to which the expression in x is to be equal as will make the necessary number of coefficients vanish.

    0
    0
  • The forests of Peak and Duffield had their separate courts and officers, the justice seat of the former being in an extra-parochial part at equal distances from Castleton, Tideswell and Bowden, while the pleas of Duffield Forest were held at Tutbury.

    0
    0
  • The Mosaic Institute contained an agrarian law, based upon an equal division of the soil amongst the adult males, a census of whom was taken just before their entrance into Canaan.

    0
    0
  • The year 1903 was memorable for a very heavy rainfall, comparable though not equal in its disastrous effects to that of 1879.

    0
    0
  • Accordingly it is more susceptible to exhaustion of surface soil as to its nitrogenous, and especially as to its mineral supplies; and in the common practice of agriculture it is found to be more benefited by direct mineral manures, especially phosphatic manures, than is wheat when sown under equal soil conditions.

    0
    0
  • Among other things, he made a more thorough study of socialist writers, with the result that, though he was not converted to any of their schemes as being immediately practicable, he began to look upon some more equal distribution of the produce of labour as a practicability of the remote future, and to dwell upon the prospect of such changes in human character as might render a stable society possible without the institution of private property.

    0
    0
  • Howard, who constantly issues brochures of equal value in the form of Bulletins of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

    0
    0
  • Leaving Edward, now his only brother in blood and almost his equal in arms, in Galloway, he suddenly transferred his own operations to Aberdeenshire.

    0
    0
  • The bark and young cones afford a tanning material, inferior indeed to oakbark, and hardly equal to that of the larch, but of value in countries where substances more rich in tannin are not abundant.

    0
    0
  • Were his powers, physical as well as mental, equal to the task ?

    0
    0
  • Still De Blainville made some advance in a right direction, as for instance by elevating the parrots' and the pigeons as " Ordres," equal in rank to that of the birds of prey and some others.

    0
    0
  • Oscines, equal to Miiller's group of the same name; 2.

    0
    0
  • Marsh states that he had fully satisfied himself that Archaeopteryx belonged to the Odontornithes, which he thought it advisable for the present to regard as a subclass, separated into three orders - Odontolcae, Odontotormae and Saururae - all well marked, but evidently not of equal rank, the last being clearly much more widely distinguished from the first two than they are from one another.

    0
    0
  • The whole site of Venice is dominated by the existence of one great main canal, the Grand Canal, which, winding through the town in the shape of the letter S, divides it into two equal parts.

    0
    0
  • The powers of the two houses are equal in every respect except that the Senate passes upon the governor's appointments and tries impeachment cases brought before it by the House of Representatives.

    0
    0
  • The property rights of husband and wife are nearly equal; a wife may hold her property the same as if single, and a widower or a widow is entitled to the use for life of one-third of the real estate of which his or her deceased consort was seized at the time of his or her death.

    0
    0
  • This anonymous writer,' he says, acquired his learning by teaching others, and adopted a dogmatic tone, which has caused him to be received at Paris with applause as the equal of Aristotle, Avicenna, or Averroes.

    0
    0
  • Xnyviaicos, ribbon), a quartic curve invented by Jacques Bernoulli (Acta Eruditorum, 1694) and afterwards investigated by Giulio Carlo Fagnano, who gave its principal properties and applied it to effect the division of a quadrant into 2 2 m, 3.2 m and 5.2 m equal parts.

    0
    0
  • The lemniscate of Bernoulli may be defined as the locus of a point which moves so that the product of its distances from two fixed points is constant and is equal to the square of half the distance between these points.

    0
    0
  • They are in almost continuous motion, their power of endurance being equal to the rapidity of their motions.

    0
    0
  • As a commercial product spider-silk has been found to be equal, if not superior, to the best silk spun by lepidopterous larvae; but the cannibalistic propensities of spiders, making it impossible to keep more than one in a single receptacle, coupled with the difficulty of getting them to spin freely in a confined space, have hitherto prevented the silk being used on any extensive scale for textile fabrics.

    0
    0
  • But under the Statute of Frauds (1677), ss., 1, 2) leases, except those the term of which does not exceed three years, and in which the reserved rent is equal to two-thirds at least of the improved value of the premises, were required to be in writing signed by the parties or their lawfully authorized agents; and, under the Real Property Act 1845, a lease required by law to be in writing is void unless made by deed.

    0
    0
  • 1818); (iii.) cheptel given to a farmer (fermier) or participating cultivator (colon partiaire) - in the cheptel given to the farmer (also called cheptel de fer) stock of a value equal to the estimated price of the stock given must be left at the expiry of the lease (Art.

    0
    0
  • Though it is probably destined to be used even more extensively as a fertilizer before the demand for it as a feeding stuff becomes equal to the supply, practically all the cotton seed meal of the south will ultimately be used for feeding.

    0
    0
  • For a long time these shells or hulls, as they are called, were burned at oil mills for fuel, 22 tons being held equal to a cord of wood, and 43 tons to a ton of coal.

    0
    0
  • They are adapted to special conditions which are lacking in their new surroundings, but a few will probably do fairly well the first year, and the seeds from these probably rather better the next, and so on, so that in a few years' time a strain may be available which is equal or even superior to the original one introduced.

    0
    0
  • Other things being equal, the broker would be better off if he could hedge with equal ease against all his risks.

    0
    0
  • But other things are not equal: the market would be more confusing and quotations would be complicated if " futures " were in use for all grades.

    0
    0
  • would become more sensitive, but, other things being equal, the range of movement ought to diminish, and ultimately the average daily movement also, though at first the latter might not fall appreciably if, indeed, it did not rise, owing to the increased frequency of movement.

    0
    0
  • In this table measurements of price movements stated both absolutely and as percentages of price levels are given, because authorities have expressed doubts as to whether the former or the latter might be expected to remain constant, other things being equal, when price rose.

    0
    0
  • The calyx is a long tube, or a series of connected tubes, situated above the core barrel, to which it is equal in diameter.

    0
    0
  • In Germany, the law prescribes a close-test of 21° C., equal to about 70° F., whilst in Russia the standard is 28° C., equal to 84.4° F., by the close-test; in both these countries the weights of petroleum which may be stored in specified buildings are determined by law.

    0
    0
  • To the same great rendezvous other leaders also gathered, some of higher rank than Godfrey or Raymund or Bohemund, but none destined to exercise an equal influence on the fate of the Crusade.

    0
    0
  • In diplomacy he proved fully the equal of all - white or black - with whom he had to deal, while he ruled with a rare combination of vigour and moderation over the nation which he had created.

    0
    0
  • The extinction of the western caliphate and the dispersion of the once noble heritage of the Ommayads into numerous petty independent states, had taken place some thirty years previously, so that Castilian and Moslem were once again upon equal terms, the country being almost equally divided between them.

    0
    0
  • Whatever were his qualities as a fighter, the Cid was but indifferent material out of which to make a saint, - a man who battled against Christian and against Moslem with equal zeal, who burnt churches and mosques with equal zest, who ravaged, plundered and slew as much for a livelihood as for any patriotic or religious purpose, and was in truth almost as much of a Mussulman as a Christian in his habits and his character.

    0
    0
  • Hot-wire ammeters are open to the following objections: The scale divisions for equal increments of current are not equal in length, being generally much closer together in the lower parts of the scale.

    0
    0
  • When a current is passed through the wire, continuous or alternating, it creates heat, which expands the air in the bulb and forces the liquid up one side of the U-tube to a certain position in which the rate of loss of heat by the air is equal to the rate at which it is gaining heat.

    0
    0
  • an angle equal to that of the torsion head.

    0
    0
  • 8) is graduated into equal divisions, and the weight is provided with a sharp tongue of metal in order that its position on the shelf may be accurately determined.

    0
    0
  • In painting, sculpture and music he considered himself the equal of specialists.

    0
    0
  • He was a man of considerable intellectual attainments, of prodigious memory, master of both Latin and Greek, and wrote prose and verse with equal facility.

    0
    0
  • An ardent Liberal, he took an active part in party struggles under the Restoration, while throwing himself with equal vigour into the great work of historical regeneration which was going on at that period.

    0
    0
  • There was a strong demand for the removal of these Creek Indians, known as Seminoles, and by treaties at Payne's Landing in 1832 and Fort Gibson in 1833 the Indian chiefs agreed to exchange their Florida lands for equal territory in the western part of the United States.

    0
    0
  • Many ingenious devices for forming bars have been produced; but generally a strong frame is used, across which steel wires are stretched at distances equal to the size of the bars to be made, the blocks being first cut into slabs and then into bars.

    0
    0
  • Glycerin soap ordinarily consists of about equal parts of pure hard soap and glycerin (the latter valuable for its emollient properties).

    0
    0
  • was levied on soap made in the United Kingdom, and that heavy impost (equal when 3d.

    0
    0
  • Its libraries contained in 1909 98,000 bound volumes and an equal number of pamphlets, and the college had a faculty numbering 113 and a student enrolment of The resources of the college in 1909 were about $3,500,000.

    0
    0
  • By Kepler's second law the radius vector, FP, sweeps over equal areas in equal times.

    0
    0
  • Since the area of the triangle FPP' is one half the product of FP into the perpendicular p from P on FP', it follows that if these perpendiculars were equal all round the orbit, the areas described during the infinitesimal time would be smallest at the pericentre and continually increase during the passage of the body to B.

    0
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  • He discharged the duties of an envoy with equal magnificence and dexterity; the treaty of May r r60, which put an end to the war, was of his making.

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  • But Henry and Marguerite still continued friends; she still bore the title of queen; she visited Marie de' Medici on equal terms; and the king frequently consulted her on important affairs, though his somewhat parsimonious spirit was grieved by her extravagance.

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  • radius, but outside the city limits proper, there was a further population equal in number to that within the municipality itself.

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  • He burned phosphorus in air standing over mercury, and showed that (1) there was a limit to the amount of phosphorus which could be burned in the confined air, (2) that when no more phosphorus could be burned, one-fifth of the air had disappeared, (3) that the weight of the air lost was nearly equal to the difference in the weights of the white solid produced and the phosphorus burned, (4) that the density of the residual air was less than that of ordinary air.

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  • He also showed that on heating mercury calx alone an " air " was liberated which differed from other " airs," and was slightly heavier than ordinary air; moreover, the weight of the " air " set free from a given weight of the calx was equal to the weight taken up in forming the calx from mercury, and if the calx be heated with charcoal, the metal was recovered and a gas named " fixed air," the modern carbon dioxide, was formed.

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  • Matter can neither be created nor destroyed; however a chemical system be changed, the weights before and after are equal.'

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  • equal changes in temperature and pressure occasion equal changes in equal volumes of all gases and vapours - Avogadro deduced the law: Under the same conditions of temperature and pressure, equal volumes of gases contain equal numbers of molecules; and he showed that the relative weights of the molecules are determined as the ratios of the weights of equal volumes, or densities.

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  • At a later date Berzelius denoted an oxide by dots, equal in number to the number of oxygen atoms present, placed over the element; this notation survived longest in mineralogy.

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  • Of great importance is the chemical identity of the diamond, graphite and charcoal, a fact demonstrated in part by Lavoisier in 1773, Smithson Tennant in 1796, and by Sir George Steuart-Mackenzie (1780-1848), who showed that equal weights.

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  • Gomberg's triphenyl-methyl play no part in what follows), it is readily seen that the simplest hydrocarbon has the formula CH 4, named methane, in which the hydrogen atoms are of equal value, and which may be pictured as placed at the vertices of a tetrahedron, the carbon atom occupying the centre.

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  • In methane and ethane the hydrogen atoms are of equal value, and no matter which one may be substituted by another element or group the same compound will result.

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  • The values in other cases are calculable from the formula RI 09° 28' - a), where a is the internal angle of the regular polygon contained by sides equal in number to the number of the carbon atoms composing the ring.

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  • The proof is divided into two parts: (1) that four hydrogen atoms are equal, and (2) that two pairs of hydrogen atoms are symmetrical with reference to a specified hydrogen atom.

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  • These three acids yield on heating phenol, identical with the substance started with, and since in the three oxybenzoic acids the hydroxyl groups must occupy positions other than I, it follows that four hydrogen atoms are equal in value.

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  • Obviously, isomeric ring-systems are possible, since the carbon atoms in the original rings are not all of equal value.

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  • Unfortunately, the term normal is sometimes given to solutions which are strictly decinormal; for example, iodine, sodium thiosulphate, &c. In technical analysis, where a solution is used for one process only, it may be prepared so that I cc. is equal to.

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  • According to the law of Avogadro, equal volumes of different gases under the same conditions of temperature and pressure contain equal numbers of molecules; therefore, since the density depends upon the number of molecules present in unit volume, it follows that for a comparison of the densities of gases, the determinations must be made under coincident conditions, or the observations reduced or re-computed for coincident conditions.

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  • It is found that isomers have nearly the same critical volume, and that equal differences in molecular content occasion equal differences in critical volume.

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  • Recent researches have shown that the law originally proposed by Kopp - " That the specific volume of a liquid compound (molecular volume) at its boiling-point is equal to the sum of the specific volumes of its constituents (atomic volumes), and that every element has a definite atomic value in its compounds " - is by no means exact, for isomers have different specific volumes, and the volume for an increment of CH 2 in different homologous series is by no means constant; for example, the difference among the esters of the fatty acids is about 57, whereas for the aliphatic aldehydes it is 49.

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  • Obviously, therefore, liquids are comparable when the pressures, volumes and temperatures are equal fractions of the critical constants.

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  • 185.8° Equal increments in the molecule are associated with an equal rise in the boiling-point, but this increment varies in different homologous series.

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  • It follows that the thermal effects stated above must be equal, i.e.

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  • only contain single carbon linkages, then the number of such linkages is 2n - m, and if the thermal effect of such a linkage be X, then the termAisobviously equal to (2n - m)X.

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  • it is equal to the sum of the thermal effects of the aldehyde and carbonyl groups.

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  • It is remarkable that the position of the halogen in the molecule has no effect on the heat of formation; for example, chlorpropylene and allylchloride, and also ethylene dichloride and ethylidene dichloride, have equal heats of formation.

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  • compounds having the same composition, have equal molecular refractions, and that equal differences in composition are associated with equal differences in refractive power.

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  • molecular weight, is constant for isomers, and that two atoms of hydrogen were equal to one of carbon, three to one of oxygen, and seven to one of chlorine; but these ratios were by no means constant, and afforded practically no criteria as to the molecular weight of any substance.

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  • To reduce these figures to a common standard, so that the volumes shall contain equal numbers of molecules, the notion of molecular volumes is introduced, the arbitrary values of the crystallographic axes (a, b, c) being replaced by the topic parameters' (x, ?i, w), which are such that, combined with the axial angles, they enclose volumes which contain equal numbers of molecules.

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  • The piece was warmly received at Dresden on the 2nd of January 1843; but its success was by no means equal to that of Rienzi.

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  • Fears were entertained, and even the friends of the viceroy to some extent shared them, that he was not equal to the crisis.

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  • In the male the right tooth usually remains similarly concealed, but the left is immensely developed, attaining a length equal to more than half that of the entire animal.

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  • From the 11th Paris was placarded with posters headed Analyse de la doctrine do Babceuf (sic), tribun du peuple, of which the opening sentence ran: "Nature has given to every man the right to the enjoyment of an equal share in all property," and which ended with a call to restore the constitution of 1793.

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  • The scale of that map, as determined by the equator or centre meridian, we will suppose to be i: 125,000,000, while the encircling meridian indicates a scale of i: 80,000,000; and a " mean " scale, equal to the square root of the proportion which the area of the map bears to the actual area of a hemisphere, is r: 112,000,000.

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  • It will suffice therefore to point out that the ordinary needs of the cartographer can be met by conical projections, and, in the case of maps covering a wide area, by Lambert's equal area projection.

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  • i csos, equal; f aOin, deep) 1 -- Section of a Cone on his map of Sweden and Norway (1:600,000; 1835), coloured the lowlands up to 300 ft.

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  • The Measurement of Areas is easily effected if the map at our disposal is drawn on an equal area projection.

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  • When dealing with maps not drawn on an equal area projection we substitute quadrilaterals bounded by meridians and parallels, the areas for which are given in the " Smithsonian Geographical Tables " (1894), in Professor H.

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  • The parallels or climata 2 drawn through places, of which the longest day is of equal length and the decimation (distance) from the equator is the same, he maintained, ought to have been inserted at equal intervals, say of half an hour, and the meridians inserted on a like principle.

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  • Dorpfeld, we assume an Attic stadium of 200 steps (500 ft.) to be equal to 164 metres, a degree of 700 stad.

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  • would be equal to 114,800 metres, its actual length according to modern measurement being I Io,808 metres.

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  • Si-ngan-fu), the capital of China, was equal to 225 °, which Ptolemy reduced to 177°, but which in reality only amount to 126°.

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  • The errors due to an exaggeration of distances were still further increased on account of his assuming a degree to be equal to Soo stadia, as determined by Posidonius, instead of accepting the 700 stadia of Eratosthenes.

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  • The seven climates adopted by Idrisi are erroneously supposed to be equal in latitudinal extent.

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  • The charts in use of the medieval navigators of the Indian Ocean - Arabs, Persians or Dravidas - were equal in value if not superior to the charts of the Mediterranean.

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  • Nor can Idrisi's map of the world, were drawn at intervals of zams, supposed to be equal to three hours' sail.

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  • These miles, however, were not the ordinary Roman miles of l000 paces or 5000 ft., but smaller miles of Greek or Oriental origin, of which six were equal to five Roman miles, and as the latter were equal to 1480 metres, the Portolano miles had a length of only 1233 metres, and 75 2 of the former, and 90 3 of the latter were equal to a degree.

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  • A trigonometrical survey of British India was begun in 1800 and the country can now boast of a survey which in most respects is equal to those of most European states.

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  • and the publication of parish and township or county maps keeps pace with the settlement of the country; but with the exception of Victoria none of these states is in possession of a topographical map equal in accuracy to similar maps published in Europe.

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  • He became the leader and spokesman of the democratic party in the Connexion which claimed for the laity the free election of class-leaders and stewards, and equal representation with ministers at Conference.

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  • But a day of God is equal to a thousand years (Ps.

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  • To the student of ecclesiastical history it is remarkable as exhibiting a form of Christianity widely divergent from the prevalent types, being a religious fellowship which has no formulated creed demanding definite subscription, and no liturgy, priesthood or outward sacrament, and which gives to women an equal place with men in church organization.

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  • Several imprisonments, including that of George Fox at Derby in 1650-1651, were brought about under the Blasphemy Act of 1650, which inflicted penalties on any one who asserted himself to be very God or equal with God, a charge to which the Friends were peculiarly liable owing to their doctrine of perfection.

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  • Of late years the meetings have been, for the most part, held jointly, with equal liberty for all men and women to state their opinions, and to serve on all committees and other appointments.

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  • Dividing the province into three equal parts of 250 m.

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  • Without taking any step to verify it, Emmet put on a green and white uniform and placed himself at the head of some eighty men, who marched towards the castle, being joined in the streets by a second body of about equal strength.

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  • The largest of all, however, was the macrocollon, probably of good quality and equal to the hieratic, and a cubit or nearly 18 in.

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  • After a month's vigorous drilling Hicks led 5000 of his men against an equal force of dervishes in Sennar, whom he defeated, and cleared the country between the towns of Sennar and Khartum of rebels.

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  • The majority of plant specimens are most suitably fastened on paper by a mixture of equal parts of gum tragacanth and gum arabic made into a thick paste with water.

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  • Subsequent popes manifested equal ardour, with the same damaging results, in the repair and adornment of the catacombs, and many of the paintings covering their walls, which have been assigned to the period of their original construction, are really the work of these later times.

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  • In North America the earliest representative of the group is Systemodon of the Lower Eocene, in which all the upper premolars are quite simple; while the molars are of a type which would readily develop into that of the modern tapirs, both outer columns being conical and of equal size.

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  • Of the upper incisors the first and second are nearly equal, with short, broad crowns, the third is large and conical, considerably larger than the canine, which is separated from it by an interval.

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  • Fore-feet with four toes, having distinct hoofs: the first toe being absent, the third the longest, the second and fourth nearly equal, and the fifth the shortest and scarcely reaching the ground in the ordinary standing position.

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  • Hind-feet with the typical perissodactyle arrangement of three toes - the middle one being the largest, the two others nearly equal.

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  • The skull is high, with -the facial and cranial portions approximately equal.

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  • The post-glenoid process is small, and the facial and cranial portions of the skull are approximately of equal length.

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  • With equal zeal did Reuchlin act as the 6 See the instructive article by S.

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  • It divides the entrance to the Gulf of Mexico into two passages of nearly equal width, - the Strait of Florida, about I io m.

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  • Gradual abolition of slavery was declared by a law of the 13th of February 1880; definitive abolition in 1886; and in 1893 the equal civil status of blacks and whites in all respects was proclaimed by General Calleja.

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  • Note that the class of rationals less than or equal tò 2r is not a real number.

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  • The patriarch of Constantinople is the nominal head of the Orthodox priesthood; but by an arrangement concluded in 1879, his authority was delegated to the Austrian emperor, in exchange for a revenue equal to the tribute previously paid by the clergy of the provinces; and his nominations for the metropolitanate of Serajevo, and the bishoprics of Dolnja Tuzla, Banjaluka and Mostar require the imperial assent.

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  • The Serb and Moslem delegates, who had started on the same day for Budapest, to present their petition to the emperor, learned from the rescript that the government intended to concede to their compatriots "a share in the legislation and administration of provincial affairs, and equal protection for all religious beliefs, languages and racial distinctions."

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  • From Emerson he gained more than from any man, alive or dead; and, though the older philosopher both enjoyed and learned from the association with the younger, it cannot be said that the gain was equal.

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  • In this work Law shows himself at least 'the equal of the ablest champion of Deism.

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  • So also did the " Midhat Constitution " promulgated by Abd-ul-Hamid almost immediately after his accession to the throne, owing largely to the reactionary spirit at that time of the' Ulema and of the sultan's immediate advisers, but almost, if not quite, in equal measure to the scornful reception of the Constitution by the European powers.

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  • All Turkish subjects, of whatever race or religion, have equal juridical and political rights and obligations, and all discrimination as to military service has been abolished.

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  • The copper money was in pieces of a nominal value of 40, 20, TO, 5 and i paras, 40 paras being equal to 1 piastre.

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  • The division of the line into equal sections of 200 kilometres apiece produced at once a somewhat ridiculous result.

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  • On the 2nd of June 1908 a fresh convention was signed between the government and the Bagdad Railway Company providing, on the same financial basis, for the extension of the line from Bulgurlu to Helif and of the construction of a branch from Tel-Habesh to Aleppo, covering a total aggregate length of approximately 840 kilometres, The principle of equal sections of 200 kilometres was thus set on one side.

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  • Admitted on equal terms to the European family of nations, the Ottoman government had given a solemn guarantee of its intention to make the long-promised reforms a reality.

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  • He himself tried versification, and some of his lines which have come down to us appear quite equal to the average work of his contemporaries.

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  • His hasidas are almost equal to his ghazels; for, while they rival those of Nef `i in brilliancy, they surpass them in beauty of diction, and are not so artificial and dependent on fantastic and farfetched conceits.

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  • In cavalry they were weak, for the Russian does not take kindly to equitation and the horses were not equal to the accepted European standard of weight, while the Cossack was only formidable to stragglers and wounded.

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  • Had the Austrians possessed mobility equal to that of the French the latter should have been overwhelmed in detail, but whilst the French covered 17 and 19 m.

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  • In his position at Bautzen he felt himself equal to all his enemy's combinations.

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  • The actual working of his mind towards that strategic and tactical ascendancy that rendered his presence on the battlefield, according to the testimony of his opponents, equal to a reinforcement of 40,000 men, was entirely undiscernible.

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  • But it probably pleased Mme de Stael to quite an equal degree that Napoleon should apparently put forth his power to crush her and fail.

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  • Arabian authors already had found three square numbers of equal difference, but the difference itself had not been assigned in proposing the question.

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  • The flowers have a hollow tube at the base bearing at its free edge five sepals, an equal number of petals, usually concave or spoon-shaped, pink or white, and a great number of stamens.

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  • Under the laws of the state the legal existence and legal personality of a woman are not affected by marriage, and the property rights of a husband and wife are nearly equal.

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  • The head is rather large, and is furnished at first with five simple eyes of nearly equal size; but as it increases in size the homologues of the facetted eyes of the imago become larger, whereas those equivalent to the ocelli remain small.

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  • The natural harbour, which, with a depth diminishing from 70 to 30 fathoms, strikes in from the northwest so as to cut the island into two fairly equal portions, with an isthmus not more than 14 m.

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  • In this battle the Allies and French were of about equal strength (3 7,000): the former having 48 guns, the latter 40.

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  • Faraday found that the mass of substance liberated at the electrodes in the cell C was equal to the sum of the masses liberated in the cells A and B.

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  • The mean result of the best determinations shows that when a current of one ampere is passed for one second, a mass of silver is deposited equal to o ooi i 18 gramme.

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  • If the ions move at equal rates, the salt which is decomposed to supply the ions liberated must be taken equally from the neighbourhood of the two electrodes.

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  • If we assume that no other cause is at work, it is easy to prove that, with non-dissolvable electrodes, the ratio of salt lost at the anode to the salt lost at the cathode must be equal to the ratio of the velocity of the cation to the velocity of the anion.

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  • The velocity with which the ions move past each other is equal to the sum of their individual velocities, which can therefore be calculated.

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  • (I) In very dilute solutions of simple substances, where only one kind of dissociation is possible and the dissociation of the ions is complete, the number of pressure-producing particles necessary to produce the observed osmotic effects should be equal to the number of ions given by a molecule of the salt as shown by its electrical properties.

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  • A series of equivalent solutions all containing the same coloured ion have absorption spectra which, when photographed, show identical absorption bands of equal intensity.

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  • If a certain minimum charge must be collected in order to start coagulation, it will need the conjunction of 6n monovalent, or 3n divalent, to equal the effect of 2n trivalent ions.

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  • In the case of substances like ammonia and acetic acid, where the dissociation is very small, I - a is nearly equal to unity, and only varies slowly with dilution.

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  • An explanation of the failure of the usual dilution law in these cases may be given if we remember that, while the electric forces between bodies like undissociated molecules, each associated with equal and opposite charges, will vary inversely as the fourth power of the distance, the forces between dissociated ions, each carrying one charge only, will be inversely proportional to the square of the distance.

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  • This is fully borne out by the experiments of Julius Thomsen, who found that the heat of neutralization of one gramme-molecule of a strong base by an equivalent quantity of a strong acid was nearly constant, and equal to 13,700 or 13,800 calories.

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  • Zinc dissolves at the anode, an equal amount of zinc replaces an equivalent amount of copper on the other side of the porous partition, and the same amount of copper is deposited on the cathode.

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  • Let an electromotive force exactly equal to that of the cell be applied to it in the reverse direction.

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  • Thus, if L denote the heat corresponding with the chemical changes associated with unit electric transfer, Le will be the heat corresponding with an electric transfer e, and will also be equal to the change in internal energy of the cell.

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  • Again, we may calculate the osmotic work done, and, if the whole cycle of operations be supposed to occur at the same temperature, the osmotic work must be equal and opposite to the electrical work of the first operation.

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  • If secondary effects are eliminated, the deposition of metals also is a reversible process; the decomposition voltage is equal to the electromotive force which the metal itself gives when going into solution.

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  • We can therefore calculate the rate at which the salt as a whole will diffuse by examining the conditions for a steady transfer, in which the ions diffuse at an equal rate, the faster one being restrained and the slower one urged forward by the electric forces.

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  • Their representation in the states general was exactly equal to that of the Dutch, though their population was in the proportion of seven to five.

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