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epithet

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epithet

epithet Sentence Examples

  • Her star was the planet Venus, and classical writers give her the epithet Caelestis and Urania.

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  • He adopted the name Grynaeus from the epithet of Apollo in Virgil.

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  • One of these was that involved in the practice, now grown almost universal, of bestowing the epithet Oeotokos, "Mother of God," upon Mary the mother of Jesus.

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  • The name Piyadassi is the official epithet always used by Asoka in his inscriptions when speaking of himself.

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  • Napoleon apparently remembered seeing him on the battlefield and, addressing him, again used the epithet "young man" that was connected in his memory with Prince Andrew.

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  • Here it was that Athena helped Bellerophon to bridle Pegasus; and hence she received the epithet of "the Bridler," Chalinitis.

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  • It was simply a covering epithet, and like the word "god" could be transferred from one deity to another.

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  • Terminus was probably in its origin only an epithet of Jupiter.

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  • The most common and consistent tradition connects Homer with the valley of Smyrna and the banks of the Meles; his figure was one of the stock types on Smyrnaean coins, one class of which was called Homerian; the epithet "Melesigenes" was applied to him; the cave where he was wont to compose his poems was shown near the source of the river; his temple, the Homereum, stood on its banks.

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  • Towards the middle of the 18th century Leipzig was the seat of the most influential body of literary men in Germany, over whom Johann Christoph Gottsched, like his contemporary, Samuel Johnson, in England, exercised a kind of literary dictatorship. Then, if ever, Leipzig deserved the epithet of a "Paris in miniature" (Klein Paris) assigned to it by Goethe in his Faust.

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  • even founded some Greek towns, and when they had conquered Babylonia and Mesopotamia they all adopted the epithet " Philhellen."

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  • In Homer the word IitFoves occurs as a name of inhabitants of Attica, with the epithet (Il.

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  • But if the epithet is intended to designate an animal that takes an interest in its rider so far as a beast can, that in some way understands his intentions, or shares them in a subordinate fashion, that obeys from a sort of submissive or halffellow-feeling' with his master, like the horse or elephant, then I say that the camel is by no means docile - very much the contrary.

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  • The second epithet designates its position on a hill, but the first is given it from the market granted to the abbots of St Albans to be kept there, by Henry II.

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  • From his German descent he was surnamed Ashkenazi (the German), and we find that epithet applied to him in a recently discovered document of date 1559.

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  • Then suddenly, for reasons which cannot easily be explained, he inaugurated a reign of terror which lasted for twenty-four years and earned for him the epithet of "theTerrible."

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  • the like epithet of " mother " applied to the prophetess Deborah, Judges v.

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  • Frazer takes the epithet to mean " bearer of the sacred objects deposited on the altar "; L.

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  • In this wider sense Demeter is akin to Ge, with whom she has several epithets in common, and is sometimes identified with Rhea-Cybele; thus Pindar speaks of Demeter xaXKoKparos (" brass-rattling "), an epithet obviously more suitable to the Asiatic than to the Greek earth-goddess.

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  • According to Farnell, the meaning of the epithet is to be looked for in the original conception of Erinys, which was that of an earth-goddess akin to Ge, thus naturally associated with Demeter, rather than that of a wrathful avenging deity.

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  • The epithet "admirable" (admirabilis) for Crichton first occurs in John Johnston's Heroes Scoti (1603).

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  • The promulgation of the Concordat (18th of April 1802) and the institution of what was in all but name a state religion tended strongly in the same direction, the authority of the priests being generally used in support of the man to whom Chateaubriand applied the epithet "restorer of the altars."

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  • His usual epithet is "the Ancient" (`Atiga), and he is also called "the deeply hidden and guarded."

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  • Malak-bel has been explained as " messenger of Bel "; but more probably Malak is the common Babylonian epithet malik given to various gods, and means " counsellor "; Malak-bel will then be the sun as the visible representative of Bel.

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  • It is worth noticing that this epithet like " lord of eternity " (or, " of the world "), has a distinctly Jewish character.

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  • Originally, Iphigeneia, the "mighty born," is probably merely an epithet of Artemis, in which the notion of a priestess of the goddess had its origin.

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  • Tantalus's betrayal of the secrets of the gods refers to the sun unveiling the secrets of heaven; the slaying of Pelops denotes the going-down of the sun, Pelops meaning the "` gray one," an epithet of the gloomy sky in which the last rays of the sun are extinguished.

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  • In one Asura, whose Aryan original was Varuna, he concentrated the whole of the divine character, and conferred upon it the epithet of "the wise" (mazdao) .

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  • The left branch is appreciably noticed near Odessa and the north-west corner; the right branch sweeps past the Crimea, strikes the Caucasian shore (where it comes to the surface running across, but not into, the south-east corner of the Black Sea), and finally disperses flowing westwards along the northern coast of Asia Minor between Cape Jason and 1 The early Greek navigators gave it the epithet of axenus, i.e.

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  • The last distinctive epithet was derived from the little hamlet in the vicinity which furnished shelter, not only to the workmen, but to the monks of St Jerome who were afterwards to be in possession of the monastery; and the hamlet itself is generally but perhaps erroneously supposed to be indebted for its name to the scoriae or dross of certain old iron mines.

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  • It stood on a small rocky peninsula with a natural harbour on the northern side and an open but serviceable bay on the southern; and from this position acquired the epithet of SLoroµos, or the two-mouthed.

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  • A city of Peloponnesus on the east coast of Laconia, distinguished by the epithet of Limera (either "The Well-havened" or " The Hungry ").

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  • 7raXat6s, old, and Mos, stone), in anthropology, the characteristic epithet of the Drift or early Stone Age when Man shared the possession of Europe with the mammoth, the cave-bear, the woolly-haired rhinoceros and other extinct animals.

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  • No satisfactory derivation of the name Athena has been given 1; Pallas, at first an epithet, but after Pindar used 1 0.

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  • Of these the aegis, usually explained as a storm-cloud, is probably intended as a battle-charm, like the Gorgon's head on the shield and the faces on the shields of Chinese soldiers; the owl probably represents the form under which she was worshipped in primitive times, and subsequently became her favourite bird (the epithet -yXavK6.)7rts, meaning "keen-eyed" in Homer, may have originally signified "owl-faced"); the snake, a common companion of the earth deities, probably refers to her connexion with ErechtheusErichthonius.

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  • His philosophical doctrines are not known, though some have inferred from the epithet ebSac�ovuais (" fortunate"), usually applied to him, that he held the end of life to be eiSaa�ovia.

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  • The name of the city or tribe which it gives us is touta marouca, and it mentions also a citadel with the epithet tarincris.

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  • As in the case of Ninib, Nergal appears to have absorbed a number of minor solar deities, which accounts for the various names or designations under which he appears, such as Lugalgira, Sharrapu ("the burner," perhaps a mere epithet), Ira, Gibil (though this name more properly belongs to Nusku, q.v.) and Sibitti.

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  • There is not a single branch of the law which he did not simplify and amend, and the iron firmness with which he caused justice to be administered, irrespective of persons, if it exposed him to the charge of tyranny from the nobles, also won for him from the common people the epithet of " the Just."

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  • On the other hand, there is an epithet Asir or Ashir ("overseer") applied to several gods and particularly to the deity Asur, a fact which introduced a third element of confusion into the discussion of the name Assur.

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  • Hence the great dispute about the application to the Virgin Mary of the epithet OEoTOKOS.

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  • By Diodorus 33, 18 he is praised as a mild ruler; and the fact that from 140 he takes on his coins the epithet Philhellen (W.

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  • Histrio-mastix, published in 1633, was a violent attack upon stage plays in general, in which the author pointed out that kings and emperors who had favoured the drama had been carried off by violent deaths, which assertion might easily be interpreted as a warning to the king, and applied a disgraceful epithet to actresses, which, as Henrietta Maria was taking part in the rehearsal of a ballet, was supposed to apply to the queen.

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  • 227); the epithet Amathusia in Roman poetry often means little more than "Cypriote," attesting however the fame of the city.

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  • 64) was annexed the remaining eastern part of Pontus, which formed part of Polemon's realm but was attached to the province Cappadocia and distinguished by the epithet cappadocicus.

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  • The Homeric poems (12th - 10th centuries) know of Dorians only in Crete, with the obscure epithet TpexaiKes, and no hint of their origin.

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  • Morris, in The Defence of Guinevere, speaks of "gloomy Gawain"; perhaps the most absurdly misleading epithet which could possibly have been applied to the "gay, gratious, and gude" knight of early English tradition.

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  • above sealevel, in the valley of the Nera (anc. Nar), from which the town took its distinguishing epithet, 5 m.

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  • The ancient Asculum was the capital of Picenum, and it 1 The epithet distinguishes it from Ascoli Satriano (anc. Ausculum), which lies m.

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  • At his own request he was ordered east, and on the 23rd of September 1861 was made brigadier-general of volunteers and assigned to command a brigade in the Army of the Potomac. He took part in the Peninsula campaign, and the handling of his troops in the engagement at Williamsburg on the 5th of May 1862, was so brilliant that McClellan reported "Hancock was superb," an epithet always afterwards applied to him.

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  • avri, opposite, and iipKTOS, the Bear, the northern constellation of Ursa Major), the epithet applied to the region (including both the ocean and the lands) round the South Pole.

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  • Mention may also be made of the Lares grundules, whose worship was connected with the white sow of Alba Longa and its thirty young (the epithet has been connected with grunnire, to grunt): the viales, who protected travellers; the hostilii, who kept off the enemies of the state; the permarini, connected with the sea, to whom L.

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  • They spent their energy in attacking Plato and Aristotle, and hence earned the opprobrious epithet of Eristic. They used their dialectic subtlety to disprove the possibility of motion and decay; unity is the negation of change, increase and decrease, birth and death.

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  • But as early as 1865, Arminians were welcomed to Congregational fellowship. In the last few decades, with the spread in the community of innovations in doctrinal and critical opinions, a wider diversity of belief has come to prevail, so that " Evangelical," in the popular sense of the term, rather than " Calvinistic," is the epithet more suit able to American Congregational preachers and churches.

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  • The Homeric epithet 'ApyEtybO rqs, which the Greeks interpreted as "the slayer of Argus," inventing a myth to account for Argus, is explained as originally an epithet of the wind (apyEO-Tris), which clears away the mists (apyos, q5aivco).

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  • Originally the epithet was meant to be taken strictly, viz.

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  • Babylonia and Assyria, however, seem to be out of the question: malik, " arbiter, decider," is there an epithet of various gods, and as an appellative means "prince" and not king; further, little ' In Hos.

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  • In a synod which met in 430, he decided in favour of the epithet 1 At Alexandria the mystic and allegorical tendency prevailed, at Antioch the practical and historical, and these tendencies showed themselves in different methods of study, exegesis and presentation of doctrine.

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  • His character peeps forth most clearly perhaps in the saying which has become his epithet, Atterdag (" There will be a to-morrow"), which is an indication of that invincible doggedness to which he owed most of his successes.

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  • Louis well deserved the epithet of "great" bestowed upon him by his contemporaries; later (1241) the Tatar hordes, under Batu, appeared Sword.

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  • That glorious epithet belonged of right to Hungary,which g p g g had already borne the brunt of the struggle with the Ottoman power for more than a century.

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  • The term " classic " is derived from the Latin epithet classicus, found in a passage of Aulus Gellius (xix.

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  • 1 The epithet " classic " is accordingly applied (I) generally to an author of the first rank, and (2) more 1 The above derivation is in accordance with English usage.

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  • As applied to a class of epistles, the title dates from Eusebius, early in the 4th century; the epithet is given to single epistles by Origen, and is found as far back as the end of the 2nd century.

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  • all-shining"), is an epithet of the moon-goddess.

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  • The Outer Hebrides being almost entirely composed of gneiss the epithet suitably serves them, but, strictly speaking, only the more northerly of the Inner Hebrides may be distinguished as Trap Islands.

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  • "ApicTos, the Bear, the northern constellation of Ursa Major), the epithet applied to the region round the North Pole, covering the area (both ocean and lands) where the characteristic polar conditions of climate, &c., obtain.

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  • They were companions of St Columba and their efforts to convert the folk to Christianity seem to have impressed the popular imagination, for several islands bear the epithet "Papa" in commemoration of the preachers.

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  • Each case must be considered on its merits; and the critic's procedure must of necessity be "eclectic" - an epithet often used with a tinge of reproach, the ground for which it is not easy to discover.

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  • A peculiarity of larch wood is the difficulty with which it is ignited, although so resinous; and, coated with a thin layer of plaster, beams and pillars of larch might probably be found to justify Caesar's epithet " igni impenetrabile lignum "; even the small branches are not easily kept alight, and a larch fire in the open needs considerable care.

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  • COPPERHEADS, an American political epithet, applied by Union men during the Civil War to those men in the North who, deeming it impossible to conquer the Confederacy, were earnestly in favour of peace and therefore opposed to the war policy of the president and of Congress.

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  • Other examples in which buff or rust-colour predominates have also been deemed distinct, and to those has been applied the epithet russata.

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  • Failing to obtain currency for his radical'propaganda, he retired to his native province, and there established a school (the Risshi-sha) for teaching the principles of government by the people, thus earning for himself the epithet of "the Rousseau of Japan."

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  • Many stories are told of the vivacity and enthusiasm with which he lectured, of the absent-mindedness which sometimes led him, forgetting that his pupils could not hear what he was saying, to continue his explanations while he was out of the classroom looking for some piece of apparatus, and of the vigorous tirades, generally culminating in the epithet "plagiaire," in which he used to indulge against men with whom he disagreed (Hofer, Hist.

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  • Tolet.)- suggest that all they had to start from was the epithet itself.

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  • The Greek word is used by Homer as a personal epithet, and by Hesiod for the hard metal in armour, while Theophrastus applies it to the hardest crystal.

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  • 381-4) where it has the epithet Ercar6p. ruXos, "hundred-gated," probably derived in the first place from the gateways of its endless temples, though perhaps.

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  • The Latin word ecclesiasticus is, properly speaking, not a name, but an epithet meaning "churchly," so that it would serve as a designation of any book which was read in church or received ecclesiastical sanction, but in practice Ecclesiasticus has become a by-name for the Wisdom of Sirach.

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  • In the Greek text this name appears as "Jesus son of Sirach Eleazar" (probably a corruption of the Hebrew reading), and the epithet "of Jerusalem" is added, the translator himself being resident in Egypt.

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  • Different writers style her "the tenth Muse," "the flower of the Graces," "a miracle," "the beautiful," the last epithet referring to her writings, not her person, which is said to have been small and dark.

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  • ARABI PASHA (c. 1839-), more correctly AUMAD `ARABI, to which in later years he added the epithet al-Misri, " the Egyptian," Egyptian soldier and revolutionary leader, was born in Lower Egypt in 1839 or 1840 of a fellah family.

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  • To the last he sacrificed expression rather too much to style, and he was perhaps over conscious of the balanced epithet.

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  • The epithet is applied to Zeus and the Erinyes as the deities of revenge and punishment.

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  • 70); (b) another name for, or epithet of, Ascanius.

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  • (128/7-123 B.C.) they bear the epithet of " Philhellen " as a regular part of their title upon the coins.

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  • in Mesopotamia, where a strong native element in such a city as Edessa is indicated by its epithet pa of31tp13apos.

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  • It is, however, doubtful in what sense this word appeared to him, either as a name of God, as in the Old Testament it often occurs and regularly without the article, or actually as the epithet of a heavenly book, although this use cannot be substantiated from Jewish literature.

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  • The Homeric epithet 130wires may have meant "cow-faced" to the earliest worshippers of Hera, though by Homer and the later Greeks it was understood as "large-eyed," like the cow.

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  • CH0N5, he who travels by boat, perhaps originally a mere epithet of the moon-god Ioh or Thoth, is chiefly familiar as the third member of the Theban triad.

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  • The date at which these conceptions became general is not quite certain, but it can hardly be later than the Middle Kingdom, when the dead man has the epithet justified appended to his name in the inscriptions of his tomb.

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  • The New Empire.The epithet new is generally attached to this period, and empire instead of kingdom marks its wider power.

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  • Alike for what he did and for what he was, there is none to equal Alfred in the whole line of English sovereigns; and no monarch in history ever deserved more truly the epithet of Great.

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  • We may infer, from its epithet, "Golden," that the external appearance of Antioch was magnificent; but the city needed constant restoration owing to the seismic disturbances to which the district has always been peculiarly liable.

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  • The epithet ha-zaken (" the elder"), which usually accompanies his name, proves him to have been a member of the Sanhedrin, and according to a trustworthy authority Hillel filled his leading position for forty years, dying, therefore, about A.D.

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  • In late hieroglyphic the name of Thoth often has the epithet " the twice very great," sometimes " the thrice very great "; in the popular language (demotic) the corresponding epithet is " the five times very great," found as early as the 3rd century B.C. Greek translations give o p..iyas Kai ' Alias and p. yco-Tos: T pio-jeyas occurs in a late magical text.

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  • Edmund, the "deed-doer" as the chronicle calls him, "Edmundus magnificus" as Florence of Worcester describes him, perhaps translating the Saxon epithet, was buried at Glastonbury, an abbey which he had entrusted in 943 to the famous Dunstan.

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  • As an orator he well deserved the epithet of "the Hungarian purple Cicero."

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  • Earthquakes were thought to be produced by Poseidon shaking the earth - hence his epithet of Enosichthon, " Earth-shaker"- and hence he was worshipped even in inland places which had suffered from earthquakes.

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  • His Arabic name was Mansur (the victor), and he received the epithet Chrysorrhoas (gold-pouring) on account of his eloquence.

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  • The noblest survivals of Buddhism in India are to be found, not among any peculiar body, but in the religion of the people; in that principle of the brotherhood of man, with the reassertion of which each new revival of Hinduism starts; in the asylum which the great Hindu sects afford to women who have fallen victims to caste rules, to the widow and the out-caste; in the gentleness and charity to all men, which takes the place of a poor-law in India, and gives a high significance to the half satirical epithet of the " mild " Hindu.

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  • The most notable of these battles, whereby he won his honorific epithet of Nevsky (i.e.

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  • In 1822, with the approval of George IV., who frequented the gardens before his accession, the epithet Royal was added to their title.

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  • Kant's transcendental teaching is summarily as follows: " Transcendental " is his epithet for what is neither empirical - i.e.

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  • The epithet Aeolian implies high antiquity, inasmuch as according to Herodotus Smyrna became Ionian about 688 B.C. Naturally the Ionians had their own version of the story - a version which made Homer come out with the first Athenian colonists.

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  • Skandaalso called Kumara (the youth), Karttikeya, or Subrahmanya (in the south) - the six-headed war-lord of the gods; and Ganese, the lord (or leader) of Siva's troupes of attendants, being at the same time the elephant-headed, paunch-bellied god of wisdom; whilst a third, Kama (Kamadeva) or Kandarpa, the god of love, gets his popular epithet of Ananga," the bodiless,"from his having once, in frolicsome play, tried the power of his arrows upon Siva, whilst engaged in austere practices, when a single glance from the third (forehead) eye of the angry god reduced the mischievous urchin to ashes.

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  • Neither the spirit nor the god is conceived as 7 So the epithet 'el might be applied in Hebrew to men of might, to lofty cedars, or mountains of unusual height, as well as to the Supreme Being.

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  • She is the daughter of Ouranos and Gaia; and after Metis she becomes the bride of Zeus.6 Pindar describes her as born in a golden car from the primeval Oceanus, source of all things, to the sacred height of Olympus to be the consort of Zeus the saviour; and she bears the same august epithet, as the symbol of social justice and the refuge for the oppressed.'

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  • Botanists are agreed that the only species in general cultivation in Great Britain is the one which Bauhin, in his Phytopinax, p. 89 (1596), called Solanum tuberosum esculentum, a name adopted by Linnaeus (omitting the last epithet), and employed by all botanical writers.

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  • In the second, addressed to Juvenal himself, the epithet facundus is applied to him, equally applicable to his " eloquence " as satirist or rhetorician.

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  • In Albertus Magnus the name Geber occurs only once and then with the epithet "of Seville"; doubtless the reference is to the Arabian Jabir ben Aflah, who lived in that city in the r r th century, and wrote an astronomy in 9 books which is of importance in the history of trigonometry.

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  • The absurd epithet, the "laughing philosopher," applied to him by some unknown and very superficial thinker, may possibly have contributed in some measure to the fact that his importance was for centuries overlooked.

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  • This consisted of a paf3Sos or bronze rod; a 7rM6aTcy, a small disk or basin, resembling a scale-pan; a larger disk (XEKavis); and (in 1 The epithet Kara&ros (let down) may refer to the rod, which might be' raised or lowered as required; to the lower disk, which might be moved up and down the stem; to the moving up and down of the scales, in the supposed variety of the game mentioned below.

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  • It has been suggested that it means the "wrestler" or "struggler" (iraAatw) and is an epithet of Heracles, who is often identified with Melkart, but there does not appear to be any traditional connexion between Heracles and Palaemon.

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  • Besides the poems mentioned above, he wrote hymns to Dante, to the Apostles, "Dio e popolo," &c. The chief merit of his work lies in the spontaneity and enthusiasm for the Italian cause which rendered it famous, in spite of certain technical imperfections, and he well deserved the epithet of "The Tyrtaeus of the Italian revolution."

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  • The stream is heavily charged with sediment, and from that circumstance got its ancient epithet of flavus (tawny).

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  • Various fabulous properties were attributed to the animal, whatever it was, by the ancients, that of extraordinary powers of vision, including ability to see through opaque substances, being one; whence the epithet lynx-eyed," which has survived to the present day.

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  • But with the possible exception of the prohibition of oaths there is nothing which ought to suggest the epithet.

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  • His great dialectic skill acquired for him the epithet "uprooter of mountains."

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  • In both these islands there lingered a definite tradition of a connexion with the cult of the oriental Aphrodite Urania, an epithet which will be referred to later.

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  • 130 f oll., a passage belonging to the latest period of epic), as " raging," an epithet that indicates that in those comparatively early times the orgiastic character of his worship was recognized.

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  • He is the god of agriculture, specially connected with Aristaeus, which, originally a mere epithet, became an independent personality (see, however, Farnell, Cults of the Greek States, iv.

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  • Carneius (probably "horned") is considered by some to be a pre-Dorian god of cattle, also connected with harvest operations, whose cult was grafted on to that of Apollo; by others, to have been originally an epithet of Apollo, afterwards detached as a separate personality (Farnell, Cults, iv.

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  • Here probably also is to be referred the epithet Jyceius, which, formerly connected with AUK- (" shine") and used to support the conception of Apollo as a light-god, is now 1 Hesychius; who also gives the explanation crn s (" fold"), in which case Apollo would be the god of flocks and herds.

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  • In accordance with this, the epithet -yEvns will not mean "born of" or "begetting light," but rather "born from the she-wolf," in which form Leto herself was said to have been conducted by wolves to Delos.

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  • whether Paean (or Paeon) was originally an epithet of Apollo, subsequently developed into an independent personality, or an independent deity merged in the later arrival (Farnell, Cults, iv.

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  • According to Wilamowitz-M011endorff in his edition of Isyllus, the epithet Maleatas alluded to above is also connected with the functions of the healing god, imported into Athens in the 4th century B.C. with other well-known health divinities.

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  • Further, he is able to purify the guilty and to cleanse from sin (here some refer the epithet iarpOyavres, in the sense of "physician of the soul").

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  • p. 150, who takes Agyieus to mean "leader"); on the epithet Prostaterius, he who "stands before the house," hence "protector," see G.

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  • It cannot be shown that on Greek soil Apollo originally had the meaning of a sun-god; in Homer, Aeschylus and 'Plato, the sun-god Helios is distinctly separated from Phoebus Apollo; the constant epithet cfoi(30s, usually explained as the brightness of the sun, may equally well refer to his physical beauty or moral purity; XvKrJyEV11S has already been noticed.

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  • He assumed the name of Paolo, by which, with the epithet Servita, he was always known to his contemporaries.

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  • FLAVIUS VALERIUS CONSTANTIUS, commonly called Chlorus (the Pale), an epithet due to the Byzantine historians, Roman emperor and father of Constantine the Great, was born about A.D.

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  • He chose the epithet Arya as being more dignified than the slightly contemptuous term Hindu.

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  • It well deserves the epithet "craggy" (rraorraX6Ecraa) of the Homeric hymn.

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  • currus, " chariot"), in Roman antiquities, the epithet applied to the chair of office, sella curulis, used by the "curuie" or highest magistrates and also by the emperors.

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  • Jainism purports to be the system of belief promulgated by Vaddhamana, better known by his epithet of Maha-vira (the great hero), who was a contemporary of Gotama, the Buddha.

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  • He richly deserved the epithet "the greatest of the Magyars" bestowed upon him by his political antagonist Kossuth.

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  • ANADYOMENE ('AvaSvo l av), an epithet of Aphrodite (Venus), expressive of her having sprung from the foam of the sea.

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  • Within Sanskrit itself probably two words have to be distinguished: (1) drya, the origin of Aryan, from which the usual term arya is a derivative; (2) arya, which frequently appears in the Rig Veda as an epithet of deities.

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  • 233-235) apply the epithet "Pelasgic" to a district called Argos about Mt Othrys in south Thessaly, and to Zeus of Dodona.

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  • Some authorities see in it a descriptive epithet, derived from Arabic darasa (those who read the Book), or darisa (those in possession of Truth) or du g s (the clever or initiated); but more connect it with the name of the first missionary, Ismael Darazi.

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  • It is possible that the epithet 9eoXo^yos for St John may go back as far as Papias.

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  • Strictly, however, the epithet implies the absence of all limitation.

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  • Divination by means of flies was known at Babylon."' There are other cases of names compounded of Baal and an element equivalent to a descriptive epithet, e.g.

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  • The epithet "violet-crowned," used of Athens by Pindar, is due either to the blue haze on the surrounding hills, or to the use of violets (or irises) for festal wreaths.

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  • Both Opis (or Oupis) and Hecaerge are names of Artemis, the latter being the feminine of Hecaergos, an epithet of Apollo.

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  • p. 431), although the epithet 17µEpacia ("the tamer," according to others, the "gentle" goddess of healing) seems to refer to her connexion with the latter.

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  • There is no doubt that Callisto is identical with Artemis; her name is an obvious variation of KaXMiaTrt, a frequent epithet of the goddess, to whom a temple was erected on the hill where Callisto was supposed to be buried.

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  • For this exploit he received, in 1774, the honorific epithet Chesmensky, and the privilege of quartering the imperial arms in his shield.

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  • The island also received the epithet of Holy, and was a favourite burial-ground until modern times.

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  • The Zeus of Laodicea, with the curious epithet Azeus or Azeis, is a frequent symbol on the city coins.

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  • for "bright," "pure,"), a common epithet of Apollo.

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  • The tale goes that the scorn of the daughter of a neighbouring king induced Harald to take a vow not to cut nor comb his hair until he was sole king of Norway, and that ten years later he was justified in trimming it; whereupon he exchanged the epithet "Shockhead" for the one by which he is usually known.

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  • It will be realized from the foregoing description that it is impossible to draw accurate boundary lines to the great Irish plain, yet it rightly carries the epithet central because it dis- Ceutrai tinctly divides the northern mountain groups from the southern.

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  • Even more important was Rashi's commentary on the Talmud, which became so acknowledged as the definitive interpretation that Rashi is cited simply under the epithet of "the Commentator."

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  • The Aeolic form of the name, /piipva, was retained even in the Attic dialect, and the epithet "Aeolian Smyrna" remained long after the conquest.

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  • The "crown of Smyrna" seems to have been an epithet applied to the acropolis with its circle of buildings.

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  • But, in the title of his Ecclesiastical History he prefixes the old to the new name and proudly adds the epithet Angligena.

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  • The later epithet Corvinus, adopted by his son Matthias, was doubtless derived from another property, Piatra da Corvo or Raven's Rock.

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  • On the east side the plain is also limited by a low ridge, which still justifies the epithet of nemorosa, or the " wooded," applied by Virgil to Zacynthus.

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  • The branches bear horrific sharp axillary spines, as is suggested by the specific epithet (Gibson 1999 ).

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  • He, as well as the king, both deserve the epithet ' great ' .

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  • Now may we be convinced of the propriety of applying the epithet " good " to humility or piety toward God.

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  • Did you notice him then, secret and shy as an otter, transferring an epithet?

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  • As a result of this action he was given the epithet " Butcher " Cumberland.

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  • The gig was organized by a promoter who uses the epithet " Up For It " .

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  • As a result he earned the epithet ' Battle Shirker ' .

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  • The adjective applied to the plant, the specific epithet, is often helpful in describing the plant.

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  • The same epithet is sometimes [240] coupled with the term relation, in which case the impropriety is still more glaring.

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  • He is said to have been vain and fat, and to have been so fond of display that he was nicknamed Pompicus, or the Showy (unless the epithet refers to his literary style).

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  • In other writers the word is a mere epithet of Apollo in his capacity as a god of healing (cf.

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  • ANTILEGOMENA (avTcXeyo / eva, contradicted or disputed), an epithet used by the early Christian writers to denote those books of the New Testament which, although sometimes publicly read in the churches, were not for a considerable time admitted to be genuine, or received into the canon of Scripture.

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  • It was simply a covering epithet, and like the word " god " could be transferred from one deity to another.

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  • By the Chinese it is called the country of the Manchus, an epithet meaning " pure," chosen by the founder of the dynasty which now rules over Manchuria and China as an appropriate designation for his family.

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  • In every Mahommedan and Hindu country the most scurrilous epithet bestowed on a European or a Christian is "a dog," and that accounts for the fact that in the whole of the Jewish history there is not a single allusion to hunting with dogs.

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  • Several quaint and beautiful legends have been handed down as to the origin of the epithet of "venerable" generally attached to his name.

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  • The date, the twenty-first year after the formal coronation of Asoka, would be 248 B.C. The name Piyadassi is the official epithet always used by Asoka in his inscriptions when speaking of himself.

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  • The epithet rrpovoia (" forethought") is due, according to Farnell, to a confusion with irpovaLa, referring to a statue of the goddess standing "before a shrine," and arose later (probably spreading from Delphi), some time after the Persian wars, in which she repelled a Persian attack on the temples "by divine forethought"; another legend attributes the name to her skill in assisting Leto at the birth of Apollo and Artemis.

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  • OMAR BIN IBaAIrTIsr AL-KHAYYAM, the great Persian mathematician, astronomer, freethinker and epigrammatist, who derived the epithet Khayytm (the tentmaker) most likely from his fathers trade, was born in or near NIsh~pflr, where he is said to have died in A.H.

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  • His philosophical doctrines are not known, though some have inferred from the epithet ebSac�ovuais (" fortunate"), usually applied to him, that he held the end of life to be eiSaa�ovia.

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  • Again, Aristotle's description of Xenophanes as the first of the Eleatic unitarians does not necessarily imply that the unity asserted by Xenophanes was the unity asserted by Parmenides; the phrase, "contemplating the firmament, he declared that the One is God," leaves it doubtful whether Aristotle attributed to Xenophanes any philosophical theory whatever; and the epithet a ypoLKOTEpos discourages the belief that Aristotle regarded Xenophanes as the author of a new and important departure.

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  • Dr Neree Beauchemin Keeps Within Somewhat Narrow Limits In Les Floraisons Matutinales (1897); But Within Them He Shows True Poetic Genius, A Fine Sense Of Rhythm, Rhyme And Verbal Melody, A Curiosa Felicitas Of Epithet And Phrase, And So Sure An Eye For Local Colour That A Stranger Could Choose No Better Guide To The Imaginative Life Of Canada.

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  • the trivial epithet it bears; for by none of his countrymen is it deemed an unlucky bird, but rather the reverse.

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  • Paracelsus's name was Theophrastus Bombast von Hohenheim; for the names Philippus and Aureolus which are sometimes added good authority is wanting, and the epithet Paracelsus, like some similar compounds, was probably one of his own making, and was meant to denote his superiority to Celsus.

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  • Meanwhile a headless statue of a king named Khyan, found at Bubastis, was attributed on various grounds to the Hyksos, the soundest arguments being his foreign name and the boastful un-Egyptian epithet "beloved of his ka," where "beloved of Ptah" or some other god was to be expected.

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  • The synonym "gray," given by Willughby and Ray, is doubtless derived from the general colour of the species, and has its analogue in the Icelandic Grdond, applied almost indifferently, or with some distinguishing epithet, to the female of any of the freshwater ducks, and especially to both sexes of the present, in which, as stated in the text, there is comparatively little conspicuous difference of plumage in drake and duck.

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  • Prof. Kennett points out to the present writer that the epithet "bald-head" may refer to the sign of mourning for Elisha's lost master (cf.

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  • The epithet then scornfully applied to him of "Clemency" Canning is now remembered only to his honour.

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  • en, neut, et) is added as a suffix to the substantive (when there is no epithet).

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  • I2II~ 608 A.H)all three paoegyrists of the atabegs of Azerbaijan, and especially of Sultan J~izii Arslan Kamal-uddin I~fahgni, tortured to death by the Moguls in 1237 (635 A.H.), who sang, like his father Jamal-uddIn, the praise of the governors of I~fahn, and gained the epithet of the creator of fine thoughts (Khallal~-ulmaanI); and Saif-uddin IsfarangI (d.

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  • Zeus took him up, enclosed him within his own thigh till he came to maturity, and then brought him to the light, so that he was twice born; it was to celebrate this double birth that the dithyrambus (also used as an epithet of the god) was sung (see Etym.

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  • The epithet Maleatas, which, as the quantity of the first vowel (a) shows,' cannot mean god of "sheep" or "the apple-tree," is probably a local adjective derived from Malea (perhaps Cape Malea), and may refer to an originally distinct personality, subsequently merged in that of Apollo (see below).

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  • The position of Colonus itself is marked by two bare knolls of lightcoloured earth, which caused the poet in the same chorus tc apply the epithet "white" (ap'yii-ra) to that place.

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  • Various explanations have been given of the epithet 6pOia: (1) that it refers to the primitive type of the "'erect" wooden idol; (2) that it means "she who safely rears children after birth," or "heals the sick" (cf.

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