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epidemics

epidemics Sentence Examples

  • The dissemination of plant parasites is favored by many circumstances not always obvious, whence an air of mystery regarding epidemics was easily created in earlier times.

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  • The origin of these two epidemics was obscure.

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  • The origin of these two epidemics was obscure.

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  • Endemic diseases are unknown and epidemics are rare.

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  • Yellow fever epidemics are common on the Campeche coast, and sometimes appear at Progreso and Merida.

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  • The epidemic nature of wheat-rust was known to Aristotle about 350 B.C., and the Greeks and Romans knew these epidemics well, their philosophers having shrewd speculations as to causes, while the people held characteristic superstitions regarding them, which found vent in the dedication of special festivals and deities to the pests.

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  • - Among the most Interesting modern means of waging war against epidemic pests is that of introducing other epidemics among the pests themselvese.g.

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  • The name of John Pringle (1707-1782) should also be mentioned as one of the first to study epidemics of fevers occurring in prisons and camps.

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  • Mangrove swamps surround the town and epidemics of cholera, yellow fever and other tropical diseases have been frequent; but the unhealthiness of the climate is mitigated to some extent by the high tides which cover the marshes, and the invigorating breezes which blow in from the sea.

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  • Moreover, as this complication was a marked feature in certain epidemics of plague in India, the hypothesis has been framed by Hirsch that a special variety of plague, pestis indica, still found in India, is that which overran the world in the 14th century.

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  • The name of John Pringle (1707-1782) should also be mentioned as one of the first to study epidemics of fevers occurring in prisons and camps.

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  • The most unhealthy period is from 1st May to 31st October, when there are, from time to time, outbreaks of typhoid, small-pox, diphtheria and other epidemics.

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  • Experience with epidemics, dearly bought in the past, has shown that one fruitful cause is the laying open to the inroads of some Fungus or insect, hitherto leading a quiet endemic life in the fields and forests, large tracts of its special food, along which it may range rampant without check to its dispersal, nutrition and reproduction.

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  • Nevertheless, epidemics occur, and practical measures are devised to meet the various cases and to check the ravages already begun.

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  • There have been several professional photographers (all detected in fraud sooner or later) who made it their business to take photo complaints, to certain epidemics of the middles ages,' and to phenomena that have occurred at some religious revivals.

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  • Epidemics of smallpox and typhoid occur; and leprosy, imported from the Orange River and Cape Colonies, has taken firm hold on the Basuto, of whom about 9r per too() are sufferers from this disease.

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  • Aside from the recurrent loss of life, the pecuniary loss from such epidemics was enormous, and the interference with commerce and social intercourse with other countries extremely vexatious.

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  • As a consequence of these insanitary conditions the death-rate is very high, and in case of epidemics the mortality is enormous.

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  • This immigration was also stimulated by the terrible condition of western Europe between 987 and 1060, when it was visited by an endless succession of bad harvests and epidemics.

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  • The most valuable intellectual possession was a large mass of recorded observations in individual cases and epidemics of disease.

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  • At the same time the discovery of new diseases, unknown to the ancients, and the keener attention which the great epidemics of plague caused to be paid to those already known, led to more minute study of the natural history of disease.

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  • Epidemics rarely spread over any considerable tract of country, but are nearly always confined within local limits.

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  • Littre accepts the following thirteen as absolutely genuine: (I) On Ancient Medicine (IIEpi ap X airs i f rpLK'Y / s); (2) The Prognostics (IIpoyvcovruK6v); (3) The Aphorisms ('AOopc-pot); (4) The Epidemics, i.

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  • Of these Adams accepts as certainly genuine the 2nd, 6th, 5th, 3rd (7 books), 4th, 7th, 8th, 9th and 12th, and as " pretty confidently acknowledged as genuine, although the evidence in their favour is not so strong," the 1st, Loth and 13th, and, in addition, (14) On Ulcers (IIEpi EXKc v); (15) On Fistulae (IIEpi vu piyywv); (16) On Hemorrhoids (IIEpi aipoppot&e); (17) On the Sacred Disease (IIEpi iepi l s yob o- According to the sceptical and somewhat subjective criticism of Ermerins, the whole collection is to be regarded as spurious except Epidemics, books i.

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  • Daremberg's edition of the Ouvres choisies (2nd ed., Paris, 1855) includes the Oath, the Law, the Prorrhetics, book i., the Prognostics, On Airs, Waters, and Places, Epidemics, books i.

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  • above high water mark, and was thus for a long period subject to inundation and epidemics, and only careful drainage rendered the site healthy.

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  • The city is built in a bowllike depression of the great central plateau, and the drainage from the surrounding hillsides has produced a dangerously insanitary condition, from which one or two virulent fever epidemics have resulted.

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  • Some, however, give rise to dangerous or fatal diseases, while others may cause ravaging epidemics; instances of these are given under the various orders.

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  • The climate is mild and healthy, although serious epidemics of yellow fever and typhus have occurred.

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  • All collections of living beings are subject to epidemics, and in an ideal menagerie special precautions should be taken.

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  • On both coasts yellow fever epidemics appear at frequent intervals.

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  • There were no unusual epidemics during those years, and the rate given may be considered normal.

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  • Epidemics of typhus are not unknown, as well as ophthalmia.

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  • Drains were rare, epidemics common.

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  • Plague, formerly one of the great scourges of the country, seems to have been stamped out, the last visitation having been in 1844, but cholera epidemics occasionally occur.i Cholera rarely extends south of Cairo.

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  • In 1848 it is believed that over 200,000 persons died from cholera, but later epidemics have been much less fatal.

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  • The mean annual temperature is about 82° to 83° F.; malarial and bilious fevers are common, the latter being known as "Guayaquil fever," and epidemics of yellow fever are frequent.

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  • The climate is now less healthy than it was, severe epidemics of malarial fever having frequently occurred, so that malaria now appears to be endemic among the non-European population.

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  • There were in addition several epidemics of small-pox and plague, and from about 1880 onward the continual decline in the price of sugar seriously affected the islanders, especially the Creole population.

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  • For the epidemics of the succeeding centuries we must refer to more detailed works.(1)

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  • It is impossible, however, to pass over the great cycle of epidemics in the 14th century known as the Black Death.

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  • (1) See Noah Webster's History of Epidemic Diseases, 8vo (2 vols., London, 1800) (a work which makes no pretension to medical learning, but exhibits the history of epidemics in connexion with physical disasters - as earthquakes, famines, &c.); Lersch, Kleine Pest-Chronik (8vo, 1880) (a convenient short compendium, but not always accurate); "Athanasii Kircheri Chronologia Pestium" (to A.D.

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  • The most complete medical history of epidemics is Haser's Geschichte der epidemischen Krankheiten (3rd ed., Jena, 1882), forming the third volume of his History of Medicine.

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  • (2) See the original account reprinted with other documents in Haser, op. cit.; also Hecker, Epidemics of the Middle Ages, trans.

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  • plague epidemics, even in the latest, that in Russia in 1878-1879, and, moreover, according to the latest accounts, are not a special feature of Indian plague.

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  • Hecker calculates that one-fourth of the population of Europe, or 25 millions of persons, died in the whole of the epidemics.

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  • Some of the epidemics of this period in Italy and Germany are known by the accounts of eminent physicians, as Vochs, Fracastor, Mercurialis, Borgarucci, Ingrassia, Massaria, Amici, &c., (3) whose writings are important because the question of contagion first began to be raised, and also plague had to be distinguished from typhus fever, which began in this century to appear in Europe.

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  • The epidemics in England will be most conveniently considered in one series.

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  • In another direction the plague spread over Little Russia in 1770, and desolated Kieff, while in the next year it broke out in Moscow and produced one of the most destructive epidemics of modern.

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  • The disease, while reappearing in the seats of the terrible earlier epidemics, was more limited in its range and of shorter duration.'

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  • After a short interval it reappeared at Divanieh in December 1874, and spread over a much wider area than in the previous epidemics.

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  • The Astrakhan disease may have been imported from Resht or Baku, or may have been caused concurrently with the epidemics of these places by some cause affecting the basin of the Caspian generally.

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  • In 1834 and 1836 other epidemics occurred, which at last attracted the attention of government.

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  • And even in the East plague was confined to more or less clearly localized epidemics; it showed no power of pandemic diffusion.

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  • At the end of the 16th century there was a pestilence following a prolonged famine, and in the 17th century two violent epidemics are recorded under the names ta'un and waba.

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  • (2) Pneumonic plague was observed and described in many of the old epidemics, and particularly by two medical men, Dr Gilder and Dr Whyte, in the outbreak in Kathiawar in 1816; but its precise significance was first recognized by Childe in Bombay.

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  • It does not differ from them in its clinical features more than epidemics of other diseases are apt to vary at different times, or more than can be accounted for by difference of handling.

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  • During the epidemics of 1878 and 1879 fully two-thirds of the population fled from the city, many of whom died of the fever at other places, and a still larger number did not return.

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  • Medical men have stated that the number of deaths, in times when there are no epidemics, amounts to 59 or 20 per thousand, and the number of births to 25 to 40 per thousand.

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  • Difficulties on the route; dissensions between Emin and the authorities in German East Africa, and misunderstandings on the part of both; epidemics of disease in Emin's force, followed by a growing spirit of mutiny among his native followers; an illness of a painful nature which attacked him - all these gradually undermined Emin's courage, and his diaries at the close of 1891 reflect a gloomy and almost hopeless spirit.

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  • The virulence of infective diseases varies in different epidemics, and at different times in the same epidemic. It had been noted that many infective diseases did not attack an individual a second time, the first attack appearing to protect from subsequent ones.

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  • The annual diminution in the number of the Indian population was undoubtedly very great, but it was due far more to the result of European epidemics and to indulgence in alcohol than to hard work.

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  • This phenomenon is due to the activity of a whole series of marine bacteria of various genera, the examination and organisms depend on the discovery that their patho genicity or virulence can be modified - diminished or increased - by definite treatment, and, in the natural course of epidemics, by alterations in the environment.

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  • 6 a may result, a point of extreme importance in connexion with the lighting and ventilation of dwellings, the purification of rivers and streams, and the general diminution of epidemics in nature.

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  • Cholera epidemics.

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  • Besides those who died in warfare, whole tribes of Hottentots were destroyed by epidemics of smallpox in 1713 and in 1755.

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  • We are indebted to the Local Government Board for having traced to such causes certain epidemics of typhoid, and there can be no manner of doubt that the evil has been very general.

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  • Both it and the aromatic solution are powerful intestinal astringents, and are therefore useful in diarrhoea of a serious type, being strongly recommended both as a prophylactic and as a treatment during epidemics of Asiatic cholera.

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  • This decrease was due partly to the famines of 1896-1897 and 1900-1901, partly to the epidemics of cholera and fever which accompanied them, and partly to the plague which attacked the state in as great measure as the surrounding presidency.

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  • The power of the crown was increased by the confiscation of the great Sturlung estates, which were underleased to farmers, while the early falling off of the Norse trade threatened to deprive the island of the means of existence; for the great epidemics and eruptions of the 1.4th century had gravely attacked its pastoral wealth and ruined much of its pasture and fishery.

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  • In those cases due to Shiga's bacillus the ideal treatment has been put at our disposal by the preparation of a specific antitoxin; this has been given a trial in several grave epidemics of late, and may be said to be the most satisfactory treatment and offer the greatest hope of recovery.

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  • Subsequent epidemics have not been attended by anything like this mortality, but there has, however, been a steady decrease, principally among young children, owing to whooping-cough, tuberculosis and croup. Every Fijian child seems to contract yaws at some time in its life, a mistaken notion existing on the part of the parents that it strengthens the child's physique.

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  • Epidemics of influenza and fever have been very prevalent of late years in the central provinces.

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  • In countries with generalized epidemics, antenatal clinic attendees are thought to represent the adult population with good accuracy.

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  • viral conjunctivitis may occur in epidemics, affecting many people at the same time.

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  • Figure: an example of plant microcosm systems used to quantify spatio-temporal dynamics of epidemics (left ).

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  • epidemics of influenza.

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  • Moreover, as we know, the plague epidemics of early modern London did not hit all areas of the capital with equal force.

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  • Hundreds of thousands have died from hunger or the cholera and typhoid epidemics which have swept the country.

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  • During the 19 th century, cholera spread to Europe and the Americas, causing several devastating epidemics.

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  • followed by a discussion of the epidemics of the middle ages and their effects upon the public order.

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  • mumps epidemics in young children.

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  • This could lead to earlier epidemics of disease initiated from seed- or soil-borne oospores.

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  • plague epidemics of early modern London did not hit all areas of the capital with equal force.

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  • poliomyelitis epidemics were frequent in the 30's and 40's and patients with spinal paralysis were treated in tank ventilators.

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  • quantify spatio-temporal dynamics of epidemics (left ).

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  • Such methods may have backfired on the Poles, as epidemics are poor respecters of persons.

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  • Clean water was in short supply and there were major epidemics of water-borne diseases including typhoid, cholera and diarrhea.

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  • virulent epidemics and the scope of health care workers ' duty of care "

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  • whitefly vector has not been effective in preventing epidemics and yield losses due to these viruses.

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  • The most unhealthy period is from 1st May to 31st October, when there are, from time to time, outbreaks of typhoid, small-pox, diphtheria and other epidemics.

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  • The Malays formerly suffered severely from smallpox epidemics, but in the portion of the peninsula under British rule vaccination has been introduced, and the ravages of the disease no longer assume serious dimensions.

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  • The epidemic nature of wheat-rust was known to Aristotle about 350 B.C., and the Greeks and Romans knew these epidemics well, their philosophers having shrewd speculations as to causes, while the people held characteristic superstitions regarding them, which found vent in the dedication of special festivals and deities to the pests.

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  • It is among the Invertebrata that epidemics of destruction are referred to, though we should bear in mind that it is only the difference in numerical proportion that prevents our speaking of an epidemic of elephants or of rabbits, though we use the term when speaking of blight insects; there is little consistency in the matter, as it is usual to speak of an invasion or scourge of locusts, caterpillars, &c. Insect injuries are very varied in degree and in kind.

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  • Again, the curious distortions on the stems of nettles attacked by the Aecidium form of the heteroecious Puccina (]aricis (see FUNGf for Heteroecism), or on maize stems and leaves attacked by Ustilago Maydis, or on the inflorescence of crucifers infested with Cystopus, &c., are not individually very destructive; it is the cumulative effects of numerous attacks or of extensive epidemics which eventually tell.

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  • The dissemination of plant parasites is favored by many circumstances not always obvious, whence an air of mystery regarding epidemics was easily created in earlier times.

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  • Experience with epidemics, dearly bought in the past, has shown that one fruitful cause is the laying open to the inroads of some Fungus or insect, hitherto leading a quiet endemic life in the fields and forests, large tracts of its special food, along which it may range rampant without check to its dispersal, nutrition and reproduction.

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  • It may be that in particular cases particular modes of cultivation disfavour the host; or that the soil, climate or seasons do so; but overwhelming evidence exists to show that the principal causes of epidemics reside in circumstances which favor the spread, nutrition and reproduction of the pest, and the lesson to be learnt is, that precautions against the establishment of such favoring conditions must be sought.

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  • Nevertheless, epidemics occur, and practical measures are devised to meet the various cases and to check the ravages already begun.

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  • - Among the most Interesting modern means of waging war against epidemic pests is that of introducing other epidemics among the pests themselvese.g.

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  • Endemic diseases are unknown and epidemics are rare.

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  • There have been several professional photographers (all detected in fraud sooner or later) who made it their business to take photo complaints, to certain epidemics of the middles ages,' and to phenomena that have occurred at some religious revivals.

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  • 4 See Hecker, Epidemics of the Middle Ages (1859).

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  • Yellow fever epidemics are common on the Campeche coast, and sometimes appear at Progreso and Merida.

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  • h,e, exhaustion of the soil in the vicinity of towns, or epidemics brought on by insanitary habits, might easily cause depopulation in so hot a climate.

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  • Epidemics of smallpox and typhoid occur; and leprosy, imported from the Orange River and Cape Colonies, has taken firm hold on the Basuto, of whom about 9r per too() are sufferers from this disease.

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  • Aside from the recurrent loss of life, the pecuniary loss from such epidemics was enormous, and the interference with commerce and social intercourse with other countries extremely vexatious.

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  • As a consequence of these insanitary conditions the death-rate is very high, and in case of epidemics the mortality is enormous.

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  • This immigration was also stimulated by the terrible condition of western Europe between 987 and 1060, when it was visited by an endless succession of bad harvests and epidemics.

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  • The most valuable intellectual possession was a large mass of recorded observations in individual cases and epidemics of disease.

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  • At the same time the discovery of new diseases, unknown to the ancients, and the keener attention which the great epidemics of plague caused to be paid to those already known, led to more minute study of the natural history of disease.

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  • Epidemics rarely spread over any considerable tract of country, but are nearly always confined within local limits.

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  • Littre accepts the following thirteen as absolutely genuine: (I) On Ancient Medicine (IIEpi ap X airs i f rpLK'Y / s); (2) The Prognostics (IIpoyvcovruK6v); (3) The Aphorisms ('AOopc-pot); (4) The Epidemics, i.

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  • Of these Adams accepts as certainly genuine the 2nd, 6th, 5th, 3rd (7 books), 4th, 7th, 8th, 9th and 12th, and as " pretty confidently acknowledged as genuine, although the evidence in their favour is not so strong," the 1st, Loth and 13th, and, in addition, (14) On Ulcers (IIEpi EXKc v); (15) On Fistulae (IIEpi vu piyywv); (16) On Hemorrhoids (IIEpi aipoppot&e); (17) On the Sacred Disease (IIEpi iepi l s yob o- According to the sceptical and somewhat subjective criticism of Ermerins, the whole collection is to be regarded as spurious except Epidemics, books i.

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  • Daremberg's edition of the Ouvres choisies (2nd ed., Paris, 1855) includes the Oath, the Law, the Prorrhetics, book i., the Prognostics, On Airs, Waters, and Places, Epidemics, books i.

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  • above high water mark, and was thus for a long period subject to inundation and epidemics, and only careful drainage rendered the site healthy.

    0
    0
  • Mangrove swamps surround the town and epidemics of cholera, yellow fever and other tropical diseases have been frequent; but the unhealthiness of the climate is mitigated to some extent by the high tides which cover the marshes, and the invigorating breezes which blow in from the sea.

    0
    0
  • The city is built in a bowllike depression of the great central plateau, and the drainage from the surrounding hillsides has produced a dangerously insanitary condition, from which one or two virulent fever epidemics have resulted.

    0
    0
  • Some, however, give rise to dangerous or fatal diseases, while others may cause ravaging epidemics; instances of these are given under the various orders.

    0
    0
  • The climate is mild and healthy, although serious epidemics of yellow fever and typhus have occurred.

    0
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  • All collections of living beings are subject to epidemics, and in an ideal menagerie special precautions should be taken.

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  • On both coasts yellow fever epidemics appear at frequent intervals.

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  • There were no unusual epidemics during those years, and the rate given may be considered normal.

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  • Epidemics of typhus are not unknown, as well as ophthalmia.

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  • Drains were rare, epidemics common.

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  • Plague, formerly one of the great scourges of the country, seems to have been stamped out, the last visitation having been in 1844, but cholera epidemics occasionally occur.i Cholera rarely extends south of Cairo.

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  • In 1848 it is believed that over 200,000 persons died from cholera, but later epidemics have been much less fatal.

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  • Other destructive agencies were epidemics, such especially as measles and small-pox, which swept away 30,000 Fijians in 1875; the introduction of strong drinks, including, besides vile spirits, a most pernicious concoction brewed in Tahiti from oranges; Maori Religion and Mythology, p. 26.

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  • The mean annual temperature is about 82° to 83° F.; malarial and bilious fevers are common, the latter being known as "Guayaquil fever," and epidemics of yellow fever are frequent.

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  • The climate is now less healthy than it was, severe epidemics of malarial fever having frequently occurred, so that malaria now appears to be endemic among the non-European population.

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  • There were in addition several epidemics of small-pox and plague, and from about 1880 onward the continual decline in the price of sugar seriously affected the islanders, especially the Creole population.

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  • For the epidemics of the succeeding centuries we must refer to more detailed works.(1)

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  • It is impossible, however, to pass over the great cycle of epidemics in the 14th century known as the Black Death.

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  • Moreover, as this complication was a marked feature in certain epidemics of plague in India, the hypothesis has been framed by Hirsch that a special variety of plague, pestis indica, still found in India, is that which overran the world in the 14th century.

    0
    0
  • (1) See Noah Webster's History of Epidemic Diseases, 8vo (2 vols., London, 1800) (a work which makes no pretension to medical learning, but exhibits the history of epidemics in connexion with physical disasters - as earthquakes, famines, &c.); Lersch, Kleine Pest-Chronik (8vo, 1880) (a convenient short compendium, but not always accurate); "Athanasii Kircheri Chronologia Pestium" (to A.D.

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  • The most complete medical history of epidemics is Haser's Geschichte der epidemischen Krankheiten (3rd ed., Jena, 1882), forming the third volume of his History of Medicine.

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  • (2) See the original account reprinted with other documents in Haser, op. cit.; also Hecker, Epidemics of the Middle Ages, trans.

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  • plague epidemics, even in the latest, that in Russia in 1878-1879, and, moreover, according to the latest accounts, are not a special feature of Indian plague.

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  • Hecker calculates that one-fourth of the population of Europe, or 25 millions of persons, died in the whole of the epidemics.

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  • Some of the epidemics of this period in Italy and Germany are known by the accounts of eminent physicians, as Vochs, Fracastor, Mercurialis, Borgarucci, Ingrassia, Massaria, Amici, &c., (3) whose writings are important because the question of contagion first began to be raised, and also plague had to be distinguished from typhus fever, which began in this century to appear in Europe.

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  • The epidemics in England will be most conveniently considered in one series.

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  • In 1656 one of the most destructive of all recorded epidemics in Europe raged in Naples; it is said to have carried off 300,000 persons in the space of five months.

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  • As has often been observed in other plague epidemics, sound people could enter infected houses and even sleep in the beds of those who had died of the plague " before they were even cold or cleansed from the stench of the diseased " (Hodges).

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  • In another direction the plague spread over Little Russia in 1770, and desolated Kieff, while in the next year it broke out in Moscow and produced one of the most destructive epidemics of modern.

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  • The disease, while reappearing in the seats of the terrible earlier epidemics, was more limited in its range and of shorter duration.'

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  • After a short interval it reappeared at Divanieh in December 1874, and spread over a much wider area than in the previous epidemics.

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    0
  • The Astrakhan disease may have been imported from Resht or Baku, or may have been caused concurrently with the epidemics of these places by some cause affecting the basin of the Caspian generally.

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  • In 1834 and 1836 other epidemics occurred, which at last attracted the attention of government.

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  • And even in the East plague was confined to more or less clearly localized epidemics; it showed no power of pandemic diffusion.

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    0
  • At the end of the 16th century there was a pestilence following a prolonged famine, and in the 17th century two violent epidemics are recorded under the names ta'un and waba.

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    0
  • (2) Pneumonic plague was observed and described in many of the old epidemics, and particularly by two medical men, Dr Gilder and Dr Whyte, in the outbreak in Kathiawar in 1816; but its precise significance was first recognized by Childe in Bombay.

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  • It does not differ from them in its clinical features more than epidemics of other diseases are apt to vary at different times, or more than can be accounted for by difference of handling.

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  • During the epidemics of 1878 and 1879 fully two-thirds of the population fled from the city, many of whom died of the fever at other places, and a still larger number did not return.

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  • Medical men have stated that the number of deaths, in times when there are no epidemics, amounts to 59 or 20 per thousand, and the number of births to 25 to 40 per thousand.

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  • Difficulties on the route; dissensions between Emin and the authorities in German East Africa, and misunderstandings on the part of both; epidemics of disease in Emin's force, followed by a growing spirit of mutiny among his native followers; an illness of a painful nature which attacked him - all these gradually undermined Emin's courage, and his diaries at the close of 1891 reflect a gloomy and almost hopeless spirit.

    0
    0
  • The virulence of infective diseases varies in different epidemics, and at different times in the same epidemic. It had been noted that many infective diseases did not attack an individual a second time, the first attack appearing to protect from subsequent ones.

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  • The annual diminution in the number of the Indian population was undoubtedly very great, but it was due far more to the result of European epidemics and to indulgence in alcohol than to hard work.

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  • This phenomenon is due to the activity of a whole series of marine bacteria of various genera, the examination and organisms depend on the discovery that their patho genicity or virulence can be modified - diminished or increased - by definite treatment, and, in the natural course of epidemics, by alterations in the environment.

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  • 6 a may result, a point of extreme importance in connexion with the lighting and ventilation of dwellings, the purification of rivers and streams, and the general diminution of epidemics in nature.

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  • Cholera epidemics.

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  • Besides those who died in warfare, whole tribes of Hottentots were destroyed by epidemics of smallpox in 1713 and in 1755.

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  • We are indebted to the Local Government Board for having traced to such causes certain epidemics of typhoid, and there can be no manner of doubt that the evil has been very general.

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  • Both it and the aromatic solution are powerful intestinal astringents, and are therefore useful in diarrhoea of a serious type, being strongly recommended both as a prophylactic and as a treatment during epidemics of Asiatic cholera.

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  • This decrease was due partly to the famines of 1896-1897 and 1900-1901, partly to the epidemics of cholera and fever which accompanied them, and partly to the plague which attacked the state in as great measure as the surrounding presidency.

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  • The power of the crown was increased by the confiscation of the great Sturlung estates, which were underleased to farmers, while the early falling off of the Norse trade threatened to deprive the island of the means of existence; for the great epidemics and eruptions of the 1.4th century had gravely attacked its pastoral wealth and ruined much of its pasture and fishery.

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  • In those cases due to Shiga's bacillus the ideal treatment has been put at our disposal by the preparation of a specific antitoxin; this has been given a trial in several grave epidemics of late, and may be said to be the most satisfactory treatment and offer the greatest hope of recovery.

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  • Subsequent epidemics have not been attended by anything like this mortality, but there has, however, been a steady decrease, principally among young children, owing to whooping-cough, tuberculosis and croup. Every Fijian child seems to contract yaws at some time in its life, a mistaken notion existing on the part of the parents that it strengthens the child's physique.

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  • Epidemics of influenza and fever have been very prevalent of late years in the central provinces.

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  • Sometimes they became infected with other illnesses, and variolation seemed to start entirely new epidemics.

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  • Such methods may have backfired on the Poles, as epidemics are poor respecters of persons.

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  • Clean water was in short supply and there were major epidemics of water-borne diseases including typhoid, cholera and diarrhea.

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  • Read the full article online: " Virulent epidemics and the scope of health care workers ' duty of care "

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  • Control of the whitefly vector has not been effective in preventing epidemics and yield losses due to these viruses.

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  • According to the World Health Organization, the major epidemics of African sleeping sickness were documented primarily in the sub-Saharan portions of Africa.

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  • In addition, Kawasaki disease sometimes occurs in epidemics, such as those reported in Japan in 1979, 1982, and 1985.

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  • No epidemics, however, have been reported since 1985.

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  • Rubella is a virus that has a seasonal pattern, with epidemics most likely in the spring.

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  • Type 1 is the cause of epidemics, and many cases of paralysis, which is the most severe manifestation of the infection.

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  • Group B rotaviruses have caused major epidemics of adult diarrhea in China.

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  • Early in the twentieth century, severe scarlet fever epidemics were common.

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  • The condition occurs most often in spring and fall and can occur in epidemics within dormitories, army barracks, or other locations where young people live in close proximity to each other.

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  • Mumps epidemics came in two to five year cycles.

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  • Although the disease usually appears in individuals, it sometimes affects several members of the same family and occasionally occurs in small epidemics.

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  • Epidemics are widespread regional outbreaks that occur every two to three years and affect 5-10 percent of the population.

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  • Before vaccination, epidemics of measles peaked in the spring every two to four years.

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  • Such actions led to major epidemics of the disease in those countries.

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  • Reporting is necessary for tracking potential epidemics, to help doctors identify the specific strain of diphtheria, and to see if resistance to penicillin or erythromycin has developed.

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  • We have experienced several epidemics and learned a great deal about how to combat the spread of disease.

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  • Epidemics of plagues and diseases threaten the fabric of society, ripping it apart and forcing man to struggle with basic survival.

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  • These end of the world themes tend to intertwine with others such as the retaliation of artificial intelligence, epidemics and man’s consumption of natural resources.

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  • The Malays formerly suffered severely from smallpox epidemics, but in the portion of the peninsula under British rule vaccination has been introduced, and the ravages of the disease no longer assume serious dimensions.

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  • Epidemics of cholera, which occurred during the years of scarcity and famine, also swept away large numbers.

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  • It may be that in particular cases particular modes of cultivation disfavour the host; or that the soil, climate or seasons do so; but overwhelming evidence exists to show that the principal causes of epidemics reside in circumstances which favor the spread, nutrition and reproduction of the pest, and the lesson to be learnt is, that precautions against the establishment of such favoring conditions must be sought.

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  • 4 See Hecker, Epidemics of the Middle Ages (1859).

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  • Epidemics of cholera, which occurred during the years of scarcity and famine, also swept away large numbers.

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  • Around 430 BC, Athens, embroiled in the Second Peloponnesian War, endured three years of epidemics that wiped out a third of its inhabitants.

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