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epidemic

epidemic

epidemic Sentence Examples

  • In 1888 there was an epidemic of yellow fever.

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  • In 1903 the city was devastated by an epidemic of plague.

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  • "Poor Rev. Martin died in a flu epidemic in '04," Fred said, his voice sounding duly respectful.

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  • An epidemic of a fatal character had ruined the French silk producers.

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  • The health of the city of Hamburg and the adjoining district may be described as generally good, no epidemic diseases having recently appeared to any serious degree.

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  • The country is naturally very healthful, as evidence of which may be mentioned that no great epidemic has ever visited the state.

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  • The difference in level between the city and the lake being less than six feet and the lake having no natural outlet, typhus fever became a common epidemic in its lower and poorer sections.

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  • The difference in level between the city and the lake being less than six feet and the lake having no natural outlet, typhus fever became a common epidemic in its lower and poorer sections.

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  • The village was abandoned in or before 1758, owing probably to an epidemic of smallpox, and the fort was abandoned in 1759.

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  • He created many of the medical terms we use today, such as acute, chronic, endemic, epidemic, paroxysm, and relapse.

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  • The annual losses due to epidemic plant diseases attain proportions not easily estimated.

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  • Destructive parasites rapidly ruin the whole plant-body (Pythium), whereas restrained parasites only tax the host slightly, and ill effects may not be visible for a long time, or only when the fungus is epidemic (Rhytisma).

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  • Yellow fever (which first appeared in Cuba in 1647) was long the only epidemic disease, Havana being an endemic focus.

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  • - Among the most Interesting modern means of waging war against epidemic pests is that of introducing other epidemics among the pests themselvese.g.

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  • In Germany, in 1414, there was a recrudescence of the epidemic of flagellation, which then became a clearly-formulated heresy.

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  • There was a disastrous fire in 1829, an epidemic of yellow fever in 1839, and a flood in 1840, but the growth of the city was not seriously checked; the cotton receipts of 1846 were 212,019 bales, and in 1847 a cotton factory was built.

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  • (2) Much attention has been directed in scientific circles to the possibility of "stamping out" epidemic malaria by administrative measures.

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  • The movement was strongly supported by King Humbert, whose intrepidity in visiting the most dangerous spots at Busca and Naples while the epidemic was at its height, reassuring the panic-stricken inhabitants by his presence, excited the enthusiasm of his people and the admiration of Europe.

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  • Muscardine, however, has not been epidemic for many years.

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  • Rinderpest and other epidemic diseases swept over the country in 1895-1896, and during the war of1899-1902the province was practically denuded of live stock.

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  • Thus he came to the conclusion that the malady had been inherent in many successive generations of the silkworm, and that the epidemic condition was only an exaggeration of a normal state brought about by the method of cultivation and production of graine pursued.

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  • Empusa Muscae causes the wellknown epidemic in house-flies during the autumn; the dead, affected flies are often found attached to the window surrounded by a white halo of conidia.

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  • The annual deathrate per 1000 was 54 per 1000 for the Federal District in 1901, 50 ill 1902, 48 in 1903, 46 in 1904, and 56 in 1905; the increase for the last-mentioned year being due to an epidemic of typhus fever.

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  • The industrial and commercial progress of Cartagena was much hindered, during the first half of the 19th century, by the prevalence of epidemic diseases, the abandonment of the arsenal, and rivalry with the neighbouring port of Alicante.

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  • They were almost exterminated, and an epidemic of influenza in 1839 killed half of those left; ten years later there were only 90 survivors out of a total population of 1200.

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  • A physician of Plymouth, John Huxham (1694-1768), made researches on epidemic fevers, in the spirit of Sydenham and Hippocrates, which are of the highest importance.

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  • The earliest writers upon cholera emphasized its remarkable preference for particular places; and the history of each successive epidemic implies, besides an importation of the contagion, certain local conditions which may be either general sanitary defects or peculiarities of climate and soil.

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  • The crops being still green, and nothing else available as forage for the horses, an epidemic of colic broke out amongst them, and in ten days the mounted arms had lost upwards of one-third of their strength; men died of sunstroke in numbers, and serious straggling began.

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  • She left the sisterhood in 1874, and their hospital in 1877, to take charge of the municipal epidemic hospital, where the cases were largely small-pox.

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  • Diphtheria first appeared in 1868 and continued as a severe epidemic until 1872, since when it has only occurred at rare intervals and in isolated cases.

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  • The epidemic nature of wheat-rust was known to Aristotle about 350 B.C., and the Greeks and Romans knew these epidemics well, their philosophers having shrewd speculations as to causes, while the people held characteristic superstitions regarding them, which found vent in the dedication of special festivals and deities to the pests.

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  • Smallpox is frequent on the coast, but is diminishing before vaccination; other epidemic diseases are extremely rare.

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  • In that year, and again in 1834, a cholera epidemic caused considerable loss of life.

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  • Numerous wild hypotheses as to changes in the constitution of the host-plant, leading to supposed vulnerability previously non-existent, would probably never have seen the light had the full significance of the truth been grasped that an epidemic results when the external laciors favor a parasite somewhat more than they do the host.

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  • Horsesickness, a kind of malarial fever, which takes an epidemic form in very wet seasons, causes considerable loss.

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  • Numerous wild hypotheses as to changes in the constitution of the host-plant, leading to supposed vulnerability previously non-existent, would probably never have seen the light had the full significance of the truth been grasped that an epidemic results when the external laciors favor a parasite somewhat more than they do the host.

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  • In all these biographies there is internal evidence of confusion; many of the incidents related are elsewhere told of other persons, and certain of them are quite irreconcilable with his character, so far as it can be judged of from his writings and from the opinions expressed of him by his contemporaries; we may safely reject, for instance, the legends that he set fire to the library of the Temple of Health at Cnidos, in order to destroy the evidence of plagiarism, and that he refused to visit Persia at the request of Artaxerxes Longimanus, during a pestilential epidemic, on the ground that he would in so doing be assisting an enemy.

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  • The plague was scarcely stayed before the whole city was in flames, a calamity of the first magnitude, but one which in the end caused much good, as the seeds of disease were destroyed, and London has never since been visited by such an epidemic. On the 2nd of September 1666 the fire broke out at one o'clock in the morning at a house in Pudding Lane.

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  • did, in fact, call together at Pavia a council, which it was necessary to transfer almost at once to Siena, owing to an epidemic, and which had to be dissolved owing to circumstances still imperfectly known, just as it was beginning to discuss the subject of reform (1424).

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  • did, in fact, call together at Pavia a council, which it was necessary to transfer almost at once to Siena, owing to an epidemic, and which had to be dissolved owing to circumstances still imperfectly known, just as it was beginning to discuss the subject of reform (1424).

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  • Dram-drinking was spreading like an epidemic. Freethinkers' clubs flourished.

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  • The first disease investigated by Pasteur was that of chicken cholera, an epidemic which destroyed io% of the French fowls; after the application of the preventive method the death-rate was reduced to below i %.

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  • After the cholera epidemic of 1853, which carried off more than 4000 of the inhabitants, the medical association built several ranges of workmen's houses, and their example was followed by various private capitalists, among whom may be mentioned the Classen trustees, whose buildings occupy an open site on the western outskirts of the city.

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  • County Council have certain powers and duties of sanitary authority for the purpose of epidemic regulations.

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  • Coming to Italy during an epidemic of plague, he was very diligent in tending the sick in the public hospitals at Aquapendente, Cesena and Rome, and effected many miraculous cures by entre nous, a la vie, a la mort."

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  • The "spiritualistic" movement spread like an epidemic. "Spirit circles" were soon formed in many families.

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  • The "spiritualistic" movement spread like an epidemic. "Spirit circles" were soon formed in many families.

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  • In 1733-1734 there was a dreadful epidemic of smallpox, which destroyed a great number of the people.

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  • For instance, a Fungus epidemic is impossible unless the climatic conditions are such as to favor the dispersal and germination of the spores; and when plants are killed off owi~ig to the supersaturation of the soil with water, it is by no means obvious whether the excess of water and dissolved materials, or the exclusion of oxygen from the root-hairs, or the lowering of the temperature, or the accumulation of foul products of decomposition should be put into the foreground.

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  • These lands are fairly healthy, the principal drawback being the virulent form assumed by simple epidemic maladies.

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  • The population of the country at the censuses of 1880, 1890 and 1900 was: From 1870 to 1880 there was little increase of population, owing to the great cholera epidemic of 1872-1873, and to many epidemic diseases among children towards the end of the period.

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  • With horses only just recovering from an epidemic, they proved quite unequal to the task of catching the Cossacks, who swarmed round them in every direction, never accepting an engagement but compelling a constant watchfulness for which nothing in their previous experience had sufficiently prepared the French.

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  • Epidemic diseases are rare and children's diseases mild; cholera has visited Florence several times, but the city has been free from it for many years.

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  • Epidemic diseases are rare and children's diseases mild; cholera has visited Florence several times, but the city has been free from it for many years.

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  • Minister of public works in the first Depretis cabinet of 1876, and minister of the interior in the Cairoli cabinet of 1878, he in the latter capacity drafted the franchise reform, but created dissatisfaction by the indecision of his administrative acts, particularly in regard to the Irredentist agitation, and by his theory of repressing and not in any way preventing crime, which led for a time to a perfect epidemic of murders.

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  • It was not till De Bary (1866) made known the true nature of parasitic Fungi, based on his researches between 1853-1863, that the vast domain of epidemic diseases of plants was opened up to fruitful investigation, and such modern treatises as those of Frank (1880 and L895), Sorauer (1886), Kirchner (1890), were gradually made possible.

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  • N., commemorates the deliverance of the town from a severe epidemic of fever in 1612.

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  • The term of office of the first viceroy, Antonio de Mendoza, was marked by the Mixton War, by an attempt to suppress the encomienda system, and by Events: a violent epidemic among the natives.

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  • had been crowded with wounded from the first, and now, owing to the persistent wet weather, smallpox and dysentery became epidemic. Towards the close of September rations had to be reduced, and the troops began slaughtering the cavalry horses for food.

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  • He resembled his Greek master in the high value he set on the study of the "natural history of disease"; in the importance he attached to "epidemic constitution" - that is, to the influence of weather and other natural causes in modifying disease; and further in his conception of the healing power of nature in disease, a doctrine which he even expanded beyond the teaching of Hippocrates.

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  • In the first place the 15th and 16th centuries were notable for the outbreak of certain epidemic diseases, which were unknown to the old physicians.

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  • In the first place the 15th and 16th centuries were notable for the outbreak of certain epidemic diseases, which were unknown to the old physicians.

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  • His report on the epidemic is the only original one we have.

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  • These programs have cropped up in response to a growing obesity epidemic that has hit not only the United States, but many countries all over the world.

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  • An epidemic of cholera in the summer of 1883 gave the British officers their first chance of acquiring the esteem and confidence of their men, and the opportunity was nobly utilized.

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  • The regeneration of the fellahin army dates from that epidemic.

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  • Rogers at the time of the cholera epidemic) controls in peace fourteen station hospitals, and in war furnishes a mobile field hospital to each brigade.

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  • An event which caused a deep impression on the public mind was the epidemic of influenza in the autumn of 1918.

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  • In 1902 Palestine was devastated by a severe epidemic of cholera.

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  • In 1895-1899, owing to the war, there were few non-immune persons in the city, and there was no trouble with the fever, but from the autumn of 1899 a heavy immigration from Spain began, and a fever epidemic was raging in 1900.

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  • In accordance with the decree Frequens, and the promises which he had made, Martin V., after an interval of five years, summoned a new council, which was almost immediately transferred from Pavia to Siena, in consequence of an epidemic (1423).

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  • On the establishment of Roman Catholic orphanages some years later the pretensions of the priests so irritated the people that on the occurrence of an epidemic in the schools in the year 1870 they attacked the French and Russian establishments and murdered twenty-one of the foreign inmates, besides numbers of their native followers.

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  • There has been more than one horticultural excitement in California, but especially in orange culture, which was for a time almost as epidemic a fever as gold seeking once was.

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  • was an epidemic among children, they were brought to touch a serpent's skin which hung on a pole.

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  • Smallpox, dysentery and fevers, frequently of a bilious character, are endemic and occasionally epidemic. Cholera breaks out from time to time and works great havoc, as was the case in 1903 when one of the raja of Sarawak's punitive expeditions was stricken while ascending the Limbang river by boat, and lost many hundreds of its numbers before the coast could be regained.

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  • pestis, pestilentia), in medicine, a term given to any epidemic disease causing a great mortality, and used in this sense by Galen and the a ncient medical writers, but now confined to a special disease, otherwise called Oriental, Levantine, or Bubonic Plague, which may be shortly defined a specific infectious fever, one variety being characterized by buboes (glandular swellings) and carbuncles.

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  • "Plague" was formerly divided into two chief varieties: (1) mild plague, pestis minor, larval plague (Radcliffe), peste fruste, in which the special symptoms are accompanied by little fever or general disturbance; and (2) ordinary epidemic or severe plague, pestis major, in which the general disturbance is very severe.

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  • In Italy there was a great mortality in 543, but the most notable epidemic was in 565, which so depopulated the country as to leave it an easy prey to the Lombards.

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  • and in 590 a great epidemic at Rome is connected with the pontificate of Gregory the Great.

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  • the special implication of the lungs as shown by spitting of blood and other symptoms. Guy de Chauliac notes this feature in the earlier epidemic at Avignon, not in the later.

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  • (1) See Noah Webster's History of Epidemic Diseases, 8vo (2 vols., London, 1800) (a work which makes no pretension to medical learning, but exhibits the history of epidemics in connexion with physical disasters - as earthquakes, famines, &c.); Lersch, Kleine Pest-Chronik (8vo, 1880) (a convenient short compendium, but not always accurate); "Athanasii Kircheri Chronologia Pestium" (to A.D.

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  • 1656), in Scrutinium pestis (Rome, 1658; Leipzig, 1671, 4to); Bascome, History of Epidemic Pestilences (London, 1851, 8vo).

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  • The epidemic of 1563-1564 in London and England was very severe, a thousand dying weekly in London.

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  • The great plague of 1592 in London seems to have been a part of the same epidemic, which was hardly extinguished by the end of the century, and is noted in London again in 1599.

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  • (1) In 1632 a severe epidemic, apparently plague, was in Derbyshire.

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  • About the same time, 1635-1637, plague was prevalent in Holland, and the epidemic of Nijmwegen is celebrated as having been described by Diemerbroeck, whose work (Tractatus de peste, 4to, 1641-1665) is one of the most important on the subject.

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  • The English epidemic was widely spread and lasted till 1647, in which year, the mortality amounting to 3597, we have the fifth epidemic in London.

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  • The comparatively limited spread of this frightful epidemic in Italy at this time is a most noteworthy fact.

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  • Nevertheless the epidemic spread in the next few years over Spain and Germany, and a little later to Holland, where Amsterdam in1663-1664was again ravaged with a mortality given as 50,000, also Rotterdam and Haarlem.

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  • But from its past history and local conditions, London might well be deemed capable of producing such an epidemic. In the bills of mortality since 1603 there are only three years when no deaths from plague are recorded.

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  • After 1666 there was no epidemic of plague in London or any part of England, though sporadic cases appear in bills of mortality up to 1679; and a column filled up with " o " was left till 1703, when it finally disappeared.

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  • France saw the last plague epidemic in 1668, till it reappeared in 1720.

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  • In the years1675-1684a new plague epidemic appeared in North Africa, Turkey, Poland, Hungary, Austria and Germany, progressing generally northward.

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  • Many North German cities suffered about the same time; but in 1683 the plague disappeared from Germany till the epidemic of 1707.

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  • Certain places near Brunswick (10° E.) marked the western limit of the epidemic; and cholera was arrested at the same spot in later years (Haser).

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  • In 1720 Marseilles became affected with an epidemic plague, the origin of which was attributed by some to contagion through the ship of a Captain Chataud which arrived on the 10th of May 1720, from Syria, where plague at that time prevailed, though not epidemically when he sailed.

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  • The epidemic spread generally over Provence, but not to other parts of France, notwithstanding that, as confessed by D'Antrechaus, consul of Toulon, a believer in the exclusive power of contagion, there were abundant opportunities.

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  • In all 87,659 persons are said to have died out of a population of nearly 250,000.2 This great epidemic caused a panic in England which led to the introduction (under Mead's advice) of quarantine regulations, never previously enforced, and also led to the publication of many pamphlets, &c., beside Mead's well-known Discourse on Pestilential Contagion (London, 1720).

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  • The ship and cargo were burnt, but soon after cases of a suspicious form of disease were observed in the hospital and in the poorest parts of the town; and in the summer a fearful epidemic of plague developed itself which destroyed 40,000 or 50,000 persons, and then became extinct without spreading to other parts of Sicily.

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  • An epidemic in Dalmatia in1783-1784is noteworthy in connexion with later outbreaks in the same region.

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  • In the last years of the century (1799-1800) there was a new epidemic in Syria and Egypt, where it affected the French and afterwards the English army.

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  • In 1812 was a more general epidemic affecting these places and also Egypt.

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  • In 1828 an isolated epidemic appeared in Greece in the Morea, supposed to have been brought by troops from Egypt.

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  • A far more serious epidemic was connected with the campaign of the Russian army "against Turkey in 1828-1829.

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  • In 1831 another epidemic occurred in Constantinople and Roumelia; in 1837 again in Roumelia and in Odessa - its last appearance in these regions, and the last on the European continent except an isolated outbreak in Dalmatia in 1840, and one in Constantinople in 1841.4 The plague-epidemics in Egypt between 1833 and 1845 are very important in the history of plague, since the disease was almost for the first time scientifically studied in its home by skilled European physicians, chiefly French.

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  • The epidemic of 18 34183 5 was not less destructive than many of those notorious in history; but in1844-1845the disease disappeared.

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  • In the autumn of 1873 it returned, but came again to a spontaneous termination.6 After the epidemic of Benghazi in 1856-1859, plague was next heard of in the district of Maku, in the extreme north-west of Persia in November 1863.

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  • The epidemic began in December 1866 (or probably earlier) and ceased in June 1867.

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  • But numerous cases of nonfatal mild bubonic disease (mild plague or pestis minor) occurred both before and after the epidemic, and according to Tholozan similar cases had been observed nearly every year from 1856 to 1865.8 The next severe epidemic of plague in Irak began in December 1873.

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  • This epidemic was carefully studied by Surgeon-Major Colvill.

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  • The epidemic ceased in July, but broke out again early in 1876, and in this year extended northwards to Bagdad and beyond.

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  • After its customary cessation in the autumn the epidemic began again in October 1876, though sporadic cases occurred all the summer.

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  • The epidemic appears, however, to have died out in 1871, and no further accounts of plague there were received.

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  • The district had suffered in the great epidemic of plague in Persia in 1829-1835.

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  • Payne, who, like all the foreign commissioners, reached the spot when the epidemic was over.

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  • With respect to the origin of this epidemic, the possibility of its having originated on the spot, as in Resht and on the Euphrates in very similar situations, is not to be denied.

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  • In 1823 (though not officially known till later) an epidemic broke out at Kedarnath in Gurwhal, a sub-district of Kumaon on the south-west of the Himalayas, on a high situation.

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  • A very remarkable circumstance was the death of animals (rats, and more rarely snakes) at the outbreak of an epidemic. The rats brought up blood, and the body of one examined after death by Dr Francis showed an affection of the lungs.'

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  • 2, for halfyear ended the 31st of March 1878, 15th issue (Shanghai); Lowry, " Notes on Epidemic Disease at Pakhoi " (1882), ibid., 24th issue, p. 31.

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  • That is to say, there are periods of quiescence, with epidemic outbreaks which attract notice at irregular intervals.

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  • In two intermediate years-1895 and 18 9 7-very few cases were recorded, but more recently the epidemic has gathered force again.

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  • It is at least probable from these notes that even before the undoubted outbreak, which began in Cutch in 1812, India was no stranger to epidemic plague.

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  • The outbreak, which hardly reached epidemic proportions, lasted about six months.

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  • Very mild cases occurring in the course of an outbreak of typical plague may be explained by greater power of resistance in individuals, but the epidemic prevalence of a mild illness preceding the appearance of undoubted plague suggests some difference or modification of the exciting cause.

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  • Epidemic outbreaks of other diseases - for instance, cholera, diphtheria and typhoid fever - are often preceded and followed by the prevalence of mild illness of an allied type; and t he true significance of this fact is one of the most important problems in epidemiology.

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  • At Sydney a careful investigation was made; and the conclusion reached by Dr Tidswell was that " there was no ground for even a suspicion that our epidemic was being maintained by any process of direct contagion between man and man," but that rats were the carriers.

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  • Conversely, the traces left by a casual set-back, such as famine, war, or an epidemic disease, remain long after it has been succeeded by a period of recuperation, and are to be found in the ageconstitution and the current vital statistics.

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  • In Finland the death-rate at the earlier period taken for the comparison was abnormally swollen by epidemic disease, and if it be set on one side the decline appears to have been in harmony with that in its Scandinavian neighbours.

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  • The great epidemic in the French vineyards in the years 1882 to 1885 led to a reduction of the yield of about 50%.

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  • Many remedies for this disease have been suggested, including total submersion of the vineyards, the use of carbon bisulphide for spraying, and of copper salts, but there appears to be little doubt that a really serious epidemic can only be dealt with by systematic destruction of the vines, followed by replanting with resistant varieties.

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  • This, of course, naturally leads to the production of a wine somewhat different in character to that produced before the epidemic, but this difficulty may be overcome to some extent, as it was in the Bordeaux vineyards, by grafting ancient stock on the roots of new and resistant vines.

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  • Since then oidium has reappeared from time to time, but the remedy of spraying with finely divided sulphur, which was discovered at the time of the epidemic, has enabled the wine farmers to keep it under.

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  • During the smallpox epidemic of 1721 he attempted in vain to have treatment by inoculation employed, for the first time in America; and for this he was bitterly attacked on all sides, and his life was at one time in danger; but, nevertheless, he used the treatment on his son, who recovered, and he wrote An Account of the Method and further Success of Inoculating for the Small Pox in London (r 721).

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  • The fleet, disabled by an epidemic, was, throughout the war, little more than a floating hospital.

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  • Their number does not much exceed 40,000, which is being steadily reduced by drunkenness and epidemic diseases.

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  • In 1893 the epidemic appeared again, but in a milder form.

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  • The virulence of infective diseases varies in different epidemics, and at different times in the same epidemic. It had been noted that many infective diseases did not attack an individual a second time, the first attack appearing to protect from subsequent ones.

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  • The prosperity of the residency was further affected by a cattle plague in 1879, followed by a fever epidemic which carried off 50,000 people, and except in the rice season there is a considerable emigration of natives.

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  • Where any part of the country appears to be threatened with or is affected by any formidable epidemic, endemic or infectious disease, the Local Government Board may make regula tions for the speedy interment of the dead, house-tohouse visitation, the provision of medical aid and accommodation, the promotion of cleansing, ventilation and disinfection, and the guarding against the spread of disease.

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  • During his short pontificate the States of the Church suffered dire calamities, famine, epidemic and a fresh outbreak of brigandage.

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  • Lord Canning, the governor-general, who had at first hoped that he had only to deal with isolated cases of disaffection, at last recognized that the plague was epidemic, and that only stern measures could stay it.

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  • After the cholera epidemic of 1884, M.

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  • On account of an epidemic of murders disarmament had to be enforced in the district.

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  • His mind, excitable by nature, very imperfectly disciplined by education, and exposed to the enthusiasm which was then epidemic in England, began to be fearfully disordered.

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  • The money thus poured into the country produced an epidemic of speculation known as the "Share Mania".

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  • The last-known "epidemic" of ergotism occurred in Lorraine and Burgundy in the year 1816.

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  • No great epidemic has visited the city since the outbreak of cholera in 1866.

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  • - Wheat, like other cereals, is liable to epidemic diseases caused by parasitic organisms which prey on the plant tissues.

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  • A terrible epidemic of measles in that year swept away 40,000, or about one-third of the Fijians.

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  • There was an epidemic of violent attacks on the emperor; the publication of the Lanterne and the Baudin trial, conducted by Gambetta, were so many death-blows to the regime.

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  • The epidemic spread rapidly over the Peninsula, causing great havoc in important cities like Granada, Saragossa and Valencia.

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  • The climate is good, the temperature equable and epidemic diseases are rare.

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  • In the Isle of Wight a serious epidemic broke out in 1906 which caused great destruction to bee-life in the following year.

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  • Sometimes I think there's an epidemic of that domestic shit going around.

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  • "Poor Rev. Martin died in a flu epidemic in '04," Fred said, his voice sounding duly respectful.

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  • avian flu - the ecology of an epidemic Bird flu has been raging through Asia for more than a decade.

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  • Unlike the Indian situation, in this case the epidemic and non-epidemic zone B. tabaci were not different biotypes and readily interbred.

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  • bird flu epidemic.

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  • snakes, which prey on rodents had a field day, their ranks swelled to epidemic proportions and reported snake bites surged.

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  • Diseases that had been epidemic became endemic in urban centers.

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  • An epidemic of Asiatic cholera claimed over 4,000 lives.

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  • cholera epidemic which swept through the town.

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  • The crack cocaine epidemic was taking its toll on the inner city.

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  • Documents cited by the EWG authors showing the complicity of major asbestos defendants and their insurers in the American asbestos epidemic are disturbing.

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  • He, alongside a few other crackpots, is calling for a fully comprehensive, independent public inquiry into the Foot-and-Mouth epidemic.

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  • An industry of books, conferences and experts appeared to uncover an epidemic of sexual abuse, incest and satanic cults.

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  • diphtheria epidemic claimed the lives of fifty soldiers.

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  • In 561 it experienced a second earthquake disaster and in the 6 th century was hit with a major plague epidemic.

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  • distemper epidemic Ailsa Hall and Catriona Stephenson explain why harbor seals have been dying in their thousands.

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  • most parents dread the letter home telling of the latest head lice epidemic at their child's school or nursery.

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  • ecology of an epidemic Bird flu has been raging through Asia for more than a decade.

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  • Diseases that had been epidemic became endemic in urban centers.

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  • epidemic of cholera struck Welshpool in 1848 causing many deaths.

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  • The epidemic of obesity is followed by an epidemic of obesity is followed by an epidemic of Type 2 diabetes.

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  • epidemic of poliomyelitis in a tropical nation was contemporaneous with the introduction of the pesticide DDT in that country.

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  • epidemic of smallpox was sweeping through Russia.

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  • Certainly animal tests are failing to curb the current epidemic of drug-induced disease.

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  • The incident comes two years to the day when the first case in the foot-and-mouth epidemic was reported in England.

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  • Research Paul's current research is concerned with developing and applying statistical and mathematical models for the vCJD epidemic in the UK.

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  • The other great uncertainty is the effect of an avian flu epidemic in the EU.

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  • epidemic typhus.

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  • epidemic proportions in the western world.

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  • The cholera epidemic of 1832 had been the worst ever experienced in Scotland.

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  • The ' big ' factor is a part of the obesity epidemic, " she adds.

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  • In 1864 there was a smallpox epidemic in the district.

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  • While he student he worked with local doctors during a typhus epidemic.

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  • He was probably a victim of the worldwide influenza epidemic of 1918.

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  • The Spanish flu epidemic which swept Europe in 1918 was a mass killer.

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  • ergot poisoning approaching epidemic proportions were recorded in most European countries including certain areas of Russia.

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  • fever epidemic in the south enabled homeopaths to cure many more.

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  • avian flu - the ecology of an epidemic Bird flu has been raging through Asia for more than a decade.

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  • flu epidemic.

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  • His cautionary approach was powerfully vindicated by the scandal of the 1976 ' swine flu ' epidemic in the USA 3.

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  • fowl pest epidemic.

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  • Evolutionary genomics of Staphylococcus aureus: insights into the origin of methicillin-resistant strains and the toxic shock syndrome epidemic.

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  • hammer blow with the outbreak of an epidemic of plague.

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  • heterosexual epidemic has not occurred in a way in which it could have done.

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  • idealized mathematical model of the epidemic will be described.

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  • Mr Wilesmith's data on the decline in age-specific incidences in younger age classes, and other information supported downward trend in the epidemic.

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  • influenza epidemic of 1918.

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  • Stockton has seen a massive influx of African asylum seekers, many from areas where AIDS is at epidemic proportions.

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  • judicatory an epidemic occurring right under the nose of church middle judicatories and no one seems to notice.

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  • We are at a crucial juncture in the HIV epidemic.

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  • When the ruminant feed ban was introduced, the scale of the epidemic was still latent.

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  • measles epidemic in the United States in 1991, there were 55,000 cases.

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  • To control an epidemic of FMD it is essential to understand the mechanism by which the FMD virus is being spread.

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  • mercenarya disease of epidemic proportions among Swiss mercenaries in the pay of European Kings.

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  • mouth epidemic caused great difficulties for the company.

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  • mucus trooper, a stoic, a model patient, a walking epidemic or a shirker?

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  • Tryptophan produced in a genetically modified bacterium was linked to an epidemic called eosinophilia myalgia syndrome in 1989.

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  • neurophysiology of pain and the relevance of the biopsychosocial model to understanding the modern epidemic of backpain.

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  • Indeed, to maintain the epidemic, each affected animal would have to have one affected offspring.

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  • phytoplankton blooms in the sea: evidence for a global epidemic.

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  • plague epidemic in London nears completion.

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  • epidemic poliomyelitis: Some pathological observations on human material.

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  • There was an extensive epidemic of poliomyelitis in Iceland caused by type I poliovirus that coincided with and was followed by outbreaks of ID.

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  • It was first described in 1921 and therefore predates the BSE epidemic by many years.

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  • Information: The problem of obesity has taken on epidemic proportions over the last few years.

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  • punctuated regularly with mainstream news articles on the national epidemic of alcohol abuse.

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  • All the exotic ruminants appear to be linked to the BSE epidemic via the consumption of contaminated feed.

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  • The conditions which gave rise to the epidemic included poor sanitation and a lack of safe water sources in the region.

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  • racial segregation was a reality in Virginia in the epidemic years.

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  • smallpox epidemic in the district.

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  • HIV transmission occurs largely through heterosexual sex, although sex between men, which is highly stigmatized, is also fueling the epidemic.

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  • In 869 A.D., a merciless epidemic went sweeping through Kyoto.

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  • An epidemic of acquired systemic toxoplasmosis involving an unusually high number of cases of ocular disease occurred in 1995 in Canada.

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  • These include infections of the skin and eyes (e.g. trachoma) and infections carried by lice, e.g. louse-borne epidemic typhus.

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  • Working when sick is infectious Are you a mucus trooper, a stoic, a model patient, a walking epidemic or a shirker?

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  • typhoid epidemic in late 1914.

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  • These include infections of the skin and eyes (e.g. trachoma) and infections carried by lice, e.g. louse-borne epidemic typhus.

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  • The group includes epidemic and endemic typhus fevers, tick-borne typhus, scrub typhus and Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

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  • typhus epidemic in 1891 which resulted in 29 deaths.

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  • epidemic typhus is only likely to affect volunteer workers who come into close contact with locals.

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  • Poliomyelitis virus of low virulence in patients with epidemic " summer grippe or sore throat " .

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  • Forget teenage hoodies and football yobs, Britain is a nation under siege from an epidemic of pet bullies!

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  • Pearse's detachment was decimated by an epidemic of cholera (perhaps the first mention of this disease by name in Indian history); but the survivors penetrated to Madras, and not only held in check Bhonsla and the nizam, but also corroborated the lesson taught by Goddard - that the Company's sepoys could march anywhere, when boldly led.

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  • The country is naturally very healthful, as evidence of which may be mentioned that no great epidemic has ever visited the state.

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  • While he was there a terrible epidemic of the plague broke out and lasted for two years, carrying off more than a third of the inhabitants of Cairo and Alexandria.

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  • The industrial and commercial progress of Cartagena was much hindered, during the first half of the 19th century, by the prevalence of epidemic diseases, the abandonment of the arsenal, and rivalry with the neighbouring port of Alicante.

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  • Sanitation and public hygiene received a potent impulse from the cholera epidemic of 1884, many of the unhealthiest quarters in Naples and other cities being demolished and rebuilt, with funds chiefly furnished by the state.

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  • The movement was strongly supported by King Humbert, whose intrepidity in visiting the most dangerous spots at Busca and Naples while the epidemic was at its height, reassuring the panic-stricken inhabitants by his presence, excited the enthusiasm of his people and the admiration of Europe.

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  • During the cholera epidemic at Naples and Busca in 1884, and the Ischia earthquake of 1885, he, regardless of danger, brought relief and encouragement to sufferers, and rescued many lives.

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  • In 1903 the city was devastated by an epidemic of plague.

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  • The epidemic nature of wheat-rust was known to Aristotle about 350 B.C., and the Greeks and Romans knew these epidemics well, their philosophers having shrewd speculations as to causes, while the people held characteristic superstitions regarding them, which found vent in the dedication of special festivals and deities to the pests.

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  • It was not till De Bary (1866) made known the true nature of parasitic Fungi, based on his researches between 1853-1863, that the vast domain of epidemic diseases of plants was opened up to fruitful investigation, and such modern treatises as those of Frank (1880 and L895), Sorauer (1886), Kirchner (1890), were gradually made possible.

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  • For instance, a Fungus epidemic is impossible unless the climatic conditions are such as to favor the dispersal and germination of the spores; and when plants are killed off owi~ig to the supersaturation of the soil with water, it is by no means obvious whether the excess of water and dissolved materials, or the exclusion of oxygen from the root-hairs, or the lowering of the temperature, or the accumulation of foul products of decomposition should be put into the foreground.

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  • It is among the Invertebrata that epidemics of destruction are referred to, though we should bear in mind that it is only the difference in numerical proportion that prevents our speaking of an epidemic of elephants or of rabbits, though we use the term when speaking of blight insects; there is little consistency in the matter, as it is usual to speak of an invasion or scourge of locusts, caterpillars, &c. Insect injuries are very varied in degree and in kind.

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  • The annual losses due to epidemic plant diseases attain proportions not easily estimated.

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  • - Among the most Interesting modern means of waging war against epidemic pests is that of introducing other epidemics among the pests themselvese.g.

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  • In Germany, in 1414, there was a recrudescence of the epidemic of flagellation, which then became a clearly-formulated heresy.

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  • These lands are fairly healthy, the principal drawback being the virulent form assumed by simple epidemic maladies.

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  • Severe remittents (pernicious or bilious remittents) approximate to the type of yellow fever, which is conventionally limited to epidemic outbreaks in western longitudes and on the west coast of Africa.

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  • (2) Much attention has been directed in scientific circles to the possibility of "stamping out" epidemic malaria by administrative measures.

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  • An epidemic of a fatal character had ruined the French silk producers.

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  • The first disease investigated by Pasteur was that of chicken cholera, an epidemic which destroyed io% of the French fowls; after the application of the preventive method the death-rate was reduced to below i %.

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  • Dram-drinking was spreading like an epidemic. Freethinkers' clubs flourished.

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  • Yellow fever (which first appeared in Cuba in 1647) was long the only epidemic disease, Havana being an endemic focus.

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  • The crops being still green, and nothing else available as forage for the horses, an epidemic of colic broke out amongst them, and in ten days the mounted arms had lost upwards of one-third of their strength; men died of sunstroke in numbers, and serious straggling began.

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  • With horses only just recovering from an epidemic, they proved quite unequal to the task of catching the Cossacks, who swarmed round them in every direction, never accepting an engagement but compelling a constant watchfulness for which nothing in their previous experience had sufficiently prepared the French.

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  • The decrease may chiefly have been due to infectious diseases, especially a very severe epidemic of smallpox.

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  • In 1733-1734 there was a dreadful epidemic of smallpox, which destroyed a great number of the people.

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  • The health of the city of Hamburg and the adjoining district may be described as generally good, no epidemic diseases having recently appeared to any serious degree.

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  • Horsesickness, a kind of malarial fever, which takes an epidemic form in very wet seasons, causes considerable loss.

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    0
  • The population of the country at the censuses of 1880, 1890 and 1900 was: From 1870 to 1880 there was little increase of population, owing to the great cholera epidemic of 1872-1873, and to many epidemic diseases among children towards the end of the period.

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  • Wounds caused by projectiles, sabres, &c., are the special subject of naval and military surgery; while under the head of military hygiene we may include the general subject of ambulances, the sanitary arrangements of camps, and the various forms of epidemic camp sickness.

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  • He resembled his Greek master in the high value he set on the study of the "natural history of disease"; in the importance he attached to "epidemic constitution" - that is, to the influence of weather and other natural causes in modifying disease; and further in his conception of the healing power of nature in disease, a doctrine which he even expanded beyond the teaching of Hippocrates.

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  • A physician of Plymouth, John Huxham (1694-1768), made researches on epidemic fevers, in the spirit of Sydenham and Hippocrates, which are of the highest importance.

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  • County Council have certain powers and duties of sanitary authority for the purpose of epidemic regulations.

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  • The plague was scarcely stayed before the whole city was in flames, a calamity of the first magnitude, but one which in the end caused much good, as the seeds of disease were destroyed, and London has never since been visited by such an epidemic. On the 2nd of September 1666 the fire broke out at one o'clock in the morning at a house in Pudding Lane.

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  • Coming to Italy during an epidemic of plague, he was very diligent in tending the sick in the public hospitals at Aquapendente, Cesena and Rome, and effected many miraculous cures by entre nous, a la vie, a la mort."

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  • Diphtheria first appeared in 1868 and continued as a severe epidemic until 1872, since when it has only occurred at rare intervals and in isolated cases.

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  • The study of epidemic and endemic diseases generally has brought to light an array of facts which very strongly suggest that an intimate association exists between the soil and the appearance and propagation of certain diseases; but although experiments and observations allow this view to be looked upon as well established, still the precise role played by the soil in an aetiological respect is by no means so well understood as to make it possible to separate the factors and dogmatize on their effects.

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  • The earliest writers upon cholera emphasized its remarkable preference for particular places; and the history of each successive epidemic implies, besides an importation of the contagion, certain local conditions which may be either general sanitary defects or peculiarities of climate and soil.

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  • In all these biographies there is internal evidence of confusion; many of the incidents related are elsewhere told of other persons, and certain of them are quite irreconcilable with his character, so far as it can be judged of from his writings and from the opinions expressed of him by his contemporaries; we may safely reject, for instance, the legends that he set fire to the library of the Temple of Health at Cnidos, in order to destroy the evidence of plagiarism, and that he refused to visit Persia at the request of Artaxerxes Longimanus, during a pestilential epidemic, on the ground that he would in so doing be assisting an enemy.

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  • had been crowded with wounded from the first, and now, owing to the persistent wet weather, smallpox and dysentery became epidemic. Towards the close of September rations had to be reduced, and the troops began slaughtering the cavalry horses for food.

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  • Smallpox is frequent on the coast, but is diminishing before vaccination; other epidemic diseases are extremely rare.

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  • The annual deathrate per 1000 was 54 per 1000 for the Federal District in 1901, 50 ill 1902, 48 in 1903, 46 in 1904, and 56 in 1905; the increase for the last-mentioned year being due to an epidemic of typhus fever.

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  • In 1888 there was an epidemic of yellow fever.

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  • N., commemorates the deliverance of the town from a severe epidemic of fever in 1612.

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  • Rinderpest and other epidemic diseases swept over the country in 1895-1896, and during the war of1899-1902the province was practically denuded of live stock.

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  • Minister of public works in the first Depretis cabinet of 1876, and minister of the interior in the Cairoli cabinet of 1878, he in the latter capacity drafted the franchise reform, but created dissatisfaction by the indecision of his administrative acts, particularly in regard to the Irredentist agitation, and by his theory of repressing and not in any way preventing crime, which led for a time to a perfect epidemic of murders.

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  • They were almost exterminated, and an epidemic of influenza in 1839 killed half of those left; ten years later there were only 90 survivors out of a total population of 1200.

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  • The term of office of the first viceroy, Antonio de Mendoza, was marked by the Mixton War, by an attempt to suppress the encomienda system, and by Events: a violent epidemic among the natives.

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  • There was a disastrous fire in 1829, an epidemic of yellow fever in 1839, and a flood in 1840, but the growth of the city was not seriously checked; the cotton receipts of 1846 were 212,019 bales, and in 1847 a cotton factory was built.

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  • In that year, and again in 1834, a cholera epidemic caused considerable loss of life.

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  • Muscardine, however, has not been epidemic for many years.

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  • Thus he came to the conclusion that the malady had been inherent in many successive generations of the silkworm, and that the epidemic condition was only an exaggeration of a normal state brought about by the method of cultivation and production of graine pursued.

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  • She left the sisterhood in 1874, and their hospital in 1877, to take charge of the municipal epidemic hospital, where the cases were largely small-pox.

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  • Empusa Muscae causes the wellknown epidemic in house-flies during the autumn; the dead, affected flies are often found attached to the window surrounded by a white halo of conidia.

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  • Destructive parasites rapidly ruin the whole plant-body (Pythium), whereas restrained parasites only tax the host slightly, and ill effects may not be visible for a long time, or only when the fungus is epidemic (Rhytisma).

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  • After the cholera epidemic of 1853, which carried off more than 4000 of the inhabitants, the medical association built several ranges of workmen's houses, and their example was followed by various private capitalists, among whom may be mentioned the Classen trustees, whose buildings occupy an open site on the western outskirts of the city.

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  • The village was abandoned in or before 1758, owing probably to an epidemic of smallpox, and the fort was abandoned in 1759.

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  • An epidemic of cholera in the summer of 1883 gave the British officers their first chance of acquiring the esteem and confidence of their men, and the opportunity was nobly utilized.

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  • The regeneration of the fellahin army dates from that epidemic.

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  • Rogers at the time of the cholera epidemic) controls in peace fourteen station hospitals, and in war furnishes a mobile field hospital to each brigade.

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  • Among others of the name may be mentioned (3) Athenodorus Of Teos, who played the cithara at the wedding of Alexander the Great and Statira at Susa (324 B.C.); (4) a Greek physician of the 1st century A.D., who wrote on epidemic diseases; and two sculptors, of whom (5) one executed the statues of Apollo and Zeus which the Spartans dedicated at Delphi after Aegospotami; and (6) the other was a son of Alexander of Rhodes, whom he helped in the Laocoon group.

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  • An event which caused a deep impression on the public mind was the epidemic of influenza in the autumn of 1918.

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  • In 1902 Palestine was devastated by a severe epidemic of cholera.

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  • In 1895-1899, owing to the war, there were few non-immune persons in the city, and there was no trouble with the fever, but from the autumn of 1899 a heavy immigration from Spain began, and a fever epidemic was raging in 1900.

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  • In accordance with the decree Frequens, and the promises which he had made, Martin V., after an interval of five years, summoned a new council, which was almost immediately transferred from Pavia to Siena, in consequence of an epidemic (1423).

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  • On the establishment of Roman Catholic orphanages some years later the pretensions of the priests so irritated the people that on the occurrence of an epidemic in the schools in the year 1870 they attacked the French and Russian establishments and murdered twenty-one of the foreign inmates, besides numbers of their native followers.

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  • There has been more than one horticultural excitement in California, but especially in orange culture, which was for a time almost as epidemic a fever as gold seeking once was.

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  • was an epidemic among children, they were brought to touch a serpent's skin which hung on a pole.

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  • Smallpox, dysentery and fevers, frequently of a bilious character, are endemic and occasionally epidemic. Cholera breaks out from time to time and works great havoc, as was the case in 1903 when one of the raja of Sarawak's punitive expeditions was stricken while ascending the Limbang river by boat, and lost many hundreds of its numbers before the coast could be regained.

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  • pestis, pestilentia), in medicine, a term given to any epidemic disease causing a great mortality, and used in this sense by Galen and the a ncient medical writers, but now confined to a special disease, otherwise called Oriental, Levantine, or Bubonic Plague, which may be shortly defined a specific infectious fever, one variety being characterized by buboes (glandular swellings) and carbuncles.

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  • "Plague" was formerly divided into two chief varieties: (1) mild plague, pestis minor, larval plague (Radcliffe), peste fruste, in which the special symptoms are accompanied by little fever or general disturbance; and (2) ordinary epidemic or severe plague, pestis major, in which the general disturbance is very severe.

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  • In Italy there was a great mortality in 543, but the most notable epidemic was in 565, which so depopulated the country as to leave it an easy prey to the Lombards.

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  • and in 590 a great epidemic at Rome is connected with the pontificate of Gregory the Great.

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  • the special implication of the lungs as shown by spitting of blood and other symptoms. Guy de Chauliac notes this feature in the earlier epidemic at Avignon, not in the later.

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  • (1) See Noah Webster's History of Epidemic Diseases, 8vo (2 vols., London, 1800) (a work which makes no pretension to medical learning, but exhibits the history of epidemics in connexion with physical disasters - as earthquakes, famines, &c.); Lersch, Kleine Pest-Chronik (8vo, 1880) (a convenient short compendium, but not always accurate); "Athanasii Kircheri Chronologia Pestium" (to A.D.

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  • 1656), in Scrutinium pestis (Rome, 1658; Leipzig, 1671, 4to); Bascome, History of Epidemic Pestilences (London, 1851, 8vo).

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  • The epidemic of 1563-1564 in London and England was very severe, a thousand dying weekly in London.

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  • The great plague of 1592 in London seems to have been a part of the same epidemic, which was hardly extinguished by the end of the century, and is noted in London again in 1599.

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    0
  • (1) In 1632 a severe epidemic, apparently plague, was in Derbyshire.

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    0
  • About the same time, 1635-1637, plague was prevalent in Holland, and the epidemic of Nijmwegen is celebrated as having been described by Diemerbroeck, whose work (Tractatus de peste, 4to, 1641-1665) is one of the most important on the subject.

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  • The English epidemic was widely spread and lasted till 1647, in which year, the mortality amounting to 3597, we have the fifth epidemic in London.

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  • The comparatively limited spread of this frightful epidemic in Italy at this time is a most noteworthy fact.

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  • Nevertheless the epidemic spread in the next few years over Spain and Germany, and a little later to Holland, where Amsterdam in1663-1664was again ravaged with a mortality given as 50,000, also Rotterdam and Haarlem.

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  • But from its past history and local conditions, London might well be deemed capable of producing such an epidemic. In the bills of mortality since 1603 there are only three years when no deaths from plague are recorded.

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  • After 1666 there was no epidemic of plague in London or any part of England, though sporadic cases appear in bills of mortality up to 1679; and a column filled up with " o " was left till 1703, when it finally disappeared.

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  • France saw the last plague epidemic in 1668, till it reappeared in 1720.

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    0
  • In the years1675-1684a new plague epidemic appeared in North Africa, Turkey, Poland, Hungary, Austria and Germany, progressing generally northward.

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    0
  • Many North German cities suffered about the same time; but in 1683 the plague disappeared from Germany till the epidemic of 1707.

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    0
  • Certain places near Brunswick (10° E.) marked the western limit of the epidemic; and cholera was arrested at the same spot in later years (Haser).

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  • In 1720 Marseilles became affected with an epidemic plague, the origin of which was attributed by some to contagion through the ship of a Captain Chataud which arrived on the 10th of May 1720, from Syria, where plague at that time prevailed, though not epidemically when he sailed.

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  • The epidemic spread generally over Provence, but not to other parts of France, notwithstanding that, as confessed by D'Antrechaus, consul of Toulon, a believer in the exclusive power of contagion, there were abundant opportunities.

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  • In all 87,659 persons are said to have died out of a population of nearly 250,000.2 This great epidemic caused a panic in England which led to the introduction (under Mead's advice) of quarantine regulations, never previously enforced, and also led to the publication of many pamphlets, &c., beside Mead's well-known Discourse on Pestilential Contagion (London, 1720).

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  • The ship and cargo were burnt, but soon after cases of a suspicious form of disease were observed in the hospital and in the poorest parts of the town; and in the summer a fearful epidemic of plague developed itself which destroyed 40,000 or 50,000 persons, and then became extinct without spreading to other parts of Sicily.

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  • An epidemic in Dalmatia in1783-1784is noteworthy in connexion with later outbreaks in the same region.

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  • In the last years of the century (1799-1800) there was a new epidemic in Syria and Egypt, where it affected the French and afterwards the English army.

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  • In 1812 was a more general epidemic affecting these places and also Egypt.

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  • In 1828 an isolated epidemic appeared in Greece in the Morea, supposed to have been brought by troops from Egypt.

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  • A far more serious epidemic was connected with the campaign of the Russian army "against Turkey in 1828-1829.

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  • In 1831 another epidemic occurred in Constantinople and Roumelia; in 1837 again in Roumelia and in Odessa - its last appearance in these regions, and the last on the European continent except an isolated outbreak in Dalmatia in 1840, and one in Constantinople in 1841.4 The plague-epidemics in Egypt between 1833 and 1845 are very important in the history of plague, since the disease was almost for the first time scientifically studied in its home by skilled European physicians, chiefly French.

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  • The epidemic of 18 34183 5 was not less destructive than many of those notorious in history; but in1844-1845the disease disappeared.

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  • In the autumn of 1873 it returned, but came again to a spontaneous termination.6 After the epidemic of Benghazi in 1856-1859, plague was next heard of in the district of Maku, in the extreme north-west of Persia in November 1863.

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  • The epidemic began in December 1866 (or probably earlier) and ceased in June 1867.

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  • But numerous cases of nonfatal mild bubonic disease (mild plague or pestis minor) occurred both before and after the epidemic, and according to Tholozan similar cases had been observed nearly every year from 1856 to 1865.8 The next severe epidemic of plague in Irak began in December 1873.

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  • This epidemic was carefully studied by Surgeon-Major Colvill.

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  • The epidemic ceased in July, but broke out again early in 1876, and in this year extended northwards to Bagdad and beyond.

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  • After its customary cessation in the autumn the epidemic began again in October 1876, though sporadic cases occurred all the summer.

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  • The epidemic appears, however, to have died out in 1871, and no further accounts of plague there were received.

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  • The district had suffered in the great epidemic of plague in Persia in 1829-1835.

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  • His report on the epidemic is the only original one we have.

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  • Payne, who, like all the foreign commissioners, reached the spot when the epidemic was over.

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  • With respect to the origin of this epidemic, the possibility of its having originated on the spot, as in Resht and on the Euphrates in very similar situations, is not to be denied.

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  • In 1823 (though not officially known till later) an epidemic broke out at Kedarnath in Gurwhal, a sub-district of Kumaon on the south-west of the Himalayas, on a high situation.

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  • A very remarkable circumstance was the death of animals (rats, and more rarely snakes) at the outbreak of an epidemic. The rats brought up blood, and the body of one examined after death by Dr Francis showed an affection of the lungs.'

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  • 2, for halfyear ended the 31st of March 1878, 15th issue (Shanghai); Lowry, " Notes on Epidemic Disease at Pakhoi " (1882), ibid., 24th issue, p. 31.

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  • That is to say, there are periods of quiescence, with epidemic outbreaks which attract notice at irregular intervals.

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  • In two intermediate years-1895 and 18 9 7-very few cases were recorded, but more recently the epidemic has gathered force again.

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  • It is at least probable from these notes that even before the undoubted outbreak, which began in Cutch in 1812, India was no stranger to epidemic plague.

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  • The outbreak, which hardly reached epidemic proportions, lasted about six months.

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  • Very mild cases occurring in the course of an outbreak of typical plague may be explained by greater power of resistance in individuals, but the epidemic prevalence of a mild illness preceding the appearance of undoubted plague suggests some difference or modification of the exciting cause.

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  • Epidemic outbreaks of other diseases - for instance, cholera, diphtheria and typhoid fever - are often preceded and followed by the prevalence of mild illness of an allied type; and t he true significance of this fact is one of the most important problems in epidemiology.

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  • At Sydney a careful investigation was made; and the conclusion reached by Dr Tidswell was that " there was no ground for even a suspicion that our epidemic was being maintained by any process of direct contagion between man and man," but that rats were the carriers.

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  • Conversely, the traces left by a casual set-back, such as famine, war, or an epidemic disease, remain long after it has been succeeded by a period of recuperation, and are to be found in the ageconstitution and the current vital statistics.

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  • In Finland the death-rate at the earlier period taken for the comparison was abnormally swollen by epidemic disease, and if it be set on one side the decline appears to have been in harmony with that in its Scandinavian neighbours.

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  • The great epidemic in the French vineyards in the years 1882 to 1885 led to a reduction of the yield of about 50%.

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  • Many remedies for this disease have been suggested, including total submersion of the vineyards, the use of carbon bisulphide for spraying, and of copper salts, but there appears to be little doubt that a really serious epidemic can only be dealt with by systematic destruction of the vines, followed by replanting with resistant varieties.

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  • This, of course, naturally leads to the production of a wine somewhat different in character to that produced before the epidemic, but this difficulty may be overcome to some extent, as it was in the Bordeaux vineyards, by grafting ancient stock on the roots of new and resistant vines.

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  • Since then oidium has reappeared from time to time, but the remedy of spraying with finely divided sulphur, which was discovered at the time of the epidemic, has enabled the wine farmers to keep it under.

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  • His graduation thesis was on the ambitious subject of " the historical development of epidemic and contagious diseases all over the world, with the laws of their diffusion," which showed the influence of Schonlein.

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  • During the smallpox epidemic of 1721 he attempted in vain to have treatment by inoculation employed, for the first time in America; and for this he was bitterly attacked on all sides, and his life was at one time in danger; but, nevertheless, he used the treatment on his son, who recovered, and he wrote An Account of the Method and further Success of Inoculating for the Small Pox in London (r 721).

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  • The fleet, disabled by an epidemic, was, throughout the war, little more than a floating hospital.

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  • Their number does not much exceed 40,000, which is being steadily reduced by drunkenness and epidemic diseases.

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  • In 1893 the epidemic appeared again, but in a milder form.

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  • The virulence of infective diseases varies in different epidemics, and at different times in the same epidemic. It had been noted that many infective diseases did not attack an individual a second time, the first attack appearing to protect from subsequent ones.

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  • The prosperity of the residency was further affected by a cattle plague in 1879, followed by a fever epidemic which carried off 50,000 people, and except in the rice season there is a considerable emigration of natives.

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  • Where any part of the country appears to be threatened with or is affected by any formidable epidemic, endemic or infectious disease, the Local Government Board may make regula tions for the speedy interment of the dead, house-tohouse visitation, the provision of medical aid and accommodation, the promotion of cleansing, ventilation and disinfection, and the guarding against the spread of disease.

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  • During his short pontificate the States of the Church suffered dire calamities, famine, epidemic and a fresh outbreak of brigandage.

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  • Lord Canning, the governor-general, who had at first hoped that he had only to deal with isolated cases of disaffection, at last recognized that the plague was epidemic, and that only stern measures could stay it.

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  • After the cholera epidemic of 1884, M.

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  • On account of an epidemic of murders disarmament had to be enforced in the district.

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  • His mind, excitable by nature, very imperfectly disciplined by education, and exposed to the enthusiasm which was then epidemic in England, began to be fearfully disordered.

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  • The money thus poured into the country produced an epidemic of speculation known as the "Share Mania".

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  • The last-known "epidemic" of ergotism occurred in Lorraine and Burgundy in the year 1816.

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  • No great epidemic has visited the city since the outbreak of cholera in 1866.

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  • - Wheat, like other cereals, is liable to epidemic diseases caused by parasitic organisms which prey on the plant tissues.

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  • A terrible epidemic of measles in that year swept away 40,000, or about one-third of the Fijians.

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  • There was an epidemic of violent attacks on the emperor; the publication of the Lanterne and the Baudin trial, conducted by Gambetta, were so many death-blows to the regime.

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  • The epidemic spread rapidly over the Peninsula, causing great havoc in important cities like Granada, Saragossa and Valencia.

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  • The climate is good, the temperature equable and epidemic diseases are rare.

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  • In the Isle of Wight a serious epidemic broke out in 1906 which caused great destruction to bee-life in the following year.

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  • The message concerning the undesirability of excessive drinking is punctuated regularly with mainstream news articles on the national epidemic of alcohol abuse.

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  • All the exotic ruminants appear to be linked to the BSE epidemic via the consumption of contaminated feed.

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  • The conditions which gave rise to the epidemic included poor sanitation and a lack of safe water sources in the region.

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  • Racial segregation was a reality in Virginia in the epidemic years.

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  • HIV transmission occurs largely through heterosexual sex, although sex between men, which is highly stigmatized, is also fueling the epidemic.

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  • In 869 A.D., a merciless epidemic went sweeping through Kyoto.

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  • An epidemic of acquired systemic toxoplasmosis involving an unusually high number of cases of ocular disease occurred in 1995 in Canada.

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  • They died in the Typhoid epidemic in late 1914.

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  • The group includes epidemic and endemic typhus fevers, tick-borne typhus, scrub typhus and Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

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  • There is mention of a typhus epidemic in 1891 which resulted in 29 deaths.

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  • Epidemic typhus is only likely to affect volunteer workers who come into close contact with locals.

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  • Poliomyelitis virus of low virulence in patients with epidemic " summer grippe or sore throat ".

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  • In the year 1871 the memorable epidemic of yellow fever broke out at Buenos Ayres.

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  • Forget teenage hoodies and football yobs, Britain is a nation under siege from an epidemic of pet bullies !

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  • The epidemic is predicted to surpass the country's medical capability soon because it is spreading so rapidly.

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  • Like people, obesity has reached epidemic proportions among cats and dogs.

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  • When infectious diseases like AIDS are brought into the mix, this issue quickly becomes an epidemic.

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  • It is a win-win solution for an epidemic environmental issue.

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  • Decorating and design shows are epidemic and many people have become savvy decorators just by tuning in to their favorite design program every week.

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  • Teenage depression and suicide is a very serious issue and is reaching epidemic proportions.

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  • Obviously cigarette smoking is a massive epidemic so the priority review was a good idea.

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  • When considering how many smokers are added to the pot outside of the U.S. smoking becomes a serious epidemic.

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  • Michael Jackson Pictures]] Bad celebrity plastic surgery is something of an epidemic in Hollywood.

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  • The fattening starches such as corn, wheat, potato or tapioca used to hold dry kibble together could also be contributing to the epidemic of obesity and other health issues in our dogs and cats.

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  • Unless the case is occurring in a person known to have been exposed to or in the midst of an epidemic of meningococcal disease, there may be no specific symptoms or signs found that help the doctor diagnose the problem.

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  • It can be used for travelers going to areas where meningococcal disease is more common or is epidemic.

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  • There are two types, bullous and epidemic.

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  • Epidemic impetigo can be caused by staph or strep bacteria and (as the name implies) is very easily passed among children.

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  • "Self-cutting is almost epidemic in adolescents."

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  • The salivary glands are also called the parotid glands; therefore, mumps is sometimes referred to as an inflammation of the parotid glands (epidemic parotitis).

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  • The greatest mumps epidemic was in 1941 when approximately 250 cases were reported for every 100,000 people.

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  • When mumps reaches epidemic proportions, diagnosis is relatively easy on the basis of the physical symptoms.

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  • Epidemic parotitis-The medical name for mumps.

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  • The viruses causing primary encephalitis can be epidemic or sporadic.

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  • Arthropod-borne viral encephalitis is responsible for most epidemic viral encephalitis.

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  • The epidemic of immmunodeficiency virus (HIV), the virus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), has resulted in a huge increase in the incidence of pneumonia.

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  • The Russian flu in the winter of 1977 is an example of an epidemic.

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  • A regional epidemic is shorter lived than a pandemic, lasting only several weeks.

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  • The Cruelest Miles: The Heroic Story of Dogs and Men in a Race against an Epidemic.

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  • Chronic head lice is an epidemic that is not only frustrating, but also discouraging, as patients seeking relief and riddance of the head louse seem to fight a never-ending battle.

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  • Most often an epidemic arises in households where there are several humans serving as lice hosts.

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  • Preventing lice and future outbreaks is the second most important step of successfully ridding an epidemic.

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  • With the aging baby boomer generation and the obesity epidemic affecting people of all ages, medical fields will continue growing and expanding indefinitely in order to provide adequate treatment to patients.

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  • This disease rose to epidemic proportions in Asia once mills began polishing rice.

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  • With the onset of the AIDS epidemic, Red Cross became a leader in HIV testing.

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  • Twenty years ago, the AIDS epidemic was a reasonable concern when it came to any needle-required activity.

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  • When feelings of distrust infect a relationship, the feelings are like an epidemic, they continue to spread unless dealt with.

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  • Because autism is becoming such a common issue (many believe it is becoming an epidemic), educators are receiving specialized training for teaching and handling autistic children.

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  • As I learned more and more about the health and safety issues with our food system, the childhood obesity epidemic, food recalls, and more, I thought, parents need to know about this.

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  • As tuberculosis, a serious bacterial lung infection, reached epidemic proportions in 1924, the overcrowded structure was expanded into a 400 patient sanatorium.

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  • When the AIDS epidemic broke in the 80's, tattoo parlors came under fire for suspected unsanitary conditions and unsafe practices, allegedly using the same tattoo needle on multiple customers.

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  • At times, any signs of progress may seem small and almost insignificant, but researchers are working diligently to find a cause, and possibly a cure, for what many believe has become an epidemic among our children.

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  • One study supports the theory of an environmental connection to the autism epidemic.

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  • Age of Autism is an online newspaper that focuses on autism, naming the pervasive developmental disorders as an "epidemic" that stems from environmental conditions.

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  • Dan is the coauthor of the book Age of Autism: Mercury, Medicine and a Man-made Epidemic.

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  • Since this medicinal plant only exists in one specific area of the world, supplying entire nations with it to treat the obesity epidemic is not realistic.

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  • Let's face it, it's no secret that America is in the middle of an ongoing obesity epidemic.

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  • Francine Ratner Kaufman, MD explores this issue in her article, Type 2 Diabetes in Children and Young Adults: A "New Epidemic" featured on Clinical Diabetes.

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  • Obesity has surged to epidemic proportions in this country.

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  • With the obesity epidemic increasing and affecting younger and younger people, there is great concern about what the proper child diet is, and what weight-loss diets may be safely implemented with an overweight child.

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  • Dr. Sears: America is in the middle of an obesity epidemic that threatens our entire health care system.

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  • With an obesity epidemic in full swing, many people are turning to over the counter weight loss methods, like Fullbar for help.

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