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engendered

engendered Sentence Examples

  • The staff engendered deep loyalty in their students.

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    58
  • The newly-cleaned park engendered great pride in the people who use it.

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  • It was engendered simply by the evolutionary process.

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  • The politics of the situation engendered fiercer hatred than religion.

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  • The excitement was engendered by the fact that it was decided to put the case studies together as a book.

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  • The good feelings about the book were engendered by visual input.

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  • Each little change in the administration engendered a multitude of others, so that the modest attempts at reform were found to be like the letting out of water.

    2
    1
  • The bitter feelings engendered between employer and employed culminated in the peasants' revolt of 1381.

    2
    3
  • It is not a real relation in objects, but rather a mental habit of belief engendered by frequent repetititon or custom.

    1
    2
  • While the population of Brazil continued to increase, the moral and intellectual culture of its inhabitants was left in great measure to chance; they grew up with those robust and healthy sentiments which are engendered by the absence of false teachers, but with a repugnance to legal ordinances, and encouraged in their ascendancy over the Indians to habits of violence and oppression.

    0
    0
  • The love-sick mood and romantic temperament of the young Irishman found congenial soil in the wild surroundings of unexplored Canadian forests, and the enthusiasm thus engendered for the "natural" life of savagery may have been already fortified by study of Rousseau's writings, for which at a later period Lord Edward expressed his admiration.

    0
    0
  • In the meantime, however, blood feuds had been engendered between the chiefs Usibepu 1 For his action on this occasion Colonel (afterwards General Sir) Redvers Buller, who was Wood's principal assistant, received the V.C. Piet Uys was among the slain.

    0
    0
  • Unfortunately, however, the confusion engendered by a defective organization has long been a byword among the people; there is no printed catalogue, quantities of books are buried in packingcases and unavailable, the collection of foreign books is very poor, hardly any new works being purchased, and the building itself is quite inadequate and far from safe; but the site of a new one has now been purchased and the plans are agreed upon, so that eventually the whole collection will be transferred to more suitable quarters.

    0
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  • Hence the fear with which the political, religious and social controls were regarded came to be associated also with the specifically moral control of lower by higher feelings, and engendered the coercive element in the feeling of obligation.

    0
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  • Lastly, when we once have freed ourselves from the antipathy engendered by his severance of ethics from the field of politics, when we have once made proper allowance for his peculiar use of phrases like frodi onorevoli or scelleratezze gloriose, nothing is left but admiration for his mental attitude.

    0
    0
  • The terms " Reformation " and " Protestantism " are inherited by the modern historian; they are not of his devising, and come to him laden with reminiscences of all the exalted enthusiasms and bitter antipathies engendered by a period of fervid religious dissension.

    0
    0
  • Belief in the strength of its walls and of the castle that occupied the centre bridge, thus effectually command ing navigation by the river, engendered arrogance and overconfidence, and the people of Dinant thought they could defy the full power of Burgundy.

    0
    0
  • The homogeneity of wide circles, the sense of responsibility engendered by it, and continuity with the past are almost entirely lacking in it.

    0
    0
  • The willows are cut at the first indication of the sap rising and "couched" in rotten peelings and soil at a slight angle, the butts being on the ground, which should be strewn with damp straw from a manure heap. The tops are covered lightly with rotted peelings and by periodical application of water, fermentation is induced at the bottom, heat is engendered, the leaves force their way through the covering and peeling may begin.

    0
    0
  • The first man, Adam, was engendered by Satan in conjunction with "sin," "cupidity," "desire."

    0
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  • The ease with which money was acquired in the war period, the acquiescence of the people, and the influences of extravagance and corruption engendered by the war, opened, at the return of peace, a period of extravagant expenditure that has continued with progressive increase down to the present.

    0
    0
  • This caused a disagreement between Alabama and the United States authorities; although it was amicably settled, it engendered a feeling that the pulicy of the national government might not be in harmony wD.h the interests of the state - a feeling which, intensified by the slavery agitation, did much to cause secession in 1861.

    0
    0
  • The "Unionists" were successful in the elections of 1851 and 1852, but the feeling of uncertainty engendered in the south by the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Bill and the course of the slavery agitation after 1852 led the State Democratic convention of 1856 to revive the "Alabama Platform"; and when the "Alabama Platform" failed to secure the formal approval of the Democratic National convention at Charleston, South Carolina, in 1860, the Alabama delegates, followed by those of the other cotton "states," withdrew.

    0
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  • The success of these undertakings engendered a wild spirit of speculation in tea companies both in India and at home, which reached its climax in 1865.

    0
    0
  • " Reverence Zeus, the Father-God ": " all fathers are sacred to Zeus, the Father-God, and all brothers to Zeus the God of the family ": these phrases of Aristophanes and Epictetus 13 express the ideas that engendered his titles Ilarpci.ios, FapdiXcos, TEXE70, `Opoyvcos.

    0
    0
  • The Greek consciousness of the sin of murder, only dimly awakened in the Homeric period, and only sensitive at first when a kinsman or a suppliant was slain, gradually expands till the sanctity of all human life becomes recognized by the higher morality of the people: and the names of ZEUs M€tXL tos, the dread deity of the ghost-world whom the sinner must make " placable," of ZEUs `I ho-tos and IIpoorpora70s, to whom the conscience-striken outcast may turn for mercy and pardon, play a guiding-part in this momentous evolution.9 Even this summary reveals the deep indebtedness of early Greek civilization to this cult, which engendered ideas of importance for the higher religious thought of the race, and which might have developed into a monotheistic religion, had a prophet-philosopher arisen powerful enough to combat the polytheistic proclivities of Hellas.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, the inadequate compensation awarded to slaveowners, and the suspicions engendered by the method of payment, caused much resentment, and in 1835 the trekking of farmers into unknown country in order to escape from an unloved government, which had characterized the 18th century, recommenced.

    0
    0
  • The influence of literature on Burke lay partly in the direction of emancipation from the mechanical formulae of practical politics; partly in the association which it engendered, in a powerful understanding like his, between politics and the moral forces of the world, and between political maxims and the old and great sentences of morals; partly in drawing him, even when resting his case on prudence and expediency, to appeal to the widest and highest sympathies; partly, and more than all, in opening his thoughts to the many conditions, possibilities and "varieties of untried being," in human character and situation, and so giving an incomparable flexibility to his methods of political approach.

    0
    0
  • The immediate object of this excellent piece was to hold up the court scheme of weak, divided and dependent administrations in the light of its real purpose and design; to describe the distempers which had been engendered in parliament by the growth of royal influence and the faction of the king's friends; to show that the newly formed Whig party had combined for truly public ends, and was no mere family knot like the Grenvilles and the Bedfords; and, finally, to press for the hearty concurrence both of public men and of the nation at large in combining against "a faction ruling by the private instructions of a court against the general sense of the people."

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    0
  • But the spirit of research, fostered by the fusion of races and the social and intellectual competition thus engendered, was not crushed by these proceedings; and for the next century and more the higher minds of Spain found in Damascus and Bagdad the intellectual aliment which they desired.

    0
    0
  • This struggle engendered extraordinary bitterness, since success might mean continued life, and defeat prompt demise, to competing towns.

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  • The upset was engendered purely by the fact that the statistics do not point the way that some would *want* them to point.

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  • We saw enthusiasm engendered in a wide cross section of pupils.

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  • The attitude engendered by the status quo is revealed in the opinions of the existing landowning interests referred to above.

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  • On every continent, the march of progress has engendered monstrous urban conglomerations, vast pools of human misery.

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  • cosmology sun ULYSSES ' JUPITER ENCOUNTER has engendered 13 articles in the 11 Sept. issue of Science.

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  • Music is now a major strength of the school, in terms of the enthusiasm engendered in a wide cross section of pupils.

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  • draughtide was merely a dream engendered by copious drafts of the Welshman's beloved cwrw da.

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  • What a change in perspective, in attitude toward one s self, is thus engendered!

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  • It is the sort of building that has often engendered great pride in the people who use it.

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  • The paranoia over Bolshevism, the " red scare " of 1919, engendered an atmosphere of mistrust and intolerance in American society.

    0
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  • underminet at first hand in the undermining of confidence and bouts of depression that these often savage attacks engendered in him.

    0
    0
  • The growth of Clerical influence in France engendered a belief that Italy would soon have to defend with the sword her newly-won unity, while the tremendous lesson of the Franco-Prussian War convinced the military authorities of the need for thorough military reform.

    0
    0
  • This pertinacity engendered a belief in France that Italy was about to undertake in Tunisia a more aggressive policy than necessary for the protection of her commercial interests.

    0
    0
  • A recollection of the manifold forms which religious life and thought have taken in Christendom or in Islam, and the passions which are so easily engendered among opposing sects, will prevent a one-sided estimate of the religious standpoints which the writings betray; and to the recognition that they represent lofty ideals it must be added that the great prophets, like all great thinkers, were in advance of their age.

    0
    0
  • The bitter feelings engendered between employer and employed culminated in the peasants' revolt of 1381.

    0
    0
  • But, in fact, it failed; and the friction engendered between the First Lord and the First Sea Lord was one of the causes which drove Mr. Asquith to invite the Unionists in May to join in a Coalition Government.

    0
    0
  • The spirit of Nathan der Weise may not have been exactly the spirit engendered by the Crusades; and yet it is not without reason that Lessing stages the fable which teaches toleration in the Latin kingdom of Jerusalem.

    0
    0
  • While the population of Brazil continued to increase, the moral and intellectual culture of its inhabitants was left in great measure to chance; they grew up with those robust and healthy sentiments which are engendered by the absence of false teachers, but with a repugnance to legal ordinances, and encouraged in their ascendancy over the Indians to habits of violence and oppression.

    0
    0
  • The love-sick mood and romantic temperament of the young Irishman found congenial soil in the wild surroundings of unexplored Canadian forests, and the enthusiasm thus engendered for the "natural" life of savagery may have been already fortified by study of Rousseau's writings, for which at a later period Lord Edward expressed his admiration.

    0
    0
  • In the meantime, however, blood feuds had been engendered between the chiefs Usibepu 1 For his action on this occasion Colonel (afterwards General Sir) Redvers Buller, who was Wood's principal assistant, received the V.C. Piet Uys was among the slain.

    0
    0
  • Want of cleanliness favours their multiplication in a high degree - the idea once existed, and is probably still held by the very ignorant, that they are directly engendered from dirt.

    0
    0
  • Unfortunately, however, the confusion engendered by a defective organization has long been a byword among the people; there is no printed catalogue, quantities of books are buried in packingcases and unavailable, the collection of foreign books is very poor, hardly any new works being purchased, and the building itself is quite inadequate and far from safe; but the site of a new one has now been purchased and the plans are agreed upon, so that eventually the whole collection will be transferred to more suitable quarters.

    0
    0
  • Hence the fear with which the political, religious and social controls were regarded came to be associated also with the specifically moral control of lower by higher feelings, and engendered the coercive element in the feeling of obligation.

    0
    0
  • Lastly, when we once have freed ourselves from the antipathy engendered by his severance of ethics from the field of politics, when we have once made proper allowance for his peculiar use of phrases like frodi onorevoli or scelleratezze gloriose, nothing is left but admiration for his mental attitude.

    0
    0
  • The terms " Reformation " and " Protestantism " are inherited by the modern historian; they are not of his devising, and come to him laden with reminiscences of all the exalted enthusiasms and bitter antipathies engendered by a period of fervid religious dissension.

    0
    0
  • Belief in the strength of its walls and of the castle that occupied the centre bridge, thus effectually command ing navigation by the river, engendered arrogance and overconfidence, and the people of Dinant thought they could defy the full power of Burgundy.

    0
    0
  • It is not a real relation in objects, but rather a mental habit of belief engendered by frequent repetititon or custom.

    0
    0
  • The homogeneity of wide circles, the sense of responsibility engendered by it, and continuity with the past are almost entirely lacking in it.

    0
    0
  • The willows are cut at the first indication of the sap rising and "couched" in rotten peelings and soil at a slight angle, the butts being on the ground, which should be strewn with damp straw from a manure heap. The tops are covered lightly with rotted peelings and by periodical application of water, fermentation is induced at the bottom, heat is engendered, the leaves force their way through the covering and peeling may begin.

    0
    0
  • The first man, Adam, was engendered by Satan in conjunction with "sin," "cupidity," "desire."

    0
    0
  • The ease with which money was acquired in the war period, the acquiescence of the people, and the influences of extravagance and corruption engendered by the war, opened, at the return of peace, a period of extravagant expenditure that has continued with progressive increase down to the present.

    0
    0
  • This caused a disagreement between Alabama and the United States authorities; although it was amicably settled, it engendered a feeling that the pulicy of the national government might not be in harmony wD.h the interests of the state - a feeling which, intensified by the slavery agitation, did much to cause secession in 1861.

    0
    0
  • The "Unionists" were successful in the elections of 1851 and 1852, but the feeling of uncertainty engendered in the south by the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Bill and the course of the slavery agitation after 1852 led the State Democratic convention of 1856 to revive the "Alabama Platform"; and when the "Alabama Platform" failed to secure the formal approval of the Democratic National convention at Charleston, South Carolina, in 1860, the Alabama delegates, followed by those of the other cotton "states," withdrew.

    0
    0
  • Patteson was murdered in 1871, a victim of the mistrust engendered in the natives by kidnapping traders.

    0
    0
  • Councils of war were summoned to consider how this exposed and distant province was to be defended, and for some months war was considered inevitable; but the danger was averted by the renewal of the Triple Alliance and the other decisive steps taken at this time by the German government (see Germany).1 Since this time the foreign policy of Austria-Hungary has been peaceful and unambitious; the close connexion with Germany has so far been maintained, though during the last few years it has been increasingly difficult to prevent the violent passions engendered by national enmity at home from reacting on the foreign policy of the monarchy; it would scarcely be possible to do so, were it not that discussions on foreign policy take place not in the parliaments but in the Delegations where the numbers are fewer and the passions cooler.

    0
    0
  • Each little change in the administration engendered a multitude of others, so that the modest attempts at reform were found to be like the letting out of water.

    0
    0
  • The spirit of the clans remained true indeed, but their prince became " a broken man ": his clemency, and courage, and all that had endeared him to his people, perished under the disgusts and vices engendered by many years of a secret fugitive existence, after he was driven from France in 1749 '(see' A.

    0
    0
  • The success of these undertakings engendered a wild spirit of speculation in tea companies both in India and at home, which reached its climax in 1865.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, sadhuism, by the multiplicity of the independent sects which have arisen in India, has engendered and favoured a spirit of tolerance which cannot escape the notice of the most superficial observer."An independent Saiva sect, or, indeed, the only strictly Saiva sect, are the Vira Saivas, more commonly called Lingayats (popularly Lingaits) or Lingavats, from their practice of wearing on their person a phallic emblem of Siva, made of copper or silver, and usually enclosed in a case suspended from the neck by a string.

    0
    0
  • The three weeks' contest over the election of a speaker in the House of Representatives, in December 1849, emphasized the sectional passions already engendered.

    0
    0
  • " Reverence Zeus, the Father-God ": " all fathers are sacred to Zeus, the Father-God, and all brothers to Zeus the God of the family ": these phrases of Aristophanes and Epictetus 13 express the ideas that engendered his titles Ilarpci.ios, FapdiXcos, TEXE70, `Opoyvcos.

    0
    0
  • The Greek consciousness of the sin of murder, only dimly awakened in the Homeric period, and only sensitive at first when a kinsman or a suppliant was slain, gradually expands till the sanctity of all human life becomes recognized by the higher morality of the people: and the names of ZEUs M€tXL tos, the dread deity of the ghost-world whom the sinner must make " placable," of ZEUs `I ho-tos and IIpoorpora70s, to whom the conscience-striken outcast may turn for mercy and pardon, play a guiding-part in this momentous evolution.9 Even this summary reveals the deep indebtedness of early Greek civilization to this cult, which engendered ideas of importance for the higher religious thought of the race, and which might have developed into a monotheistic religion, had a prophet-philosopher arisen powerful enough to combat the polytheistic proclivities of Hellas.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, the inadequate compensation awarded to slaveowners, and the suspicions engendered by the method of payment, caused much resentment, and in 1835 the trekking of farmers into unknown country in order to escape from an unloved government, which had characterized the 18th century, recommenced.

    0
    0
  • The influence of literature on Burke lay partly in the direction of emancipation from the mechanical formulae of practical politics; partly in the association which it engendered, in a powerful understanding like his, between politics and the moral forces of the world, and between political maxims and the old and great sentences of morals; partly in drawing him, even when resting his case on prudence and expediency, to appeal to the widest and highest sympathies; partly, and more than all, in opening his thoughts to the many conditions, possibilities and "varieties of untried being," in human character and situation, and so giving an incomparable flexibility to his methods of political approach.

    0
    0
  • The immediate object of this excellent piece was to hold up the court scheme of weak, divided and dependent administrations in the light of its real purpose and design; to describe the distempers which had been engendered in parliament by the growth of royal influence and the faction of the king's friends; to show that the newly formed Whig party had combined for truly public ends, and was no mere family knot like the Grenvilles and the Bedfords; and, finally, to press for the hearty concurrence both of public men and of the nation at large in combining against "a faction ruling by the private instructions of a court against the general sense of the people."

    0
    0
  • But the spirit of research, fostered by the fusion of races and the social and intellectual competition thus engendered, was not crushed by these proceedings; and for the next century and more the higher minds of Spain found in Damascus and Bagdad the intellectual aliment which they desired.

    0
    0
  • This struggle engendered extraordinary bitterness, since success might mean continued life, and defeat prompt demise, to competing towns.

    0
    0
  • The paranoia over Bolshevism, the " Red Scare " of 1919, engendered an atmosphere of mistrust and intolerance in American society.

    0
    0
  • The attitude engendered by the status quo is revealed in the opinions of existing landowning interests referred to above.

    0
    0
  • I saw it at first hand in the undermining of confidence and bouts of depression that these often savage attacks engendered in him.

    0
    0
  • The tattoos that this history has engendered are legendary.

    0
    0
  • Though crewed by Mimbari primarily, the command crews were made up of Rangers and occasionally Susan Ivanova (who's grasp of Mimbari engendered a few chuckles).

    0
    0
  • The growth of Clerical influence in France engendered a belief that Italy would soon have to defend with the sword her newly-won unity, while the tremendous lesson of the Franco-Prussian War convinced the military authorities of the need for thorough military reform.

    0
    1
  • This pertinacity engendered a belief in France that Italy was about to undertake in Tunisia a more aggressive policy than necessary for the protection of her commercial interests.

    0
    1
  • A recollection of the manifold forms which religious life and thought have taken in Christendom or in Islam, and the passions which are so easily engendered among opposing sects, will prevent a one-sided estimate of the religious standpoints which the writings betray; and to the recognition that they represent lofty ideals it must be added that the great prophets, like all great thinkers, were in advance of their age.

    0
    1
  • But, in fact, it failed; and the friction engendered between the First Lord and the First Sea Lord was one of the causes which drove Mr. Asquith to invite the Unionists in May to join in a Coalition Government.

    0
    1
  • The spirit of Nathan der Weise may not have been exactly the spirit engendered by the Crusades; and yet it is not without reason that Lessing stages the fable which teaches toleration in the Latin kingdom of Jerusalem.

    0
    1
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