Enervating sentence examples

  • At the same time his rule, if not harsh, was enervating and demoralizing.

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  • I hope to be a friend that is encouraging, not enervating.

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  • The first week of classes was enervating to the new students.

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  • Warm, sunny days can be very pleasant to relax, but also very enervating.

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  • Although enervating, the climate of Siam, as is natural from the position of the country, is not one of extremes.

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  • The climate, especially from November to April, is somewhat enervating to the Englishman, but not unhealthy.

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  • The enervating heat of the sun can hardly be avoided in the desert.

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  • Time alone can show how far these colonies are likely to be permanently successful, or how the subtly enervating influence of the climate will affect later generations.

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  • Some parties can be very enervating to introverts.

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  • It gives her something to do, and keeps her quiet, which I think is desirable while this enervating weather lasts.

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  • and the climate is enervating.

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  • For the most part the climate of Yucatan is healthy, though enervating.

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  • The Venetian feudal families pursued a mild but somewhat enervating policy towards the natives, who began to merge their nationality in that of the Latins and adopted for the island the new name of Corfu.

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  • Buddhism is at its best at Siam, and this and the enervating climate are responsible for the comparatively small direct success of Christian propaganda in Siam proper.

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  • The fertility of Moab, the wealth of wine and corn, the temperate climate and the enervating heat supply conditions which directed the form of cult.

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  • In summer the heat is damp and enervating, and, as Trebizond is approached, the vegetation becomes almost subtropical.

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  • As sea-nymphs, they represent the treacherous calm of ocean, which conceals destruction beneath its smiling surface; or they signify the enervating influence of the hot wind (compare the name Sirius), which shrivels up the fresh young life of vegetation.

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  • enervatene]; for indeed I have felt the enervating effects upon the mind of reading in succession several works of the lighter class.

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  • During the summer months the heat is tempered by a fresh sea-breeze, and there is usually a sharp fall of temperature at night; but in spring and autumn the east and south-east winds, which blow across the heated depression of the Ghor, are enervating and oppressive.

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  • The reason of this lack of warlike quality was no doubt the enervating effect of the great heat of the depression in which the city lies, which has the same effect on the handful of degraded humanity that still occupies the ancient site.

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  • In Tuscany the rule of Ferdinand and of his minister Fossombroni was mild and benevolent, but enervating and demoralizing.

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  • According to this view the enervating luxury of Palestinian culture almost destroyed the lofty ideal monotheism inculcated in the desert, and after the fall of the northern tribes (latter part of the 8th cent.) Judah is naturally regarded as the sole heir.

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  • Sheltered places in the lowlands, especially near streams and lagoons, are malarial and enervating, and at some points on the coast are subject to dangerous fevers.

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  • Notwithstanding that Freetown possesses an abundant and pure water-supply, drawn from the adjacent hills, it is enervating and unhealthy, and it was particularly to the capital, often spoken of as Sierra Leone, that the designation "White Man's Grave" applied.

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  • 285) to explain the peculiarly enervating qualities of the water of the fountain.

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  • As a race the Polynesians are somewhat apathetic. An enervating climate and lavish natural resources incline them to lead easy lives.

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  • The inhabitants of the north—the Piedmontese, Lombards and Genoese especially—have suffered less than those of the rest of the peninsula from foreign domination and from the admixture of inferior racial elements, and the cold winter climate prevents the heat of summer from being enervating.

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  • Whenever such sense is evoked it is only as a momentary relief to his prevailing sense of the hideousness of contemporary life, or in protest against what he regarded as the enervating influences of art.

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  • Loire, where he led a restless and enervating existence, held an atmosphere little favorable to enthusiasm and energy.

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  • Ferdinand was succeeded by his son, Leopold II., who continued his father's policy R of benevolent but somewhat enervating despotism, which produced marked effects on the Tuscan character.

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  • The brighter the green, the more enervating and hopeful a person may feel, which is why lime green travel totes are the perfect accessory for keeping listless and weary travelers in a positive frame of mind.

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  • Personally, I find the idea of "Fashion with a capital F" almost enervating.

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  • The climate of North Borneo is tropical, hot, damp and enervating.

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  • enervates it was the enervating heat of the afternoon, perhaps the soporific effect of the bathing session, or maybe something else entirely.

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  • The wealth and luxury of successive generations, the monotonous routine of life, the separation of the educated class from the higher work of the world, have produced their enervating and paralysing effect on the mainsprings of poetic and imaginative feeling.

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  • To Europeans the climate is found to be relaxing and enervating, but if, in spite of some disinclination for exertion, regular exercise is taken from the beginning, and ordinary precautions against chills, more especially to the stomach, are adopted, a European has almost as good a chance of remaining in good health in the peninsula as in Europe.

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  • The literature of the later republic reflects the sympathies and prejudices of an aristocratic class, sharing in the conduct of national affairs and living on terms of equality with one another; that of the Augustan age, first in its early serious enthusiasm, and then in the licence and levity of its later development, represents the hopes and aspirations with which the new monarchy was ushered into the world, and the pursuit of pleasure and amusement, which becomes the chief interest of a class cut off from the higher energies of practical life, and moving in the refining and enervating atmosphere of an imperial court.

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