Enemy Sentence Examples

enemy
  • One deity for an enemy is bad enough.

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  • You're my enemy forever!

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  • You disabled my greatest enemy for me.

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  • A woman has no greater enemy than a so-called 'decent' woman.

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  • So perished the greatest enemy that the Romans had to encounter in Asia Minor.

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  • The enemy will find it out.

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  • I wanted my nephew to see what kind of enemy he had.

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  • This night's journey was simpler than the past few journeys, as no enemy territory stood between her kingdom and her ally.

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  • He never comes to see after an enemy.

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  • This force was hemmed in by the enemy.

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  • Ahead, the enemy was already visible.

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  • Neither in Moscow nor anywhere in Russia did anything resembling an insurrection ever occur when the enemy entered a town.

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  • Moscow was set on fire by the soldiers' pipes, kitchens, and campfires, and by the carelessness of enemy soldiers occupying houses they did not own.

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  • They are asking to attack and making plans of all kinds, but as soon as one gets to business nothing is ready, and the enemy, forewarned, takes measures accordingly.

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  • The enemy were about 11 m.

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  • Albania, the traditional claim of France to protect Roman Catholics in the Ottoman Empire has been greatly impaired by the non-religious character of the Republic. Like Italy, she is now regarded by Eastern Catholics with distrust as an enemy of the Holy Father.

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  • It was noteworthy that none of the proposed plans of campaign considered France as an enemy.

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  • Owing to this menace of the enemy and disputes over very urgent questions the Provisional National Assembly was elected with difficulty, but in session at Kaunas (Kovno) from Jan.

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  • Every mile of his march northwards through the Carolinas diminished the supply region of the enemy, and desperate efforts were made to stop his advance.

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  • He was thereupon declared a public enemy and superseded by C. Cassius (the murderer of Caesar),who attacked him in Laodicea.

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  • On the receipt by Arthur of the insulting message of the Roman emperor, demanding tribute, it is he who is despatched as ambassador to the enemy's camp, where his arrogant and insulting behaviour brings about the outbreak of hostilities.

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  • Then the history relapses into the business vein and tells of the debates which took place as to the best means of carrying out the vow after the count's decease, the rendezvous, too ill kept at Venice, the plausible suggestion of the Venetians that the balance due to them should be made up by a joint attack on their enemy, the king of Hungary.

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  • Having defeated the enemy, Amphitryon put Comaetho to death and handed over the kingdom of the Taphians to Cephalus.

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  • During the Persian invasion the Tegeans displayed a readiness unusual among Peloponnesian cities; in the battle of Plataea they were the first to enter the enemy's camp. A few years later they headed an Arcadian and Argive league against Sparta, but by the loss of two pitched battles (Tegea and Dipaea) were induced to resume their former loyalty (about 468-467).

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  • As a fortress, Metz has always been of the highest importance, and throughout history down to 1870 it had never succumbed to an enemy, thus earning for itself the name of La pucelle.

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  • Corps on his right was preparing to attack, and noting personally signs of retreat in the enemy's lines,!determined at 3 p.m.

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  • Orders were forthwith despatched to the 6th infantry division, at that moment between Puxieux and Tronville, to wheel in to their right and attack, and, their movement being still hidden from the enemy, these troops were formally drawn up for action and sent forward as a whole.

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  • He gave no objective, and when the brigadier pointed out that the enemy was still beyond the striking radius of his horses, Frossard reiterated the order, which was obeyed to the letter.

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  • Near Vionville they took ground to their left, opening to full intervals as they did so, and then ascended the gentle incline which still hid them from their enemy.

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  • Unanimously he and his staff agreed that this fresh enemy could only be the advanced guard of a large Prussian force, possibly, it was suggested, of the crown prince's army, from Alsace and Nancy, and a fresh delay arose while the situation was investigated.

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  • Many of them had so little idea of the general situation that they actually placed outposts to the north and east, whilst the whole of the enemy's army lay to the south and west.

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  • The cavalry of the Saxons had established the fact that the French had not retreated northward, but though scouts from the Guard had already seen the enemy on the heights of St Privat, this information had not yet reached headquarters, nor had it been transmitted to the IX.

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  • The English commander put to sea, and found the enemy anchored on the coast of Flanders, in three divisions.

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  • The French, with more recklessness than was usual with them in later times, bore down on their enemy courageously but in some disorder.

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  • At the same time the men of Zealand repulsed a French raid from Ath on Ardenburg, and this infraction of the neutrality of the Spanish Netherlands served but to raise up another enemy for Louis.

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  • Montecucculi thus achieved one of the greatest objects of the 17th century strategist, the wearing down of the enemy in repeated and useless marches.

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  • He had derived a considerable revenue from the enemy's country, and he had moreover quartered his troops without expense.

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  • Picking up on his way such reinforcements as were available, he marched southward with all speed behind the Vosges, and in the last stages of the movement he even split up his forces into many small bodies, that the enemy's spies might be misled.

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  • The battle of Tiirkheim (5th of January 1675) nevertheless resulted in another and this time a decisive victory for the French; a few days after the battle Turenne could report that there was not a soldier of the enemy left in Alsace.

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  • There can be little doubt that neither in guns nor in gunnery was the British squadron capable of meeting the enemy, and long before the fatal day it should have been reinforced by at least two cruisers of the 1st Cruiser Squadron, all of which were ships in long commission with good armament.

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  • When the " Glasgow " sighted the enemy the " Good Hope " was some 26 m.

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  • When the German squadron was sighted it would have been possible to fall back on the " Canopus," but this would have entailed the destruction of the " Otranto," which would have been overtaken by the enemy in two or three hours.

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  • Then, yielding to his wife's entreaties, he sallied forth and defeated the enemy, but was never seen again, having been carried off by the Erinyes, who had heard his mother's curse (or he was slain by Apollo in battle).

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  • The establishment of Elizabeth on the English throne put on the flank of his scattered dominions another power, forced no less than France by unavoidable political necessities to be his enemy.

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  • It was useless to attempt to avenge this disaster, which occurred on the 15th of August 778, for the enemy disappeared as quickly as he came; the incident has passed from the domain of history into that of legend and romance, being associated by tradition with the pass of Roncesvalles.

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  • The gases evolved from the sudden outbursts or blowers in coal, which are often given off at a considerable tension, are the most dangerous enemy that the collier has to contend with.

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  • Scipio's arrival in Africa in 204 gave him another chance, and no sooner had he joined the Roman general than he crushed his old enemy Syphax, and captured his capital Cirta (Constantine).

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  • Massinissa, according to the story, married Sophonisba immediately after his victory, but was required by Scipio to dismiss her as a Carthaginian, and consequently an enemy to Rome.

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  • To civil war she was consistently opposed, and never ceased to dissociate herself from the plans of the emigres, but here again her very position made her an enemy of the republic. In any case, all her actions had as their aim - firstly, the safeguarding of the monarchy and the king's position, and later, when she saw this to be impossible, that of securing the safety of her husband and her son.

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  • Houston now assumed active command and retreated before Santa Anna until he reached the San Jacinto river, where he dealt the enemy a crushing blow and brought the war to an end; nearly all of Santa Anna's army were killed, wounded or taken prisoners, and even Santa Anna himself was captured the next day, while the Texans lost only two killed and twenty-three wounded.

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  • Thus, a number of soldiers with firearms may occupy an extensive region to the exclusion of the enemy's armies, though the space filled by their bodies is but small.

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  • The duke then ordered Cutts to observe the enemy in Blenheim, and concentrated all his attention on the centre.

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  • It was at the close of Jehoiakim's reign, apparently just before his death, that the enemy appeared at the gates of Jerusalem, and although he himself "slept with his fathers" his young son was destined to see the first captivity of the land of Judah (597 B.C.).

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  • By the accident of the terrain, or perhaps, following the experience of Breitenfeld, by design, the right of the Swedes was somewhat nearer to the enemy than the left.

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  • The famous cavalry leader had brought on his mounted men ahead of the infantry and asking, " Where is the king of Sweden ?"charged at once in the direction of the enemy's right.

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  • Tertullian (c. 160-240) uses it in both senses, of an oath, as in the passage of his treatise About Spectacles, where he says that no Christian " passes over to the enemy's camp without throwing away his arms, without abandoning the standards and sacraments of his chief."

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  • This included Luther's old enemy, Duke George of Saxony, the electors of Bran- denburg and Mainz, and two princes of Brunswick.

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  • It carries the war into the camp of the enemy by seeking to demonstrate that the completely determined action which is set over against freedom as the basis of explanation in the material world is merely a hypothesis which, while it serves sufficiently well the limited purpose for which it is devised, is incapable of verification in the ultimate constituents of physical nature.

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  • After a cannonade in which it suffered more severely than its entrenched enemy, the French centre furiously attacked the village of Allerheim; the fighting here was very heavy, and on the whole in favour of the Germans, although Mercy was killed.

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  • In the campaign of 1660 he won the victories of Polonka and Lachowicza and penetrated to the heart of the enemy's country.

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  • The subjugation of them is ascribed were called by the students Philister; they were " outsiders," the enemy of the chosen people.

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  • The Genoese, who had the larger and more efficient fleet, sent their whole power against their enemy.

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  • The Genoese, desiring to draw their enemy out to battle, and to make the action decisive, arranged their fleet in two lines abreast.

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  • The fore-sight was a small globe, and in the original patterns this was placed on a movable leaf on which deflection for speed of one's own ship was given, while deflection for speed of enemy's ship and wind were given on the tangent sight.

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  • Khufu's work in the temple of Bubastis is proved by a surviving fragment, and he is figured slaying his enemy at Sinai before the god Thoth.

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  • In enemy countries, it is true, his enterprises were sequestrated, and his firm at Rotterdam placed on the Allies' " black list."

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  • The allies were still resting in fancied security, dispersed throughout widely distant cantonments; for nothing but vague rumours had reached them, and they had not moved a man to meet the enemy.

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  • As the foe would lie away to his right and left front after he had passed the Sambre, one wing would be pushed up towards Wellington and another towards Blucher; whilst the mass of the reserve would be centrally placed so as to strike on either side, as soon as a force of the enemy worth destroying was encountered and gripped.

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  • The other is to be used exclusively to neutralize the other enemy, by holding him at bay.

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  • Ney spent the morning in massing his two corps, and in reconnoitring the enemy at Quatre Bras, who, as he was informed, had been reinforced.

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  • It was a somewhat complicated manoeuvre; for he was attempting to outflank his enemy with a corps that he had subordinated to Marshal Ney.

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  • His cavalry gained contact before noon with Thielemann's corps, which was resting at Gembloux, but the enemy was allowed to slip away and contact was lost for want of a serious effort to keep it.

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  • It was during this struggle that Lord Uxbridge launched two of his cavalry brigades on the enemy; and the "Union brigade" catching the French infantry unawares rode over them, broke them up, and drove them to the bottom of the slope with the loss of two eagles.

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  • Champion of the papacy and in secret league with the Lombard cities he was able to defy the common enemy, Frederick II.

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  • At his call, delegates from Massachusetts, Plymouth, Connecticut and Maryland met in New York City with delegates from New York on the 1st of May 1690 to consider concerted action against the enemy, and although the expedition which they sent out was a failure it numbered 855 men, New York furnishing about one-half the men, Massachusetts one of the two commanders and Connecticut the other.

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  • After a fourth Easter synod in 1053 Leo set out against the Normans in the south with an army of Italians and German volunteers, but his forces sustained a total defeat at Astagnum near Civitella (18th June 1053); on going out, however, from the city to meet the enemy he was received with every token of submission, relief from the pressure of his ban was implored and fidelity and homage were sworn.

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  • In justification of their action, and to enlist the support of the Turkish people, the Government made much of the facts that the war was against Russia, the traditional and inexorable enemy of the empire, and that Great Britain and France were in alliance with Russia.

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  • It was one of the empire's historical fronts; beyond it lay the traditional Russian enemy; on the hither side was the Ottoman fortress of Erzerum, the greatest place of arms in Asia Minor.

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  • With greater passion Flourens declares " Our enemy is God.

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  • President Kruger, however, soon brushed these propositions aside, and responded by stating that, in consideration of the common enemy and the dangers which threatened the Republic, an offensive and defensive alliance must be preliminary to any closer union.

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  • To this Brand rejoined that, as far as the offensive was concerned, he did not desire to be a party to attacking any one, and as for the defensive, where was the pressing danger of the enemy which Kruger feared ?

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  • Both by sea and by land their policy was to mass their resources, repulsing meantime the attacks of the Japanese with as much damage to the enemy and as little to themselves as possible.

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  • After he had minutely arranged the Eastern Detachment in a series of rearguard positions, so that each fraction of it could contribute a little to the game of delaying the enemy before retiring on the positions next in rear, the commander of the detachment, Zasulich, told him that " it was not the custom of a knight of the order of St George to retreat," and Kuropatkin did not use his authority to recall the general, who, whether competent or not, obviously misunderstood his mission.

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  • Yet another object was given him, to " relieve the pressure on Port Arthur by drawing upon himself the bulk of the enemy's forces," and he was not to allow himself to be drawn into a decisive action against superior numbers.

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  • He wished to inflict a severe blow before the enemy could be reinforced by the late besiegers of Port Arthur, and sent Grippenberg with seven divisions against Oku's two on the Japanese left.

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  • The circle was complete, but there were no Russians in the centre, and a map of the positions of the Japanese on the evening of the 10th shows the seventeen divisions thoroughly mixed up and pointing in every direction but that of the enemy.

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  • The Russians again broke out northward; but some of the Japanese squadrons hung on to the remnant of the enemy's battle-fleet, and the others dealt with the numerous Russian vessels that were unable to keep up. Then Togo called off his ships, and gave the torpedo craft room and the night in which to act.

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  • Isolated instances of relations being established with co-nationals in the enemy camp were recorded from the beginning.

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  • This factor was the rupture of communications with foreign countries, due in the earlier stages of the war to the limitation, and at one time the prohibition, of exports by neutral countries, the passing over of some of these countries to the enemy, and lastly the blockade by the enemy Powers, which increased in efficiency and made it more and more difficult to import the most essential commodities, until in the end it was almost impossible to obtain from abroad anything, needed either for the soldiers or the civilians.

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  • In this respect Austria found herself in the same position as the German Empire; in fact, her position was in many respects considerably worse; many richly productive territories were temporarily occupied by the enemy; and as Austria was far less well provided with raw materials than Germany she was less in a position to produce goods for exchange.

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  • Next came the defeat of a northern coalition headed by Sar-duris of Ararat, no fewer than 72,950 of the enemy being captured along with the city of Arpad, where the Assyrian king received the homage of various Syrian princes.

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  • It not only brought him into unremitting conflict with the Protestants and the nobles of France, but also made him the enemy of his mother, of his brother Gaston of Orleans, who made himself the champion of the cause of the nobles, and sometimes even of his wife.

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  • The temporary removal of the common peril, moreover, let loose all the sectional and personal jealousies, which even in face of the enemy had been with difficulty restrained, and the year 1823 witnessed the first civil war between the Greek parties.

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  • For twelve months the population held out, repulsing the attacks of the enemy, refusing every offer of honourable capitulation.

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  • The worst enemy of the P Y Greeks was their own incurable spirit of faction; in the very crisis of their fate, during the siege of Missolonghi, rival presidents and rival assemblies struggled for supremacy, and a third civil war had only been prevented by the arrival of Cochrane and Church.

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  • Perhaps the earliest known instance of his prominent appearance of large size in the sculptures of the temples is under Tahraka, at Jebel Barkal, Nubia, at the beginning of the 7th century B.C. As the protector of children and others he is the enemy of noxious beasts, such as lions, crocodiles, serpents and scorpions.

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  • In 1793 he distinguished himself by the brilliant defence of a redoubt at the Col di Tenda, with only thirty men against a battalion of the enemy.

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  • The Boca Grande was filled with stone after the city had been captured three times, because of the ease with which an enemy's ships could pass through it at any time, and the narrow and more easily defended Boca Chica, 7 m.

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  • And when literary jealousy was complicated with theological differences, as in the case of the free-thinkers, or with French vanity, as in that of Budaeus, the cause of the enemy was espoused by a party and a nation.

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  • Etienne Dolet calls him "enemy of Cicero, and jealous detractor of the French name."

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  • All the gods, even Zeus, hate him, but his bitterest enemy is Athena, who fells him to the ground with a huge stone.

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  • In later accounts (and even in the Odyssey) Ares' character is somewhat toned down; thus, in the "Homeric" hymn to Ares, he is addressed as the assistant of Themis (Justice), the enemy of tyrants, and leader of the just.

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  • The Girondists, for all their fine phrases, were sold to the enemy, as Lafayette, Dumouriez and a hundred others - once popular favourites - had been sold.

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  • In the 8th century came the Arab invasion from the west, and we find Kashgar and Turkestan lending assistance to the reigning queen of Bokhara, to enable her to repel the enemy.

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  • Most of these German citizens in process of time were absorbed by the Polish population, and became devoted, heart and soul, to their adopted country; but these were not the only Germans with whom the young Polish state depressed the land, and, at this very time, another enemy appeared in the east - the Lithuanians.

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  • This was notably the case as regards his dealings with the old enemy of his race, the Teutonic Order, whose destruction was the chief aim of his ambition.

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  • Chmielnicki, by suddenly laying bare the nakedness of the Polish republic, had opened the eyes of Muscovy to the fact that her secular enemy was no longer formidable.

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  • Muscovy had done with Poland as an adversary, and had no longer any reason to fear her ancient enemy.

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  • He was full of the idea of a league of republics against the league of sovereigns; but he was unaware that the Jacobins themselves were already considering the best mode of detaching Prussia, Poland's worst enemy, from the anti-French coalition.

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  • Mark has another nephew, Andret, who is Tristan's enemy throughout the romance.

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  • In the War of 1812 Frederick, Havre de Grace, and Frenchtown were burned by the British; but particularly noteworthy were the unsuccessful movements of the enemy by land and by sea against Baltimore, in which General Robert Ross (c. 1766-1814), the British commander of the land force, was killed before anything had been accomplished and the failure of the fleet to take Fort McHenry after a siege of a day and a night inspired the song The Star-spangled Banner, composed by Francis Scott Key who had gone under a flag of truce to secure from General Ross the release of a friend held as a prisoner by the British and during the attack was detained on his vessel within the British lines.

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  • Moreover, all his martial energy notwithstanding, his personality must have been singularly winning; for it is said of him that he left behind not a single enemy, all his opponents having long since been converted by him into friends.

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  • As against the civilian enemy the navy strangled commerce; its military preponderance nipped in the bud every successive attempt of the Confederates to create a fleet (for each new vessel as it emerged from the estuary or harbour in which it had been built, was destroyed or driven back), while at any given point a secure base was available for the far-ranging operations of the Union armies.

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  • Here extraordinary good fortune put into the enemy's hands a copy of Lee's orders, from which it was clear that the Confederates were dangerously dispersed.

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  • Lee's lines were becoming dangerously extended, but he could not allow the enemy to cut him off from the west.

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  • A combat which took place, at Mount Jackson, during the pursuit, again ended successfully, and the triumphant Federals retired down the Valley, ruthlessly destroying everything which might be of the slightest value to the enemy.

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  • Sherman acted thus in order to teach his own men and the enemy that he was not "afraid," and the lesson was not valueless.

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  • As usual, all that could be of possible value to the enemy was destroyed and, by some accident, the town itself was burned.

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  • The town-bred soldier of the eastern states was a thoughtful citizen who was determined to do his duty, but he had far less natural aptitude for war than his enemy from the Carolinas or his comrade from Illinois or Kansas.

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  • Five heavy accurate shots from the Federal's turret guns crushed the enemy in a few minutes.

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  • On the 19th of June they beat the enemy at Staoueli.

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  • Great Britain and Prussia very properly insisted that Charles John's first duty was to them, the former power rigorously protesting against the expenditure of her subsidies on the nefarious Norwegian adventure before the common enemy had been crushed.

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  • During the Crimean War he revived his "secret war plan" for the total destruction of an enemy's fleet, and offered to conduct in person an attack on Sevastopol and destroy it in a few hours without loss to the attacking force.

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  • McClellan lingered north of Richmond, despite President Lincoln's constant demand that he should "strike a blow" with the force he had organized and taken to the Yorktown peninsula in April, until General Lee had concentrated 73,000 infantry in his front; then the Federal commander, fearing to await the issue of a decisive battle, ended his campaign of invasion in the endeavour to "save his army"; and he so far succeeded that on July 3 he had established himself on the north bank of the James in a position to which reinforcements and supplies could be brought from the north by water without fear of molestation by the enemy.

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  • But he lost 15,000 men in the course of his seven days' retreat, and 20% of the remainder became ineffective from disease contracted in the swamps of the Chickahominy, while enormous quantities of valuable stores at White House on the Pamunkey had been burnt to avoid seizure by the enemy.

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  • Meanwhile General Jackson, with Stuart's cavalry corps, "marched by the fight without giving attention, and went into camp at Hundley's Corner half a mile in rear of the enemy's position."

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  • P. Hill engaged the enemy in front and Longstreet in reserve moved along the left bank of the Chickahominy.

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  • General Lee required Longstreet to attack the enemy's left, and at this moment he procured the assistance of some part of Jackson's corps which had become separated from the remainder.

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  • Stuart was to operate at his discretion north of the Chickahominy, and it seems that he was attracted by the enemy's abandoned depot at White House more than by McClellan's retreating army.

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  • General Lee had thus on the seventh day concentrated his army of ten divisions in the enemy's front; but Jackson's dispositions were unfortunate and General Lee's plan of attack was thus upset; and while seeking a route to turn the enemy's right the Confederate commander was apprised that a battle had been improvised by the divisions in advance.

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  • General Lee's offensive operations now ended, though Stuart's cavalry rejoined the main army at night and followed the enemy on July 2 to Evelington Heights, while Lee rested his army.

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  • The accompanying actions (tying knots, &c.) which he performs are assumed to work themselves out on the enemy whose evil eye.

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  • By one of his swift and secret flank marches he placed his corps on the flank of the enemy, and on the 2nd of May flung them against the Federal NI.

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  • Thus, with the exception of Epicureanism - which was always treated by Neoplatonism as its mortal enemy - there is no outstanding earlier system which did not contribute something to the new philosophy.

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  • Every prodigal, therefore, is a public enemy; every frugal man a public benefactor.

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  • He successfully checked the advance of the enemy at the passage of the Aisne (between Laon and Reims) and their ill-organized force melted away as he advanced.

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  • The decisive engagement was fought (probably) in the Gulf of Morbihan and the Romans gained the victory by cutting down the enemy's rigging with sickles attached to poles.

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  • The armies were very large, an expedition often consisting of several divisions, each numbering eight thousand men; but the tactics of the commanders were quite rudimentary, consisting merely of attack by arrows and javelins at a distance, gradually closing into a hand-to-hand fight with clubs and spears, with an occasional feigned retreat to draw the enemy into an ambuscade.

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  • He had advanced as far as the tenth sheet, bearing the signature K, when his work was discovered by Johann Cochlaeus, a famous controversialist and implacable enemy of the Reformation, who not only caused the Senate of Cologne to prohibit the continuation of the printing, but also communicated with Henry VIII.

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  • For the seven years following he was the chief speaker among the small band of anti-Imperialists in the French chamber, and was regarded generally as the most formidable enemy of the empire.

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  • Having raised a permanent force for the war called the Continental Line, they awaited further operations of the enemy.

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  • A small American force under Lafayette, whom Wayne reinforced during the summer, partially checked the enemy.

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  • He wished to concentrate on the rear of the enemy's line, but his captains scattered themselves along the French formation.

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  • This powerful upstart was the natural enemy of the nobility, who suffered much at his hands, though it is very difficult to determine whether the initiative in these prosecutions proceeded from him or his master.

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  • In 1014 Brian Boroihme, king of Munster, attacked the enemy and fought the battle of Clontarf, in which he and his son and 11,000 of his followers fell.

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  • Owing to his unrivalled knowledge of the country, he succeeded in interrupting the enemy's communications between Rome and Naples.

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  • Thereupon Cleomenes urged Leotychides, a relative and personal enemy of Demaratus, to claim the throne on the ground that the latter was not really the son of Ariston but of Agetus, his mother's first husband.

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  • Thither On the next day the victorious Vitellians followed them, but only to come to terms at once with their disheartened enemy, and to be welcomed into the camp as friends.

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  • When his native town was besieged by the enemy, the inhabitants resolved to escape with their most valuable belongings.

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  • In the meanwhile Garibaldi had invaded Sicily with his Thousand, and King Victor Emmanuel decided at last that he too must intervene; Fanti was given the chief command of a strong Italian force which invaded the papal states, seized Ancona and other fortresses, and defeated the papal army at Castelfidardo, where the enemy's commander, General Lamoriciere, was captured.

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  • But the favourable account was written under the personal supervision of Timur's grandson, Ibrahim, while the other was the production of his direst enemy.

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  • They are carried into battle to assist the tribe, are regularly anointed, fondled and invoked; for it is believed that the souls present in them are powerful to work weal and woe to friend and enemy respectively.

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  • During Clarke's lifetime, fearing perhaps to be branded as an enemy of religion and morality, Collins made no reply, but in 1729 he published an answer, entitled Liberty and Necessity.

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  • Large piles of building were erected, with strong outside walls, capable of resisting the assaults of an enemy, within which all the neces sary edifices were ranged round one or more open courts, usually surrounded with cloisters.

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  • She continued her work of building a line of forts on the great lakes - on the river Niagara, on the Ohio, on the Mississippi; and the English colonies, with the enemy thus in their rear, grew ever more restive.

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  • History comes nearer to philosophy; and Aristotle's Constitutions were known to his enemy Timaeus, who attacked him for disparaging the descent of the Locrians of Italy, according to Polybius (xii.), who defended Aristotle.

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  • Although not a man of great importance, Bibulus showed great persistency as the enemy of Caesar.

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  • During the siege of Delhi another native, said to be an enemy of Bisharat Ali's, informed Hodson that he had turned rebel.

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  • It is that immense mass of letters that prove the real greatness of the statesman, and disprove De Retz's portrait, which is carefully arranged to show off his enemy against the might of Richelieu.

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  • In its ultimate form the Messianic hope of the Jews is the centre of the whole eschatology, embracing the doctrine of the last troubles of Israel (called by the Rabbins the "birth pangs of the Messiah"), the appearing of the anointed king, the annihilation of the hostile enemy, the return of the dispersed of Israel, the glory and world-sovereignty of the elect, the new world, the resurrection of the dead and the last judgment.

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  • On the 23rd of September Wellesley supposed himself to be still some miles from the enemy; he suddenly found that the entire forces of Sindhia and the raja of Berar were close in front of him at Assaye.

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  • He landed at Mondego Bay in the first week of August, and moved southwards, driving in the enemy at Rollo.

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  • So great was the public displeasure in England at the escape of the enemy that a court of inquiry was held.

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  • Soult had to move southwards to live, and the English were again more than a match for the enemy in front of them.

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  • Position after position was evacuated by the French, until Wellington, driving everything before him, came up with the retreating enemy at Vittoria, and won an overwhelming victory (June 21st).

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  • The ban of the congress, however, went out against the common enemy, and the presence of Wellington at Vienna enabled the allies at once to decide upon their plans for the campaign.

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  • In character and interests he was rather Provencal than Spanish, a favourer of the troubadours, no enemy of the Albigensian heretics, and himself a poet in the southern French dialect.

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  • The Hanoverians, however, were victorious at the battle of Langensalza on the 27th of June 1866, but the advance of fresh bodies of the enemy compelled them to capitulate two days later.

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  • Thus, for once, Napoleon decided to attack both flanks of the enemy.

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  • Still, the left attack may have had a purely tactical object, for in that quarter was the main body of the Prussians and Russians, and Napoleon's method was always to concentrate the fury of the attack on the heaviest masses of the enemy, i.e.

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  • The British government had no desire to place obstacles in the way of a belligerent desiring to take reasonable precautions in order to prevent the enemy from receiving supplies, but they insisted that the right of taking such precautions did not imply a " consequential right to intercept at any distance from the scene of operations and without proof that the supplies in question were really destined for use of the enemy's forces, any articles which that belligerent might determine to regard as contraband of war."

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  • As yet no means are known which call so much into action as a great war, that rough energy born of the camp, that deep impersonality born of hatred, that conscience born of murder and cold-bloodedness, that fervour born of effort in the annihilation of the enemy, that proud indifference to loss, to one's own existence, to that of one's fellows, to that earthquake-like soul-shaking which a people needs when it is losing its vitality."

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  • It is allowable to deceive an enemy by fabricated despatches purporting to come from his own side; by tampering with telegraph 1112Ssages; by spreading false intelligence in newspapers; by sending pretended spies and deserters to give him untrue reports of the numbers or movements of the troops; by employing false signals to lure him into an ambuscade.

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  • Tenison's reputation as an enemy of Romanism led the duke of Monmouth to send for him before his execution in 1685, when Bishops Ken and Turner refused to administer the Eucharist; but, although Tenison spoke to him in "a softer and less peremptory manner" than the two bishops, he was, like them, not satisfied with the sufficiency of Monmouth's penitence.

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  • In May 1644 he opened the campaign by recrossing the Rhine and raiding the enemy's posts as far as Uberlingen on the lake of Constance and Donaueschingen on the Danube.

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  • Turenne's march (August 3rd, 1644) was slow and painful, as had been anticipated, and late in the afternoon, on passing Wittnau, he encountered the enemy.

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  • He himself and all the young nobles of his staff dismounted and led the infantry forward again, the prince threw his baton into the enemy's lines for the soldiers to retrieve, and in the end, after a bitter struggle, the Bavarians, whose reserves had been taken away to oppose Turenne in the Merzhausen defile, abandoned the entrenchments and disappeared into the woods of the adjoining spur.

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  • He distinguished himself in the expedition to Santo Domingo in many fights, and especially in a daring reconnaissance with few men into the heart of the enemy's lines, for which he got the cross with laurels of San Fernando.

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  • Achior now publicly professes Judaism, and at the instance of Judith the Israelites make a sudden victorious onslaught on the enemy.

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  • Rough Castle, near Falkirk, is very much smaller; it is remarkable for the astonishing strength of its turf-built and earthen ramparts and ravelins, and for a remarkable series of defensive pits, reminiscent of Caesar's lilia at Alesia, plainly intended to break an enemy's charge, and either provided with stakes to impale the assailant or covered over with hurdles or the like to deceive him.

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  • A few days later there died, also in Constantinople, his old enemy and persecutor, Athanaric.

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  • One barbarous custom which was regarded as a sacrifice was the dedication of an enemy's army to the gods, especially Odin.

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  • In Chinese history we are told how, in the sixty-fourth year of the reign of Hwang-ti (2634 B.C.), the emperor Hivan-yuan, or Hwang-ti, attacked one Tchi-yeou, on the plains of Tchou-lou, and finding his army embarrassed by a thick fog raised by the enemy, constructed a chariot (Tchi-nan) for indicating the south, so as to distinguish the four cardinal points, and was thus enabled to pursue Tchi-yeou, and take him prisoner.

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  • In one of the actions of this war the "Centaur" and "Implacable," unsupported by the Swedish ships (which lay to leeward), cut out the Russian 80-80-gun ship "Sevolod" from the enemy's line and, after a desperate fight, forced her to strike.

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  • Dread of the Normans, too, explains the singular attitude of the Curia towards the Comneni, of whom it was alternately the enemy and the protector or ally.

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  • But he was soon confronted with an extremely dangerous enemy, in the person of Duke Gian Galeazzo Visconti of Milan, who was aiming at the sovereignty of all Italy.

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  • The widely diffused view that this pope was an enemy of science and culture is unfounded.

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  • His fall soon followed, when he had lost all ground in Florence; and his execution on the 23rd of May 1498 freed Alexander from a formidable enemy (see Savonarola).

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  • So pronounced an enemy of French preponderance did Innocent become that he approved the League of Augsburg, and was not sorry to see the Catholic James II., whom he considered a tool of Louis, thrust from the throne of England by the Protestant William of Orange.

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  • In France the Conservative Monarchical party had just shown its inability to preserve the Crown, whilst the Republic had anchored itself firmly by denouncing the clergy as its enemy.

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  • Christian, who loved to figure as "the friend of God, the enemy of the priests," is sometimes called "the mad bishop," and was a merciless, coarse, and blasphemous man.

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  • It is assumed (probably rightly) that no enemy could get round to this side in sufficient strength to deliver any attack that the existing forts could not easily repel.

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  • On the 22nd of July, when the Confederates under his old classmate Hood made a sudden and violent attack on the lines held by the Army of the Tennessee, McPherson rode up, in the woods, to the enemy's firing line and was killed.

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  • By gardeners the bullfinch has long been regarded as a deadly enemy, from its undoubted destruction of the buds of fruit-trees in spring-time, though whether the destruction is really so much of a detriment is by no means so undoubted.

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  • When in use, the prism is supported some inches above the body and is the only part that can be seen by the enemy.

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  • The excessive favour which he showed to John, his youngest-born, was another cause of heart-burning; and Louis, the old enemy, did his utmost to foment all discords.

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  • He would neither conciliate Sweden, henceforth his most dangerous enemy, nor guard himself against her by a definite system of counter-alliances.

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  • This personification of Death has had as a consequence the introduction into the folklore of many lands of stories, often humorous, of the tricks played on the Enemy of Mankind.

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  • In 1810 the order was made one for military merit against the enemy in the field exclusively.

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  • The" Vindictive,"supported by two auxiliary vessels" Iris II."and" Daffodil,"was to assault the mole on its outer and western side and by creating an impression that this was the main operation, divert the enemy's fire from the blocking ships.

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  • The navy chafed at its inactivity and looked eagerly for some outlet where it could get at grips with its enemy.

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  • They objected to serve beyond the limits of their states, were not amenable to discipline, and behaved as a rule very ill in the presence of the enemy.

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  • Into the midst of this region of banditti Sigismund came as a sort of grand justiciar, a sworn enemy of every sort of disorder.

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  • Proclamations were issued in which the crime of Bothwell was denounced, and the disgrace of the country, the thraldom of the queen and the mortal peril of her infant son, were set forth as reasons for summoning all the lieges of the chief cities of Scotland to rise in arms on three hours' notice and join the forces assembled against the one common enemy.

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  • Not a single friend, not a single enemy, was forgotten; the slightest service, the slightest wrong, had its place assigned in her faithful and implacable memory for retribution or reward.

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  • A kinder or more faithful friend, a deadlier or more dangerous enemy, it would be impossible to dread or to desire.

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  • Their success was due as much to their readiness in adopting their enemy's methods of warfare as to their bravery.

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  • At the same time a new enemy arose in the Illyrian pirate fleets, which outdid them in unscrupulousness and violence.

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  • The next enemy whom Turkey was called upon to face was Russia, later joined by Austria.

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  • The reason for this rising was that the king had granted the duchy of Swabia to Henry's enemy, Otto, a grandson of the emperor Otto the Great, and had given the new Bavarian East Mark, afterwards known as Austria, to Leopold I., count of Babenberg.

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  • When Louis the Lame died in 1445 his father came into the power of his implacable enemy, Henry of Bavaria-Landshut, and died in prison in 1447.

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  • But Prussia was henceforth the enemy, not Austria.

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  • The separatist ambitions of Bavaria were thus formally given up; she had no longer "need of France"; and in the war of 1870-71, the Bavarian army marched, under the command of the Prussian crown prince, against the common enemy of Germany.

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  • Worsted in this struggle, which was concluded in 1462, Albert made an alliance with his former enemy, George Podebrad, king of Bohemia, a step which caused Pope Paul II.

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  • In a written defence, the famous Apology, published later in the year, William replied at great length to the charges that had been brought against him, and carrying the war into the enemy's camp, endeavoured to prove that the course he had pursued was justified by the crimes and tyranny of the king.

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  • His edict prohibiting all commercial intercourse with the enemy at once aroused against him the bitter hostility of the merchants of Holland and Zeeland, who thrived by such traffic. His attempts to pack the council of State, on which already two Englishmen had seats, with personal adherents and to override the opposition of the provincial states of Holland to his arbitrary acts, at last made his position impossible.

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  • Meanwhile the enemy broke up camp, and, although harassed by native levies raised by the British, effected an orderly retreat.

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  • Seeing the preparations made by his enemy, Kofi Karikari endeavoured to make peace, and in response to General Wolseley's demands the European captives were released (January 1874).

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  • Avoiding the main road, held by the enemy in force, they attacked a weakly held stockade, and succeeded in cutting their way through, with a loss of two British officers mortally wounded, 39 Hausa killed, and double that number wounded or missing.

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  • Carriers could scarcely be obtained, there were no local food supplies, the rainy season was at its height, all the roads were deep mire, the bush was almost impenetrable, and the enemy were both brave and cunning, fighting behind concealed stockades.

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  • Making his final dispositions, the colonel spread a report that on the 13th he would attack Kokofu, east of Bekwai, and this drew off several thousands of the enemy from Kumasi.

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  • In the following century a new enemy appeared in the Hanseatic league, which was jealous of its rivalry, but their invasion was frustrated by Queen Philippa.

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  • These negotiations would probably have succeeded but for the malign influence of another Goth, Sarus, the hereditary enemy of Alaric and his house.

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  • The Scots, however, crossed by a ford, and continued the pursuit of the enemy as far as Berwick.

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  • To his enemy, Bernard Saisset, he was neither man nor beast, but a statue, "the handsomest man in the world, but unable to do anything but stare fixedly at people without saying a word."

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  • The advantage of this arrangement was that it left all hands free to fight, a barrier could be formed with the oars and yards, and the enemy's chance of making use of his superior numbers to attack on both sides would be, as far as possible, limited - a great point when all fighting was with the sword, or with such feeble missile weapons as bows and javelins.

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  • It was suspected that the enemy without was being aided by treason within.

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  • His southern vehemence gave him great influence among the students of the Quartier Latin, and he was soon known as an inveterate enemy of the imperial government.

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  • It was not until the 4th of May 1877, when the peril from reactionary intrigues was notorious, and the clerical party had begun a campaign for the restoration of the temporal power of the pope, that he delivered his famous speech denouncing "clericalism" as "the enemy."

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  • Luxemburg himself with the right wing of cavalry and some infantry and artillery made a wide sweep round the enemy's left by way of Ligny and Les Trois Burettes, concealed by the high-standing corn.

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  • At 8 o'clock the frontal attack began by a vigorous artillery engagement, in which the French, though greatly outnumbered in guns, held their own, and three hours later Waldeck, whose attention had been absorbed by events on the front, found a long line of the enemy already formed up in his rear.

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  • He at once brought his second line back to oppose them, but while he was doing so the French leader filled up the gap between himself and the frontal assailants by posting infantry around Wagnelee, and also guns on the neighbouring hill whence their fire enfiladed both halves of the enemy's army up to the limit of their ranging power.

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  • It is into these figures that the nails are driven, in order to procure the vengeance of the indwelling spirit on some enemy.

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  • Starting from the hypothesis that Sweden was "DenmarkNorway's most active and irreconcilable enemy," Bernstorff logically included France, the secular ally of Sweden, among the hostile powers with whom an alliance was to be avoided, and drew near to Great Britain as the natural foe of France, especially during the American War of Independence, and this too despite the irritation occasioned in Denmark-Norway by Great Britain's masterful interpretation of the expression "contraband."

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  • Rather than remain quiet, on finding no notice taken of his latest production, he would himself force on a new conflict with the enemy.

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  • How the hostile kings of Israel and Syria came to fight a common enemy, and how to correlate the Assyrian and Biblical records, are questions which have perplexed all recent writers.

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  • Raymund Rhupen died in 1221; and after the event Bohemund reigned in Antioch and Tripoli till his death, proving himself a determined enemy of the Hospitallers, and thereby incurring excommunication in 1230.

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  • In 1440 he paid the ransom of Charles of Orleans (the son of his father's old enemy), who had been a prisoner in England since the battle of Agincourt; received him with great honour at Gravelines; and married him to Mary of Cleves, upon whom he bestowed a handsome dowry.

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  • He had from a child been an enemy of the reigning dynasty.

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  • But some foolish and ignorant Scotsmen were moved to anger by a little unpalatable truth which was mingled with much eulogy, and assailed him whom they chose to consider as the enemy of their country with libels much more dishonourable to their country than anything that he had ever said or written.

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  • When he was ready he used his new troops, before turning them against their chief enemy, the Magyars, to punish refractory Slavonic tribes; and he brought under temporary subjection nearly all the Slays between the Elbe and the Oder.

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  • Henry prudently waited until dearth of provisions forced the enemy to divide into two the bands.

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  • Along the northern and eastern frontier were tributary races, and the country was for the time rid of an enemy which, for nearly a generation, had kept it in perpetual fear.

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  • He went to an old enemy of his father, Frederick, archbishop of Mains, and the two plotted together against the king, who, hearing of their proceedings, returned to Germany in 952, leaving Duke Conrad of Lorraine as his representative in Italy.

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  • In 973 Burchard II., duke of Swabia, died, and the new emperor refused to give this duchy to Henry, further irritating this duke by bestowing it upon his enemy, Otto, a grandson of the emperor Otto I.

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  • Early in his reign he had made a determined enemy of Godfrey the Bearded duke of Henrj s Internal upper Lorraine, who, in 1044, conspired against him policy.

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  • Frederick the robber nobles found a most implacable enemy.

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  • In the later years of his reign the emperors chief enemy was Henry the Lion.

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  • Instead of attacking the enemy with his accustomed vigour, he withdrew into Bohemia and was engaged in lengthy negotiations with the Saxon soldier and diplomatist, Hans Georg von Arnim (1581-1641); his object being doubtless to come to terms with Saxony and Brandenburg either with or without the emperors consent.

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  • A common war against a common enemy now appeared the surest means of welding the dissevered halves of Germany together, and for this war Bismarck steadily prepared.

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  • There were soon plentiful signs of where this enemy was to be sought.

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  • They were looked upon even by many Liberals as an enemy to be crushed; much more was this the case with the government.

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  • It was therefore for every reason desirable to remedy a state of things by which so many parishes were left without incumbents, a condition the result of which must be either to diminish the hold of Christianity over the people, or to confirm in them the belief that the government was the real enemy.

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  • This startling victory of the Social Democracy, though to a certain extent discounted by the dissensions between the two wings of the party which were revealed at the congress at Dresden in the same year, was in the highest degree disconcerting to the government; but in the actual manipulation of the Reichstag it facilitated the work of the chancellor by enabling him to unite the other groups more readily against the common enemy.

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  • Its name shows it to be the reputed enemy of shepherds, and it is in some measure owing to their hostility that it has been exterminated in so many parts of its European range.

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  • His intellect was logical in the highest degree; he was clear and precise, an enemy of loose reasoning, and quick to refute prevailing fallacies.

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  • Lysias lifted up his voice to denounce Dionysius as, next to Artaxerxes, the worst enemy of Hellas, and to impress upon the assembled Greeks that one of their foremost duties was to deliver Sicily from a hateful oppression.

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  • In 1917 he was appointed alien property custodian under the " Trading with the Enemy Act," and within 18 months was administering 32,000 trusts, valued at $503,000,000.

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  • Frederick, however, who was in Italy, harassed and afflicted, could do little to assert the imperial authority, and his enemy, Pope Innocent IV., bestowed the two duchies upon Hermann VI., margrave of Baden, whose wife, Gertrude, was a niece of the last of the Babenbergs.

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  • Meanwhile, in foreign affairs, it had become clear that for Austria the enemy to be dreaded was no longer France, but Prussia, and Kaunitz prepared the way for a diplomatic revolution, which took effect when, on the 1st of May 1 75 6, Austria and France concluded the first treaty and Seven of Versailles.

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  • Carthage, after a long period of abstention from intervention in Sicilian affairs, and the observance of a wise neutrality during the war between Athens and Syracuse, stepped in as the ally of Segesta, the enemy of her old ally Selinus.

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  • A mightier enemy was threatening in the East.

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  • We can hardly regard Sparta as the determined enemy of Athens at this time.

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  • Nine of his ships were driven ashore, but with the other II he subsequently defeated the enemy and recovered the lost nine.

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  • Paches cleared the Asiatic seas of the enemy, reduced the other towns of Mytilene and returned to Athens with upwards of 1000 prisoners.

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  • War, this war was fought almost exclusively in the Aegean Sea, the enemy was primarily Sparta, and the deciding factor was Persian gold.

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  • The attack was impeded at first by obstacles of ground, but in the melee the weight of the British troopers gradually broke up the enemy, and the charge of the 4th Dragoon Guards, delivered against the flank of the Russian mass, was decisive.

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  • Thus, in front of the Light Brigade was a valley over a mile long, at the end of which was the enemy's cavalry and twelve guns, and on the ridges on either side there were in all twenty-two guns, with cavalry and infantry.

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  • Lucan, seeing no attempt on the part of the enemy to move guns, questioned Nolan, who is said to have pointed down the valley to the artillery on the plain; whereupon Lucan rode to Lord Cardigan, the commander of the Light Brigade, and repeated Lord Raglan's order and Nolan's explanation.

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  • She visits his sins upon the children born of his intrigues, and is thus the constant enemy of Heracles and Dionysus.

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  • The enemy's frontier was boo m.

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  • At first all seemed to go badly, as the British officers despised the enemy, and the sepoys were unaccustomed to mountain warfare, and thus alternate extremes of rashness and despondency were exhibited.

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  • Sudanese are very excitable and apt to get out of hand; unlike the fellahs they are not fond of drill, and are slow to acquire it; but their dash, pugnacious instincts and desire to close with an enemy, are valuable military qualities.

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  • In his fifth year, near Kadesh on the Orontes, his army was caught unprepared and divided by a strong force of chariots of the Hittites and their allies, and Rameses himself was placed in the most imminent danger; but through his personal courage the enemy was kept at bay till reinforcements came up and turned the disaster into a victory.

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  • At the beginning of his long reign of forty-four years he was threatened by Nebuchadrezzar; later he joined the league against Cyrus and saw with alarm the fall of his old enemy.

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  • The notion that the Arab invaders were welcomed and assisted by the Copts, driven to desperation by the persecution of Cyrus, appears to be refuted by the fact that the invaders treated both Copts and Romans with the same ruthlessness; but the dissensions which prevailed in the Christian communities, leading to riots and even civil war in Alexandria and elsewhere, probably weakened resistance to the common enemy.

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  • The general Jafar, hoping to deal with this enemy independently of Jauhar, met the Carmathians without waiting for reinforcements from Egypt, and fell in battle, his army being defeated.

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  • Finding they would not allow his troops to advance, forbidden himself to retreat with them to Alexandria, and being surrounded by the enemy, he would have hazarded a battle, but his men refused to fight.

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  • Mehemet Ali, who had been granted the honorary rank of grand vizier in 1842, paid a visit to Stamboul in 1846, where he became reconciled to his old enemy Khosrev Pasha, whom he had not seen since he spared his life at Cairo in 1803.

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  • Wolseley with the bulk of the expeditionary force arrived at Port Said on the 20th of August, a naval demonstration having been made at Abukir with a view to deceive the enemy as to the object of the great movement in.

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  • It now appeared that the enemy had dammed the sweet-water canal and blocked the railway at Tell-el-Mahuta, where entrenchments had been thrown up and resistance seemed to be contemplated.

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  • The enemy showed in force, estimated at 7000 with 12 guns, and a somewhat desultory action ensued.

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  • The situatioh on the 27th tempted attack by an enterprising enemy, and Major-General Grahams force, consisting of a squadron of the r9th Hussars, the York and Lancaster Regiment, the duke of Cornwalls Light Infantry, the Marine Artillery Battalion and two R.H.A.

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  • On the 28th Major-General Grahams troops were attacked, and after repulsing the enemy, made a general advance about 6.45 P.M.

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  • The khedive appears to have been aware of the risks to be incurred, and in a private letter he informed the general that I rely upon your prudence and ability not to engage the enemy except under the most favorable circumstances.

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  • Stewart, became involved in a charge against an unbroken enemy, and suffered somewhat severely.

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  • Information was brought by a native that the enemy had assembled in the Khor Ghob, a deep ravine not far from the zeriba.

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  • The enemy showing in front, the leading face of the square was ordered to charge up to the edge of the khor.

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  • After a severe hand-to-hand struggle, in which the troops behaved with great gallantry, order was restored and the enemy repulsed, with the aid of the fire from the 1st Brigade square and from dismounted cavalry.

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  • The British loss was 109 killed and 104 wounded; of the enemy nearly 2000 were killed.

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  • The Desert Column, 1800 men, with 2880 camels in poor condition and 153 horses, found the enemy in possession of Abu Klea wells on the 16th, and was desperately attacked on the 17th.

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  • At least 1100 of the enemy were killed.

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  • On the 10th of February an action was fought at Kirbekan with about 800 of the enemy, entailing a loss of 10 killed, including Major-General Earle, and 47 wounded.

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  • The enemy occupied the hills and fired upon the cavalry.

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  • A native had brought information that the enemy intended to attack while the zeriba was being formed, and this actually occurred.

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  • The enemy were repulsed in about twenty minutes, the naval brigade, the Berkshire regiment, the Royal Marines, and the 15th Sikhs showing the greatest gallantry.

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  • On the 24th and 26th convoys proceeding in square to Tofrik were attacked, the enemy being repulsed without difficulty.

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  • On the night of the 6th of May a combined movement was made from Suakin and Otao, which resulted in the surprise and break-up of a force of the enemy under Mahommed Sardun, and the capture of a large number of sheep and goats.

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  • In December the sirdar arrived with reinforcements from Cairo, and on the 20th sallied out and attacked the dervishes in their trenches at Gemaiza, clearing the whole line and inflicting considerable loss on the enemy, who retired towards Handub, and the country was again fairly quiet for a time.

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  • Darfur and Kordofan.On the outbreak of the mahdis rebellion Slatin Bey was governor of the province, and when Madibbo, the insurgent sheikh of Rizighat, attacked and occupied Shakka and was following up his success, Slatin twice severely defeated him, and, having concentrated his forces at El Fasher, repulsed the enemy again at Om Shanga.

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  • While the army moved along the west bank of the river, a force of Arab irregulars or Friendlies marched along the east bank, under command of Major Stuart-Wortley and Lieutenant Wood, to clear it of the enemy as far as the Blue Nile; and on the 1st of September the gun- man.

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  • MacDonald distinguished himself by his tactics, and completely repulsed the enemy.

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  • The occasion came in 1820 when Ali, emboldened by impunity, violated the sanctity of Stamboul itself by attempting to procure the murder of his enemy Pacho Bey in the very precincts of the palace.

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  • Hans also received in fief the territory of Dietmarsch from the emperor, but, in attempting to subdue the hardy Dietmarschers, suffered a crushing defeat in which the national banner called " Danebrog " fell into the enemy's hands (1500).

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  • In May 1673 a treaty of alliance was signed by the ambassador of the States-General at Copenhagen, whereby the Netherlands pledged themselves to pay Denmark large subsidies in return for the services of Io,000 men and twenty warships, which were to be held in readiness in case the United Provinces were attacked by another enemy besides France.

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  • His next move was to attempt to detach Sweden from France; but, Sweden showing not the slightest inclination for a rapprochement, Denmark was compelled to accede to the anti-French league, which she did by the treaty of Copenhagen, of January 1674, thereby engaging to place an army of 20,000 in the field when required; but here again Griffenfeldt safeguarded himself to some extent by stipulating that this provision was not to be operative till the allies were attacked by a fresh enemy.

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  • The French army (about 7000 cavalry and 30,000 infantry) took ground exactly opposite to the enemy and in a similar formation, cavalry on the wings, infantry, including the milice des communes, in the centre, Philip with the cavalry reserve and the Oriflamme in rear of the foot.

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  • Cable and Postal Censorship. - In addition to the Press Bureau, censorships of incoming and outgoing cables, letters and parcels, were established by the War Office at the commencement of the war with the three-fold object of preventing information of military value from reaching the enemy, of acquiring similar information for British purposes and of checking the dissemination of information likely to be useful to the enemy or prejudicial to the Allies.

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  • The department was divided into three branches - (r) the section which censored the correspondence of prisoners of war in the United Kingdom and British prisoners in enemy countries; (2) the private correspondence section which dealt with letters from members of the British Expeditionary Force, letters and parcels to and from certain foreign countries, press messages sent abroad by other means than cable, and newspapers.

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  • Very little information was published concerning the mercantile tonnage sunk by the enemy.

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  • There was, however, much to be said for the suppression of these figures, the publication of which would have put fresh heart into the enemy and given them valuable information as to the effect of the submarine campaign.

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  • Its only direct relation to the control of the press was a request made by it in the name of the Secretaries of State, War and the Navy that newspapers censor themselves in the matter of news that might help the enemy or embarrass the Government.

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  • It was the domicile of about 4,000,000 unnaturalized citizens of the Central Powers - " enemy aliens," to use an old and misleading phrase that was revived.

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  • Under the old Internment Statute of 1789, the Attorney-General was authorized by the President to intern dangerous enemy aliens and by an Act of Congress the Alien Property Custodian assumed charge of enemy aliens' property.

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  • In the same Act a very inclusive section gave the President complete power to control any form of communication to be delivered directly or indirectly to any enemy or ally of enemy, or communications of any sort between the United States and any foreign country.

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  • He took refuge in 1457 with Charles's most formidable enemy, Philip of Burgundy.

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  • Morgan drove the enemy into their works.

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  • Generally speaking, the classes of persons who claimed the rights of asylum were slaves who had been maltreated by their masters, soldiers defeated and pursued by the enemy, and criminals who feared a trial or who had escaped before sentence was passed.

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  • A party too in Russia itself, headed by the tsar's brother the grand-duke Constantine, was clamorous for peace; but Alexander, after a vain attempt to form a new coalition, summoned the Russian nation to a holy war against Napoleon as the enemy of the orthodox faith.

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  • He used it, in the first instance, to remove " the geographical enemy " from the gates of St Petersburg by wresting Finland from the Swedes (1809); and he hoped by means of it to make the Danube the southern frontier of Russia.

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  • Alanius was, therefore, welcomed by the Ilasidaeans, and only his treacherous murder of sixty of their number taught them that any Syrian nominee was their enemy.

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  • The attacks of rationalism, aided by Greek philosophy, were repelled and vanquished by the weapons of scholastic dialectic borrowed from the enemy; on most points of dispute discussion was forbidden altogether, and faith in what is written in Koran and tradition was enjoined without question as to how these things were true (bila kaifa).

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  • Among these are a Roman slab, carved with figures of a horseman trampling upon an enemy, several fine tombs and stones of the 13th and 14th centuries, the frith or fridstool of stone, believed to be the original bishop's throne, and the fine Perpendicular roodscreen of oak, retaining its loft.

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  • During his year of office, the heroism with which he worked hand in hand with his old enemy, Bishop Strachan, in fighting an attack of cholera, did not prevent him from winning much unpopularity by his officiousness, and in 1835 he was not re-elected either as mayor or alderman.

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  • On the Arabs he impressed himself as an enemy very fierce and astute, but as a keeper of his word.

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  • In the summer of 1309 Bruce fell on the MacDougals, on the right side of the Awe, where it rushes from Loch Awe at the pass of Brander, and, aided by a rear attack led by Douglas, seized the bridge and massacred the enemy.

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  • The country, ever jealous of its independence, found at last that France threatened her freedom even more than did England, the apparent enemy; and thus, partly from Protestantism, partly from patriotism, the English party in Scotland proved victorious, and the Reformation was accomplished.

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  • War was at hand, but Montrose formed a party by " the band of Cumbernauld," to suppress the practical dictatorship of his rival and enemy, Argyll, who, he understood, was to be one of a triumvirate, and absolute north of Forth.

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  • Every sentimental consideration was against a Union with a prelatic kingdom, " an auld enemy," which drove a hard bargain by threats of excluding Scottish commodities.

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