Enemy sentence examples

enemy
  • One deity for an enemy is bad enough.

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  • A woman has no greater enemy than a so-called 'decent' woman.

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  • You disabled my greatest enemy for me.

    82
    49
  • "My own enemy saved him," Damian said with a harsh laugh.

    75
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  • You're my enemy forever!

    54
    19
  • So perished the greatest enemy that the Romans had to encounter in Asia Minor.

    37
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  • No one here understood that they were surrounded by an enemy even Brady couldn't figure out yet.

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  • Ahead, the enemy was already visible.

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  • It is possible to love someone dear to you with human love, but an enemy can only be loved by divine love.

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  • You're your own worst enemy, as Andre always tried to warn you.

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  • The Horsemen was the tongue in cheek name given to the government program that placed a series of devices across the world, both in enemy and friendly countries.

    13
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  • I wanted my nephew to see what kind of enemy he had.

    12
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  • All were looking at the enemy in front and at the squadron commander, awaiting the word of command.

    12
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  • "Jonny, he's not your enemy," she said.

    11
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  • It is the art of being stronger than the enemy at a given moment.

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  • From General Wintzingerode's reports, I see that an enemy corps of ten thousand men is moving on the Petersburg road.

    10
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  • When Grekov returned, Count Orlov-Denisov, excited both by the abandoned attempt and by vainly awaiting the infantry columns that still did not appear, as well as by the proximity of the enemy, resolved to advance.

    10
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  • While governor he was a frequent contributor to the New Jersey Gazette, and in this way he greatly aided the American cause during the war by his denunciation of the enemy and appeals to the patriotism of his countrymen.

    10
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  • Neither in Moscow nor anywhere in Russia did anything resembling an insurrection ever occur when the enemy entered a town.

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  • He was described as chasing the British squadron all round the lake, but his encounters did not go beyond artillery duels at long range, and he allowed his enemy to continue in existence long after he might have been destroyed.

    9
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  • Damian located the enemy ahead of them, shooting intersections clear as they reached them.

    9
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  • There was no one now between the squadron and the enemy except a few scattered skirmishers.

    9
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  • This night's journey was simpler than the past few journeys, as no enemy territory stood between her kingdom and her ally.

    8
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  • It was calm, and at intervals the bugle calls and the shouts of the enemy could be heard from the hill.

    8
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  • The enemy will find it out.

    8
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  • We are not one another's enemies, and we'll never defeat our common enemy so long as we're squabbling.

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  • If it was someone he knew, then that opens up another list—his wife, a business enemy, an old grudge, or he could have been scooped.

    8
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  • "Has the enemy entered the city?" he asked.

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  • "A town captured by the enemy is like a maid who has lost her honor," thought he (he had said so to Tuchkov at Smolensk).

    7
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  • Moscow was set on fire by the soldiers' pipes, kitchens, and campfires, and by the carelessness of enemy soldiers occupying houses they did not own.

    7
    3
  • The enemy in the rear of our army?

    7
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  • After that day he underwent great personal risk in saving fugitives; in particular, he saved the life of the count of Champcenetz, the governor of the Tuileries, who was his personal enemy, at the request of Mrs Elliott.

    7
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  • Our front line and that of the enemy were far apart on the right and left flanks, but in the center where the men with a flag of truce had passed that morning, the lines were so near together that the men could see one another's faces and speak to one another.

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  • After a time they lent a ready ear to detailed allegations of corruption brought against him by his old enemy Nuncomar.

    7
    7
  • By the end of the first week she had to face another enemy — a thunderstorm.

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  • In 1798, when the French occupied Rome, Consalvi was imprisoned in the castle of St Angelo, together with other papal officials, in retaliation for the murder of General Duphot; a proposal to whip him through the streets was defeated by the French general in command, but, after three months' confinement, he was deported with a crowd of galley slaves to Naples, and his property was confiscated as that of "an enemy of the Roman republic."

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  • When men were killed or wounded, when rows of stretchers went past, when some troops retreated, and when great masses of the enemy came into view through the smoke, no one paid any attention to these things.

    6
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  • When they get infested with aphids, do we think about their enemy, the praying mantis?

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  • He is my worst enemy, and yet, I admire him as the wisest man in the world.

    6
    5
  • But this man, an enemy who had—up until now—wanted to kill her, left her feeling a little less alone.

    6
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  • They are asking to attack and making plans of all kinds, but as soon as one gets to business nothing is ready, and the enemy, forewarned, takes measures accordingly.

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  • Timokhin, armed only with a sword, had rushed at the enemy with such a desperate cry and such mad, drunken determination that, taken by surprise, the French had thrown down their muskets and run.

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  • I am accustomed to a different enemy, one not nearly as strong.

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  • On these conditions Mary obtained the hearty support of the states Against France, but her humiliations were not yet at an end; two of her privy councillors, accused of traitorous intercourse with the enemy, were, despite her entreaties, seized, tried and beheaded (April 3).

    5
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  • His enemy, Henry, who wished to be king, was pressing him hard.

    5
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  • We cannot only see our enemy but have deconstructed it to its very core.

    5
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  • The French columns that had advanced beyond the village went back; but as though in revenge for this failure, the enemy placed ten guns to the right of the village and began firing them at Tushin's battery.

    5
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  • In view of all this information, when the enemy has scattered his forces in large detachments, and with Napoleon and his Guards in Moscow, is it possible that the enemy's forces confronting you are so considerable as not to allow of your taking the offensive?

    5
    5
  • As Denzel Washington's character observed in the movie Crimson Tide, "In the nuclear world, the true enemy is war itself."

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  • Also, as we are masters of Ulm, we cannot be deprived of the advantage of commanding both sides of the Danube, so that should the enemy not cross the Lech, we can cross the Danube, throw ourselves on his line of communications, recross the river lower down, and frustrate his intention should he try to direct his whole force against our faithful ally.

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  • Serpukhov is already occupied by an enemy detachment and Tula with its famous arsenal so indispensable to the army, is in danger.

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  • Everywhere Kutuzov retreated, but the enemy without waiting for his retreat fled in the opposite direction.

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  • The confederacy was from its beginning supported by the Roman see, though Podébrad after the death of his implacable enemy, Pius II., attempted to negotiate with the new pope, Paul II.

    4
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  • On the high ground where the enemy was, the smoke of a cannon rose, and a ball flew whistling over the heads of the hussar squadron.

    4
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  • He did not lose sight either of the welfare of his army or of the doings of the enemy, or of the welfare of the people of Russia, or of the direction of affairs in Paris, or of diplomatic considerations concerning the terms of the anticipated peace.

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  • It made him dangerous, an enemy of her mate and his brothers.

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  • He knew nothing aside from Memon's heavy-fisted ways and those of the surrounding clans, but he felt far more comfortable sitting in a hall full of what should be the enemy than he ever had at Memon's court.

    4
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  • "We have a common enemy," Andre reminded them.

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  • In battle the carroccio was surrounded by the bravest warriors in the army and it served both as a rallying-point and as the palladium of the city's honour; its capture by the enemy was regarded as an irretrievable defeat and humiliation.

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  • At Marston Moor on the 2nd of July he commanded all the horse of the Eastern Association, with some Scottish troops; and though for a time disabled by a wound in the neck, he charged and routed Rupert's troops opposed to him, and subsequently went to the support of the Scots, who were hard pressed by the enemy, and converted what appeared at one time a defeat into a decisive victory.

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  • Eureka helped him by flying into the faces of the enemy and scratching and biting furiously, and the kitten ruined so many vegetable complexions that the Mangaboos feared her as much as they did the horse.

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  • "He is the enemy of mankind!" cried another.

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  • Beyond Smolensk there were several different roads available for the French, and one would have thought that during their stay of four days they might have learned where the enemy was, might have arranged some more advantageous plan and undertaken something new.

    3
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  • "The cease-fire must make it easier to travel," she observed, recalling the enemy positions around the spacecraft launch sites.

    3
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  • Our enemy figured out you're alive and on the planet.

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  • You and Damian have a common enemy, one that threatens both of you.

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  • I haven't protected him to let my…our enemy turn him into my father!

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  • In this action for the first time trophies were taken: banners, cannon, and two enemy generals.

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  • The farther forward and nearer the enemy he went, the more orderly and cheerful were the troops.

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  • The sole importance of the crossing of the Berezina lies in the fact that it plainly and indubitably proved the fallacy of all the plans for cutting off the enemy's retreat and the soundness of the only possible line of action--the one Kutuzov and the general mass of the army demanded--namely, simply to follow the enemy up.

    3
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  • Either Cynthia's presence relaxed her or she'd decided David Dean was not a combatant from the enemy camp.

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  • Everything he'd suspected was true: Jessi's enemy was none other than the Black God, who sent her after the only belonging Xander had.

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  • My idle fairies and my fiery enemy have taught me a new way of doing good.

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  • At the same time his son Alexander was beheaded at Antioch by Pompey's order as an enemy of Rome.

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  • At the moment he opened his eyes he heard in front of him, where the enemy was, the long-drawn shouts of thousands of voices.

    2
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  • Several times parts of the Pavlograd regiment had exchanged shots with the enemy, had taken prisoners, and once had even captured Marshal Oudinot's carriages.

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  • The enemy has entered the borders of Russia with immense forces.

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  • Moscow when occupied by the enemy did not remain intact like Berlin, Vienna, and other towns, simply because its inhabitants abandoned it and did not welcome the French with bread and salt, nor bring them the keys of the city.

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  • All that he now wanted to know was what troops these were and to learn that he had to capture a "tongue"--that is, a man from the enemy column.

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  • How sick was the man who kept his former enemy as a slave?

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  • He had always been the enemy with the most capability to harm her, yet did the most to help her.

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  • Unfortunately Poland profited little or nothing by this great triumph, and now that she had broken the back of the enemy she was left to fight the common enemy in the Ukraine with whatever assistance she could obtain from the unwilling and unready Muscovites.

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  • Robertson, another political enemy of Conkling's, to the desirable post of Collector of the Port of New York, and thereby destroyed all prospects of party harmony.

    2
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  • But he was now destined to learn that his enemy Francis, whom he had discomfited in the council chamber at Calcutta, was more than his match in the parliamentary arena.

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  • This daunted the enemy for a time, but the defenders were soon out of breath.

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  • But Rostov pulled away his arm and, with as much anger as though Denisov were his worst enemy, firmly fixed his eyes directly on his face.

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  • All their faces were as serene as if all this were happening at home awaiting peaceful encampment, and not within sight of the enemy before an action in which at least half of them would be left on the field.

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  • Forgive thy enemy, do not avenge thyself except by doing him good.

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  • Everywhere one heard curses on Bonaparte, "the enemy of mankind."

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  • 'The enemy of the human race,' as you know, attacks the Prussians.

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  • It was not Napoleon alone who had experienced that nightmare feeling of the mighty arm being stricken powerless, but all the generals and soldiers of his army whether they had taken part in the battle or not, after all their experience of previous battles--when after one tenth of such efforts the enemy had fled--experienced a similar feeling of terror before an enemy who, after losing HALF his men, stood as threateningly at the end as at the beginning of the battle.

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  • I will not make peace as long as a single armed enemy remains in my country!

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  • But the enemy has lost masses...

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  • His excellency Prince Andrew himself gave me orders to move all the people away and not leave them with the enemy, and there is an order from the Tsar about it too.

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  • The enemy ceased firing, and that stern, threatening, inaccessible, and intangible line which separates two hostile armies was all the more clearly felt.

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  • The enemy is still far away, your excellency.

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  • They disappeared into the forest, and Count Orlov-Denisov, having seen Grekov off, returned, shivering from the freshness of the early dawn and excited by what he had undertaken on his own responsibility, and began looking at the enemy camp, now just visible in the deceptive light of dawn and the dying campfires.

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  • I am not your enemy!

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  • Quite commonly the burrow has a second passage running obliquely upwards from the main passage to the surface of the soil, and this subsidiary track may itself be shut off from the main branch by an inner door, so that when an enemy has forced an entrance through the main door, the spider retreats behind the second, leaving the intruder to explore the seemingly empty burrow.

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  • The exact extent, however, to which each particular class of enemy has affected the protective habits and attributes of spiders is by no means always evident; and it is impossible to discuss the question in detail within the limits of a short article.

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  • An enemy to all controversy and all violence, whether in act or thought, he had a serenity of character comparable only to that of Sophocles or Goethe.

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  • Theobald of Champagne had taken the cross as early as 1230, and 1239 he sailed to Acre in spite of the express prohibition of the pope, who, having quarrelled with Frederick II., was eager to divert any succour from Jerusalem itself, so long as Jerusalem belonged to his enemy.

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  • The answer is partly that men like St Louis did think that the Crusade was misplaced, and partly that Frederick was really attacked not as a revolted Christian, but as the would-be unifier of Italy, the enemy of the states of the church.

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  • Though he was always an enemy to liberalism, his natural independence of character prevented him from acquiescing in the reactionary measures of the king.

    1
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  • Inflamed with a hatred of France just then rising to the dignity of a party principle, they found in Gallatin an enemy who was both by origin and opinion peculiarly obnoxious to them.

    1
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  • Son and nobles alike supported the Moors, when he tried to unite the nation in a crusade; and when he allied himself with the rulers of Morocco they denounced him as an enemy of the faith.

    1
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  • At the moment of marching out to meet the enemy, Johnston was relieved of his command and was replaced by Gen.

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  • About the same time his father was killed in an engagement with the Spaniards, and the news raised his hatred of the national enemy to the pitch of a personal and bitter animosity.

    1
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  • She accepted the peace of Berlin in 1742 in order to have a free hand against her Bavarian enemy, the emperor Charles VII..

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  • Her instincts, like those of her enemy Frederick and her son Joseph II., were emphatically absolutist.

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  • Colonel Swayne thrice defeated the enemy, who lost 1200 men and 600 taken prisoners, and the mullah fled across the Haud, taking refuge with the Mijertin in Italian territory.

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  • Cobbe (who had gained the V.C. at Erigo) was pushed west to Gumburu, and came into contact with the enemy.

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  • In a pitched battle fought on the 10th of January 1904 at Jidballi in the Nogal country the enemy were routed, losing over loon men in killed alone, while the British loss in killed and wounded was 58.

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  • In 1730 his enemy and rival, Prince Dolgoruki, was interned here with his family; and in 1742 General Ostermann was sent to Berezov with his wife and died there in 1747.

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  • In the hunter period the savage warrior does not enslave his vanquished enemy, but slays him; the women of a conquered tribe he may, however, carry off and appropriate as wives or as servants, for in this period domestic labour falls almost altogether on their sex.

    1
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  • In a second attack the enemy's cavalry inflicted severe losses on the 42nd.

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  • Herzegovina, where Vukcic offered a desperate resistance, held out until 1483; but apart from the heroic defence of Jajce, the efforts of the Bosnians were feeble and inglorious, many of the Bogomils joining the enemy.

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  • Their favourite pursuits were fighting, either against a common enemy or among themselves, hunting, hawking and listening to the minstrels who celebrated their exploits.

    1
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  • 1, 1831), nominally in order to punish his enemy Abdullah, pasha of Acre, really in order to take by force of arms the pashaliks of Syria and Damascus promised as a reward for his services in Greece.

    1
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  • The regimental officers had all acquired their rank before the enemy and knew how to manage their men, and of the men themselves nearly two-thirds had seen active service.

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  • Mack's march to Ulm was therefore a necessity of the situation, and his continuance in this exposed position, if foolhardy against such an adversary, was at any rate the outcome of the high resolve that even if beaten he would inflict crippling losses upon the enemy.

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  • As soon as their strategic purpose of cutting him off from Vienna became apparent, the emperor moved his troops into position, and in the afternoon issued his famous proclamation to his troops, pointing out the enemy's mistakes and his plan for defeating them.

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  • The emperor gathered little from the confused reports of their purposeless manoeuvres, but, secure in the midst of his " battalion square " of 200,000 men, he remained quite indifferent, well knowing that an advance straight on Berlin must force his enemy to concentrate and fight, and as they would bring at most 127,000 men on to the battlefield the result could hardly be doubtful.

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  • Organization and tactics did not affect the issue directly, for the conduct of the men and their junior officers gave abundant proof that in the hands of a competent leader the " linear " principle of delivering one shattering blow would have proved superior to that of a gradual attrition of the enemy here, as on the battlefields of the Peninsula and at Waterloo, and this in spite of other defects in the training of the Prussian infantry which simultaneously caused its defeat on the neighbouring field of Auerstadt.

    1
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  • It then became necessary to disturb the repose of the whole army to counter the enemy's intentions.

    1
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  • It was designed to hold the enemy in position by the vigour of its attack, thus neutralizing his independent will power and compelling him to expend his reserves in the effort to rescue the troops engaged.

    1
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  • Thus, when late on the 7th of February 1807 Murat and Soult overtook the enemy near Eylau (q.v.) the fighting was severe but not prolonged.

    1
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  • This time the emperor was determined his enemy should not escape him, and about 8 A.M.

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  • ordered Soult and Augereau on the left and right respectively to assail the enemy, Murat and the Guards remaining in the centre as reserve.

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  • The emperor now pressed on towards Friedland, where he would completely control the Russian communications with Konigsberg, their immediate base of supply, but for once the Russians outmarched him and covered their movement so successfully that for the next three days he seems to have completely lost all knowledge of his enemy's whereabouts.

    1
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  • The enemy lay direct to his right, an Murat, the IV.

    1
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  • The latter at once assumed the role of advanced guard cavalry and was ordered to observe the enemy at Friedland, Ney following in close support.

    1
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  • Davout was turned about and directed on the enemy's right, and the VIII.

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  • In reply he immediately wrote: " You do not inform me what has rendered necessary such an extraordinary measure which weakens and divides my troops "- and - " I cannot quite grasp the meaning of your letter yet, I should have preferred to see my army concentrated between Ingolstadt and Augsburg, the Bavarians in the first line, with the duke of Danzig in his old position, until we know what the enemy is going to do.

    1
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  • " To-morrow will be a day of preparation spent in drawing closer together, and I expect to be able by Wednesday to manoeuvre against the enemy's columns according to circumstances."

    1
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  • When, therefore, the latter, on the 22nd, marched southward to reopen his communications by the defeat of the enemy's army, always the surest means of solving this difficulty, he actually reached the neighbourhood of Eckmuhl with a sufficient numerical superiority had he only been prompt enough to seize his opportunity.

    1
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  • in the morning that it was not the main body of the enemy he had had before him, but only its left wing, and that the main body itself must still be northward towards Regensburg.

    1
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  • This left the direct road to Vienna open, and Napoleon, hoping to find peace in the enemy's capital, pushed the whole of his army down the right bank, and with Murat's cavalry entered the city on the 12th of May, after somewhat severe resistance lasting three days.

    1
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  • They counselled retreat, but having heard them all he replied, in substance: " If we leave here at all we may as well retire to Strassburg, for unless the enemy is held by the threat Sf further operations he will be free to strike at our communications and has a shorter distance to go.

    1
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  • Of the enemy's plans Napoleon knew nothing, but, in accordance with his usual practice, the position he had selected met all immediate possible moves.

    1
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  • Again arrangments were made for a Napoleonic battle; behind Murat's cavalry came the " general advanced guard " to attack and hold the enemy, whilst the main body and Davout were held available to swing in on his rear.

    1
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  • Then he had stood with 420,000 men on a front of 160 m., now he had only 229,000 men on a front of 135; he had missed three great opportunities of destroying his enemy in detail, and in five weeks, during which time he had only traversed 200 m., he had seen his troops reduced numerically at least one-third, and, worse still, his army was now far from being the fighting machine it had been at the outset.

    1
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  • Meanwhile the Russians had not lost a single gun and the moral of their men had been improved by the result of the many minor encounters with the enemy; further, the and then began a series of rearguard actions and nocturnal retreats which completely accomplished their purpose of wearing down the French army.

    1
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  • The allies, aware of the gradual strengthening of their enemy's forces but themselves as yet unable to put more than 200,000 in the field, had left a small corps of observation opposite Magdeburg and along the Elbe to give timely notice of an advance towards Berlin; and with the bulk of their forces had taken up a position about Dresden, whence they had determined to march down the course of the Elbe and roll up the French from right to left.

    1
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  • At length when both sides were exhausted by their efforts he sent forward nearly a hundred guns which tore asunder by their case-shot fire the enemy's line and marched his reserve right through the gap. Had he possessed an adequate cavalry force the victory would have been decisive.

    1
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  • The enemy's escape annoyed him greatly, the absence of captured guns and prisoners reminded him too much of his Russian experiences, and he redoubled his.

    1
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  • The enemy, having everything to gain and nothing to lose thereby, agreed finally to a six weeks' suspension of arms. This was perhaps the gravest military error of Napoleon's whole career, and his excuse for it, " want of adequate cavalry," is the strongest testimony as to the value of that arm.

    1
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  • As soon as a suspension of arms (to i 5th of August) had been agreed to, Napoleon hastened to withdraw his troops from the dangerous position they occupied with reference to the passes leading over the mountains from Bohemia, for he entertained no doubt now that Austria was also to be considered as an enemy.

    1
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  • Finally he decided to group his corps round Gorlitz and Bautzen whence they could either meet the enemy advancing from Breslau or fall on his flank over the mountains if they attempted to force their way into Saxony by the valley of the Elbe.

    1
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  • Seeing clearly that his want of an efficient cavalry precluded all ideas of a resolute offensive in his old style, he determined to limit himself to a defence of the line of the Elbe, making only dashes of a few days' duration at any target the enemy might present.

    1
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  • In his position at Bautzen he felt himself equal to all his enemy's combinations.

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  • In these he seems suddenly to have cut adrift from every principle the truth of which he had himself so brilliantly demonstrated, and we find him discussing plans based on hypothesis, not knowledge, and on the importance of geographical points without reference to the enemy's field army.

    1
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  • Ney, who had joined Oudinot after Grossbeeren, had been defeated at Dennewitz (6th Sept.), the victory, won by Prussian troops solely, giving the greatest encouragement to the enemy.

    1
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  • the Saxons, who had remained faithful to Napoleon longer than his other German allies, went over to the enemy.

    1
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  • As at Krasnoi in 1812, they went straight for their enemy and after one of the most brilliant series of artillery movements in history, directed by General Drouot, they marched right over their enemy, practically destroying his whole force.

    1
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  • At nightfall the fighting ceased and the emperor retired to Lesmont, and thence to Troyes, Marmont being left to observe the enemy.

    1
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  • He had determined to move eastward to St Dizier, rally what garrisons he could find, and raise the whole country against the invaders, and had actually started on the execution of this plan when his instructions fell into the enemy's hands and his projects were exposed.

    1
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  • The general advanced guard of all arms now followed immediately behind the cavalry screen and held the enemy in position, while the remainder of the army followed at a day's march in a " bataillon carree " ready to manoeuvre in any required direction.

    1
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  • The full reach of this discovery seems as yet scarcely to have impressed itself upon the emperor with complete conviction, for in the succeeding campaign in Poland we find that he twice departed from this form - at Pultusk and Heilsbergand each time his enemy succeeded in escaping him.

    1
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  • In 1814 and in 1815 in the presence of the enemy he again rises supremely to each occasion, only to lapse in the intervals.

    1
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  • All this decreased Savonarola's popularity to some extent, but the enemy having been beaten at Leghorn and the league being apparently on the point of breaking up, the Florentines took courage and the friar's party was once more in the ascendant.

    1
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  • It is as dangerous for your enemy to have a picture of you as for him to know your name.

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  • His conduct of the battle, once it had opened, was a model of the "partial" victory - the destruction of a part of the enemy's forces under the eyes of the rest - which was in the 17th and 18th centuries the tactician's ideal, and was sufficient to ensure him the reputation of being the best general of his age.

    1
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  • By driving eastward from Arras, covered on the left by the rivers Scarpe and Sensee, the First Army would endeavour to turn the enemy's positions on the Somme battlefield and cut his system of railway communications which ran south-westward across their front."

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  • the Canadian Corps, were to be engaged, the main axis of the attack being the line of the Arras-Cambrai road; the two remaining corps were to stand fast, while making all endeavours to deceive the enemy and prevent him dispatching reinforcements to other threatened points.

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  • of the river without success and at the end of the day the Canadians had penetrated into and maintained themselves within the enemy defences some two and a half miles to the E.

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  • passed through to continue the advance; by nightfall the tangle of trenches and wire at the junction were in British hands and the villages of Queant and Pronville had also been wrested from the enemy.

    1
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  • The British Third Army followed up the retreating enemy, being impeded only by rearguards whose resistance was easily overcome, and by Sept.

    1
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  • In order to obtain observation and jumping-off ground for the attack on the main Hindenburg system it was necessary to clear the enemy from the positions still held by him forward of this line.

    1
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  • The first few days of the British advance passed with little resistance from the enemy, who fell back rapidly under cover of the fire of light machine-guns and isolated field guns.

    1
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  • in line from the right, met with very stubborn opposition; the enemy were expecting the attack and fought well.

    1
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  • A series of partial offensives were therefore undertaken on the succeeding days, on both wings of the army, but with little real result; neither corps could succeed in attaining the final objectives of the first day's attack or clear the enemy entirely from the advanced defences of the Hindenburg line.

    1
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  • The Third Army will assist the Fourth Army with counter battery work on the enemy's guns in the region La Terriere-Villers Outreaux.

    1
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  • right flank by the First French Army, will deliver the main attack against the enemy's defences from Le Tronquoy to Le Catelet, both inclusive, operating.

    1
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  • was allotted to each gun the resistance of the enemy was speedily stifled.

    1
    0
  • A certain amount of ground gained beyond the railway had to be evacuated before the violent counter-blows of the enemy against the left of the 1st and then of the 4th Div.

    1
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  • Corps, but that the salient held by the enemy in that area should be left until the progress of the operations on either flank should endanger the garrison's line of retreat.

    1
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  • under cover of darkness; Beaucamp was once more secured, Highland Ridge was carried by storm, and parties pushed forward to Welsh Ridge which was cleared of the enemy by 6 P.M.

    1
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  • of Cantaing, and her parties succeeded in getting over the obstacle and establishing themselves there despite the counter-attacks of the enemy.

    1
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  • deep into the most formidable part of the hostile fortress, routed the four enemy divisions in its front and taken 4,200 prisoners and 70 guns.

    1
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  • Despite the comparative failure of the Composite Corps the attack had on the whole been a brilliant success, seven Allied divisions having defeated nine enemy divisions ensconced in immensely powerful works, capturing from them 5,300 prisoners and ioo guns and effecting such a wide breach in the last German line of defence that its complete capture in a few days was assured.

    1
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  • the army front was redistributed in preparation for the general offensive to be undertaken on the 3rd against the last defensive position left to the enemy - the Masnieres - Beaurevoir line.

    1
    0
  • Corps, but little progress was made in that sector, as the enemy, who was believed to be preparing for a withdrawal eastwards, resisted stubbornly around Beaurevoir to cover his retirement.

    1
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  • Being, however, required to resume his power, and retain it until the independence of the country had been completely established, he reorganized his troops, and set out from Angostura, in order to cross the Cordilleras, effect a junction with General Santander, who commanded the republican force in New Granada, and bring their united forces into action against the common enemy.

    1
    0
  • By June 1824 the liberating army was completely organized; and taking the field soon after, it routed the vanguard of the enemy.

    1
    0
  • Other writers, again, blame the com mercial cupidity of the Italian towns; of what avail, they asked with no little justice, was the Crusade, when Venice and Genoa destroyed the naval bases necessary for its success by their internecine quarrels in the Levant (as in 1257), or - still worse - entered into commercial treaties with the common enemy against whom the Crusades were directed?

    1
    1
  • On both sides was civil war, urged as fiercely as that against the common enemy, in which the parties sought allies indiscriminately among Christians and Mahommedans.

    1
    1
  • He rose to great distinction in the war between Sancho of Castile and Sancho of Navarre, in which he won his name of Campeador, by slaying the enemy's champion in single combat.

    1
    1
  • The enemy received their final blow at Palap, but not before three officers were killed, three wounded, and 102 sepoys and followers killed and wounded.

    1
    1
  • The British lost for killed and 85 wounded, but put the enemy to flight.

    1
    1
  • We have fully concentrated forces of nearly seventy thousand men with which to attack and defeat the enemy should he cross the Lech.

    1
    1
  • On the opposite side the enemy could be seen by the naked eye, and from their battery a milk-white cloud arose.

    1
    1
  • The gun rang out with a deafening metallic roar, and a whistling grenade flew above the heads of our troops below the hill and fell far short of the enemy, a little smoke showing the spot where it burst.

    1
    1
  • Everyone got up and began watching the movements of our troops below, as plainly visible as if but a stone's throw away, and the movements of the approaching enemy farther off.

    1
    1
  • Next he thought that his enemy would send the squadron on a desperate attack just to punish him--Rostov.

    1
    1
  • "Colonel," interrupted the officer of the suite, "You must be quick or the enemy will bring up his guns to use grapeshot."

    1
    1
  • Rostov wiping his muddy hands on his breeches looked at his enemy and was about to run on, thinking that the farther he went to the front the better.

    1
    1
  • If Kutuzov decided to retreat along the road from Krems to Olmutz, to unite with the troops arriving from Russia, he risked being forestalled on that road by the French who had crossed the Vienna bridge, and encumbered by his baggage and transport, having to accept battle on the march against an enemy three times as strong, who would hem him in from two sides.

    1
    1
  • On receiving the news he immediately dispatched Adjutant General Wintzingerode, who was in attendance on him, to the enemy camp.

    1
    1
  • A small but distinctly visible enemy column was moving down the hill, probably to strengthen the front line.

    1
    1
  • It seemed to him that it was a very long time ago, almost a day, since he had first seen the enemy and fired the first shot, and that the corner of the field he stood on was well-known and familiar ground.

    1
    1
  • They all had but one wish: to advance as soon as possible against the enemy under the Emperor's command.

    1
    1
  • He suggested addressing him as 'Usurper and Enemy of Mankind.'

    1
    1
  • Dispositions for an attack on the enemy position behind Kobelnitz and Sokolnitz, November 30, 1805.

    1
    1
  • The gay triumphant shouting of the enemy army had a stimulating effect on him.

    1
    1
  • Whether all the enemy forces were, as we supposed, six miles away, or whether they were near by in that sea of mist, no one knew till after eight o'clock.

    1
    1
  • In front, far off on the farther shore of that sea of mist, some wooded hills were discernible, and it was there the enemy probably was, for something could be descried.

    1
    1
  • He had felt perfectly sure that there were other troops in front of him and that the enemy must be at least six miles away.

    1
    1
  • The fog had begun to clear and enemy troops were already dimly visible about a mile and a half off on the opposite heights.

    1
    1
  • Suddenly he heard musket fire quite close in front of him and behind our troops, where he could never have expected the enemy to be.

    1
    1
  • After the field marshal's departure it appears that we are within sight of the enemy and must give battle.

    1
    1
  • Buxhowden is commander-in-chief by seniority, but General Bennigsen does not quite see it; more particularly as it is he and his corps who are within sight of the enemy and he wishes to profit by the opportunity to fight a battle 'on his own hand' as the Germans say.

    1
    1
  • Our aim is no longer, as it should be, to avoid or attack the enemy, but solely to avoid General Buxhowden who by right of seniority should be our chief.

    1
    1
  • So energetically do we pursue this aim that after crossing an unfordable river we burn the bridges to separate ourselves from our enemy, who at the moment is not Bonaparte but Buxhowden.

    1
    1
  • General Buxhowden was all but attacked and captured by a superior enemy force as a result of one of these maneuvers that enabled us to escape him.

    1
    1
  • At last our enemy, Buxhowden, catches us and attacks.

    1
    1
  • But as it turns out, just at that moment a third enemy rises before us--namely the Orthodox Russian soldiers, loudly demanding bread, meat, biscuits, fodder, and whatnot!

    1
    1
  • As soon as he noticed a French officer, who thrust his head out of the door, that warlike feeling of hostility which he always experienced at the sight of the enemy suddenly seized him.

    1
    1
  • Instead of an enemy, Nicholas found in Ilagin a stately and courteous gentleman who was particularly anxious to make the young count's acquaintance.

    1
    1
  • If you tell, you are my enemy! declared Natasha.

    1
    1
  • Already from his military experience and what he had seen in the Austrian campaign, he had come to the conclusion that in war the most deeply considered plans have no significance and that all depends on the way unexpected movements of the enemy--that cannot be foreseen--are met, and on how and by whom the whole matter is handled.

    1
    1
  • The men of that party, remembering Suvorov, said that what one had to do was not to reason, or stick pins into maps, but to fight, beat the enemy, keep him out of Russia, and not let the army get discouraged.

    1
    1
  • Our advanced line, already in action, could be heard briskly exchanging shots with the enemy in the dale.

    1
    1
  • On the way he came upon a bush, his gallant horse cleared it, and almost before he had righted himself in his saddle he saw that he would immediately overtake the enemy he had selected.

    1
    1
  • Bless his counsels, his undertakings, and his work; strengthen his kingdom by Thine almighty hand, and give him victory over his enemy, even as Thou gavest Moses the victory over Amalek, Gideon over Midian, and David over Goliath.

    1
    1
  • The enemy is advancing to destroy Russia, to desecrate the tombs of our fathers, to carry off our wives and children.

    1
    1
  • At the very beginning of the war our armies were divided, and our sole aim was to unite them, though uniting the armies was no advantage if we meant to retire and lure the enemy into the depths of the country.

    1
    1
  • And truly though the enemy was twice stronger than we, we were unshakable.

    1
    1
  • I have said and still say that the theater of war is Poland and the enemy will never get beyond the Niemen.

    1
    1
  • Dessalles looked in amazement at the prince, who was talking of the Niemen when the enemy was already at the Dnieper, but Princess Mary, forgetting the geographical position of the Niemen, thought that what her father was saying was correct.

    1
    1
  • In the offices and shops and at the post office everyone was talking about the army and about the enemy who was already attacking the town, everybody was asking what should be done, and all were trying to calm one another.

    1
    1
  • Bald Hills will be occupied by the enemy within a week.

    1
    1
  • With fifteen thousand men I held the enemy at bay for thirty-five hours and beat him; but he would not hold out even for fourteen hours.

    1
    1
  • In the French circle of Helene and Rumyantsev the reports of the cruelty of the enemy and of the war were contradicted and all Napoleon's attempts at conciliation were discussed.

    1
    1
  • If we had had only peasants to fight, we should not have let the enemy come so far, said he with a sense of shame and wishing to change the subject.

    1
    1
  • But at that moment Denisov, no more intimidated by his superiors than by the enemy, came with jingling spurs up the steps of the porch, despite the angry whispers of the adjutants who tried to stop him.

    1
    1
  • Count Rostopchin writes that he will stake his life on it that the enemy will not enter Moscow.

    1
    1
  • To anyone who looks at the field of Borodino without thinking of how the battle was actually fought, this position, protected by the river Kolocha, presents itself as obvious for an army whose object was to prevent an enemy from advancing along the Smolensk road to Moscow.

    1
    1
  • "Why, so as not to lay waste the country we were abandoning to the enemy," said Prince Andrew with venomous irony.

    1
    1
  • He did not notice the sound of the bullets whistling from every side, or the projectiles that flew over him, did not see the enemy on the other side of the river, and for a long time did not notice the killed and wounded, though many fell near him.

    1
    1
  • Be so good as to ride to General Barclay and inform him of my firm intention to attack the enemy tomorrow, said Kutuzov sternly.

    1
    1
  • Toward two o'clock the regiment, having already lost more than two hundred men, was moved forward into a trampled oatfield in the gap between Semenovsk and the Knoll Battery, where thousands of men perished that day and on which an intense, concentrated fire from several hundred enemy guns was directed between one and two o'clock.

    1
    1
  • The more the Russian army retreated the more fiercely a spirit of hatred of the enemy flared up, and while it retreated the army increased and consolidated.

    1
    1
  • He gave orders to prepare for a fresh conflict to finish the enemy and did this not to deceive anyone, but because he knew that the enemy was beaten, as everyone who had taken part in the battle knew it.

    1
    1
  • Moving troops in close proximity to an enemy is always dangerous, and military history supports that view.

    1
    1
  • And as soon as the enemy drew near the wealthy classes went away abandoning their property, while the poorer remained and burned and destroyed what was left.

    1
    1
  • His Serene Highness has passed through Mozhaysk in order to join up with the troops moving toward him and has taken up a strong position where the enemy will not soon attack him.

    1
    1
  • I assure you I was his enemy eight years ago.

    1
    1
  • Expecting the enemy from behind and not in front, the French separated in their flight and spread out over a distance of twenty-four hours.

    1
    1
  • Seeing their enemy unexpectedly the French fell into confusion and stopped short from the sudden fright, but then they resumed their flight, abandoning their comrades who were farther behind.

    1
    1
  • Why was the Russian army--which with inferior forces had withstood the enemy in full strength at Borodino--defeated at Krasnoe and the Berezina by the disorganized crowds of the French when it was numerically superior?

    1
    1
  • This procrastinator Kutuzov, whose motto was "Patience and Time," this enemy of decisive action, gave battle at Borodino, investing the preparations for it with unparalleled solemnity.

    1
    1
  • Blaine, the bitterest political enemy of Senator Roscoe Conkling the leader of the New York "stalwarts."

    1
    2
  • prevented him from carrying out his planned crusade against Bohemia, his successor was a scarcely less bitter enemy of the country.

    1
    2
  • This proved to be the last pitched battle of the war, the Danes never again venturing to attack their once more invincible enemy in the open field.

    1
    2
  • The enemy has a widget too, the D2001.

    1
    2
  • He imagined only important possibilities: "If the enemy attacks the right flank," he said to himself, "the Kiev grenadiers and the Podolsk chasseurs must hold their position till reserves from the center come up.

    1
    2
  • "From the direction, it must be the enemy," repeated Rostov.

    1
    2
  • Will you stay here if the enemy occupies the place? asked Prince Andrew.

    1
    2
  • The battle of Borodino was not fought on a chosen and entrenched position with forces only slightly weaker than those of the enemy, but, as a result of the loss of the Shevardino Redoubt, the Russians fought the battle of Borodino on an open and almost unentrenched position, with forces only half as numerous as the French; that is to say, under conditions in which it was not merely unthinkable to fight for ten hours and secure an indecisive result, but unthinkable to keep an army even from complete disintegration and flight.

    1
    2
  • Not that sort of victory which is defined by the capture of pieces of material fastened to sticks, called standards, and of the ground on which the troops had stood and were standing, but a moral victory that convinces the enemy of the moral superiority of his opponent and of his own impotence was gained by the Russians at Borodino.

    1
    2
  • When the reading which lasted more than an hour was over, Langeron again brought his snuffbox to rest and, without looking at Weyrother or at anyone in particular, began to say how difficult it was to carry out such a plan in which the enemy's position was assumed to be known, whereas it was perhaps not known, since the enemy was in movement.

    1
    3
  • appointed him one of the ambassadors who made peace with the Empire and drew up the Concordat of Worms (1122), and in the following year, with his later enemy Cardinal Peter Pierleoni, he was papal legate in France.

    1
    4
  • Politics, which de Lesseps had always avoided, was his greatest enemy in this matter.

    1
    5
  • 8 the inclusion of Libyans shows that the enemy was subsequently supposed to be African.

    1
    5
  • I'm not the enemy.

    0
    0
  • Since each wagon had three teams of horses, that could become time consuming - and time was their enemy.

    0
    0
  • Let them all be pissed off at me; perhaps that would bring them closer together against a common enemy.

    0
    0
  • "I …" Another hesitation, as the youth grappled with what to say to his sworn enemy.

    0
    0
  • Even surrounded by the enemy?

    0
    0
  • One of his Guardians was training the enemy.

    0
    0
  • Sasha was their enemy.

    0
    0
  • For their support against our enemy?

    0
    0
  • I believe your regular launch sites have been well covered by the enemy.

    0
    0
  • I'm not sure how you made it through the enemy's defenses.

    0
    0
  • Your sister's family joined our enemy.

    0
    0
  • Wipe out my only natural enemy.

    0
    0
  • I guess I am my own worst enemy.

    0
    0
  • I will not spare my enemies, and you are my enemy.

    0
    0
  • He glanced between her and the enemy's men outside.

    0
    0
  • It was her remaining guard, Ledden, whose watchful gaze had rarely left the enemy's men outside the door.

    0
    0
  • What kind of men did such to a woman of any clan, even an enemy clan?

    0
    0
  • For a long moment she savored the feel of him against her and wondered what it would be like to be this man's lover instead of his enemy.

    0
    0
  • Where his career was concerned, recently he had been his own worst enemy.

    0
    0
  • Stronger than his curiosity was the knowledge that he wanted nothing to do with whatever Jonny was planning, no doubt against the White God, his sworn enemy.

    0
    0
  • Simple in his habits, conciliatory in his bearing, and catholic in his tastes, he enjoyed great popularity and rarely made a personal enemy.

    0
    0
  • If he mastered the whole coast-line of the Levant, the enemy's fleet would find itself left in the air.

    0
    0
  • Notwithstanding the abandonment of Christianity by a large section of the population after the Turkish conquest, the authority of the sultans was never effectively established, and succeeding centuries present a record of interminable conflicts between the tribesmen and the Turks, between the Christians and the converts to Islam, or between all combined and the traditional Montenegrin enemy.

    0
    0
  • Ali Pasha's greater numbers enabled him to outflank his enemy.

    0
    0
  • If the porta hepatis was torn it prognosticated a plundering of the enemy's land.

    0
    0
  • Great writers like Milton and Harrington supported Cromwell's view of the duty of a statesman; the poet Waller acclaimed Cromwell as "the world's protector"; but the London tradesmen complained of the loss of their Spanish trade and regarded Holland and not Spain as the national enemy.

    0
    0
  • At first he speaks with complacence of a melee, and reports that he and his men "agreed to charge" the enemy.

    0
    0
  • He suppressed this domestic rebellion indeed, but in the meantime the Poles had invaded the Bohemian domains with 60,000 men, and when in 1474 Matthias was at last able to take the field against them in order to raise the siege of Breslau, he was obliged to fortify himself in an entrenched camp, whence he so skilfully harried the enemy that the Poles, impatient to return to their own country, made peace at Breslau (Feb.

    0
    0
  • It was bold policy to confide Frederick to his greatest enemy and rival; but the pope honorably discharged his duty, until his ward outgrew the years of tutelage, and became a fair mark for ecclesiastical hostility.

    0
    0
  • The names of some of these earliest captains of adventure, Fra Moriale, Count Lando and Duke Werner, who styled himself the Enemy of God and Mercy, have been preserved to us.

    0
    0
  • The king of Naples was his natural enemy, and he had cause to suspect that Piero de Medici might abandon his alliance.

    0
    0
  • The Piedmontese defeated the enemy ~t Pastrengo (April 30), but did not profit by the victory.

    0
    0
  • The comparatively facile success achieved by Baratieri against Mangash seems to have led him to undervalue his enemy, and to forget that Menelek, negus and king conques~

    0
    0
  • For this unfortunate combination Signor Sonnino himself was not altogether to blame; having lost many of his most faithful followers, who, weary of waiting for office, had gone over to the enemy, he had been forced to seek support among men who had professed hostility to the existing order of things and thus to secure at least the neutrality of the Extreme Left and make the public realize that the reddest of Socialists, Radicals and Republicans may be tamed and rendered harmless by the offer of cabinet appointments.

    0
    0
  • He was a determined enemy both to Roman influence and to French ascendancy.

    0
    0
  • Or, if, as the Ritschlians maintain, it is a slander invented by their enemy, C. E.

    0
    0
  • Cesare, who could still count on the Spanish cardinals, wished to prevent the election of Giuliano della Rovere, the enemy of his house, but the latter's chances were so greatly improved that it was necessary to come to terms with him.

    0
    0
  • The nearest enemy was Bohemia, to whom Poland had lately been compelled to pay tribute for her oldest possession, Silesia.

    0
    0
  • "This land Persis," says Darius, in an inscription at Persepolis, "which Ahuramazda has given to me, which is beautiful and rich in horses and men, according to the will of Ahuramazda and myself it trembles before no enemy."

    0
    0
  • of Macedon's victory more than two and a half centuries before, and in the year following, at the neighbouring Orchomenus, he scattered immense hosts of the enemy with trifling loss to himself.

    0
    0
  • Papirius Carbo and the younger Marius, had massacred Sulla's supporters wholesale, confiscated his property, and declared him a public enemy.

    0
    0
  • Rome was at the same time in extreme peril from the advance of a Samnite army, and was barely saved by Sulla, who, after a hardfought battle, routed the enemy under Pontius Telesinus at the Colline gate of Rome.

    0
    0
  • The taking of Zahaia in 1481 by the enemy gave occasion to reprisals.

    0
    0
  • After Edward's burial, at which he bore the king's banner, Howard, an enemy of the Wydviles, linked his fortunes with those of the duke of Gloucester.

    0
    0
  • He presented a famous report in the Constituent Assembly on the organization of the army, but is better known by his eloquent speech on the 28th of February 1791, at the Jacobin Club, against Mirabeau, whose relations with the court were beginning to be suspected, and who was a personal enemy of Lameth.

    0
    0
  • His chief exploits during the war were his defence of the wounded Sarpedon, his fight with Ajax, son of Telamon (his particular enemy), and the storming of the Greek ramparts.

    0
    0
  • Norman warriors had long before helped the Christians of Spain in their warfare with the Saracens of the Peninsula, and in Sicily it was from the same enemy that they won the great Mediterranean island.

    0
    0
  • It would be unjust, however, to say that he was the determined enemy of all progress.

    0
    0
  • The French were victorious, but Gaston fell in the act of pursuing the enemy.

    0
    0
  • But after three hours, Pescara's light horse having meantime been driven in by the superior light horse of the enemy, the artillery-loving duke of Ferrara conceived the brilliant plan of taking his mobile field-guns to the extreme right of the enemy.

    0
    0
  • A captain of landsknechts, Fabian by name, holding his long pike crosswise, brought it down with all his force upon the opposing spears, and at the cost of his life made a narrow gap through which the French broke into the mass of the enemy.

    0
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  • that he should harbour in his dominions a declared enemy of the throne and majesty of kings.

    0
    0
  • As the Austrian influence increased Panin found a fresh enemy in Joseph II., and the efforts of the old statesman to prevent a matrimonial alliance between the Russian and Austrian courts determined Catherine to get rid of a counsellor of whom, for some mysterious reason, she was secretly afraid.

    0
    0
  • Yet again, Saul had been chosen by Yahweh to free his people from the Philistines; he had been rejected for his sins, and had suffered continuously from this enemy; Israel at his death was left in the unhappy state in which he had found it; it was the Judaean David, the faithful servant of Yahweh, who was now chosen to deliver Israel, and to the last the people gratefully remembered their debt.

    0
    0
  • The enemy under Hazael's son Ben-hadad (properly Bar-hadad) was driven out and Joash regained the territory which his father had lost (2 Kings xiii.

    0
    0
  • Antiochus required peace in Jerusalem and probably regarded Onias as the representative of the pro-Egyptian faction, the allies of his enemy.

    0
    0
  • After this victory Judas made an alliance with the people of Rome, who had no love for Demetrius his enemy, nor any intention of putting their professions of friendship into practice.

    0
    0
  • Though they saw the enemy advancing upon them sword in hand they remained at worship untroubled and were slaughtered as they poured libation and burned incense, for they put their own safety second to the service of God.

    0
    0
  • When Cassius demanded a tribute of 700 talents from Palestine, Antipater set Herod, Phasael and this Malichus, his enemy, to collect it.

    0
    0
  • He found there, as he subsequently explained, the most confused ideas current as to the aims of the Allies in the war, and deliberate perversions circulated by enemy agents.

    0
    0
  • When the Sudan War broke out, Baker, hastening with 3 500 men to relieve Tokar, encountered the enemy under Osman Digna at El Teb.

    0
    0
  • While yet an infant, his father was driven from his kingdom, either by a revolt of his subjects, caused by his own harshness (Lanzelet), or by the action of his enemy Claudas de la Deserte (Lancelot).

    0
    0
  • Thus converted into an enemy, Gawain urges his uncle to make war on Lancelot, and there follows a desperate struggle between Arthur and the race of Ban.

    0
    0
  • The king had only been warned at the last moment by Tissaphernes and gathered an army in all haste; Cyrus advanced into Babylonia, before he met with an enemy.

    0
    0
  • This promise he brilliantly fulfilled by routing the forces of the Argive confederacy at the battle of Mantinea (418), the moral effect of which was out of all proportion to the losses inflicted on the enemy.

    0
    0
  • The people, notwithstanding their German origin, showed a very strong feeling against the invaders, and in no part of France was the enemy resisted with greater stubbornness.

    0
    0
  • The conversion of Lithuania deprived the Order of its mission: the union of Lithuania to Poland robbed it of the security which it enjoyed while they were disunited, and gave new strength to Poland, a constant enemy to the Order which had deprived it of any outlet on the Baltic. Internally, too, the Order suffered.

    0
    0
  • The League naturally sympathized with Poland, not only because Poland was the enemy of the knights, but also because under Poland it hoped to enjoy the practical liberty which Polish anarchy already seemed to offer.

    0
    0
  • But Turgot's worst enemy was the poor harvest of 1774, which led to a slight rise in the price of bread in the winter and early spring of 1774-1775.

    0
    0
  • We are reminded of the practice of the Pawnees and other North-American Indians, who shaved the head with the exception of one lock (the scalp-lock), which was removed by a victorious enemy (Catlin, North American Indians, ii.

    0
    0
  • He is a great enemy to commons and common fields, and to retaining land in 1 During the 16th century wheat had risen in price, and between 1606 and 1618 never fell below 30s.

    0
    0
  • The former attacks apple and pear; the latter, which selects orange and citron, was introduced into America from Australia, and carried ruin before it in some orange districts until its natural enemy, the lady-bird beetle, Vedalia cardinalis, was also imported.

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  • About 1299 a regency was appointed in Scotland in the name of Baliol, and a letter of Baliol mentions Robert Bruce, lord of Carrick, as regent, along with William of Lamberton, bishop of St Andrews, and John Comyn the younger, a strange combination - Lamberton the friend of Wallace, Comyn the enemy of Bruce, and Bruce a regent in name of Baliol.

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  • He had chosen and knew his ground, lying between St Ninians and the Bannock, a petty burn, yet sufficient to produce marshes dangerous to heavily armed horsemen, while from the rising ground on his right the enemy's advance was seen.

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  • Nasir Lek's message and the urgent representations of Firdousi's friends had the desired effect; and Mahmud not only expressed his intention of offering full reparation to the poet, but put his enemy Maimandi to death.

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  • She also provoked a dangerous enemy in John Knox by her expressed contempt for a letter which he had written to her, but the first revolt against her authority arose from an attempt to establish a standing army.

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  • Semper, pursued as food by the leaping fish Periophthalmus, and the dorsal eyes are of especial value to them in aiding them to escape from this enemy.

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  • The incident led to a feud with the supporters of Morati, among whom was Pozzo di Borgo (destined to be his life-long enemy), and opened a breach between the Bonapartes and Paoli.

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  • General du Teil, younger brother of the baron, had recently published a work, L' Usage de l'artillerie nouvelle; and it is now known that Bonaparte derived from this work and from those of Guibert and Bourcet that leading principle, concentration of effort against one point of the enemy's line, which he had advocated at Toulon and which he everywhere put in force in his campaigns.

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  • The imperious terms in which this decree was couched and its misleading reference to the British maritime code showed that Napoleon believed in the imminent collapse of his sole remaining enemy.

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  • There, on the 16th of December, he issued a decree (omitted from the official Correspondence) declaring le nomsne Stein an enemy of France and confiscating his property in the lands allied to France.

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  • After imposing these harsh terms on his enemy, the conqueror might naturally have shown clemency to the Tirolese leader, Andreas Hofer; but that brave mountaineer, when betrayed by a friend, was sentenced to death at Mantua owing to the arrival of a special message to that effect from Napoleon.

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  • The same year witnessed the downfall of Napoleon's persistent enemy, Gustavus IV.

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  • After wavering between various plans, he decided on the 13th of July to cast himself on the generosity of the British government, and dictated a letter to the prince regent in which he compared himself to Themistocles seating himself at the hearth of his enemy.

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  • To Walpole, who looked upon every able colleague, or subordinate, as an enemy to be removed, Carteret was exceptionally odious.

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  • The operations consisted almost entirely of manoeuvres which had for their object the obtaining or the denial to the enemy of food-supplies.

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  • The chief authority for the bishop's life is William de Chambre (printed in Wharton's Anglia Sacra, 1691, and in Historiae Dunelmensis scriptores tres, Surtees Soc. 1839), who describes him as an amiable and excellent man, charitable in his diocese, and the liberal patron of many learned men, among these being Thomas Bradwardine, afterwards archbishop of Canterbury, Richard Fitzralph, afterwards archbishop of Armagh, the enemy of the mendicant orders, Walter Burley, who translated Aristotle, John Mauduit the astronomer, Robert Holkot and Richard de Kilvington.

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  • 16, an enemy submarine was reported to be in the Flow.

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  • The Genoese Admiral Luciano Doria sailed into the Adriatic, attacked and defeated Vettor Pisani at Pola in Istria, and again Venice and the lagoons lay at the mercy of the enemy.

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  • The Kaffir chief who had accompanied him to England joined the enemy; and many of his converts showed that his efforts on their behalf had effected no change in their character.

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  • Almost all the American stores at the naval station were destroyed to save them from the enemy.

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  • If an attempt be made by any enemy to lift the lid, the spider seizes its inner side with his fangs and striking his claws into the walls of the burrow offers the greatest possible resistance to the efforts of the intruder.

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  • Marching always ready to fight wherever his enemy might stand or move to meet him, his mind was relieved from all the hesitations which necessarily arise in men less confident in the security of their designs.

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  • Before the surrender all the Peruvian naval vessels in the harbour were sunk, to prevent their falling into the possession of the enemy.

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  • 25), notable, as was Fuentes d'Onor, for the coolness with which the allied squares retired amidst the enemy's horsemen; and again at Fuente Guinaldo (Sept.

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  • The decisive movement was a passage in strength near Fuenterrabia, to the astonishment of Passage of the the enemy, who in view of the width of the river Bidassoa, and the shifting sands, had thought the crossing October 7, impossible at that point.

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  • Several men and vessels were lost in crossing the bar; but by noon on the 26th of February the bridge of 26 vessels had been thrown and secured; batteries and a boom placed to protect it, 8000 troops passed over, and the enemy's gunboats driven up the river.

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  • After a great defeat of Israel by the Philistines it was brought into the field, but was captured by the enemy.

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  • The declaration of war against the emperor Francis II., nephew of Marie Antoinette, was forced upon the king by those who wished to discredit him by failure, or to compel him to declare himself openly an enemy to the Revolution.

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  • In the later story, according to Dares and Dictys, he was said to have treacherously opened the gates of Troy to the enemy; in return for which, at the general sack of the city, his house, distinguished by a panther's skin at the door, was spared by the victors.

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  • Subsequently the Romans, when besieged in the Capitol by the Gauls, created him dictator; he completely defeated the enemy (but see Brennus and Rome: History, ii., "The Republic") and drove them from Roman territory.

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  • He rendered an immense service to his country by maintaining that the cause of France, though desperate to all appearance, was not yet lost if the contending factions could lay aside their differences in the face of the common enemy.

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  • According to the legend a raven settled on his helmet during his combat with a gigantic Gaul, and distracted the enemy's attention by flying in his face.

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  • From this time down to the last period of the Hebrew monarchy Egypt was not the enemy of Judah.

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  • Though but faintly pictured in the Vedic hymns, he is there invoked with Ormazd, or Ahuramazda, the god of the sky, and is clearly a divinity of light, the protector of truth and the enemy of error and falsehood.

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  • Because light is accompanied by heat, he was the god of vegetation and increase; he sent prosperity to the good, and annihilated the bad; he was the god of armies and the champion of heroes; as the enemy of darkness and of all evil spirits, he protected souls, accompanying them on the way to paradise, and was thus a redeemer.

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  • He appears to have been a firm supporter of law and order, an enemy of clerical abuses and a careful administrator of his diocese.

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  • Next year he joined Henry in attacking their common enemy, Geoffrey Martel, count of Anjou.

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  • This Petrucci was a hitter enemy to Pandolfo's children.

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  • In a desperate fight (April 17) with a strong force of the enemy the English were overwhelmed and only four Europeans escaped to the bay.

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  • A comparatively small number of the Dutch colonists joined the enemy, but there was no general rebellion among them.

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  • Towards those Dutch colonists who had joined the enemy during the war leniency was shown, all rebels being pardoned.

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  • As a strong advocate of colonial expansion he was also a bitter enemy of Great Britain, and he was to a large extent responsible for the anti-British feeling of German Chauvinism during the last years of the 19th century.

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  • 1917) had a sobering effect, and the need for solidarity on the part of all the subject nationalities of Austria-Hungary, - a category which included also Italians, - if Italy's chief enemy was to be overthrown, became increasingly apparent.

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  • The companies had yearly feasts, at which the commander honoured warriors who had slain one or more of the enemy.

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  • As evidence of such prowess, and as a token of his right to a share of any spoil, the warrior was accustomed to scalp his enemy and adorn his bridle with the trophy.

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  • In the case of a special enemy or an adversary overcome in a private dispute before the king, he would make a cup of the skull, mounting it in bull's hide or in gold.

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  • The tactics in war were the traditional nomad tactics of harassing the enemy on the march, constantly retreating before him and avoiding a general engagement.

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  • Josephus wrote a narrative of his own Life in order to defend himself against the accusation brought by his enemy Justus of Tiberias to the effect that he had really been the cause of the Jewish rebellion.

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  • The English commander, thus foiled, executed a daring and skilful march round the enemy's flank, and on the 9th drew up for battle in rear of the hostile army.

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  • It is evident that Surrey was confident of victory, for he placed his own army, not less than the enemy, in a position where defeat would involve utter ruin.

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  • He assured them that they might look forward to complete self-government under the Crown, and at the same time urged them to sink political differences and join hands with the British against their common enemy, the Zulus.

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  • The third may be characterized as a period of transition; it marks the adoption in earnest of a guerrilla policy on the part of the enemy, and an uncertain casting about on the part of the British for a definite system with which to grapple with an unforeseen development.

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  • Half the mounted men lost their way in attempting to pass the enemy's flank and were taken, and the brigade, threatened to its left rear by Joubert's advance and by the force that had seized the railway, only escaped being enveloped by retreating upon Ladysmith, where it arrived in an exhausted state on the 26th of October.

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  • On the 10th of December Gatacre essayed a night march and attack upon the enemy's position at Stormberg, and, misled by his guides in unknown ground, was himself surprised and forced to return with a loss of 719.

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  • The only bright spot, as far as the British were concerned, was to be found in northern Cape Colony, where General French, with two cavalry brigades and details, by his skilful tactics and wonderful activity kept at arm's length a superior force of the enemy in the vicinity of Colesberg, an achievement the more noteworthy since he had pitted against him both De la Rey and De Wet, two of the three men of military genius produced by the war on the Boer side.

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  • The garrison, though already weakened by privation and sickness, made a stubborn resistance, and after one of the fiercest engagements of the war, repulsed the attack at Caesar's Camp and Wagon Hill with severe loss to the enemy, itself having 500 casualties.

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  • But meantime the mobile enemy, whose original flank had been turned, had gathered at the new centre of gravity, and the upshot of several days' fighting was the retreat of the British.

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  • They had penetrated the enemy's right centre by the seizure of Spion Kop, but the force there became the target for the concentrated attacks of the Boers, and, after suffering heavily, was withdrawn (Jan.

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  • On the 26th to 27th of August the combined forces engaged and defeated Botha in the action of Belfast or Bergendal, with the result that the enemy dispersed into the bush-veld north of the Middelburg railway.

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  • The enemy invariably dispersed before superior forces, and the removal of the women and children from the farms did not have the effect of disheartening the burghers as had been anticipated - it rather mended their vitality by relieving them of responsibility for their families' welfare.

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  • In March Babington, pursuing De la Rey after the latter's Lichtenburg misadventure, captured three guns and six maxims near Ventersdorp. In April Plumer occupied Pietersburg, the last remaining seat of government open to the enemy.

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  • The blockhouse system was practically finished, and Kitchener determined upon a new means of harassing the enemy, who still had a total of about 25,000 men in the field.

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  • In 310 Agathocles, defeated and besieged in Syracuse, took the desperate resolve of breaking through the blockade and attacking the enemy in Africa.

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  • 6 the author dwells on Mount Zion; (2) that Moab is referred to as an enemy (xxv.

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  • It adds many new features to the shorter form of the story as given by Eusebius, among which is the noteworthy promise of Christ about the impregnability of the city - " Thy city shall be blessed and no enemy shall ever henceforth obtain dominion over it.

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  • The attempt Hood made in January 1782 to save them from capture, with 22 ships to 29, was not successful, but the series of bold movements by which he first turned the French out of their anchorage at the Basse Terre of St Kitts, and then beat off the attacks of the enemy, were the most brilliant things done by any British admiral during the war.

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  • to the east and thus made himself numerically equal to his enemy, but elsewhere left barely 45,000 men to oppose 150,000.

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  • As there had been no money available to purchase supplies beforehand, each of these groups had to be scattered over a wide area for subsistence, and thus news as to the enemy's points of concentration necessarily preceded any determination of the plan of campaign.

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  • The Prussians followed on the 29th, but, owing to the iie of the roads, they had to march in two long columns, separated by almost a day's march, and when the advanced guard of the left column, late in the afternoon, gained touch with the enemy, the latter were in a position to crush them by weight of numbers, had they not suddenly been ordered to continue the retreat on Miletin.

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  • Prince Frederick Charles was warned to guard the left flank of his marching troops and authorized to attack any forces of the enemy he might encounter in that direction, if not too strong for him.

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  • these, having crossed the Bistritz, discovered the enemy in considerable force, at least three corps, behind the line of low hills which here border that stream.

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  • Their artillery driven back off the ridges formed a long line from Stosser to Plotist facing the enemy, and under cover of its fire the infantry at length succeeded in withdrawing, for the Prussian reserve cavalry arrived late on the ground, and the local disconnected efforts of the divisional cavalry were checked by the still intact Austrian squadrons.

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  • The living organism may be regarded as constantly engaged in a warfare with these silent and apparently insignificant messengers of destruction and death, with the result that too often the battle ends in favour of the attacking enemy.

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  • The effect of this was to bar the enemy's approach and push back his blockading lines, which had to be carried over an inconveniently large extent of ground.

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  • The Syracusans had been at first thoroughly cowed; but they were cowed no longer, and they even plucked up courage to sally out and fight the enemy on the high ground of Epipolae.

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  • The affair seems to have been well planned up to a certain point, and well executed; but the Athenian van, flushed with a first success, their ranks broken and disordered by a pursuit of the enemy over rough ground, were repulsed with great loss by a body of heavy-armed Boeotians, and driven back in disorder.

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  • All hope for the city being now at an end, the Syracusans threw themselves on the mercy of Marcellus; but Achradina and the island still held out for a brief space under the Syracusan mercenaries, till one of their officers, a Spaniard, betrayed the latter position to the enemy, and at the same time Achradina was carried and taken.

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  • of the low terrace above the marsh (the ancient Lysimeleia),' while in the other direction it ran N.N.W., making straight for the western edge of the gorge known as the Portella del Fusco, which was thus included within the fortifications, as it would otherwise have afforded a means of access to the enemy.

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  • But meeting his old enemy Beauregard in one of the minister's rooms and making an offensive remark, he was waylaid by Beauregard some time after in a less privileged place and soundly beaten.

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  • He was sober enough (for his day and society) in eating and drinking generally; but drank coffee, as his contemporary, counterpart and enemy, Johnson, drank tea, in a hardened and inveterate manner.

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  • But he was inordinately vain, and totally unscrupulous in gaining money, in attacking an enemy, or in protecting himself when he was threatened with danger.

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  • The king obstructed the river so that the enemy could not bring up their ships, and they therefore abandoned them.

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  • Fire, however, was almost as great an enemy to London as the Dane.

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  • The Danes went from the town and ravaged the neighbourhood, so that in the end the king and his witan agreed to give sixteen thousand pounds to be relieved of the presence of the enemy.

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  • He won the bulwarks and some of his followers entered into the city, but the portcullis being let down these were cut off from their own party and were slain by the enemy.

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  • Operating in open country, mounted on horseback, and with rifles in their hands, the Boer farmers were able to inflict fearful losses on their enemy, while their own casualties were few.

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  • On " Dingaan's day " the Boer force received the attack of the Zulu while in laager; the enemy charged in dense masses, being met both by cannon shot and rifle fire, and were presently attacked in the rear by mounted Boers.

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  • This force was hemmed in by the enemy.

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  • At mid-day next day the Zulu army made a desperate attack, lasting over four hours, on Wood's camp at Kambula; the enemy - over 20,000 strong - was driven off, losing fully 1000 men, while the British casualties were 18 killed and 65 wounded.

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  • Stormy weather caused some delays in continuing the programme, but heavily armed vessels 'made their way a short distance up channel on several days early in March and engaged some of the enemy works that were sited about the Narrows.'

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  • The enemy's light guns, aided by effective searchlights, were offering a strenuous opposition to the small craft engaged on the all-important duty of clearing the channel of submerged defences.

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  • Realizing the urgent need of gaining ground before the enemy was gathered in full strength, and hoping to win the heights beyond Krithia and Achi Baba, Sir I.

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  • But the enemy speedily brought effective flanking artillery fire to bear on the beach and on the boats; the troops, both officers and men, were inexperienced, the ground to be advanced over was hilly, scrub-clad and extremely broken, and considerable confusion arose.

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  • On the other hand, the Turks, who were commanded by Essad, had likewise dug themselves in, and they could bring an effective artillery fire to bear on the Anzac trenches from three sides, the prospect of the landing force making any effective progress under the awkward conditions of ground in which it found itself was remote, and Birdwood's contingents had in reality been even less successful than had those detailed for Helles as regards securing an adequate area on the enemy's shores before the defence gathered strength.

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  • Hamilton made Imbros his headquarters, and troops also were sometimes collected there owing to its vicinity both to Helles and to Anzac. Within the Dardanelles the battleship " Goliath " had been torpedoed by the Turkish destroyer " Muavenet-i-Milliye " on May 13; on the other hand British submarines were performing invaluable service, diving under the mine-fields, causing havoc amongst enemy craft in the channel itself and higher up, and threatening Ottoman communications with the peninsula.

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  • But the routes to be followed were difficult to find in the dark, the ascent was rapid, the ground was much broken, and the enemy opposed a stubborn resistance to the advance, with the result that this was greatly retarded, and that at daybreak the most forward of the columns was not much more than halfway up. The Ottoman staff had, moreover, on the first alarm begun to hurry reinforcements on the Sari Bair from the rear, while the Allied troops were so much exhausted by their nocturnal experiences that all attempts to win the upper ridge failed on the 7th.

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  • The great numerical superiority which they had at first possessed was gone by the 9th, and their task had come to be the ejection of an almost equal enemy from a naturally formidable position.

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  • The Allies now occupied many miles of front in the peninsula, but there was hardly a spot where the enemy had not the upper hand in respect to ground - what they required was not breadth but depth, and depth they had failed to secure.

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  • The defending side, in fact, came to be in a much more favourable position than was the attacking side in respect to diminishing the strain that is always experienced by fighting personnel when in close contact with an enemy even during periods of virtual inactivity.

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  • Large bodies of infantry with a fair proportion of guns still remained on shore on the 17th, but of these roughly half - about io,000 men and a number of guns in each area - were removed that night, so that on the 18th only a meagre force, composed almost wholly of infantry and disposed almost entirely in the trenches, was holding a long front face to face with a numerically far stronger enemy.

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  • So as to deceive the enemy, bombing and rifle fire were to be practised nightly up till 11:30 P.M., after which all activity was to cease.

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  • As the staff fully foresaw, the enemy would exert greater vigilance than had been the case while the withdrawals had been in progress from the northern areas, these having given the Ottoman authorities warning of what was likely to happen.

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  • It ought also to be mentioned that there was a greater accumulation of impedimenta at Helles than there had been at either Anzac or Suvla, so that even if the weather were to remain favourable, it was certain that material of great value would have to be destroyed to prevent its falling into the enemy's hands.

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