This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

encyclopaedic

encyclopaedic Sentence Examples

  • Two encyclopaedic treatises, dealing with philosophy, are often mentioned.

    6
    2
  • Trogus himself seems to have been a man of encyclopaedic knowledge.

    3
    1
  • The first part of an encyclopaedic work probably remains to us in the Compendium Studii Philosophiae (1271).

    2
    1
  • 636) produced in his Origines an encyclopaedic work which gathered up for the middle ages much of the learning of the ancient world.

    1
    0
  • When Romilly saw Diderot in 1783, the great encyclopaedic chief assured him that submission to kings and belief in God would be at an end all over the world in a very few years.

    1
    0
  • 636) produced in his Origines an encyclopaedic work which gathered up for the middle ages much of the learning of the ancient world.

    1
    0
  • FENESTELLA, Roman historian and encyclopaedic writer, flourished in the reign of Tiberius.

    1
    1
  • On the maps illustrating the encyclopaedic Liber floridus by Lambert, Lambert Liber flori dus 1120 FIG.

    1
    1
  • A full bibliography will be found in the Russian Encyclopaedic Dictionary, as also in Mezhov, Siberian Bibliography (3 vols., St Petersburg, 1891-1892), and in A.

    1
    1
  • Neither Pope nor Swift, who perhaps excelled him in particular branches of literary production, approached him in range of genius, or in encyclopaedic versatility.

    1
    1
  • The literary world marvelled at the encyclopaedic learning displayed by the author, and supposed that the French Academy, or some other society of scholars, must have combined their powers in its production.

    1
    1
  • Of Pliny, another encyclopaedic writer, a few words must be said, though he was not a physician.

    1
    1
  • He had, in fact, every quality necessary for an encyclopaedic writer, or even for a literary and professional autocrat.

    1
    1
  • He was the first of the Arabs to treat medicine in a comprehensive and encyclopaedic, manner, surpassing probably in voluminousness Galen himself, though but a small proportion of his works are extant.

    1
    1
  • As in the case of Galen, the formal and encyclopaedic character of Avicenna's works was the chief cause of his popularity and ascendancy, though in modern times these very qualities in a scientific or medical writer would rather cause him to become more speedily antiquated.

    1
    1
  • Albrecht von Haller (1708-1777) was a man of even more encyclopaedic attainments than Boerhaave.

    1
    1
  • On the maps illustrating the encyclopaedic Liber floridus by Lambert, Lambert Liber flori dus 1120 FIG.

    1
    1
  • As in the case of Galen, the formal and encyclopaedic character of Avicenna's works was the chief cause of his popularity and ascendancy, though in modern times these very qualities in a scientific or medical writer would rather cause him to become more speedily antiquated.

    1
    1
  • Among his encyclopaedic writings were some on medical subjects, of which fragments only have been preserved.

    1
    2
  • Joseph Frank (1774-1841), a German professor at Pavia, afterwards of Vienna, the author of an encyclopaedic work on medicine now forgotten, embraced the Brunonian system, though he afterwards introduced some modifications, and transplanted it to Vienna.

    0
    0
  • In spite, therefore, of the encyclopaedic tradition which has persisted from Aristotle through the Arab and medieval schools down to Herbert Spencer, it is forced upon us in our own day that in a pursuit so manysided as medicine, whether in its scientific or in its practical aspect, we have to submit more and more to that division of labour which has been a condition of advance in all other walks of life.

    0
    0
  • His curious encyclopaedic work, entitled Satyricon, or De Nuptiis Philologiae et Mercurii et de septem Artibus liberalibus libri novem, is an elaborate allegory in nine books, written in a mixture of prose and verse, after the manner of the Menippean satires of Varro.

    0
    0
  • Of works undertaken by his instructions the most important were the Encyclopaedic Excerpts from all available treatises on various branches of learning.

    0
    0
  • The eleventh census was taken under a law almost identical with that of the tenth, and extended through twenty-five large volumes, presenting a work almost as encyclopaedic, but much more distinctively statistical.

    0
    0
  • His former doctor and private secretary, Baron Stockmar (q.v.), a man of encyclopaedic - information and remarkable judgment, who had given special.

    0
    0
  • 323), the author of an encyclopaedic work in three parts, lexicographical, grammatical and antiquarian, the main value of which lies in its quotations from early Latin literature.

    0
    0
  • He is the founder of the systematic and encyclopaedic type of scholarship embodied in the comprehensive term Altertumswissenschaft, or " a scientific knowledge of the old classical world."

    0
    0
  • With one of his pupils in particular, Theophrastus, who was born about 370 and therefore was some fifteen years younger than himself, he had a long and intimate connexion; and the work of the pupil bears so close a resemblance to that of his master, that, even when he questions Aristotle's opinions (as he often does), he seems to be writing in an Aristotelian atmosphere; while he shows the same acuteness in raising difficulties, and has caught something of the same encyclopaedic genius.

    0
    0
  • To these there should be added the Survey of Egypt, called attuhfah al-saniyyah of Ibn Jihn, belonging to the time of Kait Bey; the treatise on the Egyptian constitution called Zubdat Kashf al-Mamalik, by Khalil al-~hiri, of the same period; and the encyclopaedic work on the same subject called Subii al-Insh, by al-Qalqashandi, d.

    0
    0
  • It would, however, be uncritical to pursue this subject further; for the encyclopaedic labours of the Dutch philologers belong to a period when the Renaissance was overpast.

    0
    0
  • An encyclopaedic account, however, should rest rather on an exterior definition which can serve as it were to pigeon-hole the whole mass of significant facts.

    0
    0
  • We are astonished at the encyclopaedic wealth of knowledge which the Exercitationes display, at the vigour of the author's style, at the accuracy of his observations, but are obliged to agree with G.

    0
    0
  • Le Portugal (Paris, 1899), by 18 writers, is a brief but encyclopaedic description of continental Portugal.

    0
    0
  • The foremost literary figure of the time was the encyclopaedic Francisco Manoel de Mello (q.v.), who, though himself a Spanish classic, .strove hard and successfully to free himself from subservience to Spanish forms and style.

    0
    0
  • Seriously to examine an encyclopaedic system, that touches life, society Washington University) from 1825 to 1827, professor of Greek, Latin and German at Waterville College (now Colby College) from 1827 to 1833, professor of biblical literature and criticism in Hamilton (New York) Theological Institute from 1835 to 1851, and professor of Hebrew and of Biblical exegesis in Rochester Theological Seminary from 1851 to 1857.

    0
    0
  • This work contains a clear and excellent resume of the methods which have been devised by the leading investigators from the time of Lagrange until the present, and thus forms the most encyclopaedic treatise to which the student can refer.

    0
    0
  • Skinner in the elaborate and encyclopaedic International Critical Series.

    0
    0
  • With him begins that encyclopaedic character - the simultaneous cultivation of the whole field of investigation which is reflected from Aristotle on the Arabian school.

    0
    0
  • Profoundly versed in the Latin as well as in the Christian literature, his indefatigable intellectual curiosity led him to condense and reproduce in encyclopaedic form the fruit of his wide reading.

    0
    0
  • The encyclopaedic interest in nature, although in White's day culminating in the monumental synthesis of Buffon, was also disappearing before the analytic specialism inaugurated by Linnaeus; yet the catholic interests of the simple naturalist of Selborne fully reappear a century later in the greater naturalist of Down, Charles Darwin.

    0
    0
  • Two encyclopaedic treatises, dealing with philosophy, are often mentioned.

    0
    0
  • The first part of an encyclopaedic work probably remains to us in the Compendium Studii Philosophiae (1271).

    0
    0
  • In the summary of this part, contained in the Opus Tertium, Bacon shows very clearly his perception of the unity of science and the necessity of encyclopaedic treatment.

    0
    0
  • FENESTELLA, Roman historian and encyclopaedic writer, flourished in the reign of Tiberius.

    0
    0
  • The principal of these trades are the weaving of carpets - about Tyumen; the making of wire sieves; the painting of ikons or sacred images; the making of wooden vessels and of the necessaries for the carrying trade about Tomsk (sledges, wheels, &c).; 2 Russian Encyclopaedic Dictionary, vol.

    0
    0
  • A full bibliography will be found in the Russian Encyclopaedic Dictionary, as also in Mezhov, Siberian Bibliography (3 vols., St Petersburg, 1891-1892), and in A.

    0
    0
  • Neither Pope nor Swift, who perhaps excelled him in particular branches of literary production, approached him in range of genius, or in encyclopaedic versatility.

    0
    0
  • 1264) was the author of an encyclopaedic work called Speculum majus, in which, without much independent ability, he collected the opinions of ancient and medieval writers on the most diverse points, transcribing the fragments of their works which he deemed most interesting.

    0
    0
  • The literary world marvelled at the encyclopaedic learning displayed by the author, and supposed that the French Academy, or some other society of scholars, must have combined their powers in its production.

    0
    0
  • Among his encyclopaedic writings were some on medical subjects, of which fragments only have been preserved.

    0
    0
  • Of Pliny, another encyclopaedic writer, a few words must be said, though he was not a physician.

    0
    0
  • He had, in fact, every quality necessary for an encyclopaedic writer, or even for a literary and professional autocrat.

    0
    0
  • He was the first of the Arabs to treat medicine in a comprehensive and encyclopaedic, manner, surpassing probably in voluminousness Galen himself, though but a small proportion of his works are extant.

    0
    0
  • Albrecht von Haller (1708-1777) was a man of even more encyclopaedic attainments than Boerhaave.

    0
    0
  • Joseph Frank (1774-1841), a German professor at Pavia, afterwards of Vienna, the author of an encyclopaedic work on medicine now forgotten, embraced the Brunonian system, though he afterwards introduced some modifications, and transplanted it to Vienna.

    0
    0
  • In spite, therefore, of the encyclopaedic tradition which has persisted from Aristotle through the Arab and medieval schools down to Herbert Spencer, it is forced upon us in our own day that in a pursuit so manysided as medicine, whether in its scientific or in its practical aspect, we have to submit more and more to that division of labour which has been a condition of advance in all other walks of life.

    0
    0
  • Petrovskiy, Old Arabian Journals of Travel (Tashkent, 1894); Russian Encyclopaedic Dictionary, vol.

    0
    0
  • Under Vespasian C. Plinius Secundus, or Pliny the elder (compiler of the Natural History, an encyclopaedic treatise, 23-79), is the most important prose writer, and C. Valerius Flaccus Setinus Balbus, author of the Argonautica (d.

    0
    0
  • His curious encyclopaedic work, entitled Satyricon, or De Nuptiis Philologiae et Mercurii et de septem Artibus liberalibus libri novem, is an elaborate allegory in nine books, written in a mixture of prose and verse, after the manner of the Menippean satires of Varro.

    0
    0
  • Of works undertaken by his instructions the most important were the Encyclopaedic Excerpts from all available treatises on various branches of learning.

    0
    0
  • The eleventh census was taken under a law almost identical with that of the tenth, and extended through twenty-five large volumes, presenting a work almost as encyclopaedic, but much more distinctively statistical.

    0
    0
  • His former doctor and private secretary, Baron Stockmar (q.v.), a man of encyclopaedic - information and remarkable judgment, who had given special.

    0
    0
  • Its bibliography will be found in the Russian Geographical Dictionary of P. Semenov, and in the Russian Encyclopaedic Dictionary, published by Brockhaus and Efron (vol.

    0
    0
  • 323), the author of an encyclopaedic work in three parts, lexicographical, grammatical and antiquarian, the main value of which lies in its quotations from early Latin literature.

    0
    0
  • He is the founder of the systematic and encyclopaedic type of scholarship embodied in the comprehensive term Altertumswissenschaft, or " a scientific knowledge of the old classical world."

    0
    0
  • With one of his pupils in particular, Theophrastus, who was born about 370 and therefore was some fifteen years younger than himself, he had a long and intimate connexion; and the work of the pupil bears so close a resemblance to that of his master, that, even when he questions Aristotle's opinions (as he often does), he seems to be writing in an Aristotelian atmosphere; while he shows the same acuteness in raising difficulties, and has caught something of the same encyclopaedic genius.

    0
    0
  • Trogus himself seems to have been a man of encyclopaedic knowledge.

    0
    0
  • In the annals of precocious genius there is no greater prodigy on record than Hugo Grotius, who was able to make good Latin verses at nine, was ripe for the university at twelve, and at fifteen edited the encyclopaedic work of Martianus Capella.

    0
    0
  • To these there should be added the Survey of Egypt, called attuhfah al-saniyyah of Ibn Jihn, belonging to the time of Kait Bey; the treatise on the Egyptian constitution called Zubdat Kashf al-Mamalik, by Khalil al-~hiri, of the same period; and the encyclopaedic work on the same subject called Subii al-Insh, by al-Qalqashandi, d.

    0
    0
  • The ascription to Africanus of an encyclopaedic work entitled Kestoi (embroidered girdles), treating of agriculture, natural history, military science, &c., has been needlessly disputed on account of its secular and often credulous character.

    0
    0
  • It would, however, be uncritical to pursue this subject further; for the encyclopaedic labours of the Dutch philologers belong to a period when the Renaissance was overpast.

    0
    0
  • An encyclopaedic account, however, should rest rather on an exterior definition which can serve as it were to pigeon-hole the whole mass of significant facts.

    0
    0
  • We are astonished at the encyclopaedic wealth of knowledge which the Exercitationes display, at the vigour of the author's style, at the accuracy of his observations, but are obliged to agree with G.

    0
    0
  • Le Portugal (Paris, 1899), by 18 writers, is a brief but encyclopaedic description of continental Portugal.

    0
    0
  • The foremost literary figure of the time was the encyclopaedic Francisco Manoel de Mello (q.v.), who, though himself a Spanish classic, .strove hard and successfully to free himself from subservience to Spanish forms and style.

    0
    0
  • Seriously to examine an encyclopaedic system, that touches life, society Washington University) from 1825 to 1827, professor of Greek, Latin and German at Waterville College (now Colby College) from 1827 to 1833, professor of biblical literature and criticism in Hamilton (New York) Theological Institute from 1835 to 1851, and professor of Hebrew and of Biblical exegesis in Rochester Theological Seminary from 1851 to 1857.

    0
    0
  • When Romilly saw Diderot in 1783, the great encyclopaedic chief assured him that submission to kings and belief in God would be at an end all over the world in a very few years.

    0
    0
  • This work contains a clear and excellent resume of the methods which have been devised by the leading investigators from the time of Lagrange until the present, and thus forms the most encyclopaedic treatise to which the student can refer.

    0
    0
  • Skinner in the elaborate and encyclopaedic International Critical Series.

    0
    0
  • With him begins that encyclopaedic character - the simultaneous cultivation of the whole field of investigation which is reflected from Aristotle on the Arabian school.

    0
    0
  • Profoundly versed in the Latin as well as in the Christian literature, his indefatigable intellectual curiosity led him to condense and reproduce in encyclopaedic form the fruit of his wide reading.

    0
    0
  • The encyclopaedic interest in nature, although in White's day culminating in the monumental synthesis of Buffon, was also disappearing before the analytic specialism inaugurated by Linnaeus; yet the catholic interests of the simple naturalist of Selborne fully reappear a century later in the greater naturalist of Down, Charles Darwin.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →