Enamels sentence examples

  • In the interior on the north, the Cappella del Corporale possesses a large silver shrine, resembling in form the cathedral façade, enriched with countless figures in relief and subjects in translucent coloured enamels - one of the most important specimens of early silversmith's work that yet exists in Italy.

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  • Many substances were used as pigments: Pliny records white lead, cinnabar, verdigris and red oxide of iron; and the preparation of coloured glasses and enamels testifies to the uses to which these and other substances were put.

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  • retrotabulum (modernized retabulum) was applied to an architectural feature set up at the back of an altar, and generally taking the form of a screen framing a picture, carved or sculptured work in wood or stone, or mosaic, or of a movable feature such as the famous Pala d'Oro in St Mark's, Venice, of gold, jewels and enamels.

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  • The castle of the Hohenzollerns crowns a high rock above the river, and contains a collection of pictures, an exceptionally interesting museum (textiles, enamels, metal-work, &c.), an armoury and a library.

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  • Not until the year 1620 do we find any evidence of the style for which Arita porcelain afterwards became famous, namely, decoration with vitrifiable enamels.

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  • From that time forward the Arita factories turned out large quantities of porcelain profusely decorated with blue under the glaze and colored enamels over it.

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  • There is evidence to show that the art of decoration with enamels over the glaze reached Kieto from Hizen in Awata.

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  • In point of fact, the production of faience decorated with goid and colored enamels may be said to have commenced at the beginning of the 1 9th century in Satsuma.

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  • To this increase in production and to the more elaborate application of vitrifiable enamels may be attributed the erroneous idea that Satsuma faience decorated with gold and colored enamels had its origin at the close of the 18th century.

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  • Decoration with vitrifiable enamels over the glaze, though it began to be practised at Owari about the year 1840, never became a speciality of tile place.

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  • These men seldom use vitrifiable enamels, pigments being much more tractable and less costly.

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  • The Imari ware, even though its thick biscuit and generally ungraceful shapes be omitted from the account, shows no enamels that can rival the exquisitely soft, broken tints of the famille rose; and the Kakiemon porcelain, for all its rich though chaste contrasts, lacks the delicate transmitted tints of the shell-like kwan-yao.

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  • Ninsei, in the middle of the 17th century, inaugurated a long era of beautiful productions with his cream-like fish-roe eraquel glazes, carrying jrich decoration of clear and brilliant vitrifiable enamels.

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  • Okamuia Yasutaro, commonly called Shozan, produces specimens which only a very acute connoisseur can distinguish from the work of Nomura Ninsei; Tanzan Rokuros half-tint enamels and soft creamy glazes would have stood high in any epoch; Taizan YOhei produces Awata faience not inferior to that of former days; Kagiya SObei worthily supports the reputation of the KinkOzan ware; Kawamoto Eijiro has made to the order of a well-known KiOto firm many specimens now figuring in foreign collections as old masterpieces; and ItO TOzan succeeds in decorating faience with seven colors sons couverte (black, green, blue, russetred, tea-brown, purple and peach), a feat never before accomplished.

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  • From this judgment must be excepted, however, his ivory-white and cladon wares, as well as his porcelains decorated with blue, or blue and red sous couverte, and with vitrifiable enamels over the glaze.

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  • It can scarcely be doubted that the true instincts of the ceramist will ultimately counsel him to confine his decoration over the glaze to vitrifiable enamels, with which the Chinese and Japanese potters of former times obtained such brilliant results.

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  • But to employ enamels successfully is an achievement demanding special training and materials not easy to procure or to prepare.

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  • The process was known at an early period, and was employed for the purpose of subsidiary decoration from the close of the 16th century, but not until the 19th century did Japanese experts begin to manufacture the objects known in Europe as enamels; that is to say, vases, plaques, censers, bowls, and so forth, having their surface covered with vitrified pastes applied either in the chain plev or the cloisonn style.

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  • Up to that time there had been little demand for enamels of large dimensions, but when the foreign market called for vases, censers, plaques and such things, no difficulty was found in supplying them.

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  • Thus, about the year 1865, there commenced an export of enamels which had no prototypes in Japan, being destined frankly for European and American collectors.

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  • Two faults, however, marred the workfirst, the shapes were clumsy and unpleasing, being copied from bronzes whose solidity justified forms unsuited to thin enamelled vessels; secondly, the colors, sombre and somewhat impure, lacked the glow and mellowness that give decorative superiority to the technically inferior Chinese enamels of the later Ming and early Tsing eras.

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  • There followed then a period of gradual decline, and the enamels exported to Europe showed so much inferiority that they were supposed to be the products of a widely different era and of different makers.

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  • It is plain that such a method as the latter implies great command of colored pastes, and, indeed, no feature of the manufacture is more conspicuous than the progress made during the period1880-1900in compounding and firing vitrifiable enamels.

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  • Thus arose the so-called cloisonless enamels (musenjsppo).

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  • But as the work proceeds the cloisons are hiddenunless their presence is necessary to give emphasis to the designand the final result is a picture in vitrified enamels.

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  • The characteristic productions of the third among the modern schools are monochromatic and translucid enamels.

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  • The translucid enamels of the modern school are generally associated with decorative bases.

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  • A still higher achievement is to apply to the chiselled base designs executed in colored enamels, finally covering the whole with translucid paste.

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  • IThe artists of this school show also much skill in using enamels for the purposes of subordinate decorationsuspending enamelled butterflies, birds or floral sprays, among the reticulations of a silver vase chiselled a jour; or filling with translucid enamels parts of a decorative scheme sculptured in iron, silver, gold or shakudo.

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  • The episcopal palace contains a museum with some fine ecclesiastical vestments, enamels and other works of art.

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  • The badge has an elaborate design; it consists of a star of purple, red, yellow, gold and silver rays, on which are displayed old Japanese weapons, banners and shields in various coloured enamels, the whole surmounted by a golden kite with outstretched wings.

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  • In the upper rooms is placed a large collection of Milanese and central Italian ceramics, stuffs, furniture, bronzes, ivories, enamels, glass and historical relics; together with a picture gallery containing works by Vincenzo Foppa, Gianpietrino, Boltraffio, Crivelli, Pordenone, Morone, Cariani, Correggio, Antonello da Messina, Tiepolo, Guardi, Potter, Van Dyck and Ribeira.

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  • Among many fine pieces of jewellers' work preserved in the ecclesiastical treasuries may be mentioned the silver statuette of San Biagio, and the reliquary which contains his skull - a 17th-century casket in filigree and enamels with Byzantine medallions of the 11th or 12th century.

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  • The further enrichment of the object by enamels and inlay of other metals was practised at a very early period by Assyrian, Egyptian and Greek metal-workers, as well as by the artists of Persia and medieval Europe.

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  • These were worked by casting and hammering, and ornamented by inlay, gilding and enamels with the greatest possible skill.

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  • The gorgeous Pala d'oro, still in St Mark's at Venice, a gold retable covered with delicate reliefs and enriched with enamels and jewels, was the work of Byzantine artists during the 11th century.

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  • It is a very sumptuous work, the front of the altar being entirely of gold, with repousse reliefs and cloisonné enamels; the back and ends are of silver, with gold ornaments.

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  • It has elaborate reliefs in repousse work, cast canopies and minute statuettes, with the further enrichment of translucent coloured enamels.

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  • In the 13th and 14th centuries many life-size sepulchral effigies were made of beaten copper or bronze, and ornamented by various-coloured "champleve" enamels.

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  • And not only in bronze, but in Paris jewellery, enamels, silver, pewter and iron work a cultured refinement is apparent, beside which other productions, even the most finished, appear crude.

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  • The well-known products, styled articles de Paris, prison-made, find a large sale, and many objects of high art, fine paintings, cloisonné enamels and gold lacquer are among the beautiful products from Japanese prisoners.

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  • In the second stage, implements of true bronze (9 to io% tin) become common; painted pottery of buff clay with dull black geometrical patterns appears alongside the red-ware; and foreign imports occur, such as Egyptian blue-glazed beads (XIIth-XIIIth Dynasty, 2500-2000 B.C.),1 and cylindrical Asiatic seals (one of Sargon I., 2000 B.C.).2 In the third stage, Aegean colonists introduced the Mycenaean (late Minoan) culture and industries; with new types of weapons, wheel-made pottery, and a naturalistic art which rapidly becomes conventional; gold and ivory are abundant, and glass and enamels are known.

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  • Nicola in the village contains a remarkable staurotheca of the Ilth (?) century, and a wooden triptych in imitation of the Byzantine style with enamels of the 13th century.

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  • The Henry Walters collection of paintings, mostly by modern French artists, and of Chinese and Japanese bronzes, ivory carvings, enamels, porcelain and paintings is housed in the Walters Art Gallery at the S.

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  • An omophorion of the 11th or 12th century, with scenes from the Gospel in needlework, and a chalice of the 15th century with enamels, given by Cardinal Bessarion, the predecessor of Giuliano della Rovere as commendatory of the abbey, are among its treasures.

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  • Men The only decorative pieces that men appeared to wear were bronze armlets, inset with enamels.

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  • Painted in enamels, with dentil gilding around the rim and a gold band around the base.

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  • overglaze enamels.

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  • Ocean Pool Pendant & Matching stud earrings Hypnotic pendant with matching stud earrings in Sterling Silver inset with oceanic enamels.

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  • In the interior on the north, the Cappella del Corporale possesses a large silver shrine, resembling in form the cathedral façade, enriched with countless figures in relief and subjects in translucent coloured enamels - one of the most important specimens of early silversmith's work that yet exists in Italy.

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  • The enamels are used to delineate decorative subjects and are applied in masses, the principal colors being green, yellow and soft Prussian blue, all brilliant and transparent, with the exception of the last which is nearly opaque.

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  • In TOkyO, KiOto, Yokohama and Kobern all of which places decorating ateliers (etsuke-dokoro), similar to those of TokyO, have been established in modern timesthe artists use chiefly pigments, seldom venturing to employ vitrifiable enamels.

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  • It is a very sumptuous work, the front of the altar being entirely of gold, with repousse reliefs and cloisonné enamels; the back and ends are of silver, with gold ornaments.

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  • The well-known products, styled articles de Paris, prison-made, find a large sale, and many objects of high art, fine paintings, cloisonné enamels and gold lacquer are among the beautiful products from Japanese prisoners.

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  • He organized the famous Exposition Retrospective held at the Petit Palais in 1900, and published a number of expert volumes on enamels, ceramics and furniture.

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  • Ocean Pool Pendant & Matching Stud Earrings Hypnotic pendant with matching stud earrings in Sterling Silver inset with oceanic enamels.

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  • You'll want to avoid lacquer-based paints as well as spray enamels.

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  • Stackable fashion rings with colored enamels and coordinating diamond bands to create eye-catching, custom arrangements.

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