Empire sentence examples

empire
  • He was the ruler of the empire.

    897
    271
  • The empire grew as new countries were added.

    465
    177
  • The solders of the Roman Empire served for twenty years.

    328
    132
  • The Roman Empire existed from 27 BC to 476 AD.

    247
    112
  • Japan is the world's only remaining empire.

    226
    118
  • After World War I, as the Ottoman Empire collapsed, several new countries emerged.

    146
    99
  • Another example of such impunity was the Armenian genocide of 1915 that was orchestrated by the Ottoman Empire.

    17
    9
  • Attractions in the city include the ornate State Capitol building, designed after Paris' Hotel de Ville; the "Egg," an egg-shaped performing arts center; and the Empire State Plaza, a striking mixed use facility in the heart of downtown.

    12
    16
  • Well, aside from (ahem) intimate knowledge of the Playboy Empire, Madison got her feet wet when she served as a photo editor apprentice in one episode of The Girls Next Door, assisting with the design of a 2007 Girls Next Door calendar.

    10
    17
  • As a residence, however, for the rulers of the empire, a remote place in a difficult alpine region was far from convenient, and the real capitals were Susa, Babylon and Ecbatana.

    5
    2
  • For himself Bethlen secured the title of prince of the Empire, the seven counties of the Upper Theiss, and the fortresses of Tokaj, Munkacs and Ecsed.

    5
    2
  • In 1415 it was recovered by the Turks under Mahommed I., and since that period has belonged to the Ottoman empire.

    5
    4
  • Lauenburg entered the North German confederation in 1866 and the new German empire in 1870.

    4
    2
  • During the later Roman empire Rhodes was the capital of the province of the islands.

    4
    2
  • The caravans travelled far beyond the limits of the empire.

    4
    3
  • His title was derived from that of Frederick Barharossas judges; but he had no dependence on the empire.

    4
    3
  • The people seem to have thought that the last days of the empire had come.

    4
    3
  • Under a Ottoman threat of war he obtained in 1826 the Convention of empire.

    4
    3
  • By the establishment of the Latin empire Venice had gained a preponderance.

    4
    3
  • All this must have happened about 640 B.C. After the fall of the Assyrian empire Elam was occupied by the Persian Teispes, the forefather of Cyrus, who, accordingly, like his immediate successors, is called in the inscriptions "king of Anzan."

    4
    5
  • With regard also to the Ottoman empire his policy cannot be said to have been strictly conservative.

    4
    5
  • The Arabian tribes began to take possession of the partly cultivated lands east of Canaan, became masters of the Eastern trade, gradually acquired settled habits, and learned to speak and write in Aramaic, the language which was most widely current throughout the region west of the Euphrates in the time of the Persian Empire (6th-4th century B.C.).

    3
    0
  • The chief external interest, however, of the new financial policy of the Commonwealth lay in its relation towards the empire as a whole.

    3
    1
  • Sachsen-Meiningen), a duchy in Thuringia, forming an independent member of the German empire and consisting chiefly of an irregular crescent-shaped territory, which, with an average breadth of 10 m., stretches for over 80 m.

    3
    1
  • of the Romans under the Empire, chs.

    3
    1
  • In 1068 Alp Arslan invaded the Roman empire.

    3
    1
  • The Romans knew as little about Istakhr as the Greeks had done about Persepolis - and this in spite of the fact that for four hundred years the Sassanians maintained relations, friendly or hostile, with the empire.

    3
    3
  • Susa once more became a capital, and on the establishment of the Persian empire remained one of the three seats of government, its language, the Neo-Susian, ranking with the Persian of Persepolis and the Semitic of Babylon as an official tongue.

    3
    4
  • Shortly before his death he was forced to sign an agreement whereby the Byzantine empire undertook to pay tribute to the sultan.

    2
    0
  • and the Collapse of the Swedish Empire (London and Oxford, 1895); Bidrag til den Store Nordiske Krigs Historie (Copenhagen, 1899-1900); G.

    2
    0
  • But, as Darius said, nobody had the courage to oppose the new king, who ruled for seven months over the whole empire.

    2
    0
  • G..Gmelin, Giildenstalt, Lepechin and others - in the exploration of the recently extended Russian empire supplied not only much material to the Commentarii and Acta of the Academy of St Petersburg, but more that is to be found in their narratives - all of it being of the highest interest to students of Palaearctic or Nearctic ornithology.

    2
    0
  • 2 Were we to extend the list beyond the boundaries of the German empire, and include the ornithologists of Austria, Bohemia and the other states subject to the same monarch, the number would be nearly doubled; but that would overpass our proposed limits, though Herr von Pelzeln must be named.

    2
    0
  • The celebrations are directly traceable to the pagan Saturnalia of ancient Rome, which in spite of the conversion of the Empire to Christianity, and of the denunciation of bishops and ecclesiastical councils, continued to be celebrated by the people on the Kalends of January with all their old licence.

    2
    0
  • of Asia, and were brought, through Russian caravans, even so far as to Pomerania, Sweden and Norway, where Samanid coins have been found in great number, were in their turn overthrown by a more youthful and vigorous race, that of Sabuktagin, which founded the illustrious Ghaznevid dynasty and the Mussulman empire of India.

    2
    0
  • Their political power perhaps continued in the Gurjara empire, which at one time extended to Bengal in the east and the Nerbudda in the south, and continued in a diminished form until A.D.

    2
    0
  • Greek writers give a more flattering account of the Ephthalites, which may perhaps be due to the fact that they were useful to the East Roman empire as enemies of Persia and also not dangerously near.

    2
    0
  • It was said that the terms of resignation had actually been agreed upon with Primus, one of Vespasian's chief supporters, but the praetorians refused to allow him to carry out the agreement, and forced him to return to the palace, when he was on his way to deposit the insignia of empire in the temple of Concord.

    2
    0
  • Civil War and Rebellion in the Roman Empire, A.D.

    2
    0
  • He was successful; and the lagoons became, theoretically at least, a part of the Eastern empire.

    2
    0
  • But the empire was vast and weak, and its capital lay far away; in practice, no doubt, the lagoon population enjoyed virtual independence, though later the Byzantine claim to suzerainty became one of the leading factors in the formation of the state.

    2
    0
  • In opposition to the Frankish claim, Venice resolved to affirm her dependence on the Eastern empire.

    2
    0
  • A treaty between Charlemagne and Nicephorus (81o) recognized the Venetians as subjects of the Eastern empire, while preserving to them the trading rights on the mainland of Italy which they had acquired under Liutprand.

    2
    0
  • The state was a vassal of a weak and distant empire, which would leave it virtually free to pursue its own career; it was an independent tributary of a near and powerful kingdom with which it could trade, and trade between east and west became henceforth the note of its development.

    2
    0
  • Popular feeling at Venice ran so high that the state was rashly swept into war with the empire.

    2
    0
  • Boniface, marquis of Monferrat, desired to make good the claim to Salonica, and the Venetians doubtless wished to upset the Greek empire, which had recently shown itself so friendly to their rivals the Genoese.

    2
    0
  • But in 1261 the Greeks, supported by the Genoese, took advantage of the absence of the Venetian fleet from Constantinople to seize the city and to restore the Greek empire in the person of Michael VIII.

    2
    0
  • The appearance of the Ottoman Turk and the final collapse of the Latin empire in Syria brought about the next campaign between the rival maritime powers.

    2
    0
  • Tripoli (1289) and Acre (1291) fell to the Mussulman, and the Venetian title to her trading privileges, her diplomas from the Latin empire, disappeared.

    2
    0
  • The rapid formation of this land empire, and the obvious intention to expand, called the attention not only of Italy but of Europe to this power which seemed destined to become supreme in north Italy, and eventually led to the league of Cambrai for the dismemberment of Venice.

    2
    0
  • (See Bible: New Testament, Canon.) The title of Catholicus (KaBoXucen) seems to have been used under the Roman empire, though rarely, as the Greek equivalent of consularis and praefectus.

    2
    0
  • An agreement of 1907 with Great Britain recognized the lake as within the Abyssinian Empire.

    2
    0
  • After the fall of the Roman empire, it was the nucleus of the kingdom of Carentania, which was founded by Samo, a Frankish adventurer, but soon fell to pieces after his death.

    2
    0
  • In consolidating his empire and subduing contending factions he was ably assisted by Nizam ul-Mulk, his vizier, one of the most eminent statesmen in early Mahommedan history.

    2
    0
  • See Gibbon, Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, edited by J.

    2
    0
  • There is reason to believe that before the 6th century B.C. the caravans reached Damascus without coming near the oasis of Tadmor; probably, therefore, we may connect the origin of the city with the gradual forward movement of the nomad Arabs which followed on the overthrow of the ancient nationalities of Syria by the Babylonian Empire (6th century B.C.).

    2
    0
  • 1826), who immediately made peace with Prussia and joined the North German Confederation, his land becoming a member of the new German empire in 1871.

    2
    1
  • Nominally they were taken under the protection of the empire, in reality they were its masters and defenders.

    2
    1
  • authority, coinciding as it did with the practical elimination of the empire from Italian affairs, gave a long period of comparative independence to the nation.

    2
    1
  • They first prepared a map of the country round Peking, which was submitted to the emperor Kang-hi; and, being satisfied with the accuracy of the European method of surveying, he resolved to have a survey made of the whole empire on the same principles.

    2
    1
  • Rusden, History of Australia (1897); Australasia, British Empire Series (Kegan Paul & Co., 1900); A.

    2
    2
  • The two most striking political events in the modern history of Australia, as a whole, apart from the readiness it has shown to remain a part of the British empire, and to in Australia.

    2
    2
  • (See the article BRITISH EMPIRE.) (R.

    2
    3
  • Bury, The Later Roman Empire (London, 1889), i.

    1
    0
  • The government was vested in the council (1 30uXii) and people (8rl/20s), and administered by civil officers with Greek titles, the proedros (president), the grammateus (secretary), the archons, syndics and dekaprotoi (a fiscal council of ten), following the model of a Greek municipality under the Roman Empire.

    1
    0
  • The East was then agitated by the advance of the Parthian Empire under the Sassanidae, and the Palmyrenes, in spite of their Roman honours and their Roman civilization, which did not really go much below the surface, were by no means prepared to commit themselves altogether to the Roman side.'

    1
    0
  • In the contests which followed there can be no doubt that the Palmyrene princes cherished the idea of an independent empire of their own, though they never threw over their allegiance to the Roman suzerain until the closing act of the drama.

    1
    0
  • § viii., " The Sassanian Empire."

    1
    0
  • 270 Probus brought back Egypt into the empire, not without a considerable struggle; then in 271 Aurelian made preparations for a great campaign against the seat of the mischief itself.

    1
    0
  • and 857 sqq., and Mommsen, Provinces of the Roman Empire, (Eng.

    1
    0
  • Surely some would have devoted a life to science, dissecting the Mayan language or the searching out demise of the Anasazi Empire.

    1
    1
  • the church, but also their refusal to re-establish that "centre of political unity," the Holy Roman Empire.

    1
    1
  • Nicephorus, who needed large sums to strengthen his military force, set himself with great energy to increase the empire's revenue.

    1
    1
  • Both the alb and its name are derived ultimately from the tunica alba, the white tunic, which formed part of the ordinary dress of Roman citizens under the Empire.

    1
    1
  • (I) it is a corruption of the ancient name, Egeopelago; (2) it is from the modern Greek, `Ayco iraayo, the Holy Sea; (3) it arose at the time of the Latin empire, and means the Sea of the Kingdom (Arche); (4) it is a translation of the Turkish name, Ak Denghiz, Argon Pelagos, the White Sea; (5) it is simply Archipelagus, Italian, arcipelago, the chief sea.

    1
    1
  • Her medism in 4 91 is to be explained by her commercial relations with the Persian Empire.

    1
    1
  • 10 ff., 46 ff.); Xerxes sent him home to govern the empire during the campaign (vii.

    1
    1
  • It contains models of the principal dockyards and fortifications of the British empire, naval models of all dates, and numerous specimens of weapons of war from the remotest times to the present day.

    1
    1
  • They were not incorporated in the empire, but were ranked as allies, socii or auxilia.

    1
    1
  • The Batavians served with fidelity and distinction in all parts of the empire, and from the days of Augustus onwards formed a considerable part of the Praetorian guard.

    1
    1
  • became for a long period the bulwark of the empire against the inroads of the Germans from the north.

    1
    1
  • In the triple partition of the Carolingian empire at Verdun in 843, the central portion was assigned to the emperor Lothaire, separating the kingdoms of East Francia (the later The duchy Germany) from West Francia (the later France).

    1
    1
  • The latter occurs only in the temperate possessions of the British empire, in which there is no great preponderance of a coloured native population.

    1
    1
  • He died early, and was succeeded not by one of his sons but by his brother, Mithradates I., who became the founder of the Parthian empire.

    1
    1
  • For the later history of the Parthian empire reference should be made to Persia: Ancient History, and biographical articles on the kings.

    1
    1
  • that, if a single province could interpose a " bully's veto," constitutional and peaceful agitation would be discredited throughout the British Empire and the civilized world.

    1
    1
  • As War Minister he had the gigantic task of demobilizing armies of between four and five millions who had been in the war, of providing armies of occupation and forces for immediate garrisoning of the Empire, of building up an after-war army, and of re-creating the territorial army.

    1
    1
  • Pulcheria, and called upon to govern an empire greatly humbled.

    1
    1
  • See Gibbon, The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (ed.

    1
    1
  • There the foundations of the second great Persian Empire were laid, and Istakhr acquired special importance as the centre of priestly wisdom and orthodoxy.

    1
    2
  • The mountain tribes on the road (the Oxii, Pers, Huzha), accustomed to exact blackmail even from the king's train, learnt by a bitter lesson that a stronger hand had come to wield the empire.

    0
    0
  • In 1867 he became governor of Turkestan, and held the post until his death, making himself a name in the expansion of the empire in central Asia.

    0
    0
  • Its Prescript or constitution, adopted in 1867, and revised in 1868, provided for the following organization: The entire South was the Invisible Empire under a Grand Wizard, General N.

    0
    0
  • Arrived in the river Plate in 1527, rumours reached Cabot of mineral wealth and a rich and civilized empire in the far interior, and he resolved to abandon surveying for exploration.

    0
    0
  • In 1548 Charles laid before the states a scheme for making the Netherlands an integral part of the empire under the name of the Circle of Burgundy; but the refusal of the German Electors to make his only son Philip king of the Romans led him to abandon the project, which was never renewed.

    0
    0
  • 1914 as the founder and director of organizations for providing raw materials, during the World War, for Prussia and the German Empire.

    0
    0
  • Divination through the liver remained in force among the Assyrians and Babylonians down to the end of the Babylonian Empire.

    0
    0
  • appointed him one of the ambassadors who made peace with the Empire and drew up the Concordat of Worms (1122), and in the following year, with his later enemy Cardinal Peter Pierleoni, he was papal legate in France.

    0
    0
  • The Panislamic propaganda was encouraged; the privileges of foreigners in the Ottoman Empire - of ten an obstacle to government - were curtailed; the new railway to the Holy Places was pressed on, and emissaries were sent to distant countries preaching Islam and the caliph's supremacy.

    0
    0
  • On the 10th of December the sultan opened the Turkish parliament with a speech from the throne in which he said that the first parliament had been "temporarily dissolved until the education of the people had been brought to a sufficiently high level by the extension of instruction throughout the empire."

    0
    0
  • The Portuguese were satisfied with the possession of Malacca itself and did not seek further to extend their empire in Malaya.

    0
    0
  • He summoned experienced teachers, Protestant as well as Catholic, from Germany, established middle and higher schools in all parts of the empire, superseded the antiquated textbooks and methods of instruction, and encouraged the formation of learned societies and the growth of a professional spirit and independence among the teachers.

    0
    0
  • He supported the claims of Bohemia to a full autonomy; he strongly attacked both the February constitution and the Ausgleich with Hungary; what he desired was a common parliament for the whole empire based on a settlement with each one of the territories.

    0
    0
  • He was created a baron of the empire in 1809, and, on the fall of Napoleon, was first secretary of the cabinet and confidential secretary.

    0
    0
  • Of still greater importance for the history of Napoleon are Fain's Memoires, which were published posthumously in 1908; they relate more particularly to the last five years of the empire, and give a detailed picture of the emperor at work on his correspondence among his confidential secretaries.

    0
    0
  • Cromwell's colonial policy aimed definitely at the recognition and extension of the British empire.

    0
    0
  • 8) that the Armenians were ardent Christians, and ancient friends and allies of the Roman empire when Maximin attacked them about the year 308.

    0
    0
  • Gregory persuaded Tiridates to destroy the last relics of the old paganism, and carried out in the religious sphere his sovereign's policy of detaching Great Armenia from the Sassanid realm and allying it with the GraecoRoman empire and civilization.

    0
    0
  • He never lost an opportunity, whether in the pulpit or on the platform, of pressing on his hearers that the greatest future for Canada lay in unity with the rest of the British Empire; and his broad statesman-like judgment made him an authority which politicians of all parties were glad to consult.

    0
    0
  • On the outbreak of the South African War in 1899 Grant was at first disposed to be hostile to the policy of Lord Salisbury and Mr Chamberlain; but his eyes were soon opened to the real nature of President Kruger's government, and he enthusiastically welcomed and supported the national feeling which sent men from the outlying portions of the Empire to assist in upholding British supremacy in South Africa.

    0
    0
  • Phocas proved entirely incapable of governing the empire.

    0
    0
  • Bury, The Later Roman Empire (London, 1889), ii.

    0
    0
  • Under the empire Arvernia formed part of Prima Aquitania, and the district shared in the fortunes of Aquitaine during the Merovingian and Carolingian periods.

    0
    0
  • For a time Bela was equally fortunate in the north-west, where the ambitious and enterprising Piemyslidae had erected a new Bohemian empire which absorbed the territories of the old Babenbergers and was very menacing to Hungary.

    0
    0
  • He was chosen emperor in his forty-third year by the officers of the army at Nicaea in Bithynia in 364, and shortly afterwards named his brother Valens colleague with him in the empire.

    0
    0
  • of the empire at Naissus (Nissa) in Upper Moesia.

    0
    0
  • They made Milan their home; and the empire was nominally divided between them, Gratian taking the trans-Alpine provinces, whilst Italy, Illyricum in part, and Africa were to be under the rule of Valentinian, or rather of his mother, Justina.

    0
    0
  • The law and custom which preceded the Code we shall call " early," that of the New Babylonian empire (as well as the Persian, Greek, &c.) " late.

    0
    0
  • It was, however, reserved for the genius of Khammurabi to make Babylon his metropolis and weld together his vast empire by a uniform system of law.

    0
    0
  • Under the empire we hear almost nothing of it.

    0
    0
  • The Breisgau, originally a pagus or gau of the Frankish empire, was ruled during the middle ages by hereditary counts.

    0
    0
  • below Trent—that city and its territory, which previous to the treaty of Lunéville in 1801 was governed by sovereign archbishops, subject only to the German emperors, being now included in the Austrian empire.

    0
    0
  • Split up into numerous and mutually hostile communities, they never, through the fourteen centuries which have elapsed since the end of the old Western empire, shook off the yoke of foreigners completely; they never until lately learned to merge their local and conflicting interests in the common good of undivided Italy.

    0
    0
  • The arrangements thus established by Augustus continued almost unchanged till the time of Constantine, and formed the basis of all subsequent administrative divisions until the fall of the Western empire.

    0
    0
  • The mainstay of the Roman military control of Italy first, and of the whole empire afterwards, was the splendid system of roads.

    0
    0
  • Odoacer inaugurated that long series of foreign rulersGreeks, Franks, Germans, Spaniards and Austrians who have successively contributed to the misgovernment of Italy from distant seats of empire.

    0
    0
  • The fruit of his policy, which made of Rome a counterpoise against the effete empire of the Greeks upon the one hand and against the pressure of the feudal kingdom on the other, was seen in the succeeding century.

    0
    0
  • The Franko-Papal alliance, which conferred a crown on Pippin and sovereign rights upon the see of Rome, held within itself that ideal of mutually Charles supporting papacy and empire which exercised so the iireat powerful an influence in medieval history.

    0
    0
  • law Desiderius, the last Lombard king, in 774, and when he received the circlet of the empire from Leo Ill, at Rome ~fl 800, he did but complete and ratify the compact offered to his grandfather, Charles Martel, by Gregory III.

    0
    0
  • A race was formed strong enough to keep the empire itself in check, strong enough, except for its own internecine contests, to have formed a nation equal to its happier neighbors.

    0
    0
  • Their appointment, according to notions which defined themselves within the church at this epoch, was simoniacal; and during the long minority of Henry IV., who succeeded his father in 1056, the terrible Tuscan monk, Hildebrand of Soana, forged weapons which he used with deadly effect against the presumption of the empire.

    0
    0
  • These watchwords are said to have arisen in Germany during the disputed succession of the empire between 1135 and 1152, when the Welfs of Bavaria opposed the Swabian princes of Waiblingen origin.

    0
    0
  • But when Conrad died, the electors chose his nephew Frederick, surnamed Barbarossa, who united the rival honors of Welf and Waiblingen, to succeed him; and it was soon obvious that the empire had a master powerful Fmder!ck of brain and firm of will.

    0
    0
  • Lombardy was, roughly speaking, divided between two parties, the one headed by Pavia professing loyalty to the empire, the other headed by Milan ready to oppose its claims. The municipal animosities of the last quarter of a century gave substance to these factions; yet neither the imperial nor, the anti-imperial party had any real community of interest with Frederick.

    0
    0
  • The points of dispute between them related mainly to Matildas bequest, and to the kingdom of Sicily, which the pope had rendered independent of the empire by renewing its investiture in the name of the Holy See.

    0
    0
  • In truth, the papacy and the empire had become irreconcilable.

    0
    0
  • In the ensuing struggle with the empire, that great city rose to the altitude of patriotic heroism.

    0
    0
  • Here the jurists of Bologna appeared, armed with their new lore of Roman law, and expounded Justinians code in the interests of the German empire.

    0
    0
  • Their mutual jealousies, combined with the prestige of the empire, and possibly with the selfishness of the pope, who had secured his own position, and was not likely to foster a national spirit that would have threatened the ecclesiastical supremacy, deprived the Italians of the only great opportunity they ever had of forming themselves into a powerful nation.

    0
    0
  • Among the principal events of that reign must be reckoned the foundation of the two orders, Franciscan and Dominican, who were destined to form a militia for the holy see in conflict with the empire and the heretics of Lombardy.

    0
    0
  • The Venetians, who contracted for the transport of the crusaders, and whose blind doge Dandolo was first to land in Constantinople, received one-half and onefourth of the divided Greek empire for their spoils.

    0
    0
  • The formation of a Latin empire in the East increased the popes prestige; while at home it was his policy to organize Countess Matildas heritage by the formation of Guelph leagues, over which he presided.

    0
    0
  • pero~ In his single person he combined the prestige of empire with the crowns of Italy, Sicily, Sardinia, Germany and Burgundy; and in 1225, by marriage with Yolande de Brienne, he added that of Jerusalem.

    0
    0
  • They made him senator of Rome and vicar of Tuscany, and promised him the investiture of the regno provided he stipulated that it should not be held in combination with the empire.

    0
    0
  • Henceforth Emilia, Romagna, the March of Ancona, the patrimony of St Peter and the Campagna of Rome held of the Holy See, and not of the empire.

    0
    0
  • The quarrels of the church and empire lend pretexts and furnish war-cries; but the real question at issue is not the supremacy of pope or emperor.

    0
    0
  • Thus the Italians, during the heat of the civil wars, were ostensibly divided between partisans of the ~ ~ empire and partisans of the church.

    0
    0
  • of Luxembourg cro~sed the Alps soon after his ofeccjv~ election to the empire, and raised the hopes of the wars.

    0
    0
  • But it was now impossible for any German to control the Garden of the Empire.

    0
    0
  • Henry established imperial vicars in the Lombard towns, confirming the tyrants, but gaining nothing for the empire in exchange for the titles he conferred.

    0
    0
  • The tyrants, as we have already seen, established themselves as captains of the people, vicars of the empire, vicars for the church, leaders of the Guelph and Ghibelline parties.

    0
    0
  • When Constantinople fell in 1453, the old ties between Venice and the Eastern empire were broken, and she now entered on a wholly new phase of her history.

    0
    0
  • Leo for a while relied on Francis; for the vast power of Charles V., who succeeded to the empire in 1519, as in 1516 he had succeeded to the crowns of Spain and Lower Italy, threatened the whole of Europe.

    0
    0
  • In 1790 he succeeded to the empire, and left Tuscany to his son Ferdinand.

    0
    0
  • Finally, after the proclamation of the French empire (May 18, 1804) Napoleon proposed to place his brother Joseph over the Italian state, which now took the title of kingdom of Italy.

    0
    0
  • The French emperor, at the supposed request of the doge of Genoa, declared the Ligurian Republic to be an integral part of the French empire.

    0
    0
  • Etruria reverted to the French empire, but the Spanish princess and her son did not receive the promised indemnity.

    0
    0
  • But after the occupation of Vienna the conqueror dated from that capital on the 17th of May 1809 a decree virtually annexing Rome and the Painmonium Petri to the French empire.

    0
    0
  • Here again he cited the action of Charlemagne, his august predecessor, who had merely given certain domains to the bishops of Rome as fiefs, though Rome did not thereby cease to be part of his empire.

    0
    0
  • By an imperial decree of the I7th of February 1810, Rome and the neighboring districts, including Spoleto, became part of the French empire.

    0
    0
  • By an instrument signed on the 24th of April 1815, the Austrian territories in north Italy were erected into the kingdom of Lombardo-Venetia, which, though an integral part of the Austrian empire, was to enjoy a separate administration, the symbol of its separate individuality being the coronation of the emperors with the ancient iron crown of Lombardy (Proclamation de lempereur dAutriche, &c., April 7, 1815, State Papers, ii.

    0
    0
  • The promise of a constitution for the empire, ~,~after made in 1849, was never carried out; the government of Lombardo-Venetia was vested in Field-Marshal Radetzky; and although only very few of the revolutionists were excluded from the amnesty, the carrying of arms or the distribution or possession of revolutionary literature was punished with death.

    0
    0
  • On the 3rd of September the news of Sedan reached Florence, and with the fall of Napoleons empire the September convention ceased to have any value.

    0
    0
  • Empire, Crmieux, as president of the government delegation at Tours, hastened to offer his congratulations to Italy.

    0
    0
  • Perceiving the advantage of a visit to the imperial and apostolic court after the Italian occupation of Rome and the suppression of the religious orders, and convinced of the value of more cordial intercourse with the German empire, Visconti-Venosta and Minghetti advised their sovereign to accept both the Austrian and the subsequent German invitations.

    0
    0
  • Johnston, The Napoleonic Empire in Southern Italy (2 vols., with full bibliography, London, i904); E.

    0
    0
  • Under the Empire we hear no more of it, and no traces of antiquity, beyond inscriptions, remain.

    0
    0
  • TRIER (French treves), an ancient city of Germany, formerly the capital of an archbishopric and electorate of the empire, and now the seat of a Roman Catholic bishop and the chief town of a governrnental department in the Prussian province of the Rhine.

    0
    0
  • At first the Treveri resisted the appeal of Civilis and his Batavi to join the revolt, and built a defensive wall from Trier to Andernach, but soon after the two Treverans, Tutor and Classicus, led their fellow tribesmen, aided by the Lingones (Langres), in the attempt to set up a "Gallic empire."

    0
    0
  • Mainly on account of its strategic position, Diocletian on his reorganization of the empire made Trier the capital not only of Belgica Prima, but of the whole "diocese" of Gaul.

    0
    0
  • For a century, from Maximian to Maximus (286-388), it was (except under Julian, who preferred to reside in Paris) the administrative centre from which Gaul, Britain and Spain were ruled, so that the poet Ausonius could describe it as the second metropolis of the empire, or "Rome beyond the Alps."

    0
    0
  • He assumed the title of archchancellor of Gaul and Arles (or Burgundy), and in 1315 admitted the claim of the archbishop of Cologne to the highest place of ter the archbishop of Mainz among the spiritual princes of the empire.

    0
    0
  • In the palace which he built on the Aventine, Otto sought to surround himself with the splendour and ceremonial of the older emperors of Rome, and dreamed of making Rome once more the centre of a universal empire.

    0
    0
  • Many names and customs were introduced into his court from that of Constantinople; he proposed to restore the Roman senate and consulate, revived the office of patrician, called himself "consul of the Roman senate and people" and issued a seal with the inscription, "restoration of the Roman empire."

    0
    0
  • It was administered under the empire by a curator of praetorian rank, as were the other important roads of Italy.

    0
    0
  • As neighbouring dioceses coalesced into " provinces " and provinces into larger districts (corresponding to the civil " dioceses " of the later Roman Empire), the provincial synods of bishops and the synods of the larger districts acquired a criminal jurisdiction, still purely spiritual, of their own.

    0
    0
  • The local church sought recovery of it before the tribunals of the Empire.

    0
    0
  • On the revival of the Western Empire, however, Charlemagne, in the beginning of the 9th century, under the mistaken belief that he was following the authority of Constantine I.

    0
    0
  • A system begins to be formed, and the secular arm supports empire the decrees of the Church.

    0
    0
  • Britain remained outside that jurisdiction, the Celtic churches of the British islands, after those islands were abandoned by the Empire, pursuing a course of their own.

    0
    0
  • The empire of Russia has in the matter of ecclesiastical jurisdiction partly developed into other forms, partly systematized 4th century and later Byzantine rules.

    0
    0
  • (8th ed., Brixen, 1905, especially in regard to Austro-Hungarian Empire); J.

    0
    0
  • But Wratyslaus of Bohemia speedily appealed to the emperor for help, and a war between Poland and the Empire was only prevented by the sudden rupture of Henry IV.

    0
    0
  • By them the Parthian War was brought to a conclusion in 165, but Verus and his army brought back with them a terrible pestilence, which spread through the whole empire.

    0
    0
  • Aurelius was thenceforth indisputed master of the empire, during one of the most troubled periods of its history.

    0
    0
  • He gave large sums of money for the endowment of chairs in philosophy and rhetoric, with a view to making the schools the resort of students from all parts of the empire.

    0
    0
  • Ramsay, however, doubts this (The Church in the Roman Empire, London, 1893), and argues that it was due to a long series of instructions to provincial governors (mandata, not decreta) who interpreted their duty largely in conformity with the attitude of the reigning emperor.

    0
    0
  • 1880), the Christians were particularly dangerous, inasmuch as they taught a unity which transcended that of the Roman Empire, and must, therefore, have been regarded as antagonistic to the existing political and social organism.

    0
    0
  • The Meditations were written, it is evident, as occasion offered - in the midst of public business, and on the eve of battles on which the fate of the empire depended - hence their fragmentary appearance, but hence also much of their practical value and even of their charm.

    0
    0
  • Addis, Christianity and the Roman Empire (1893); E.

    0
    0
  • Ramsay, Cities and Bishoprics of Phrygia, and Church in the Roman Empire), but also to the Judaism of the Diaspora.

    0
    0
  • But from then only the inhabitants of Persis proper were considered as the rulers of the empire, and remained therefore in the organization of Darius free from taxes (Herod.

    0
    0
  • So the Persian kings fixed their residence at Susa, which is always considered as the capital of the empire (therefore Aeschylus wrongly considers it as a Persian town and places the tomb of Darius here).

    0
    0
  • Persis remained a part of the Seleucid empire down to Antiochus IV.

    0
    0
  • Epiphanes, who at the end of his reign restored once more the authority of the empire in Babylonia, Susiana and Persis; perhaps a battle, in which the satrap Numenius of Mesene (southern Babylonia) defeated the Persians on the shore of Carmania on sea and land (Plin.

    0
    0
  • (164) the Seleucid Empire began to dissolve.

    0
    0
  • Persis never became a part of the empire of the Arsacids, although her kings recognized their supremacy when they were strong (Strabo xv.

    0
    0
  • attempted to restore the old empire of Cyrus and Darius, and in 212 A.D.

    0
    0
  • But it shared the fate of its predecessor; when the empire was founded the Sassanids could no longer remain in Persis but transferred their headquarters to Ctesiphon.

    0
    0
  • Seleucus Nicator established the GrecoBactrian empire and continued the intercourse with India.

    0
    0
  • But it was the military genius of Rome, and the ambition for universal empire, which led, not only to the discovery, but also to the survey of nearly all Europe, and of large tracts in Asia and Africa.

    0
    0
  • In Africa their empire included Egypt, Carthage, Numidia and Mauritania.

    0
    0
  • Before the Roman legions were sent into a new region to extend the limits of the empire, it was usual to send out exploring expeditions to report as to the nature of the country.

    0
    0
  • After the division of the Roman empire, Constantinople became the last refuge of learning, arts and taste; while Alexandria continued to be the emporium whence were imported the commodities of the East.

    0
    0
  • The emperor Justinian (483-565), in whose reign the greatness of the Eastern empire culminated, sent two Nestorian monks to China, who returned with eggs of the silkworm concealed in a hollow cane, and thus silk manufactures were established in the Peloponnesus and the Greek islands.

    0
    0
  • At length the long period of barbarism which accompanied and followed the fall of the Roman empire drew to a close in Europe.

    0
    0
  • A map was attached on which several great equatorial lakes are shown, and the empire of Monomwezi or Unyamwezi is laid down.

    0
    0
  • The exploring enterprise of the Spanish nation did not wane after the conquest of Peru and Mexico, and the acquisition of the vast empire of the Indies.

    0
    0
  • So it seems that the dynasty, which more than half a century later succeeded in throwing off the Assyrian yoke and founded the Median empire, was derived from this Dayukku, and that his name was thus introduced into the Median traditions, which contrary to history considered him as founder of the kingdom.

    0
    0
  • In the, 4th century Aix, now a free city of the Holy Roman Empire, played a conspicuous part, especially in the league which, between 1351 and 1387, kept the peace between the Meuse and the Rhine.

    0
    0
  • In 1580 Protestantism got the upper hand; the ban of the empire followed and was executed by Ernest of Bavaria, archbishop-elector of Cologne in 1598.

    0
    0
  • In fact Susiana was only a late name for the country, dating from the time when Susa had been made a capital of the Persian empire.

    0
    0
  • Under the Empire he was made prefect successively in several departments, and in 1810 was created a baron.

    0
    0
  • Of his two brothers, Theodore Lameth (1756-1854) served in the American war, sat in the Legislative Assembly as deputy from the department of Jura, and became marechal-de-camp; and Charles Malo Francois Lameth (1757-1832), who also served in America, was deputy to the States General of 1789, but emigrated early in the Revolution, returned to France under the Consulate, and was appointed governor of Wiirzburg under the Empire.

    0
    0
  • By the victory he gained at Bassora in 1605 he extended his empire beyond the Euphrates; sultan Ahmed I.

    0
    0
  • The remaining years of his life he spent in arranging the affairs and revenues of his new empire and in improving his capital, Agra.

    0
    0
  • Two of Leroy-Beaulieu's works have been translated into English: one as the Empire of the Tsars and the Russians, by Z.

    0
    0
  • In 1881 Mahommed Ahmed ibn Seyyid Abdullah, a Dongolese, proclaimed himself al-mandi and founded in the eastern Sudan the short-lived empire overthrown by an AngloEgyptian force at the battle of Omdurman in 1898.

    0
    0
  • Nahr el-Furat or Frat), well known to occidentalists as the Euphrates, from its having been the boundary of the Roman empire, is regarded also by Orientals as the main stream.

    0
    0
  • 7); and it was at several periods the boundary of the Roman empire.

    0
    0
  • A little below Deir the river is joined by the Khabur (Khaboras, Biblical Khabor), the frontier of the Roman empire from Diocletian's time, which rises in the Karaja Dagh, and, with its tributary, the Jaghijagh (Mygdonius; Arab.

    0
    0
  • It was from a remote period, antedating certainly 3000 B.C., the highway of empire and of commerce between east and west, more specifically between Babylonia or Irak and Syria, and numerous empires, peoples and civilizations have left their records on its shores.

    0
    0
  • Under the Empire, however, it was overshadowed by the development of Dyrrachium and Apollonia.

    0
    0
  • Its chief distinctions are that during the later Republic and earlier Empire it yielded excellent soldiers, and thus much aided the success of Caesar against Pompey and of Octavian against Antony, and that it gave Rome the poet Virgil (by origin a Celt), the historian Livy, the lyrist Catullus, Cornelius Nepos, the elder and the younger Pliny and other distinguished writers?

    0
    0
  • But all five leaders were romanized nobles, with Roman names and Roman citizenship, and their risings were directed rather against the Roman government than the Roman empire.

    0
    0
  • In the latest empire Ausonius, Symmachus, Apollinaris, Sidonius and other Gaulish writers, chiefly of Gallia Comata, kept alive the classical literary tradition, not only for Gaul but for the world.

    0
    0
  • Mommsen, Provinces of the Roman Empire (trans.

    0
    0
  • Patricians and plebeians went on as orders defined by law, till the distinction died out in the confusion of things under the empire, till at last the word "patrician" took quite a new meaning.

    0
    0
  • Venice, a city not exactly belonging to any of these classes, essentially a city of the Eastern empire and not of the Western, gives us an example than which none is more instructive.

    0
    0
  • The age is full of troubles; Christianity is ruining the empire!

    0
    0
  • But there were two influences beyond the bounds or beyond the power of the christianized empire.

    0
    0
  • above Khartum, one of the most thriving towns in the eastern Sudan; Sennar, 241 m above Khartum, the capital of the Funj empire and chief town of the mudiria of Sennarof the ancient city little remains except a mosque with a high minaret; and Roseires, 426 m.

    0
    0
  • They adopted the Mahommedan religion and founded an empire which in the 17th and 18th centuries ruled over a large part of the eastern Sudan.

    0
    0
  • This empire was finally overthrown by the Egyptians in 1821.

    0
    0
  • ALFRED ARNETH, Ritter voN (1819-1897), Austrian historian, born at Vienna on the 10th of July 1819, was the son of Joseph Calasanza von Arneth (1791-1863), a well-known historian and archaeologist, who wrote a history of the Austrian empire (Vienna, 18 27) and several works on numismatics.

    0
    0
  • Although the name is thus correctly applied, both in English and Russian, to the whole area of the Russian empire, its application is often limited, no less correctly, to European Russia, or even to European Russia exclusive of Finland and Poland.

    0
    0
  • The use of the name in its most comprehensive sense dates only from the expansion of the empire in the 19th century; to the historian who writes of the earlier growth of the empire, Russia means, at most, Russia in Europe, or Muscovy, as it was usually called until the 18th century, from Moscow, its ancient capital.

    0
    0
  • The Russian empire stretches over a vast territory in E.

    0
    0
  • the frontier has changed frequently according to the expansion and contraction of the empire under the pressure of political exigency and expedience.

    0
    0
  • boundary of the Russian empire, followed by Afghanistan.

    0
    0
  • As thus traced, the boundary in Central Asia includes the two khanates of Bokhara and Khiva, which, though nominally protected states, are to all intents and purposes integral parts of the Russian empire.

    0
    0
  • The total length of the frontier line of the Russian empire by land is 2800 m.

    0
    0
  • and S., be left out of account, a striking uniformity of physical feature prevails throughout the whole vast extent of the Russian empire.

    0
    0
  • High plateaus like that of Pamir (the " Roof of the World ") and Armenia, and lofty mountain chains like the snow-clad Caucasus, the Alai, the Tian-shan, the Sayan Mountains, exist only on the outskirts of the empire.

    0
    0
  • Viewed broadly, the Russian empire may be said to occupy the territories to the N.W.

    0
    0
  • higher portions of the plateau formation the empire has only comparatively recently planted its foot on the Pamir, and it was only a few years earlier that it established itself firmly on the highlands of Armenia.

    0
    0
  • rivers of the old continent are comprised within the limits of - the Russian empire.

    0
    0
  • The population of the empire, which was estimated at 74,000,000 in 1859, was found to be over 129,200,000 at the census of 1897, taken over all the empire except Finland.

    0
    0
  • The official divisions of the empire are given here, and details are given in separate articles.

    0
    0
  • Within the empire a very great diversity of nationalities is comprised, due to the amalgamation or absorption by the Slav race of a variety of Ural-Altaic stocks, of Turko-Tatars, Turko-Mongols and various Caucasian races.

    0
    0
  • The following table shows the urban population in the various divisions of the empire in 1897: - There were in European Russia and Poland only twelve cities with more than too,000 inhabitants in 1884; in 1900 there were sixteen, namely, St Petersburg, Moscow, Warsaw, Odessa, Lodz, Riga, Kiev, Kharkov, Vilna, Saratov, Kazan, Ekaterinoslav, Rostov-on-the Don, Astrakhan, Tula and Kishinev.

    0
    0
  • In other parts of the empire there were four cities each having over too,000 inhabitants in that year, namely, Baku, Tiflis, Tashkent and Helsingfors.

    0
    0
  • There are thirty-four cities in European Russia and Poland, and forty in the entire empire, with from 50,000 to 100,000 inhabitants each.

    0
    0
  • Each province of the empire, except the now disfranchised steppes of Central Asia, 7 returns a certainro ortion of members (fixed in each case by P P (Y law in such a way as to give a preponderance to the Russian element), in addition to those returned by certain of 2 M.

    0
    0
  • 84 of the fundamental laws (" The empire is governed on the immutable basis of laws issued according to the established order "), argued that the emperor himself could only act within the limits of the order established by those laws.

    0
    0
  • By the law of the 20th of February 1906 the Council of the Empire was associated with the Duma as a legislative Upper House; and from this time the legislative power has been exercised normally by the emperor only in concert with the two chambers.

    0
    0
  • The Council of the Empire, or Imperial Council (Gosudarstvenniy Sovyet), as reconstituted for this purpose, consists of 196 members, of whom 98 are nominated by the emperor, The while 98 are elective.

    0
    0
  • As a legislative body the powers of the Council are co-ordinate with those of the Duma; in practice, however, it has seldom if ever initiated legislation.6 The Duma of the Empire or Imperial Duma (Gosudarstvennaya Duma), which forms the Lower House of the Russian parliament, consists (since the ukaz of the znd of June 1907) on the 27th of April 1906, while the name and princi p le of autocracy was jealously preserved, the word " unlimited " vanished.

    0
    0
  • At the head of the government is the emperor, 4 whose power is limited only by the provisions of the fundamental laws of the empire.

    0
    0
  • Of these some are ancient and undisputed: the empire may not be partitioned, but Table Showing Distribution Of Races ' These totals include in some cases small linguistic groups not mentioned in the table.

    0
    0
  • In this way the fundamental laws were suspended not only in Poland but in St Petersburg and other parts of the empire during the greater part of the four years succeeding the grant of the constitution.

    0
    0
  • In 1893 district committees for the management of the peasants' affairs, similar to those in the purely Russian governments, were introduced into this part of the empire.

    0
    0
  • As a court of justice its main drawback is that it is wholly unable to cope with the vast mass of documents representing appeals from all parts of the empire.

    0
    0
  • abolished the election of justices of the peace, except in certain large towns and some outlying parts of the empire, and greatly restricted the right of trial by jury.

    0
    0
  • The total grants from the state exchequer for education of all grades in all parts of the empire amounted in 1906 to £8,107,000.

    0
    0
  • The ordinary revenue of the empire is in excess of the ordinary expenditure, but the extraordinary expenditure not only swallows up this surplus, but necessitates the raising of fresh F loans every year.

    0
    0
  • it has the Asiatic dominions of the empire, Siberia and the Kirghiz steppes, from both of which it is separated by the Ural Mountains, the Ural river and the Caspian - the administrative boundary, however, partly extending into Asia on the Siberian slope of the Urals.

    0
    0
  • Russia was 'the seat of the empire' of the Khazars, who drove the Bulgarians, descendants of the Huns, from the Don, one Section of them migia.tiug up thu Volga to found there the Bulgarian empire, and the remainder travelling towards the Danube.

    0
    0
  • the Turkish-Mongol races of the Pechenegs, Polovtsi, Uzes, &c., while in the S., along the Black Sea, was the empire of the Khazars, who had under their rule several Slav tribes, and perhaps also some of Finnish origin.

    0
    0
  • But a closer observation of what is going on in the recently colonized confines of the empire - where whole villages live without mixing with the natives, but slowly bringing them over to the Russian manner of life, and then slowly taking in a few female elements from them - gives the key to this feature of Russian life.

    0
    0
  • According to returns published in 1905 the adherents of the different religious communities in the whole of the Russian empire numbered approximately as follows, though the heading Orthodox Greek includes a very great many Raskolniki or Dissenters.

    0
    0
  • The output of coal in the Urals is, altogether, less than 3% of the total for all the empire and 4% of the output of European Russia (exclusive of Poland) alone.

    0
    0
  • Out of an average of some 2,700,000 tons of pig-iron produced annually in the whole of the Russian empire, 61.5% is produced in the basin of the Donets, and out of an average of 2,160,500 tons of worked iron and steel 48.7% are prepared in the same region.

    0
    0
  • The external trade of the Russian empire (bullion and the external trade of Finland not included) since the year 1886 is shown in the following table: The exports rank in the following order :- cereals (wheat, barley, rye, oats, maize, buckwheat) and flour, 49.2%; timber and wooden wares, 7.2; petroleum, 5.8; eggs, 5.4; flax, 5; butter, 3; sugar, 2-4; cottons and oilcake, 2 each; oleaginous seeds, &c., 1.5; with hemp, spirits, poultry, game, bristles, hair, furs, leather, manganese ore, wool, caviare, live-stock, gutta-percha, vegetables and fruit, and tobacco.

    0
    0
  • At the same time the chief lines of railway which had been built by public companies with a state guarantee, and which represented a loss to the empire of £3,171,250 per annum, as well as a growing indebtedness, were bought by the state.

    0
    0
  • BE.) History The history of Russia may be conveniently divided into four consecutive periods: (I) the period of Independent Principalities; (2) the Mongol Domination; (3) the Tsardom of Muscovy; and (4) the Modern Empire.

    0
    0
  • Who were those warlike men of Ras who are universally recognized as the founders of the Russian Empire?

    0
    0
  • In short, they became a considerable power in eastern Europe, and might be regarded as one of the claimants for the inheritance of the decrepit East Roman Empire.

    0
    0
  • The principality which was to become the nucleus of the future Russian empire was not Novgorod with its democratic institutions, but its eastern neighbour Moscow, in which the popular assembly played a very insignificant part, and the supreme law was the will of the prince.

    0
    0
  • Here the commander of " the Golden Horde," as the western The section of the Mongol empire was called, fixed his Golden headquarters and represented the majesty of his Horde.

    0
    0
  • The nucleus of the invading horde was a small pastoral tribe in Mongolia, the chief of which, known subsequently to Europe as Jenghiz Khan, became a mighty conqueror and created a vast empire stretching from China, across northern and central Asia, to the shores of the Baltic and the valley of the Danube - a heterogeneous state containing many nationalities held together by purely administrative ties and by an enormous military force.

    0
    0
  • In the case of Kazan and Astrakhan the annexation was effected without any great effort in 1552-54, and two years later the Bashkirs, who had likewise formed part of the great Mongol empire, consented to pay tribute.

    0
    0
  • The Modern Empire.

    0
    0
  • - On the death of Peter (1725) the internal tranquillity and progress of the empire were again seriously threatened by the uncertainty of the order of succession, and the autocratic power which he had wielded so vigorously passed into the hands of a series of weak, indolent sovereigns who were habitually guided by personal caprice and the advice of intriguing favourites rather than by serious political considerations.

    0
    0
  • To avert the danger of a man of this type succeeding to the throne Peter made a law by which the reigning sovereign might choose his successor according to his own judgment, and two years later he caused his second wife, Catherine Catherine, the daughter of a Lithuanian peasant, to 1, be crowned with all due solemnity, " in recognition of the courageous services rendered by her to the Russian Empire."

    0
    0
  • (1740-41) II., of various nationalities, was called together at Moscow to consider the needs of the empire and the means of satisfying them.

    0
    0
  • Under Biren (1763-69) and his son and successor (1769-95), as nominees of Catherine, Courland was completely under Russian influence until 1795, when it was formally incorporated with the empire.

    0
    0
  • Ten years later the semblance of independence which was left to the khans of the Crimea was destroyed and the peninsula formally annexed to the empire.

    0
    0
  • It was intended that Russia should take what remained of the northern coast of the Black Sea, Austria should annex the Turkish provinces contiguous to her territory, the Danubian principalities and Bessarabia should be formed into an independent kingdom called Dacia, the Turks should be expelled from Europe, the Byzantine empire should be resuscitated, and the grand-duke Constantine, second son of the Russian heir-apparent, should be placed on the throne of the Palaeologi.

    0
    0
  • After proclaiming his intention of conferring on his subjects the blessings of peace, he joined in 1798 an Anglo-Austrian coalition against France; but when Austria paid more attention to her own interests than to the interests of monarchical institutions in general, and when England did not respect the independence of Malta, which he had taken under his protection, he succumbed to the artful blandishments of Napoleon and formed with him a plan for ruining the British empire by the conquest of India.

    0
    0
  • The sovereigns of Sardinia, Naples, Portugal and Spain were dethroned, the pope was driven from Rome, the Rhine Confederation was extended till France obtained a footing on the Baltic, the grand-duchy of Warsaw was reorganized and strengthened, the promised evacuation of Prussia was indefinitely postponed, an armistice between Russia and Turkey was negotiated by French diplomacy in such a way that the Russian troops should evacuate the Danubian principalities, which Alexander intended to annex to his empire, and the scheme for breaking up the Ottoman empire and ruining England by the conquest of India, which had been one of the most attractive baits in the Tilsit negotiations, but which had not been formulated in the treaty, was no longer spoken of.

    0
    0
  • The greater part of the territory was formally incorporated into the empire, and the petty potentates, such as the khan of Khiva and the amir of Bokhara, who were allowed to retain a semblance of their former sovereignty, became obsequious vassals of the White Tsar.

    0
    0
  • In the foreign policy of the empire Alexander III.

    0
    0
  • As another means of opposing Western influence in south-eastern Europe, Prince Lobanov inclined to the policy of protecting rather than weakening the Ottoman empire.

    0
    0
  • Subsequently, by obtaining from the Tsungli-Yaman a long lease of Port Arthur and Talienwan and a concession to unite those ports with the Trans-Siberian by a branch line, she tightened her hold on that portion of the Chinese empire and prepared to complete the work of aggression by so-called " spontaneous infiltration."

    0
    0
  • With great reluctance the tsar consented to convoke a consultative chamber of deputies as a sop to public opinion, but that concession stimulated rather than calmed public opinion, and shortly after the conclusion of peace the Liberals and the Revolutionaries, combining their forces, brought about a general strike in St Petersburg together with the stoppage of railway communication all over the empire.

    0
    0
  • In the former there had been a fusion between the Radicals, supporters of the autonomy of Poland and a federal constitution for the empire, and the Independence party (Osvobozhdenya) formed by political exiles at Paris in 1903, the fusion taking the name of Constitutional Democrats, known (from a word-play on the initials K.D.) as " Cadets."

    0
    0
  • solemnly opened the first Duma of the Empire.

    0
    0
  • The organs of government seemed paralysed by the repudiation of the principle on which their authority was based, and the empire to be in danger of falling into complete anarchy.

    0
    0
  • Neo-Slav dreams were now replaced by a passionate desire to consolidate the Russian empire on a purely Russian basis.

    0
    0
  • In Russia itself the first great history of the Russian empire was that of N.

    0
    0
  • Munro, Rise of the Russian Empire (Boston, 1900); F.

    0
    0
  • If the Asiatic portions of the Russian Empire were given in the same table, the total Russian mileage would appear nearly as large as that of Germany and Italy together.

    0
    0
  • The problem of the early railway builders in the United States was to conquer the wilderness, to build an empire, and at the same time to bind the East to the West and the North to the South.

    0
    0
  • The number of persons killed on the railways of the German Empire in the year 1907 was 1249, classified as in Table XVII.

    0
    0
  • As a separate state it dates only from about 1730, the time of the dismemberment of the Mogul empire.

    0
    0
  • He devised the plan of persuading the viceroy of Portuguese India to despatch an embassy to China, in whose train he might enter, despite the law which then excluded foreigners from that empire.

    0
    0
  • He strove, with a success disastrous to the Portuguese empire, to convert the government in Goa into a proselytizing agency.

    0
    0
  • With the uninhabited dependency of South Georgia Island, to the E.S.E., they form the most southerly colony of the British empire.

    0
    0
  • An attempt by Otto in 1215 to recover Northalbingia was easily frustrated by Valdemar, who henceforth devoted himself to the extension of the Danish empire over the eastern Baltic shores.

    0
    0
  • But this scattered and heterogeneous empire required a large standing army and a strong central government to hold it together.

    0
    0
  • Ramsay, The Church in the Roman Empire (London, 1894); A.

    0
    0
  • He was the real founder of the Parthian empire, which was of very limited extent until the final decay of the Seleucid empire, occasioned by the Roman intrigues after the death of Antiochus IV.

    0
    0
  • The Arsacidian empire was overthrown in A.D.

    0
    0
  • 226 by Ardashir (Artaxerxes), the founder of the Sassanid empire, whose conquests began about A.D.

    0
    0
  • ANTOINE PERRENOT GRANVELLA, CARDINAL DE (1517-1586), one of the ablest and most influential of the princes of the church during the great political and ecclesiastical movements which immediately followed the appearance of Protestantism in Europe, was born on the 20th of August 1517 at Besancon, where his father, Nicolas Perrenot de Granvella (1484-1550), who afterwards became chancellor of the empire under Charles V., was practising as a lawyer.

    0
    0
  • In his episcopal capacity he attended several diets of the empire, as well as the opening meetings of the council of Trent; and the influence of his father, now chancellor, led to his being entrusted with many difficult and delicate pieces of public business, in the execution of which he developed a rare talent for diplomacy, and at the same time acquired an intimate acquaintance with most of the currents of European politics.

    0
    0
  • From the middle of the 13th century onward the bishops were princes of the Empire.

    0
    0
  • PEKING, or Pekin, the capital of the Chinese Empire, situated in 39° 57' N.

    0
    0
  • In the eastern and western portions of this city are situated the residences of the highest dignitaries of the empire; while beyond its confines on the south stand the offices of the six of f icial boards which direct the affairs of the eighteen provinces.

    0
    0
  • He sought to vanquish,., but was himself vanquished by, the new religious force which was making such rapid inroads on the decaying paganism of the Roman empire.

    0
    0
  • He also read largely, though somewhat indiscriminately, in French literature, and appears to have been particularly struck with Pascal's Provincial Letters, which he tells us he reperused almost every year of his subsequent life with new pleasure, and which he particularly mentions as having been, along with Bleterie's Life of Julian and Giannone's History of Naples, a book which probably contributed in a special sense to form the historian of the Roman empire.

    0
    0
  • The author designates the story of the later empire at Constantinople (after Heraclius) as " a uniform tale of weakness and misery," a judgment which is entirely false; and in accordance with this doctrine, he makes the empire, which is his proper subject, merely a string for connecting great movements which affected it, such as the Saracen conquests, the Crusades, the Mongol invasions, the Turkish conquests.

    0
    0
  • Thus the later part of the Decline and Fall, while the narrative of certain episodes will always be read with profit, does not convey a true idea of the history of the empire or of its significance in the history of Europe.

    0
    0
  • It must be added that the pages on the Slavonic peoples and their relations to the empire are conspicuously insufficient; but it must be taken into account that it was not till many years after Gibbon's death that Slavonic history began to receive due attention, in consequence of the rise of competent scholars among the Sla y s themselves.

    0
    0
  • He rightly insisted on the facilities of communication created by the Roman empire, but did not emphasize the diffusion of Judaism.

    0
    0
  • That admiration for an empire of more than two hundred millions of men, where not one had the right to call himself free; that effeminate philosophy which has more praise for luxury and pleasures than for all the virtues; that style always elegant and never energetic, reveal at the most the elector of Hanover's slave."

    0
    0
  • He enlarges, as it was his business to do, on the tranquillity and prosperity of the empire in that period, but he does not fail to place his finger on the want of political liberty as a fatal defect.

    0
    0
  • This later prosperity lasted most of the empire.

    0
    0
  • Soon afterwards the country was incorporated into the Syrian empire and then into the kingdom of Pergamum.

    0
    0
  • shore of San Francisco Bay, named after Bishop Berkeley on account of his line "Westward the course of empire takes its way."

    0
    0
  • Among the tombs many of the poorer under the Empire were simply formed of amphorae, in which the body was placed.

    0
    0
  • From this date (404) to the fall of the Western Empire in 476 Ravenna was the chief residence of the Roman emperors.

    0
    0
  • Nine years after the death of Theodoric Justinian sent an army to destroy the Gothic monarchy and restore Italy to the empire.

    0
    0
  • Long after the Goths had lost Rome they still clung to Ravenna, till at length, weary of the feebleness of their own king, Vitiges, and struck with admiration of their heroic conqueror, they offered to transfer their allegiance to Belisarius on condition of his assuming the diadem of the Western Empire.

    0
    0
  • Thus in the year 539 was Ravenna re-united to the Roman empire.

    0
    0
  • Its connexion with that empire - or, in other words, its dependence upon Constantinople - lasted for more than 200 years, during which period, under the rule of Narses and his successors the exarchs, Ravenna was the seat of Byzantine dominion in Italy.

    0
    0
  • LAN - CHOW-FU, the chief town of the Chinese province of Kan-suh, and one of the most important cities of the interior part of the empire, on the right bank of the Hwang-ho.

    0
    0
  • But his ambition was by no means satisfied, and he even aspired to the crown of the East Roman empire.

    0
    0
  • The invasion of France by the German armies during the war of 1870-71 attracted his attention to the Germanic invasions under the Roman Empire.

    0
    0
  • During the commonwealth and empire aes grave was used to denote the old as in contradistinction to the existing depreciated coin; while aes rude was applied to the original oblong coinage of primitive times.

    0
    0
  • The problem is one of great practical importance, especially to the trative British Empire.

    0
    0
  • be equivalent to the addition of vast and valuable areas to the empire.

    0
    0
  • It was chiefly owing to him that the building up of the internal institutions of the empire was carried on without the open breach between Bismarck and the parliament, which was often imminent.

    0
    0
  • During the Roman Empire it formed part of Noricum and Pannonia.

    0
    0
  • At the end of that year, after the rising of Vienna and capture of the city by Windischgratz, it was clearly desirable that there should be a more vigorous ruler at the head of the empire, and:

    0
    0
  • Hungary, deprived of her ancient constitution, became an integral part of the Austrian empire.

    0
    0
  • In order to meet the universal discontent and the financial difficulties constitutional government was introduced; a parliament was established in which all races of the empire were represented, and in place of centralized despotism was established Liberal centralization under Schmerling and the German Liberals.

    0
    0
  • The momentary effect was immense; for some of the halo of the Holy Empire still clung round the head of the house of Habsburg, and Francis Joseph was welcomed to the ancient free city with enthusiasm.

    0
    0
  • The German empire and the Italian kingdom had been built up out of the ruins of immemorial Habsburg ambitions; yet he refused to be drawn into an alliance with France in 1869 and 1870, and became the mainstay of the Triple Alliance of Austria-Hungary, Germany and Italy.

    0
    0
  • The value of this external evidence for the history of Israel is enhanced by the fact that biblical tradition associates the changes in the thrones of Israel and Damascus with the work of the prophets Elijah and Elisha, but handles the period without a single reference to the Assyrian Empire.

    0
    0
  • Either in the natural course of events - to preserve the unity of his empire - or influenced by the rich presents of gold and silver with which Ahaz accompanied his appeal for help, Tiglathpileser intervened with campaigns against Philistia (734 B.C.) and Damascus (733-732).

    0
    0
  • The part played by Egypt proper in the ensuing anti-Assyrian combinations is not clearly known; with a number of petty dynasts fomenting discontent and revolt, there was an absence -of cohesion in that ancient empire previous to the rise of the Ethiopian dynasty.

    0
    0
  • Also, the revolt which broke out in the Persian provinces at this juncture may have extended to Palestine; although) the usurper Darius encountered his most serious opposition in the north and north-east of his empire.

    0
    0
  • With the growing weakness of the Persian empire Egypt reasserted its independence for a time.

    0
    0
  • 13 Bagoses gave a set-back to the revival of the Persian Empire.

    0
    0
  • At a time when all nationalities, and at the same time all bonds of religion and national customs, were beginning to be broken up in the seeming cosmos and real chaos of the Graeco-Roman Empire, the Jews stood out like a rock in the midst of the ocean.

    0
    0
  • It ends with the destruction of Jerusalem by the armies of the Roman Empire, which was, like Alexander, at once the masterful pupil and the docile patron of Hellenism.

    0
    0
  • His death prevented the achievement of his designs; but he had broken down the barrier, he had planted the seed of the Greek's influence in the four quarters of the Persian Empire.

    0
    0
  • As a part of the Persian Empire the community was obscure and unimportant.

    0
    0
  • The sequel shows how a Jew might rise to power in the civil service of the Egyptian Empire and yet remain a hero to some of the Jews - provided that he did not intermarry with a Gentile.

    0
    0
  • The more orthodox or conservative Jews preferred the tolerant rule of the Ptolemies: the rest, who chafed at the isolation of the nation, looked to the Seleucids, who inherited Alexander's ideal of a united empire based on a universal adoption of Hellenism.

    0
    0
  • But the fact that he summoned five vassal-kings of the empire to a conference at Tiberias suggests rather a policy of self-aggrandisement.

    0
    0
  • Apart from these local outbreaks, the Jews throughout the empire remained loyal citizens and were not molested.

    0
    0
  • The Later Empire.

    0
    0
  • Under the constitution of Caracalla (198-217) all inhabitants of the Roman empire enjoyed the civil rights of the Cives Romani (Scherer, Die Rechtsverhaltnisse der Juden, p. Io).

    0
    0
  • There were Jews in the Byzantine empire, in Rome, in France and Spain at very early periods, but it is with the Arab conquest of Spain that the Jews of Europe began to rival in culture and importance their brethren of the Persian gaonate.

    0
    0
  • (1780-1790) inaugurated a new era for the Jews of his empire.

    0
    0
  • Of this total there were in the British Empire about 380,000 Jews (British Isles 240,000, London accounts for 150,000 of these; Canada and British Columbia 60,000; India 18,000; South Africa 40,000).

    0
    0
  • Under the empire, however, the whole district remained backward and was remarkable for the absence of important towns, as the scarcity of ancient inscriptions, both.

    0
    0
  • From the 6th century, after the fall of the Ostrogothic power, and the establishment of that of Byzantium in its place in south Italy, the name Calabria was applied to the whole of the south Italian possessions of the Eastern empire, and the name-of the Brittii entirely disappeared; and after the eastern peninsula (the ancient Calabria) had been taken by the Lombards about A.D.

    0
    0
  • The famous declaration read by Gramont in the Chamber on the 6th of July, the "threat with the hand on the sword-hilt," as Bismarck called it, was the joint work of the whole cabinet; the original draft presented by Gramont was judged to be too "elliptical" in its conclusion and not sufficiently vigorous; the reference to a revival of the empire of Charles V.

    0
    0
  • This more primitive phase of the indigenous culture, of which several distinct stages are traceable, is known as the Early Minoan, and roughly corresponds with the first half of the third millennium B.C. The succeeding period, to which the first palaces are due and to which the name of Middle Minoan is appropriately given, roughly coincides with the Middle Empire of Egypt.

    0
    0
  • The succeeding Late Minoan period, best illustrated by the later palace at Cnossus and that at Hagia Triada, corresponds in Egypt with the Hyksos period and the earlier part of the New Empire.

    0
    0
  • The powerful fleet and maritime empire which Minos was said to have established will no doubt receive fuller illustration when the sea-town of Cnossus comes to be explored.

    0
    0
  • Cretan enterprise in the days of the New Egyptian empire is illustrated by repeated finds of Late Minoan pottery on Egyptian sites.

    0
    0