Eminence sentence example

eminence
  • People with eminence are highly regarded in their respective fields.
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  • On an eminence stands the ancient castle, entered by a gateway of the 13th century.
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  • Here he rose rapidly to eminence both at the bar and in politics.
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  • He got rid of all whom he disliked on the charge of having taken part in the conspiracy, and no man of eminence was safe against him.
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  • Avlona occupies an eminence near the Gulf of Avlona, an inlet of the Adriatic, almost surrounded by mountains.
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  • With old age, the man was regarded to have eminence in wisdom.
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  • The town is built on a rocky eminence on the right bank of the Steine.
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  • Romans stands on an eminence on the right bank of the Isere, a fine stone result will be the inclusion of all Israel in the heritage of the messianic kingdom of Christ.
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  • The man with scientific eminence won the Nobel Prize last year.
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  • It is beautifully situated on a steep eminence rising abruptly from the Blackwater.
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  • His extensive knowledge, combined with great oratorical powers, raised him to eminence both in Athens and in Rome.
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  • It is well situated, mainly on an eminence, near the junction of the Aire and the Calder.
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  • His father, a physician of some eminence, settled in Florence, and attached himself to the person of Cosimo de' Medici.
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  • Despite the low expectations the community had for her, Emily went to a prestigious university and achieved eminence in the medical field.
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  • It occupies a slight eminence, crowned by the ruins of a Moorish castle, and overlooking the Guadiana.
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  • It is beautifully situated on an eminence 200 ft.
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  • When the state began to honor their representative with respect, he gained political eminence across the nation.
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  • Innocent was a canon lawyer of some eminence.
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  • It stands on a commanding olive-clad eminence 1785 ft.
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  • of Belfast on a branch of the Great Northern railway, standing on an eminence.
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  • Bagdad, accordingly, although fallen from its first eminence, continued to be a city of the first rank, and during most of that period still the richest and most splendid city in the world.
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  • No other writer of such eminence is so rarely quoted; none is so entirely destitute of the tribute of new and splendid editions.
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  • He became grand officer of the Legion of Honour in 1861, and during the later years of his life received from many quarters public recognition of his eminence as a political economist.
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  • It lies on a gentle eminence in the flat fen country, and the fine Perpendicular tower and spire of the church of St Mary are a landmark from far.
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  • It is pleasantly situated on a gentle eminence near the confluence of the upper branches of the river Stour.
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  • Chinon lies at the foot of the rocky eminence which is crowned by the ruins of the famous castle.
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  • Adopting the profession of an advocate, he came to Constantinople and practised in the prefectural courts there, reaching such eminence as to attract the notice of the emperor Justinian, who appointed him in 528 one of the ten commissioners directed to prepare the first Codex of imperial constitutions.
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  • Its eminence, however, was so largely based upon dalliance with Roman society, its weakness so great in having only a mythical character, instead of a personality, as an object of adoration, and in excluding women from its privileges, that it fell rapidly before the assaults of Christianity.
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  • The parish church, effectively situated on an eminence by the side of the lake, was the scene of the ministration of the Rev. John Thomson (1778-1840), the landscape painter, who numbered Sir Walter Scott among his elders.
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  • The town-hall, a large florid building of Classic order, stands on an eminence, and its clock tower forms a landmark; it contains the spacious Centennial Hall (commemorating the first Australian colonization here in 1787), and has one of the finest organs in the world.
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  • He supported the government in its attempts to subdue by legislation the Socialists, Poles and Catholics; and he was one of the few men of eminence who gave the sanction of his name to the attacks on the Jews which began in 1878.
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  • He is said to have owed the favour of the great as much to his personal gifts and graces as to his literary eminence; and in one of his prologues he declares it to be his ambition, while not offending the many, to please the "boni."
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  • The original city grew up on the site of the City of London of the present day, on a slight eminence intersected by the Walor Wall-brook, and flanked on the west by the river Fleet.
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  • Among the public buildings are several churches and hospitals (including the Jurujuba yellow-fever hospital and the Barreto isolation hospital), the government palace, a municipal theatre and a large Salesian college situated in the suburbs of Santa Rosa on an eminence overlooking the lower bay.
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  • It occupies a fine position on and about a rocky eminence on the left bank of the river Wye.
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  • JEBEIL (anc. Gebal-Byblus), a town of Syria pleasantly situated on a slight eminence near the sea, about 20 m.
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  • His eminence as a man of science must be measured by his only original work in that department, - the construction, namely, of the new science of society.
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  • The power of the priesthood rests upon special knowledge of man and nature; but to this intellectual eminence must also be added moral power and a certain greatness of character, without which force of intellect and completeness of attainment will not receivethe confidence they ought to inspire.
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  • In the field of landscape the Japanese painter fully reached the eminence on which his great Chinese masters stood.
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  • Ozui and Ojyu, the sons of OkyO, painted in the style of their father, but failed to attain great eminence.
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  • Nearly in the centre of Kojimachi-ku, on an eminence, surrounded by moats, stood the castle of Yedo, formerly the residence of the shoguns, which was burnt down in 1873.
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  • The castle, lying on a rocky eminence, is remarkable for the peace signed here on the 22nd of April 1745 between the elector Maximilian III., Joseph of Bavaria and Maria Theresa.
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  • In this way a question of the most temporary interest, concerning an individual of no particular eminence or importance, has produced one of the most impressive vindications of literature ever spoken or written.
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  • Berkeley Castle, on an eminence south-east of the town, is one of the noblest baronial castles existing in England, and one of the few inhabited.
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  • From 1748 until his death on the 28th of August 1805 he was minister at Inveresk in Midlothian, and during this long career rose to high eminence in his church not only as leader of the moderate or "broad" Church section, but as moderator of the General Assembly 1770 and dean of the Chapel Royal in 1789.
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  • Chaumont is picturesquely situated on an eminence between the rivers Marne and Suize in the angle formed by their confluence.
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  • On a rocky eminence, 1300 ft.
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  • Three miles from Zwolle, on a slight eminence called the Agnietenberg, or hill of St Agnes, once stood the Augustinian convent in which Thomas Kempis spent the greatest part of his life and died in 1471.
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  • In 1873 President Grant nominated him for chief justice of the United States, but in spite of his great learning and eminence at the bar, his ante-war record and the feeling of distrust experienced by many members of the senate on account of his inconsistency, aroused such vigorous opposition that his nomination was soon withdrawn.
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  • Garrick was surrounded by many players of eminence, and he had the art, as he was told by Mrs Clive, " of contradicting the proverb that one cannot make bricks without straw, by doing what is infinitely more difficult, making actors and actresses without genius."
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  • The influence of the Swabian branch of the Hohenzollerns was weakened by several partitions of its lands; but early in the 16th century it rose to some eminence through Count Eitel Frederick II.
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  • It has on one side the citadel, erected on an artificially made eminence 45 ft.
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  • He attained to some eminence as a painter, and his Digte show him to have been a true poet.
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  • He was perhaps the first Roman born beyond the Alps who attained eminence in literature.
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  • A grammar-school was founded at Midhurst in 1672 and attained some eminence.
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  • It is picturesquely situated on an eminence, two sides of which are touched by the river Nene, which here makes a deep bend.
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  • The fortress of Graudenz, which since 1873 has been used as a barracks and a military depot and prison, is situated on a steep eminence about 12 m.
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  • On an eminence in the western part of the city are the ruins of a large square citadel with a small whitewashed building, called Molud Khaneh (the house of birth), in which Fath Ali Shah was born (1772).
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  • The views of the river valley from this eminence are exceedingly fine.
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  • Mulligan (1830-1864) throwing up intrenchments on Masonic College Hill, an eminence adjoining Lexington on the N.E.
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  • It is beautifully situated on an eminence near the confluence of the Wear and the Gaunless.
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  • At the foot of the grey limestone mass of Mount Mitzekeli (1500 ft.), which forms part of the fine range of hills running north from the Gulf of Arta, there lies a valley (the Hellopia of antiquity) partly occupied by a lake; and the city is built on the slopes of a slight eminence, stretching down to the western shore.
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  • He came of an intellectual stock, his grandfather and father having both been physicians of eminence and professors of one or other of the branches of medical science; his mother too belonged to a family not undistinguished in intellectual power.
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  • The church of St Mary the Virgin rises on an eminence on the outskirts of the town.
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  • Close by, on an eminence, lie the ruins of the castle of Birkenfeld, dating from the 14th century, once the residence of the counts palatine of Zweibrucken.
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  • Close by, on an eminence above the river, lies the castle of Oranienstein, formerly a Benedictine nunnery and now a cadet school, with beautiful gardens.
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  • Nor is this eminence merely due to his great opportunity in 1870; for Guizot might under Louis Philippe have almost made himself a French Walpole, at least a French Palmerston, and Lamartine's opportunities after 1848 were, for a man of political genius, illimitable.
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  • His most important work, the Athenae Cantabrigienses (1858, 1861), a companion work to the famous Athenae Oxonienses of Anthony a Wood, contains biographical memoirs of the authors and other men of eminence who were educated at the university of Cambridge from 1500 to 1609.
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  • Of these the most important is the Stanislaus cathedral, in Gothic style, consecrated in 1359, and built on the Wawel, the rocky eminence to the S.W.
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  • Nevertheless, in most states the bench is respectable in point of character, while in some it is occasionally adorned by men of the highest eminence.
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  • Above the Rosenlunds canal rises a low, rocky eminence, Lilla Otterhalleberg.
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  • For a number of years the firm furnished meridian circles to the observatories at Hamburg, Konigsberg, Pulkova, &c.; later on its activity declined, while Pistor and Martins of Berlin rose to eminence.
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  • It is situated on a slight eminence (210 ft.) near the Ombrone, one of the tributaries of the Arno.
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  • CRITOLAUS, Greek philosopher, was born at Phaselis in the 2nd century B.C. He lived to the age of eighty-two and died probably before 111 B.C. He studied philosophy under Aristo of Ceos and became one of the leaders of the Peripatetic school by his eminence as an orator, a scholar and a moralist.
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  • The Roman Catholic archiepiscopal theological college, beautifully situated on an eminence overlooking the Rhine, dates from 1892.
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  • Among the public buildings are the parish church, the tower of which, standing on a commanding eminence, is a conspicuous landmark.
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  • It was rebuilt in 1819 on an eminence overlooking one of the main entrances into the town, and is capable of accommodating loo resident pupils.
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  • The ruins of its old Norman castle stand on an eminence 9 05 ft.
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  • It is probable, however, that in the case of Thales the appellation " wise man," which was given to him and to the other six in the archonship of Damasius (586 B.C.), 1 was conferred on him not only on account of his political sagacity, but also for his scientific eminence (Plut.
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  • - Whilst in virtue of his political sagacity and intellectual eminence Thales held a place in the traditional list of the wise men, on the strength of the disinterested love of knowledge which appeared in his physical speculations he was accounted a " philosopher " (g5tX6v000s).
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  • From his time to that of Anselm no teacher of equal eminence arose in the Church.
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  • Hume's eminence in the fields of philosophy and history must not be allowed to obscure his importance as a political economist.
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  • Except at the landingplace on the south-east, the cliffs rise sheer out of deep water, and on the north-east side the highest eminence in the island, Conagher, forms a precipice 1220 ft.
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  • It is strongly placed on an eminence falling almost sheer on three sides.
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  • This eminence is itself due to an outflow of lava from that mountain, during some previous eruption in prehistoric times, for we know from Strabo that Vesuvius had been quiescent ever since the first records of the Greek settlements in this part of Italy.
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  • Its seaward fortifications rise directly from the water's edge, one fort, on the north mole, standing boldly on a tall rock almost isolated by a little inlet of the Adriatic. On the landward side a massive round tower dominates the city from a still higher eminence.
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  • His future eminence as a poet was foretold when a nightingale perched upon his lips and sang (Pliny, Nat.
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  • To the same period belong a few prose writers of eminence.
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  • The romantic movement culminated in several poets of great eminence, whose deaths prepared the way for a new school.
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  • He promulgated the famous bull In Coena Domini in its final form, 1627; published the latest revision of the Breviary, 1631; founded the College of the Propaganda for the education of missionaries, 1627; and accorded the title of "eminence" to the cardinals, 1630.
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  • He refused to support Mr Gladstone's Home Rule Bill in 1885, and was one of those who chiefly contributed to its rejection, and whose reputation for unbending integrity and intellectual eminence gave solidity to the Liberal Unionist party.
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  • The great cities of Flanders also, with their world-wide commerce and longestablished eminence in the arts, presented aspects of more splendid civic pomp and luxury.
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  • It is beautifully situated at the junction of the rivers Teme and Corve, upon and about a wooded eminence crowned by a massive ruined castle.
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  • It is interesting for its high antiquity and the ruined castle, a fortress on an eminence where a neck of land ends, projecting into the sea.
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  • He was among the intimate personal friends of Newton, and his eminence and abilities secured his admission into the Royal Society of London in 1697, and afterwards into the Academies of Berlin and Paris.
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  • Seen from an eminence on their surface, the inference is irresistible that these plateaus are fragments of the original tableland, trenched into segments by the formation of the longitudinal and transverse valleys.
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  • When two thinkers of such eminence (probably the two greatest ethical thinkers of antiquity) have arrived independently at this strange"--conclusion, have agreed in ascribing to cravings, felt in this life, so great, and to us so inconceivable, a power over the future life, we may well hesitate before we condemn the idea as intrinsically absurd, and we may take note of the important fact that, given similar conditions, similar stages in the development of religious belief, men's thoughts, even in spite of the most unquestioned individual originality, tend though they may never produce exactly the same results, to work in similar ways.
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  • It is pleasantly situated in a hilly district to the east of Clun Forest, climbing the flank and occupying the summit of an eminence.
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  • ATHELNEY, a slight eminence of small extent in the low level tract about the junction of the rivers Tone and Parrett in Somersetshire, England.
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  • On the south-western side of this square, which contains a monument to the elector Frederick Charles Joseph of Mainz (1719-1802), is the Domberg, an eminence on which stand, side by side, the cathedral and the great church of St Severus with its three spires (14th century).
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  • Laibach is an episcopal see, and possesses a cathedral in the Italian style, several beautiful churches, a town hall in Renaissance style and a castle, built in the 15th century, on the Schlossberg, an eminence which commands the town.
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  • It is pleasantly situated on a gentle eminence, in a fertile and richly cultivated district.
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  • In 1798 he was called to the bar of Ireland, and rose before long to the very highest eminence among contemporary lawyers and advocates.
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  • By this time O'Connell had attained a position of great eminence in the House of Commons: as a debater he stood in the very first rank, though he had entered St Stephen's after fifty; and his oratory, massive and strong in argument, although too often scurrilous and coarse, and marred by a bearing in which cringing flattery and rude bullying were strangely blended, made a powerful, if not a pleasing, impression.
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  • The right bank of the Moselle is bordered for some distance by pleasant promenades, and an extensive park surrounds the ruins of an old stronghold which dominated the Grande Ville from an eminence on the east.
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  • Befriended by Bunsen and Humboldt, Lepsius threw himself with great ardour into Egyptological studies, which, since the death of Champollion in 1832, had attracted no scholar of eminence and weight.
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  • He was educated at Milan by his uncle, Antonio, himself a scholar and a poet of eminence, and afterwards at Rome and Padua.
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  • of the harbour entrance; the Castillo de Los Tres Reyes del Morro and San Carlos de la Cabana, to the E.; the Santo Domingo de Atares, at the head of the western arm of the bay, commanding the city and its vicinity; and the Castillo del Principe (1767-1780), situated inland on an eminence to the W.
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  • The term Euboea did not designate the eminence upon which the Heraeum is placed, or the mountain-top behind the Heraeum only, but, as Pausanias distinctly indicates, the group of foothills of the hilly district adjoining the mountain.
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  • But Petau's eminence chiefly rests on his vast, but unfinished, De theologicis dogmatibus, the first systematic attempt ever made to treat the development of Christian doctrine from the historical point of view.
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  • This family, four of whose members are noticed specially below, did not achieve more than municipal eminence until the time of M.
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  • It occupies an eminence on the right bank of the Spree, 680 ft.
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  • The Kesselberg (1310 ft.), near the town of Neustadt, is the chief eminence.
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  • MONTELEONE CALABRO, a city of Calabria, Italy, in the province of Catanzaro, beautifully situated on an eminence gently sloping towards the Gulf of Sta Eufemia, 1575 ft.
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  • ARNSBERG, a town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Westphalia, romantically situated on an eminence almost surrounded by the river Ruhr, 44 m.
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  • The appearance of the violinist Paganini in Paris, 1831, marks the starting-point of the supreme eminence Liszt ultimately attained as a virtuoso.
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  • Thessaly, Boeotia and Mycenae have equal claims. It seems clearer that when once this local variety of Achaean had been used by poets of eminence as their vehicle for national history, it established its right to be considered the one poetical language of Hellas.
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  • He already saw the scarlet of a cardinal awaiting him, and to this eminence he would assuredly have risen.
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  • Descended from a family which had attained some legal eminence in the time of the Commonwealth, John Keble, the father of the poet, was vicar of Coln St Aldwyn, but lived at Fairford, about 3 m.
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  • The cities of Strassburg, Nuremberg, Augsburg, Basel, became centres of learned coteries, which gathered round scholars like Wimpheling, Brant, Peutinger, Schedel, and Pirckheimer, artists like Darer and Holbein, printers of the eminence of Froben.
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  • The Spanish drama, meanwhile, untrammelled by those false canons of pseudo-classic taste which fettered the theatre in Italy and afterwards in France, rose to an eminence in the hands of Lope de Vega and Calderon which only the English, and the English only in the masterpieces of three or four playwrights, can rival.
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  • several Italian painters of eminence visited France.
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  • But no Englishmen rose to European eminence in these departments.
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  • As a dignitary of the Roman Catholic Church, Cardinal HergenrOther is inevitably biased against Photius as an ecclesiastic, but his natural candour and sympathy with intellectual eminence have made him just to the man.
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  • Talmud did not attain the eminence of the sister recension, and survives in a very incomplete form, although it was perhaps once fuller.
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  • In so far as tribal eminence depends on superior skill or courage or wisdom, the germs of ethical differentiation may be discovered even here.
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  • of Tiflis, on an isolated rocky eminence, 3865 ft.
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  • Drottningsgatan terminates at the observatory, on a rocky eminence, near which are the offices for the distribution of the Nobel fund.
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  • On an eminence, which dominates the town, is situated the old castle, formerly the seat of the counts of Gerz, now partly used as barracks.
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  • Spinoza received his first training under the senior rabbi, Saul Levi Morteira, and Manasseh ben Israel, a theological writer of some eminence whose works show considerable knowledge of philosophical authors.
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  • At a time when Western Europe was rich in men of wide knowledge and intellectual eminence, he gained so high a reputation that he was described by Vincent de Beauvais as Philosophus Anglorum.
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  • Among the epistles of Gay, one rises to an eminence of merit, that called "Mr Pope's welcome from Greece," written in 1720.
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  • The town lies on an eminence, on the shores of Warrnambool Bay, in a rich pastoral and agricultural district.
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  • On an eminence east-south-east of Argostoli are the ruins of the ancient Cranii, and Lixouri is close to or upon those of Pale; while on the other side of the island are the remains of Samos on the bay of the same name, of Proni or Pronni, farther south above the vale of Rakli and its blossoming oleanders, and of an unknown city near the village of Scala.
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  • It has also been borne by two scholars of extraordinary eminence.
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  • It is this which places Scaliger on so immeasurably higher an eminence than any of his contemporaries.
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  • His brother William, who by this time held the Camden professorship of ancient history, and enjoyed an extensive acquaintance with men of eminence in London, was in a position materially to advance his interests.
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  • Hardly a single Stoic of eminence was a citizen of any city in the heart of Greece, unless we make Aristo of Chios, Cleanthes of Assus and Panaetius of Rhodes exceptions.
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  • Among men of eminence buried here are Alexander Pope and Sir Godfrey Kneller.
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  • In the early church three bishops stood forth prominently, principally from the political eminence of the cities in which they ruled - the bishops of Rome, Alexandria and Antioch.
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  • A short distance south of the Chandni Chauk the Jama Masjid, or Great Mosque, rises boldly from a small rocky eminence.
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  • It is situated at the confluence of the Steyr with the Enns, and on an eminence rises the castle of the princes of Lamberg, dating from the 10th century.
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  • On the Martinsberg, an eminence near the town, stands the ruins of the old castle of the Tarnowski family, and a small church over Boo years old.
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  • Montluc's eminence above other soldiers of his day is due to his Commentaires de Messire Blaise de Montluc (Bordeaux, 1592), in which he described his fifty years of service (1521-1574).
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  • The shallow inlet of Poole Bay is followed by the eminence of St Alban's Head, and thereafter, right round the south-western promontory of England, the cliff-bound coast, with its bays and inlets closely beset with hills, predominates over the low shore-line, exhibits a remarkable series of different forms, and provides the finest scenery of its kind in England.
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  • The palace of the dukes of Anhalt, standing on an eminence, contains a library and collections of various kinds, including a good picture gallery.
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  • The title of Lucian's most famous collection was borrowed in the i 7th century by two French writers of eminence, each of whom prepared Dialogues des morts.
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  • Amboise owes its celebrity to the imposing ch�au which overlooks the Loire from the rocky eminence above the town.
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  • It lies on a slight eminence in a fertile tract called the Vale of Aylesbury, which extends northward from the foot of the Chiltern Hills.
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  • The title "chief rabbi" has become well known through the eminence of recent occupants of the position such as Solomon Hirsch ell (1762-1842).
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  • in the 12th century on an eminence on the other side of the railway.
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  • took steps to raise it in importance, but the school owes its present eminence to Queen Elizabeth, who is commemorated as the foundress at a Latin commemoration service held periodically in the Abbey, where, moreover, the daily school service is held.
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  • Very seldom was he during that time mentioned with respect by any writer of great literary eminence.
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  • It is situated on the slopes and the summit of an eminence on the left bank of the Yonne, which is crossed by two bridges leading to suburbs on the right bank.
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  • The residence of the prince is the Heidecksburg, a palace on an eminence 200 ft.
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  • It is built on an eminence (1150 ft.), and has two public parks, a substantial court-house, a soldiers' and sailors' memorial building, a public library, a hospital and many fine residences.
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  • By his great energy and the political connexions that he formed as a leader of the Young Turks he rose to military eminence in the Turkish service.
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  • On an eminence east of Castle Street are the military barracks.
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  • His brothers Angelus (1328-1407) and Petrus (1335-1400) were of almost equal eminence with himself as jurists.
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  • that the count rose to eminence, and under the latter monarch he became "the first;among the counsellors of the king."
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  • He graduated at Harvard in 1798, was admitted to the bar at Salem, Mass., in 1801, and soon attained eminence in his profession.
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  • The unsettled times in which his youth was passed necessitated his frequent change of residence, but care was nevertheless taken that his education should not be interrupted, and he also acquired, through his journeys in foreign states (Switzerland 1818, Montenegro 1838, England and Scotland 1844) and his intercourse with men of eminence, a special taste for art and for natural science.
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  • It is one of the signs of Burke's singular and varied eminence that hardly any two people agree precisely which of his works to mark as the masterpiece.
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  • On a wooded eminence to the south of the town lies the observatory with extensive premises.
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  • The castle crowning the eminence is of unknown age, but from the time that Alexander I.
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  • St John (pop. about 10,000), the capital, situated on the north-west, is an exceedingly picturesque town, built on an eminence overlooking one of the most beautiful harbours in the West Indies.
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  • Kallay was an honorary member of the Budapest and Vienna academies of science, and attained some eminence as a writer.
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  • This way of solving, or passing over, the ultimate problems of thought has had many followers in cultured circles imbued with the new physical science of the day, and with disgust for the dogmatic creeds of contemporary orthodoxy; and its outspoken and even aggressive vindication by physicists of the eminence of Huxley had a potent influence upon the attitude taken towards metaphysics, and upon the form which subsequent Christian apologetics adopted.
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  • It made most havoc in the flower of the nation, since every kind of eminence marked men for death.
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  • On an eminence above it lie the ruins of the castle of Dillenburg, founded by Count Henry the Rich of Nassau, about the year 12J5, and the birthplace of Prince William of Orange (1533).
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  • The town stands on an eminence on the left bank of the Stour.
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  • Strassburg soon became one of the most flourishing of the imperial towns, and the names of natives or residents like Sebastian` Brant, Johann Tauler and Geiler von Kaisersberg show that its eminence was intellectual as well as material.
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  • QUEENSTOWN (formerly [[Cove Of Cork]]), a seaport, wateringplace, and naval station of county Cork, Ireland, picturesquely situated on the south side of Great Island, on the slope of an eminence rising abruptly above Cork Harbour.
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  • The eminence called Barrhill (480 ft.
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  • The development of higher education, without a corresponding advance of technical education, has created an intellectual class, comprising many men of letters, and several painters, musicians and sculptors, though none of great eminence; it also tends to produce many aspirants to official or professional careers, who find employment difficult to obtain.
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  • Antoine de Buade, seigneur de Frontenac, grandfather of the future governor of Canada, attained eminence as a councillor of state under Henri IV.; and his children were brought up with the dauphin, afterwards Louis XIII.
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  • Only one of its latter-day disciples, however, rose to real eminence; this was the Abbe Henri Gregoire, who played a considerable part in the French Revolution.
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  • His influence was due partly to his astronomical and mathematical eminence, but still more to the ascetic dignity of his nature and his superiority to ordinary weaknesses - traits which legend has embalmed.
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  • Even up to the present day men of intellectual eminence like Dr Richard Garnett have convinced themselves that astromancy has a foundation of truth, just as there are still believers in chiromancy or other forms of divination.
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  • Since Plumulites appears to be a synonym of Turrilepas (not Turrilepis), the species Turrilepas wrightii (Woodward, 1865), from the Upper Silurian of Dudley, did not long enjoy an isolated eminence as the oldest known cirripede.
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  • They form his most considerable work, and assure him a position of eminence in the economic history of France.
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  • Four miles west lies the Kolmberg, the highest eminence in the north of Saxony.
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  • Here Menasseh rose to eminence not only as a rabbi and an author, but also as a printer.
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  • Rising to a height of 368 ft., this magnificent building is loftier than St Paul's Cathedral in London, and its size is greatly enhanced by the fact that it stands on an eminence that is itself 168 ft.
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  • The town is well situated on a considerable eminence.
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  • About 1160 Walter Fitzalan, the first high steward of Scotland, built a castle on an eminence by the side of the Clyde (still called Castle Hill), the original seat of the royal house of Stewart.
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  • August Belmont eventually attained the coveted eminence of Grand Sachem of the Tammany Society.
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  • commanding eminence, said to be the highest point in South Derbyshire.
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  • His Eminence is the 26th generation descendant of Shinran himself.
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  • Yet they are not sought out for the council of the people, nor do they attain eminence in the public assembly.
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  • Largely self-taught, he achieved great eminence in the musical world in the years leading up to the First World War.
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  • Indeed all London barristers who had not yet reached the eminence of King's Counsel, were compelled to wear gowns of Stuff wool.
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  • Summary St Mwrog's church occupies an eminence projecting into a valley less than one mile south of Ruthin.
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  • This would have left the current authors with a clear run on geomorphology, in which they have recognized eminence.
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  • eminence on the banks of the Derwent.
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  • Both studies found that the thenar eminence was less sensitive to cold than the volar aspect of the wrist.
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  • The parish church, dedicated to the Holy Trinity, stands on a lofty eminence.
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  • Alport Hill is a commanding eminence, said to be the highest point in South Derbyshire.
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  • At this moment we were about fifty feet from the rocky eminence, which extended a long reef into the sea.
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  • It is situated on a bold eminence, commanding extensive views of the surrounding country.
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  • On a slight eminence near Wetheral stands the neat mansion of Geo.
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  • eminence grise within the NFU.
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  • eminence resection, medial capsular advancement.
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  • eminence in the field of Victorian Studies.
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  • eminence in the musical world in the years leading up to the First World War.
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  • eminence in the whole county worthy of notice.
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  • eminence in literature or public life ' .
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  • eminence in the village and was erected in 1863.
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  • lofty eminence.
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  • Palpate the apex of the root by following the root juga (lateral canine eminence) from the gingival margin.
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  • seekt they are not sought out for the council of the people, nor do they attain eminence in the public assembly.
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  • largely self-taught, he achieved great eminence in the musical world in the years leading up to the First World War.
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  • situated on a bold eminence, commanding extensive views of the surrounding country.
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  • thenar eminence was less sensitive to cold than the volar aspect of the wrist.
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  • The Hall, an old modernized building, occupied by a tenant, stands on an eminence, commanding a richly varied prospect.
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  • Even philosophers of the eminence of I.
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  • The former palace, called the Augustusburg, built in 1664-1690, lies on an eminence near the town; this spacious edifice is now used as a military school.
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  • rises an abrupt limestone eminence, Scout Scar, which commands an extensive view towards Windermere and the southern mountains of the Lake District.
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  • On an eminence east of the town are the ruins of Kendal castle, attributed to the first barons of Kendal.
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  • Clermont-Ferrand is situated on an eminence on the western border of the fertile plain of Limagne.
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  • Of Hans Christoph von Gagern's sons three attained considerable eminence: Friedrich Balduin, Freiherr von Gagern (1794-1848), the eldest, was born at Weilburg on the 24th of October 1794.
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  • The later eminence of Pericles has probably misled historians into exaggerating his influence at this time.
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  • It is chiefly in hermeneutics that Ernesti has any claim to eminence as a theologian.
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  • The Fulda rises in the Wasserkuppe (3117 ft.), an eminence of the Rhdngebirge, the highest in the province.
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  • The actual elevation of a summit above sea-level does not necessarily affect its mountainous character; a gentle eminence, for instance, rising a few hundred feet above a tableland, even if at an elevation of say 15,000 ft., could only be called a hill.
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  • On an eminence N.E.
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  • REDDITCH, a town in the eastern parliamentary division of Worcestershire, England, situated on an eminence near the Warwickshire border, 151 m.
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  • He was in fact the first painter of any eminence ever domiciled in Mantua.
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  • Little of original invention can be traced to any strictly Norman source; but no people were ever more eager to adopt from other nations, to take into their service and friendship from any quarter men of learning and skill and eminence of every kind.
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  • The principal buildings are the town hall, tolbooth, public library, assembly rooms, mechanics' institute, Morison's academy (founded in 1859), and Strathearn House, a hydropathic establishment built on an eminence at the back of the town, and itself sheltered by the Knock of Crieff (911 ft.
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  • The name Sofia, which came into use towards the end of the 14th century is derived from the early medieval church of St Sophia, the massive ruins of which stand on an eminence to the east of the town.
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  • The new centre was Mizpah, a commanding eminence and sanctuary, about 5 m.
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  • But the same conditions which render individual eminence difficult procure for it when once attained a more ready recognition, and the conquerors and prophets of Asia have had more power and authority than their parallels in Europe.
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  • Other notable edifices are the Gothic church of St John, dating from the beginning of the 13th century; the Gothic town hall, completed in 1537; and, standing on an eminence above the river, the Kitzerstein, a palace said to have been originally erected by the German king Henry I., although the present building is not older than the 16th century.
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  • That eminence he enjoyed before the collision with Prussia in the autumn of 1806; and he frequently, and no doubt sincerely, expressed contempt of conquests dans cette vieille Europe.
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  • Churchill's tenure of the presidency of the Board of Trade, from April 1908, was marked by the production of a scheme in the autumn of that year for the setting up of a court of arbitration in labour disputes, consisting of three persons nominated by the Board, respectively from panels of employers, workmen and " persons of eminence and impartiality."
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  • Beacon Hill, so called from its ancient use as a signal warning station, is still the most conspicuous topographical feature of the city, but it has been changed from a bold and picturesque eminence into a gentle slope.
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  • In 1837 he became full professor at Berlin; in 1841 Frederick William IV., always ready to recognize intellectual eminence, appointed him Prussian historiographer.
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  • His claim to eminence rests on the facts that he developed and formulated the doctrines of the older Sceptics, and that he handed down a full and, on the whole, an impartial account of the members of his school.
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  • The country soon became one of the most important provinces of the Roman Empire; its proconsulship was from the first regarded as the most desirable, and this eminence became still more marked afterwards.
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  • When Herodias's brother Agrippa was appointed king by Caligula, she was determined to see her husband attain to an equal eminence, and persuaded him, though naturally of a quiet and unambitious temperament, to make the journey to Rome to crave a crown from the emperor.
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  • Close to the Acropolis on the west is the lower rocky eminence of the Areopagus, "Apaos 7ra.
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  • The Hephaesteum, the so-called Theseum, is situated on a slight eminence, probably the Colonus Agoraeus, to the west of the Agora.
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  • Her disposition, fresh and natural but lacking the qualities that make for distinction, gave no promise of eminence until reasons of state brought Napoleon shortly after his divorce of Josephine to sue for her hand (see Napoleon and Josephine).
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  • The parish church of St Hilda, standing on an eminence above the sea, is late Norman and Early English, with a massive tower, heavily buttressed.
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  • Its environs are charming, and to the north of it, on an eminence, rise the fine ruins of the castle of Greifenstein, built by the German king Henry I., and from 1275 to 1583 the seat of a cadet branch of the counts of Schwarzburg.
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  • Excluded from political and municipal life by the laws which required either the taking of an oath or joining in the Lord's Supper according to the rites of the Established Church, excluding themselves not only from the frivolous pursuits of pleasure, but from music and art in general, attaining no high average level of literary culture (though producing some men of eminence in science and medicine), the Quakers occupied themselves mainly with trade, the business of their Society, and the calls of philanthropy.
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  • Edward Thornton thus described the general aspect of the state: "Bahawalpur is a remarkably level country, there being no considerable eminence within its limits, as the occasional sand-hills, seldom exceeding 50 or 60 ft.
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  • The importance of the place is due, however, to the magnificent ruins of a feudal fortress (see Castle) crowning the eminence on the slope of which the village is built.
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  • c. 370), of Cappadocia, an Arian theologian of some eminence (see ARius).
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  • But never content to sink into the mere trader, he sought to introduce among those he met on the "road" a higher tone of conversation than usually marks the commercial room, and there were many of his associates who, when he had attained eminence, recalled the discussions on political economy and kindred topics with which he was wont to enliven and elevate the travellers' table.
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  • It is pleasantly situated on a gentle eminence, in a rich pastoral vale to which it gives name, celebrated for its dairies, producing the famous cheese known as "double Gloucester."
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  • We do not know how he rose to eminence: he first appears as admiral of the Spartan navy in 407 B.C. The story of his influence with Cyrus the Younger, his naval victory off Notium, his quarrel with his successor Callicratidas in 406, his appointment as E7rurT )€us in 405, his decisive victory at Aegospotami, and his share in the siege and capitulation of Athens belong to the history of the Peloponnesian War.
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  • Though it was restored after the battle of Marathon, on a site at a little distance from its original position, it never regained its former eminence, but it was still the second city in the island.
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  • On a commanding eminence above the town is the ancient castle of Coburg, dating from the 11 th century (see below).
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  • Amboise owes its celebrity to the imposing ch�au which overlooks the Loire from the rocky eminence above the town.
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  • Numerous other pamphlets appeared, inspired or controlled by Sarpi, who had received the further appointment of censor over all that should be written at Venice in defence of the republic. Never before in a religious controversy had the appeal been made so exclusively to reason and history; never before had an ecclesiastic of his eminence maintained the subjection of the clergy to the state, and disputed the pope's right to employ spiritual censures, except under restrictions which virtually abrogated it.
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  • He had a thorough knowledge of the private and indirect motives which influence politicians, and his genial attractive manner, easy temper and vivacious, if occasionally coarse, wit helped to confer on him a social distinction which led many to take for granted his eminence as a statesman.
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  • Despite the low expectations her family had for her, Emily went to a prestigious university and achieved eminence in the medical field.
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  • Eminence offers hand-made organic skin care products with ingredients from Hungary.
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  • While prices are not listed on their website, those interested in becoming a distributor are encouraged to contact Eminence for more information, including minimum ordering requirements.
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  • With a wide range of products including cleansers, masks and even tea, Eminence products are sure to make an elegant addition to any established spa or salon product line.
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  • Eminence Organics sources all of its ingredients from purely natural and organic sources.
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  • Those at St Peter's, Westminster, and St Paul's, attained a fame which has survived, while other similar foundations lapsed, such as St Anthony's (Threadneedle Street, City), at which Sir Thomas More, Archbishop Whitgift and many other men of eminence received education.
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  • Its fortifications were strengthened in 1766 by the erection of Fort George, on an eminence to the west of the town, across the river.
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  • Coutances is beautifully situated on the right bank of the Soulle on a granitic eminence crowned by the celebrated cathedral of Notre-Dame.
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