Elizabeth sentence examples

elizabeth
  • Claire Elizabeth is one of us now and bears the surname Gustefson, not Leblanc as her birth certificate reads.

    6
    1
  • Hoffmann, Rene Descartes (1905); Elizabeth S.

    6
    1
  • MARGARET (1489-1541), queen of Scotland, eldest daughter of Henry VII., king of England, by his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Edward IV., was born at Westminster on the 29th of November 1 4 89.

    5
    2
  • On his marriage in 1823 with Elizabeth, daughter of Dawson Turner of Great Yarmouth, he had become a Christian, and had changed his name to Palgrave, the maiden name of his wife's mother.

    5
    5
  • "The Lonely Hills", by Elizabeth Cade.

    4
    6
  • NORFOLK, a city and port of entry of Norfolk county, Virginia, U.S.A., on the northern side of the Elizabeth river (an arm of the Chesapeake Bay) and at the mouth of its eastern branch, and on the Albemarle and Chesapeake and the Dismal Swamp canals, about 90 m.

    1
    0
  • Their mother, loving the latter most, avenged his death by murdering her son, and the people, horrified at her act, revolted and murdered both her and King Gorboduc. This legend was the subject of the earliest regular English tragedy which in 1561 was played before Queen Elizabeth in the Inner Temple hall.

    1
    0
  • He was attached to the Hohenstaufen by the marriage of his daughter, Elizabeth, with Conrad, son of Frederick II.

    1
    0
  • It was the birthplace of Henry VIII., Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth, and here Edward VI.

    1
    0
  • Several letters between 1643 and 1649 are addressed to the princess Elizabeth, the eldest daughter of the ejected elector palatine, who lived at The Hague, where her mother maintained the semblance of a royal court.

    1
    0
  • " I can say with truth," he writes to the princess Elizabeth, 9 " that the principle which I have always observed in my studies, and which I believe has helped me most to gain what, knowledge I have, has been never to spend beyond a very few hours daily in thoughts which occupy the imagination, and a very few hours yearly in those which occupy the understanding, and to give all the rest of my time to the relaxation of the senses and the repose of the mind."

    1
    0
  • Later charters were granted by various sovereigns, and it was incorporated by Elizabeth in 1598 under the style of a mayor, 6 brethren and 12 capital burgesses.

    1
    0
  • His first wife died in 1563, and in 1572 he married a cousin, Elizabeth Mowbray, by whom he had three sons, the eldest of whom was named Alexander.'

    1
    0
  • He did not, however, as has been supposed, spend the best years of his manhood abroad, for he was certainly at home in 1571, when the preliminaries of his marriage were arranged at Merchiston; and in 1572 he married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir James Stirling of Keir.

    1
    0
  • During the separation the New Side established the college of New Jersey at Elizabethtown (now Elizabeth) in 1747, and the Log College of the Tennents was merged into it.

    1
    0
  • Here Morton encouraged Buckingham's designs against Richard, and put him into communication with the queen dowager, Elizabeth Woodville, and with Henry Tudor, earl of Richmond.

    1
    0
  • At the same time negotiations were successfully carried on with John Casimir, with Elizabeth and with Henry of Navarre, and their help secured for the national cause.

    1
    0
  • At the same time John Casimir, brother of the elector palatine, at the invitation of the Calvinist party and with the secret financial aid of Queen Elizabeth, entered the country at the head of a body of German mercenaries from the east.

    1
    0
  • The only town charter is one of 1567-1568, in which Queen Elizabeth confirms an ancient privilege of the burgesses that they should not be upon assizes or juries with strangers, relating to matters outside the town.

    1
    0
  • EDMUND BONNER (1500?-1569), bishop of London, was perhaps the natural son of George Savage, rector of Davenham, Cheshire, by Elizabeth Frodsham, who was afterwards married to Edmund Bonner, a sawyer of Hanley in Worcestershire.

    1
    0
  • On her accession Elizabeth refused to allow him to kiss her hand; but he sat and voted in the parliament and convocation of 1559.

    1
    0
  • On the 22nd of August 1620 he married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir James Bourchier, a city merchant of Tower Hill, and of Felstead in Essex; and his father having died in 1617 he settled at Huntingdon and occupied himself in the management of his small estate.

    1
    0
  • His policy was in principle the policy of Elizabeth, of Gustavus Adolphus, and - in the following generation - of William of Orange.

    1
    0
  • On the 6th of February 1658 he lost his favourite daughter, Elizabeth Claypole, and he was much cast down by the shock of his bereavement and of her long sufferings.

    1
    0
  • By his wife Elizabeth Bourchier, Cromwell had four sons, Robert (who died in 1639), Oliver (who died in 1644 while serving in his father's regiment), Richard, who succeeded him as Protector, and Henry.

    1
    0
  • Of these Bridget was the wife successively of Ireton and Fleetwood, Elizabeth married John Claypole, Mary was wife of Thomas Belasyse, Lord Fauconberg; and Frances was the wife of Sir Robert Rich, and secondly of Sir John Russell.

    1
    0
  • in founding a regular navy began to establish dockyards, and the harbour formed by the deep channel of the Medway was utilized by Elizabeth, who built a dockyard and established an arsenal here.

    1
    0
  • (1440-1490), king of Hungary, also known as Matthias Corvinus, a surname which he received from the raven (corvus) on his escutcheon, second son of Janos Hunyadi and Elizabeth Szilagyi, was born at Kolozsvar, probably on the 23rd of February 1440.

    1
    0
  • But they sat again for this purpose under Mary and Elizabeth and (save between 1640 and 1661) continued regular criminal sessions till towards the end of the 17th century as continuously and constantly as the king's courts (op. cit.).

    1
    0
  • There was in the time of Elizabeth, James I.

    1
    0
  • HARRIET ELIZABETH STOWE [BEECHER] (1811-1896), American writer and philanthropist, seventh child of Lyman and Roxana (Foote) Beecher, was born at Litchfield, Connecticut, U.S.A., on the, 4th of June 1811.

    1
    0
  • The statute, however, would not seem to have had much effect; for in spite of a proclamation of Queen Elizabeth in 1560 imposing a fine of £ 20 for each offence on butchers slaughtering animals during Lent, in 1563 Sir William Cecil, in Notes upon an Act for the Increase of the Navy, says that "in old times no flesh at all was eaten on fish days; even the king himself could not have license; which was occasion of eating so much fish as now is eaten in flesh upon fish days."

    1
    0
  • But in spite of statutes and proclamations, of occasional severities and of the patriotic example of Queen Elizabeth, the practice of fasting fell more and more into disuse.

    1
    0
  • I felt like Claire Elizabeth must have felt when the doctor cut her cord.

    1
    1
  • She is the one from Surry and her name is listed as Elizabeth in the phone book but they call her Betty, or Becky or some foolish diminutive.

    1
    1
  • However, I do feel a kinship to this Elizabeth woman.

    1
    1
  • I suddenly realized where the illusive motor home was parked and I knew Baby Claire Elizabeth LeBlanc was unidentified but alive!

    1
    1
  • My name is Elizabeth Anne Morganthaw Gustefson, called Betsy and I'm writing these horrifying remembrances at the request of my husband Ben.

    1
    1
  • Please, Elizabeth, remove all of your clothing; everything and come to the door with your hands in front of you.

    1
    1
  • The person you and Elizabeth have been stalking.

    1
    1
  • I shall slit the throat of the lying bitch Elizabeth and watch her drown in her own blood.

    1
    1
  • Elizabeth watched in horror as his lower lip blistered.

    1
    1
  • Albert married Elizabeth, daughter of Meinhard IV., count of Gdrz and Tirol, who bore him six sons and five daughters.

    1
    1
  • and of his consort Maria Luisa of Spain, was born in Florence in 1783, and from 1818-48 was viceroy of the kingdom of Lombardo-Venetia; his mother was the Princess Elizabeth, sister of Charles Albert, King of Sardinia.

    1
    1
  • Elizabeth Barrett Browning wrote sonnets to " the large-brained woman and large-hearted man, self-named George Sand."

    1
    1
  • In 1772 he removed to Elizabeth, New Jersey, where after 1773 he lived on his estate known as "Liberty Hall."

    1
    1
  • He died at Elizabeth, New Jersey, on the 25th of July 1790.

    1
    1
  • In the political interests which these contests involved he took no part; his favourite disciple, the princess Elizabeth, was the daughter of the banished king, against whom he had served in Bohemia; and Queen Christina, his second royal follower, was the daughter of Gustavus Adolphus.

    1
    1
  • (puppies) "Why is Elizabeth Evelyn's sister?" etc., etc.

    1
    1
  • We are amused at beholding the costume of Henry VIII, or Queen Elizabeth, as much as if it was that of the King and Queen of the Cannibal Islands.

    1
    1
  • Perhaps Princess Elizabeth and Princess Mary know.

    1
    1
  • Claire Elizabeth LeBlanc, all seven pounds, six ounces of her, came into the world at Dartmouth-Hitchcok Medical Center, in Keene, New Hampshire on June third.

    1
    2
  • Three weeks later, baby Claire Elizabeth LeBlanc was baptized at St. Bernard's Catholic Church with Betsy and Ben Gustefson as godparents.

    1
    2
  • In 1738 he married Lady Elizabeth Finch, daughter of the earl of Winchelsea.

    1
    2
  • Elizabeth Cade was a lonely woman - lonely and unhappy.

    1
    3
  • I'm fairly certain she is the one; this Elizabeth...

    0
    0
  • What would you have me do, Elizabeth?

    0
    0
  • Please remove your clothing, Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • After the death of her brother William Parr, marquess of Northampton, his share of the barony called Marquis Fee reverted to Queen Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • and Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • The latter, about the time of Elizabeth's succession, expressed his hope that the bishops would become pastors, labourers and watchmen; and that the great riches of bishoprics would be diminished and reduced to mediocrity; that, being delivered from courtly and regal pomp, the bishops might take care of the flock of Christ.

    0
    0
  • He remained one of Elizabeth's most trusted Protestant counsellors, being appointed in 1572 chancellor of the order of the Garter and a secretary of state.

    0
    0
  • On the 1st of June he crowned Anne as queen, and on the 10th of September stood godfather to her child, the future Queen Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • The reign of Elizabeth is famous for the gallant enterprises that were undertaken by sea and land to discover and bring to light the unknown parts of the earth.

    0
    0
  • On the 31st of December 1 599 Queen Elizabeth granted the charter of incorporation to the East India Company, and Sir James Lancaster, one of the directors, was appointed general of their first fleet.

    0
    0
  • In 1561 Anthony Jenkinson arrived in Persia with a letter from Queen Elizabeth to the shah.

    0
    0
  • The same year he seized boon secretly sent by Elizabeth to the lords of the congregation.

    0
    0
  • Murray's influence, however, being now supreme, he embarked in December for France, but was driven by storms on to Holy Island, where he was detained, and was subsequently, on the 18th of January 1564, seized at Berwick and sent by Elizabeth to the Tower, whence he was soon liberated and proceeded to France.

    0
    0
  • The same year, however, he was recalled by Mary to aid in the suppression of Murray's rebellion, successfully eluding the ships of Elizabeth sent to capture him.

    0
    0
  • The peninsula, with considerable neighbouring territory and Cape Elizabeth, was organized as a town in 1718 and was named Falmouth.

    0
    0
  • This royal bride died of consumption, leaving no living child, and her husband took in 1513, as his second wife, Elizabeth Stafford, daughter of that duke of Buckingham upon whom the old duke of Norfolk, the tears upon his cheeks, was forced to pass sentence of death.

    0
    0
  • He left his wife for a mistress, Elizabeth Holland, was in discord with his family, and lived to see his two nieces, Anne Boleyn and Catherine Howard, and his son Surrey, the fiery-tempered poet, go in turn to the block.

    0
    0
  • Within ten years he married a third time, the lady being Elizabeth Leybourne, the widow of Lord Dacre of Gilsland.

    0
    0
  • After three such good fortunes by marriage Norfolk in his folly looked for a crown with a fourth match, listening to the laird of Lethington when he set forth the scheme by which the duke was to marry a restored queen of Scots and rule Scotland with her who should be recognized as Elizabeth's successor.

    0
    0
  • Queen Elizabeth continued his employment in diplomacy, and had he been richer he might have had an earldom.

    0
    0
  • Married in 1577 to one of the three co-heirs of the Lord Dacre of Gilsland he suffered under Elizabeth more than one imprisonment with his brother the unfortunate earl of Arundel.

    0
    0
  • Later charters from Elizabeth, James I., James II., George II.

    0
    0
  • Anne Francoise Elizabeth Lange >>

    0
    0
  • It is said that, after the invention of printing, amongst others Queen Elizabeth translated it, and that the work was well known to Shakespeare.

    0
    0
  • Queen Elizabeth's Englishings " was reprinted in 1899; on the style, see A.

    0
    0
  • The subject of the play was no doubt suggested by the case of the reported witch, Elizabeth Sawyer, who was executed in 1621.

    0
    0
  • Having no male issue, she chose as her successor the infant son of her niece, Anna Leopoldovna, duchess of Brunswick, and at her death the child was duly proclaimed emperor, under the name of Ivan VI., but in little more than a year he was dethroned by the partisans of the Princess Elizabeth, a daughter of Peter the Great and Catherine I.

    0
    0
  • As a true daughter of the great Russian reformer, Elizabeth (1741-61) relegated the German element to a subordinate position in the administration and gave her confidence to genuine Russians like Bestuzhev, Vorontsov, Razumovski (her morganatic husband) and the Shuvalovs.

    0
    0
  • Catherine, (VII.) Anne Cesarevich Ale x ius Anna, (IX.) Elizabeth duchess of (1730-40).

    0
    0
  • A History of Russian Diplomacy under the Empress Elizabeth Petrovna, 1741-1762 (1899); The First Romanovs, 1613-1725 (1905); K.

    0
    0
  • Elizabeth required Grindal to suppress the "prophesyings" or meetings for discussion which had come into vogue among the Puritan clergy, and she even wanted him to discourage preaching; she would have no doctrine that was not inspired by her authority.

    0
    0
  • Elizabeth then suggested that he should resign; this he declined to do, and after making an apology to the queen he was reinstated towards the end of 1582.

    0
    0
  • of England, daughter of Sir Thomas Boleyn, afterwards earl of Wiltshire and Ormonde, and of Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Howard, earl of Surrey, afterwards duke of Norfolk, was born, according to Camden, in 1507, but her birth has been ascribed, though not conclusively, to an earlier date (to 1502 or 1501) by some later writers.'

    0
    0
  • In September 1533 the birth of a daughter, afterwards Queen Elizabeth, instead of the long-hoped-for son, was a heavy disappointment; next year Of this there is no direct proof, but the statement rests upon contemporary belief and chiefly upon the extraordinary terms of the dispensation granted to Henry to marry Anne Boleyn, which included the suspension of all canons relating to impediments created by "affinity rising ex illicito coitu in any degree even in the first."

    0
    0
  • Roofing tiles were manufactured in Berkhampstead as early as the 13th century, and in Elizabeth's reign the making of malt was the chief industry.

    0
    0
  • Lord Anglesey married Elizabeth, daughter and co-heiress of Sir James Altham of Oxey, Hertfordshire, by whom, besides other children, he had James, who succeeded him, Altham, created Baron Altham, and Richard, afterwards 3rd Baron Altham.

    0
    0
  • O'Neill, however, refused to put himself in the power of Sussex without a guarantee for his safety; and his claims in other respects were so exacting that Elizabeth consented to measures being taken to subdue him and to restore Brian.

    0
    0
  • The latter, making some trifling concessions, consented to present himself before Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • Elizabeth was less concerned with the respective claims of Brian and Shane, the one resting on an English patent and the other on the Celtic custom, than with the question of policy involved in supporting or rejecting the demands of her proud suppliant.

    0
    0
  • Elizabeth at last authorized Sussex to take the field against Shane, but two several expeditions failed to accomplish anything except some depredation in O'Neill's country.

    0
    0
  • Force having ignominiously failed, Elizabeth consented to treat, and hostilities were stopped on terms that gave O'Neill practically the whole of his demands.

    0
    0
  • In 1598 a cessation of hostilities was arranged, and a formal pardon granted to Tyrone by Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • Acting on the queen's explicit instructions, Essex, after some ill-managed operations, had a meeting with Tyrone at a ford on the Lagan on th 7th of September 1599, when a truce was arranged; but Elizabeth was displeased by the favourable conditions allowed to the O'Neill and by Essex's treatment of him as an equal.

    0
    0
  • In 17 4 o he entered the army, and rumour had it that he was one of the favourites of the empress Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • 1 1854 Elizabeth, daughter of Maximilian Joseph, duke of o avaria, who belonged to the younger and non-royal branch si f the house of Wittelsbach.

    0
    0
  • By insisting upon the restitution of the confiscated church-lands, assuming to regard England as a papal fief, requiring Elizabeth, whose legitimacy he aspersed, to submit her claims to him, he raised insuperable obstacles to the return of England to the Church of Rome.

    0
    0
  • It was recovered by the bishop in 1355, and retained by the see until granted in 1599 to Elizabeth, who gave it to Sir Walter Raleigh.

    0
    0
  • of Cape Recife these emigrants founded a town, Port Elizabeth, its harbour being sheltered from all winds save the S.E.

    0
    0
  • By seafarers "Algoa Bay" is used as synonymous with Port Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • It retains a curiously carved screen, and the black marble tomb of Queen Elizabeth's physician, Marwood, who attained the age of 105.

    0
    0
  • Honiton is famous for its lace industry, established by refugees from Flanders under Queen Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • After receiving from Queen Elizabeth a patent for colonization in the New World, Sir Walter Raleigh, in April 1584, sent Philip Amadas, or Amidas (1S501618), and Arthur Barlowe (c. 1550 - c. 1620) to discover in the region bordering on Florida a suitable location for a colony.

    0
    0
  • Even before this we hear of the prophetic visions of Hildegard of Bingen (a contemporary of St Bernard) and Elizabeth of SchOnau.

    0
    0
  • Having attained his majority in 1805, he married on the 28th of July Catherine Elizabeth Hamilton, daughter of John James, 1st marquess of Abercorn.

    0
    0
  • The property was acquired by Sir Christopher Hatton, Lord Chancellor under Queen Elizabeth, after whom Hatton Garden is named; though the bishopric kept some hold upon it until the 18th century.

    0
    0
  • He married Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Sir Charles Morrison of Cassiobury, Hertfordshire, through whom that estate passed into his family, and by whom besides four daughters he had five sons, the eldest Arthur being created earl of Essex at the Restoration.

    0
    0
  • The two shire-courts sat together for the Domesday Inquest, and the counties were united under one sheriff until the time of Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • to the end of Elizabeth's, a number of statutes were made for the encouragement of tillage, though probably to little purpose.

    0
    0
  • By the 39th Elizabeth (1597) arable land made pasture since the 1st Elizabeth shall be again converted into tillage, and what is arable shall not be converted into pasture.

    0
    0
  • ELIZABETH [Elisabeth Philippine Marie Helene of] (1764-1794), commonly called Madame Elizabeth, daughter of Louis the Dauphin and Marie Josephine of Saxony, and sister of Louis XVI., was born at Versailles on the 3rd of May 1764.

    0
    0
  • By the execution of the king and the removal of Marie Antoinette to the Conciergerie, Madame Elizabeth was deprived of her companions in the Temple prison, and on the 9th of May 1 794 she was herself transferred to the Conciergerie, and haled before the revolutionary tribunal.

    0
    0
  • Mrs Maxwell-Scott, Madame Elizabeth of France (1908).

    0
    0
  • Saint Elizabeth >>

    0
    0
  • He was not cast in a heroic mould, and he had no desire to figure at the stake; like Cecil, and Elizabeth herself, he had a great respect for authority, and when his time came he could consistently impose authority on others.

    0
    0
  • He was not eager to assume this task, and he made great efforts to avoid promotion to the archbishopric of Canterbury, which Elizabeth designed for him as soon as she had succeeded to the throne.

    0
    0
  • This wise moderation of the Elizabethan settlement, which had been effected before his appointment, was obviously not due to him; and Elizabeth could have placed Knox or Bonner in the chair of St Augustine had she been so minded.

    0
    0
  • With secular politics he had little to do, and he was never admitted to Elizabeth's privy council.

    0
    0
  • At Carlisle there was published a bull excommunicating Bruce; and Elizabeth his wife, Marjorie his daughter, and Christina his sister, were captured in a sanctuary at Tain, while three of his brothers were executed.

    0
    0
  • In 1588 the leading persons of Pembrokeshire, with Bishop Anthony Rudd of St David's at their head, petitioned Queen Elizabeth to fortify the Haven against the projected Spanish invasion, upon which the block-houses of Dale and Nangle at either side of the mouth of the harbour were accordingly erected.

    0
    0
  • The lords of the Congregation sought help from Elizabeth, while the regent had recourse to France, where an expedition under her brother, Rene of Lorraine, marquis of Elbeuf, was already in preparation.

    0
    0
  • OLD POINT COMFORT, a summer and winter resort, in Elizabeth City county, Virginia, U.S.A., at the southern end of a narrow, sandy peninsula projecting into Hampton Roads (at the mouth of the James river), about 12 m.

    0
    0
  • In 1587 Elizabeth granted certain privileges to Wareham, but it was not incorporated until 1703, when the existing fairs for April 6 and August 23 were granted.

    0
    0
  • Elizabeth Bekker >>

    0
    0
  • A 14th-century grammar school was refounded by Queen Elizabeth; and there are two mansions dating from the same reign, which have been converted into inns.

    0
    0
  • Mrs Elizabeth Fry lived in a house in Upton Lane, on the confines of her brother's park.

    0
    0
  • On the accession of Elizabeth, Curwen at once accommodated himself to the new conditions by declaring himself a Protestant, and was continued in the office of lord chancellor.

    0
    0
  • But his very domestic regularity caused him to be entirely under the influence of his two wives, Maria Louisa of Savoy, whom he married in 1702, and who died in February 1714, and Elizabeth Farnese of Parma, whom he married in December of the same year, and who survived him.

    0
    0
  • Under Elizabeth Margate was still an obscure fishing village employing about 20 small vessels ("boys") in the coasting and river trades, chiefly in the conveyance of grain, on which in 1791 it chiefly subsisted.

    0
    0
  • Lambarde was author of the Perambulation of Kent, and founded the College of the Poor of Queen Elizabeth at Greenwich.

    0
    0
  • By Elizabeth it was conferred first on the earl of Leicester and then on Thomas Sackville, afterwards earl of Dorset.

    0
    0
  • 2 1865, son of George Tyron Harding, a farmer and country doctor, and Phebe Elizabeth Dickerson.

    0
    0
  • He married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir William Russell of Chippenham, Cambridgeshire, and was tutor at Oxford to two of his wife's brothers.

    0
    0
  • "The Brill" was one of the four Dutch towns handed over to Queen Elizabeth in 1584 as security for English expenses incurred in aiding the Dutch.

    0
    0
  • The religious poem, Le Miroir de lame pecheresse was translated by Queen Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • The church of St Nicholas (Perpendicular with Early English portions, but much restored) has a tomb of the Walsingham family, who had a lease of the manor from Elizabeth; Sir Francis Walsingham, the statesman, being born here in 1536.

    0
    0
  • ELIZABETH (1596-1662), consort of Frederick V., elector palatine and titular king of Bohemia, was the eldest daughter of James I.

    0
    0
  • The help sought from James came only in the shape of useless embassies and negotiations; the two Palatinates were soon occupied by the Spaniards and the duke of Bavaria; and the romantic attachment and services of Duke Christian of Brunswick, of the 1st earl of Craven, and of other chivalrous young champions who were inspired by the beauty and grace of the "Queen of Hearts," as Elizabeth was now called, availed nothing.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile, Elizabeth's position in Holland grew more and more unsatisfactory.

    0
    0
  • Parliament voted her £ 20,000 in 1660 for the payment of her debts, but Elizabeth did not receive the money, and on the 19th of May 1661 she left the Hague for England, in spite of the king's attempts to hinder her journey, receiving no official welcome on her arrival in London and being lodged at Lord Craven's house in Drury Lane.

    0
    0
  • She had thirteen children - Frederick Henry, drgwned at sea in 1629; Charles Louis, elector palatine, whose daughter married Philip, duke of Orleans, and became the ancestress of the elder and Roman Catholic branch of the royal family of England; Elizabeth, abbess and friend of Descartes; Prince Rupert and Prince Maurice, who died unmarried; Louisa, abbess; Edward, who married Anne de Gonzaga, "princesse palatine," and had children; Henrietta Maria, who married Count Sigismund Ragotzki but died childless; Philip and Charlotte, who died childless; Sophia, who married Ernest Augustus, elector of Hanover, and was mother of George I.

    0
    0
  • Rait (1902); Briefe der Elizabeth Stuart.

    0
    0
  • Wendland (Bibliothek des literarischen Vereins, 228, Stuttgart, 1902); "Elizabeth Stuart," by J.

    0
    0
  • Elizabeth of Romania >>

    0
    0
  • In 1593 Elizabeth incorporated it, and gave the burgesses a town hall and court of pie powder.

    0
    0
  • By listening to the revelations of the "Holy Maid of Kent," the nun Elizabeth Barton, he was charged with misprision of treason, and was condemned to the loss of his goods and to imprisonment at the king's will, penalties he was allowed to compound by a fine of X300 (25th of March 1534).

    0
    0
  • In 1585 Elizabeth granted a charter of incorporation under the name of the mayor and commonalty of Helston.

    0
    0
  • After Edward's death she was mistress to Thomas Grey, marquess of Dorset, son of Elizabeth Woodville by her first husband.

    0
    0
  • and his wife Elizabeth of Brunswick-Wolfenbiittel.

    0
    0
  • In 1749 he married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir William Wyndham, by whom he had a large family.

    0
    0
  • Joseph John Gurney of Norwich, a brother of Elizabeth Fry, by means of his high social position and his various writings (some published before 1835), was the most prominent actor in this movement.

    0
    0
  • Other works which may usefully be consulted are the Journals of John Woolman, Stephen Grellet and Elizabeth Fry; also The First Publishers of Truth, a reprint of contemporary accounts of the rise of Quakerism in various districts.

    0
    0
  • in his Scottish campaigns, and on Edward Bruce's invasion of Ulster in 1315 Richard marched against him, but he had given his daughter Elizabeth in marriage to Robert Bruce, afterwards king of Scotland, about 1304.

    0
    0
  • A grammar school of ancient foundation, renewed by Elizabeth and George III., occupies modern buildings.

    0
    0
  • Indeed E the reign of Elizabeth passed without any English colony having been permanently established in America.

    0
    0
  • Four years later his influence brought about a truce between Hungary and the Venetians, who had agreed with Bosnia for mutual support against the Croats; and in 1353, the year of his death, his daughter Elizabeth was married to King Louis.

    0
    0
  • The death of Louis in 1392, the regency of his widow Elizabeth, and a fresh outbreak in Croatia, enabled Tvrtko to fulfil his predecessor's designs by establishing a maritime state.

    0
    0
  • 1 In the following year permanent diplomatic relations were established by England with the Porte by the despatch of William Harebone as ambassador, Queen Elizabeth urging as her special claim to the sultan's friendship their common mission to fight " idolators."

    0
    0
  • Town and castle followed the vicissitudes of the dukedom of Norfolk, passing to the crown in 1405, and being alternately restored and forfeited by Henry V., Richard III., Henry VII., Edward VI., Mary, Elizabeth and James I., and finally sold in 1635 to Sir Robert Hitcham, who left it in 1636 to the master and fellows of Pembroke Hall, Cambridge.

    0
    0
  • In the Church of England, however, it was retained among the episcopal ornaments prescribed by the first Prayerbook of Edward VI., and, though omitted in the second Prayerbook, its use seemed once more to be enjoined under the Ornaments Rubric of Elizabeth's Prayer-book.

    0
    0
  • During the reigns of Elizabeth and James I.

    0
    0
  • In 1581 Queen Elizabeth granted a confirmatory charter to the mayor and bailiffs direct without reference to the lord of the castle.

    0
    0
  • In 1653 Henry married Elizabeth (d.

    0
    0
  • He continued his intrigues against the English government, and in 1598 he was charged with complicity in a plot to poison Queen Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • Having entered the church he became rector of Ripple, Worcestershire, and later of St Vedast, Foster Lane, London, and it was probably when he was chaplain to John de Vere, earl of Oxford, that he made the acquaintance of Elizabeth Woodville, afterwards the queen of Edward IV.

    0
    0
  • died in April 1483 the archbishop remained true to his widow Elizabeth, and consequently lost the chancellorship and was put into prison by Richard III.

    0
    0
  • Queen Elizabeth's or Fair Mead hunting lodge, a picturesque half-timbered building, is preserved under the Epping Forest Preservation Act.

    0
    0
  • The wording of this was taken from the last section of Elizabeth's Act of Uniformity, prefixed to the Prayer Book of 1559.

    0
    0
  • Clifton, 1877) to have been the "other order" contemplated in the Act of Uniformity of Elizabeth, and it was held that from this time the cope and surplice alone were legal vestments in the Church of England.

    0
    0
  • The first charter was not obtained until 1573, when it was incorporated by Elizabeth under the title of a "guardian and free tenants" of the town of Sittingbourne.

    0
    0
  • ELIZABETH [PETROVNA] (1709-1762), Empress Of Russia, the daughter of Peter the Great and Martha Skovronskaya, born at Kolomenskoye, near Moscow, on the 18th of December 1709.

    0
    0
  • Elizabeth had inherited her father's sensual temperament and, being free from all control, abandoned herself to her appetites without reserve.

    0
    0
  • During the reign of her cousin Anne (1730-1740), Elizabeth effaced herself as much as possible; but under the regency of Anne Leopoldovna the course of events compelled the indolent but by no means incapable beauty to overthrow the existing government.

    0
    0
  • The merit and glory of that singular affair belong to Elizabeth alone.

    0
    0
  • Fortunately for herself, and for Russia, Elizabeth Petrovna, with all her shortcomings, had inherited some of her father's genius for government.

    0
    0
  • This triumphant issue was mainly due to the diplomatic ability of the new vice chancellor, Alexius BestuzhevRyumin, whom Elizabeth, much as she disliked him personally, had wisely placed at the head of foreign affairs immediately after her accession.

    0
    0
  • Ultimately, however, the minister, strong in the support of Elizabeth, prevailed, and his faultless diplomacy, backed by the despatch of an auxiliary Russian corps of 30,000 men to the Rhine, greatly accelerated the peace negotiations which led to the treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle (October 18, 1748).

    0
    0
  • But all this would have been impossible but for the steady support of Elizabeth, who trusted him implicitly, despite the insinuations* of the chancellor's innumerable enemies, most of whom were her personal friends.

    0
    0
  • The great event of Elizabeth's later years was the Seven Years' War.

    0
    0
  • Elizabeth rightly regarded the treaty of Westminster (January 16, 1756, whereby Great Britain and Prussia agreed to unite their forces to oppose the entry into, or the passage through, Germany of the troops of every foreign power) as utterly subversive of the previous conventions between Great Britain and Russia.

    0
    0
  • A by no means unwarrantable fear of the king of Prussia, who was "to be reduced within proper limits," so that "he might be no longer a danger to the empire," induced Elizabeth to accede to the treaty of Versailles, in other words the Franco-Austrian league against Prussia, and on the 17th of May 1757 the Russian army, 85,000 strong, advanced against Konigsberg.

    0
    0
  • From the Russian point of view, Elizabeth's greatness as a statesman consists in her steady appreciation of Russian interests, and her determination to promote them at all hazards.

    0
    0
  • Elizabeth would not consent to any pacific overtures until the original object of the league had been accomplished.

    0
    0
  • Simultaneously, Elizabeth caused to be conveyed to Louis XV.

    0
    0
  • Elizabeth's object in this mysterious negotiation seems to have been to reconcile France and Great Britain, in return for which signal service France was to throw all her forces into the German war.

    0
    0
  • Elizabeth of Austria >>

    0
    0
  • and Elizabeth promulgated advertisements against simony.

    0
    0
  • The present governing charter was granted by Elizabeth in 1596, and instituted a governing body of a mayor, fourteen masters or councillors, and an indefinite number of burgesses, including a select body called "the Twenty-men."

    0
    0
  • The charter of Elizabeth granted a three days' fair at e the feast of SS Simon and Jude (Oct.

    0
    0
  • Lord Bryce married, in 1880, Elizabeth Marion, daughter of Thomas Ashton, of Hyde, and sister of the 1st Lord Ashton of Hyde.

    0
    0
  • south-east of Pontiac, Cass and Elizabeth lakes), and there is good hunting and fishing in the vicinity.

    0
    0
  • In 1823 he married the princess Elizabeth of Bavaria, who adopted the Lutheran creed.

    0
    0
  • RICHARD CROMWELL (1626-1712), lord protector of England, eldest surviving son of Oliver Cromwell and of Elizabeth Bourchier, was born on the 4th of October 1626.

    0
    0
  • While at Douai he wrote a scurrilous attack on Queen Elizabeth, which caused a riot among the English students.

    0
    0
  • It is joined to the trunk railway from Port Elizabeth to the Transvaal by a branch line from Smaldeel, 28 m.

    0
    0
  • His wife, Mary Elizabeth Campbell, the eldest daughter of the first Baron Abinger by one of the Campbells of Kilmorey, Argyllshire, whom he had married in 1821, had in 1836 been created Baroness Stratheden in recognition of the withdrawal of his claim to the mastership of the rolls.

    0
    0
  • One of the first provincial factories and consulates of the British Turkey (Levant) Company was established there in the reign of James I.; and a British agent had been in residence there even in Elizabeth's time.

    0
    0
  • to Riverside Station, forming a link in the scheme for direct communication between Natal and East London and Port Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • Early in 1828 King, accompanied by two of Chaka's indunas, voyaged in the " Elizabeth and Susan," a small schooner built by the settlers, to Port Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • In the December following Farewell went in the " Elizabeth and Susan " to Port Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • His father, Spence Monroe, was of Scotch, and his mother, Elizabeth Jones, was of Welsh descent.

    0
    0
  • Monroe was married in 1786 to Elizabeth Kortwright (1768-1830) of New York, and at his death was survived by two daughters.

    0
    0
  • Charles married Elizabeth, the sister of Casimir the Great of Poland, with whom he was connected by ties of close friendship, and Louis, by virtue of a compact made by his father thirty-one years previously, added the Polish crown to that of Hungary in 1370.

    0
    0
  • This plan was upset by the queendowager Elizabeth, who determined to rule both kingdoms during the minority of her children.

    0
    0
  • But Elizabeth did not profit long by this atrocity.

    0
    0
  • Like Louis the Great before him, Sigismund had failed to found a dynasty, but, fifteen years before his death, he had succeeded in providing his only daughter Elizabeth with a consort apparently well able to protect both her and her inheritance in the person of Albert V., duke of Austria.

    0
    0
  • Queen Elizabeth, aided by her kinsmen, the emperor Frederick III.

    0
    0
  • The resulting civil war was terminated only by the death of Elizabeth on the 13th of December 1443.

    0
    0
  • This lost him the favour of the king, who wanted money on any terms. In 1851 he acted as secretary to the duc d'Alen90n when that prince came over to England to seek the hand of Queen Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • PHILIP DORMER STANHOPE CHESTERFIELD, 4TH Earl Of (1694-1773), son of Philip Stanhope, third earl (1673-1726), and Elizabeth Savile, daughter of George Savile, marquess of Halifax, was born in London on the 22nd of September 1694; Philip, the first earl (1584-1656), son of Sir John Stanhope of Shelford, was a royalist who in 1616 was created Baron Stanhope of Shelford, and in 1628 earl of Chesterfield; and his grandson the 2nd earl (1633-1714) was grandfather of the 4th earl.

    0
    0
  • The French king's brother, Philip, duke of Orleans, had married Charlotte Elizabeth, a sister of the late elector Charles, and consequently the French king claimed a part of Charles's lands in 1680.

    0
    0
  • FITZROY JAMES HENRY SOMERSET RAGLAN, 1ST Baron (1788-1853), British field marshal, was the eighth and youngest son of Henry, 5th duke of Beaufort, by Elizabeth, daughter of Admiral the Hon.

    0
    0
  • CONRADIN, Or Conrad The Younger (1252-1268), king of Jerusalem and Sicily, son of the German king Conrad IV., and Elizabeth, daughter of Otto II.

    0
    0
  • William Murray, a native of the place, was made earl of Dysart in 1643, and his eldest child and heir, a daughter, Elizabeth, obtained in 1670 a regrant of the title, which passed to the descendants of her first marriage with Sir Lionel Tollemache, Bart., of Helmingham; she married secondly the 1st duke of Lauderdale, but had no children by him, and died in 1698.

    0
    0
  • The earldom of Dysart must not be confounded with that of Desart (Irish), created (barony 1733) in 1793, and held in the Cuffe family, who were originally of Creech St Michael, Somerset, the Irish branch dating from Queen Elizabeth's time.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, the high freights on goods by the Beira route enabled Port Elizabeth to compete successfully for the trade of Rhodesia.

    0
    0
  • In England "chemical medicine" is first heard of in the reign of Elizabeth, and was in like manner contemned and assailed by the College of Physicians and the Society of Apothecaries.

    0
    0
  • There is no evidence of the ceremonial use of incense under Elizabeth's Prayer Book, or under the present Prayer Book of 1662 (established by the fourth Act of Uniformity, 13 and 14 Charles II.

    0
    0
  • It is curious that the only two existing copies of Agas's map 2 were published in the reign of James I., although apparently they had not been altered from the earlier editions of Elizabeth's reign which have been lost.

    0
    0
  • At no other period were so many great men associated with its history; the latter years of Elizabeth's reign are specially interesting to us because it was then that Shakespeare lived in London, and introduced its streets and people into his plays.

    0
    0
  • In 1571 Queen Elizabeth changed its name to the Royal Exchange.

    0
    0
  • The settled character of the later years of Elizabeth's reign appears to have caused a considerable change in the habits of the people.

    0
    0
  • Moorfields was drained and laid out in walks in Elizabeth's reign.

    0
    0
  • the theatre, which established itself so firmly in the latter years of Elizabeth, had still further increased its.

    0
    0
  • The statue of Queen Elizabeth which stood on the west side of Ludgate was purchased by Alderman Gosling and set up against the east end of St Dunstan's church in Fleet Street, where it still remains.

    0
    0
  • In a subsequent proclamation Queen Elizabeth commanded that only one family should live in one house, that empty houses erected within seven years were not to be let and that unfinished buildings on new foundations were to be pulled down.

    0
    0
  • But they were not allowed to proceed beyond Port Elizabeth, and three months later were sent back to Zululand.

    0
    0
  • But the fleet also included two semidreadnoughts (" Lord Nelson," " Agamemnon "), the battlecruiser " Inflexible " and the newly completed " Queen Elizabeth," 1 On the naval operations, see also the article Naval History Of The War.

    0
    0
  • Tamworth was incorporated by Elizabeth in 1560 by letters patent, which state that it is an "ancient mercate town," and suggest that the charters have been lost or burned.

    0
    0
  • Mrs. Elizabeth Inchbald >>

    0
    0
  • NATHANIEL FIENNES (c. 1608-1669) English politician, second son of William, 1st Viscount Saye and Sele, by Elizabeth, daughter of John Temple, of Stow in Buckinghamshire, was born in 1607 or 1608, and educated at Winchester and at New College, Oxford, where as founder's kin he was admitted a perpetual fellow in 1624.

    0
    0
  • Fiennes married (1), Elizabeth, daughter of the famous parliamentarian Sir John Eliot, by whom he had one son, afterwards 3rd Viscount Saye and Sele; and (2), Frances, daughter of Richard Whitehead of Tuderley, Hants, by whom he had three daughters.

    0
    0
  • His chance came when the empress Elizabeth, immediately after her accession, summoned him back to court, and appointed him vicechancellor.

    0
    0
  • The Swedes, at the desire of Elizabeth, accepted Adolphus Frederick, duke of Holstein, as their future king, and, in return, received back Finland, with the exception of a small strip of land up to the river Kymmene.

    0
    0
  • A bogus conspiracy, however, got up by the Holstein faction, aided by France and Prussia, who persuaded Elizabeth that the Austrian ambassador was intriguing to replace Ivan VI.

    0
    0
  • Still his position was most delicate, especially when the betrothal between the grand-duke Peter and Sophia of AnhaltZerbst (afterwards Catharine II.) was carried through against his will, and Elizabeth of Holstein, the mother of the bride, arrived in the Prussian interests to spy upon him.

    0
    0
  • Before the end of the year Elizabeth of Holstein was also expelled from Russia, and Bestuzhev was supreme.

    0
    0
  • ALEXANDER NOWELL (c. 1507-1602), dean of St Paul's, London, was the eldest son of John Nowell of Read Hall, Whalley, Lancashire, by his second wife Elizabeth Kay of Rochdale.

    0
    0
  • His sermons occasionally created some stir, and on one occasion Elizabeth interrupted his sermon, telling him to stick to his text and cease slighting the crucifix.

    0
    0
  • Early in Elizabeth's reign, however, he wrote a larger catechism, to serve as a statement of Protestant principles; it was printed in 1570, and in the same year appeared his "middle" catechism, designed it would seem for the instruction of "simple curates."

    0
    0
  • His father Zacharias was a priest "of the course of Abijah," and his mother Elizabeth, who was also of priestly descent, was related to Mary, the mother of Jesus, whose senior John was by six months.

    0
    0
  • xxii., where Elizabeth fleeing from Herod's assassins cried: "Mount of God, receive a mother with her child," and suddenly the mountain was divided and received her).

    0
    0
  • Nicholas was selected to deliver the oration at the reception of Cardinal Pole's visitors by the university in 1557, and soon after Elizabeth's accession he went to Rome where he was befriended by Pole's confidant, Cardinal Morone; he also owed much to the generosity of Sir Francis Englefield.

    0
    0
  • His expectations of the cardinalate were disappointed by Pius V.'s death in 1572, and Sanders spent the next few years at Madrid trying to embroil Philip II., who gave him a pension of 300 ducats, in open war with Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • While his colleague Tolstoi would have raised Elizabeth Petrovna to the throne, Menshikov set up the youthful Peter II., son of the tsarevich Alexius, with himself as dictator during the prince's minority.

    0
    0
  • Under Elizabeth, however, the English Merchant Adventurers could finally rejoice at the withdrawal of privileges from the Hanseatics and their concession to England, in return for the retention of the Steelyard, of a factory in Hamburg.

    0
    0
  • For thirty-six years Creevey had kept a "copious diary," and had preserved a vast miscellaneous correspondence with such people as Lord Brougham, and his step-daughter, Elizabeth Ord, had assisted him, by keeping his letters to her, in compiling material avowedly for a collection of Creevey Papers in the future.

    0
    0
  • He held many high offices during the reigns of Elizabeth and James I., including a judgeship of the admiralty court (1584), a mastership in chancery (1588), a mastership of the court of requests (1595), chancellor and under treasurer of the exchequer (1606).

    0
    0
  • HAMPTON ROADS, a channel through which the waters of the James, Nansemond and Elizabeth rivers of Virginia, U.S.A., pass (between Old Point Comfort to the N.

    0
    0
  • The entrance from Chesapeake Bay is defended by Fortress Monroe on Old Point Comfort and by Fort Wood on a small island called the Rip Raps near the middle of the channel; and at Portsmouth, a few miles up the Elizabeth river, is, an important United States navy-yard.

    0
    0
  • In the spring of 1861 the Federals set fire to several war vessels in the Gosport navy yard on the Elizabeth river and abandoned the place.

    0
    0
  • On the 8th of March about 1 p.m., the "Merrimac," commanded by Commodore Franklin Buchanan (1795-1871), steamed down the Elizabeth accompanied by two one-gun gun-boats, to engage the wooden fleet of the Federals, consisting of the frigate "Congress," 50 guns, and the sloop "Cumberland," 30 guns, both sailing vessels, anchored off Newport News, and 1 For the idea of the low free-board and the revolving turret Ericsson was indebted to Theodore R.

    0
    0
  • He entered the service of Pardaillan, and in 1587 was sent on a mission to many of the princes of northern Europe, after which he visited England to obtain help from Queen Elizabeth for Henry of Navarre.

    0
    0
  • Among its many charitable institutions are a Masonic Home and School (1893), a Home for the Homeless (1867), St Elizabeth's Home (1886), St Luke's Home (1869), a Home for Aged Men and Couples (1879), Utica Orphan Asylum (1830), St Joseph's Infant Home (1893) and St John's Female Orphan Asylum (1834), both under the Sisters of Charity; the House of the Good Shepherd (1872; Protestant Episcopal); and the General (1873; City of Utica), Homeopathic (1895), St Luke's (1869; supported by the Protestant Episcopal Churches), St Elizabeth's (1866; Sisters of the Third Order of St Francis) and Faxton (1873) hospitals.

    0
    0
  • He was the fourth of the twelve children of the Rev. George Clayton Tennyson (1778-1831) and his wife Elizabeth Fytche (1781-1865).

    0
    0
  • Among the friends whom he now made, or for the first time cultivated, were Carlyle, Rogers, Dickens, and Elizabeth Barrett.

    0
    0
  • The remains were identified after Elizabeth's accession, mingled with the supposed relics of St Frideswide to prevent future desecration, and reburied in the cathedral.

    0
    0
  • Some weeks afterwards high feast was held on the occasion of the double marriage of the king's daughter Elizabeth with the king of Spain, and of his sister Margaret with the duke of Savoy.

    0
    0
  • By his wife Catherine de' Medici he had seven children living: Elizabeth, queen of Spain; Claude, duchess of Lorraine; Francis (II.), Charles (IX.) and Henry (III.), all of whom came to the throne; Marguerite, who became queen of Navarre in 1572; and Francis, duke of Alencon and afterwards of Anjou, who died in 1584.

    0
    0
  • Coleridge, Robert and Elizabeth Browning, Coventry Patmore, Henry Ward Beecher and Thomas Carlyle.

    0
    0
  • Among the charitable institutions are the Dayton state hospital (for the insane), the Miami Valley and the St Elizabeth hospitals, the Christian Deaconess, the Widows' and the Children's homes, and the Door of Hope (for homeless girls); and 1 m.

    0
    0
  • The town was incorporated by Elizabeth in 1582 under the government of two bailiffs and a common council of 24 burgesses, and her .charter was confirmed by James I.

    0
    0
  • The Eastern Province Magazine was issued at Port Elizabeth in 1861-1862, and the South African Magazine appeared in 1867-1868.

    0
    0
  • Lewin, Catalogue of the Port Elizabeth Library (2 vols., 1906).

    0
    0
  • In 1783 he formed a connexion with Elizabeth Bridget Cane, commonly known as Mrs Armstead or Armistead, an amiable and well-mannered woman to whom he was passionately attached.

    0
    0
  • After the hands of Elizabeth of England, Mary of Scotland and Renata of Lorraine had successively been sought for him, the council of state grew anxious about the succession, but he finally married his cousin, Sophia of Mecklenburg, on the 10th of July 1572.

    0
    0
  • The distances by rail from Johannesburg to the following seaports are: Lourengo Marques, 364 m.; Durban, 483 m.; East London, 6S9 m.; Port Elizabeth, 714 m.; Cape Town, 957 m.

    0
    0
  • in 1407 and from Elizabeth in 1576.

    0
    0
  • They were rejected both by Queen Elizabeth, and, after the Hampton Court Conference petitioned about them, by King James I.

    0
    0
  • This was conducted according to the principles enunciated in Locke's Thoughts concerning Education, and the method of teaching Latin and Greek conversationally was pursued with such success by his instructress, Mrs Elizabeth Birch, that at the age of eleven, it is said, Ashley could read both languages with ease.

    0
    0
  • ISABELLA, ISABEAU, or Elizabeth Of Bavaria (1370-1435), wife of Charles VI.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at the court of Charles Robert of Hungary, who had married Casimir's beautiful sister Elizabeth, and who gave his brother-in-law an excellent education under Italian masters.

    0
    0
  • Elizabeth Woodville, widow of Edward IV., was imprisoned in the convent of Bermondsey; and the real earl of Warwick was taken from the Tower and shown in public in the streets of London.

    0
    0
  • At Newtonbreda, overlooking the Lagan, was the palace of Con O'Neill, whose sept was exterminated by Deputy Mountjoy in the reign of Queen Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • The turbulent successors of O'Neill having been routed by the English, the town and fortress were obtained by grant dated the 16th of November 1571 by Sir Thomas Smith, a favourite of Queen Elizabeth, but were afterwards forfeited by him to the lord deputy Sir Arthur Chichester, who, in 1612, was created Baron Chichester of Belfast.

    0
    0
  • He also perjured himself when putting before Elizabeth's commission of inquiry at Westminster (December 1568) a copy of the confession of Hepburn of Bowton (Cotton MSS.

    0
    0
  • For example, when Moray, after Mary was in Elizabeth's power (May 16, 1568), wished Elizabeth to have the matter tried, he in May-June 1568 sent John Wood to England with Scots translations of the letters.

    0
    0
  • According to de Silva, Elizabeth said that she did not believe in the Letters, and that Lethington, who wrote to Cecil on the 21st of June, and sent a verbal message by the bearer, "had behaved badly in the matter," - whether that of the letters, or in general.

    0
    0
  • Lennox could not begin to prepare an English indictment against Mary till she was in England and in Elizabeth's power.

    0
    0
  • In May 1584 Bowes, the English ambassador to Holyrood, had endeavoured to procure them for Elizabeth, "for the secrecy and benefit of the cause."

    0
    0
  • In the Labyrinth (dedicated to Queen Elizabeth of England), a discussion of the freedom of the will, he covertly assailed the Calvinistic doctrine of predestination, and showed that his views were tinged with Socinianism.

    0
    0
  • On the 20th of August 1589, in spite of Queen Elizabeth's opposition, she was married by proxy to King James, without dower, the alliance, however, settling definitely the Scottish claims to the Orkney and Shetland Islands.

    0
    0
  • On the death of Queen Elizabeth, on the 24th of March 1603, James preceded her to London.

    0
    0
  • In June she followed the king to England (after distributing all her effects in Edinburgh among her ladies) with the prince and the coffin containing the body of her dead infant, and reached Windsor on the 2nd of July, where amidst other forms of good fortune she entered into the possession of Queen Elizabeth's 6000 dresses.

    0
    0
  • In spite of her birth and family she was at first favourably inclined to Spain, disapproved of her daughter Elizabeth's marriage with the elector palatine, and supported the Spanish marriages for her sons, but subsequently veered round towards France.

    0
    0
  • Besides several children who died in infancy she had Henry, prince of Wales, who died in 1612, Charles, afterwards King Charles anct Elizabeth, electress palatine and queen of Bohemia.

    0
    0
  • The establishment of Elizabeth on the English throne put on the flank of his scattered dominions another power, forced no less than France by unavoidable political necessities to be his enemy.

    0
    0
  • The early difficulties of Elizabeth's reign secured him a deceitful peace on that side for a time.

    0
    0
  • His marriage with Elizabeth of Valois on the 22nd of June 1559, and the approach of the wars of religion, gave him a temporary security from France.

    0
    0
  • P. Gachard, Actes des etats generaux des Pays Bas, 1576-1585 (Brussels, 1861-1866); and the Calendars of State Papers, Foreign Series, Elizabeth (London, 1863-1901).

    0
    0
  • in his wars in the Netherlands; aided the Catholic League in France; incited attacks upon Elizabeth by way of Ireland.

    0
    0
  • She conceived the project of marrying her favourite son, the duke of Anjou, to Queen Elizabeth of England, and her daughter Margaret to Henry of Navarre, To this end she became reconciled with the Protestants, and allowed Coligny to return to court and to re-enter the council.

    0
    0
  • She had already been separated from her son, the sight of whose ill-treatment added terribly to her sufferings; she was now parted from her daughter and Madame Elizabeth, and removed on the 1st of August 1793 to the Conciergerie.

    0
    0
  • The jury decided unanimously in the affirmative, and on the 16th of October 1793 Marie Antoinette was led to the guillotine, leaving behind her a touching letter to Madame Elizabeth, known as her "Testament."

    0
    0
  • by his wife Elizabeth Woodville, and was born, during his father's temporary exile, in the sanctuary of Westminster Abbey on the 2nd of November 1470.

    0
    0
  • Through the marriage of Sigismund's daughter, Elizabeth, with the German king, Albert II., Luxemburg, which had been made a duchy in 1354, passed to the house of Habsburg, but was seized in 1443 by Philip III.

    0
    0
  • Their monuments were erected by Queen Elizabeth, who found the choir and tombs in ruins.

    0
    0
  • 14 shows the form of crown used by Edward VI., but a tendency (not shown in the illustration) began of flattening the arches of the crown, and on some of the coins of Elizabeth the arches are not merely flattened, but are depressed in the centre, much after the character of the arches of the crown on many of the silver coins of the 19th century prior to 1887.

    0
    0
  • Albert, who had married Elizabeth, daughter of Hermann III., count of Orlamiinde, after the death of his second wife in 1286, died on the 13th of November 1314.

    0
    0
  • In the import trade Cape Town is closely rivalled by Port Elizabeth, but its export trade, which includes diamonds and bar gold, is fully 70% of that of the entire colony.

    0
    0
  • A little more than twelve months later, a coup d'etat placed the tsesarevna Elizabeth on the throne (December 6, 1741), and Ivan and his family were imprisoned in the fortress of Diinamtinde (Ust Dvinsk) (December 1 3, 1742) after a preliminary detention a Riga, from whence the new empress had at first decided to send them home to Brunswick.

    0
    0
  • It is thus styled in a charter granted by Henry VIII., but by Elizabeth's time the town was invariably termed Aberystwyth in all documents.

    0
    0
  • The chapel was allocated as a place of worship by Queen Elizabeth to certain Protestant Walloon refugees.

    0
    0
  • in 1400, and later by Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • The Act of Succession provided that, should the king have no sons, Elizabeth, Anne's daughter, should succeed to the crown.

    0
    0
  • In the Forty-two Articles we have the basis of Queen Elizabeth's Thirty-nine Articles.

    0
    0
  • Elizabeth, who succeeded her sister Mary in 1558, was suspected to be Protestant in her leanings, and her adviser, Cecil, had received his training as secretary of the Protector Somerset; but the general European situation as well as the young queen's own temperament precluded any abrupt or ostentatious change in religious matters.

    0
    0
  • Attempts to estimate the width of the gulf separating the Church of England in Elizabeth's time from the corresponding institution as it existed in the early years of her father's reign are likely to be gravely affected by personal bias.

    0
    0
  • He opened negotiations with Cecil, who induced the reluctant Elizabeth to form an alliance with the Lords of the Congregation, and the English sent a fleet to drive away the French, who were endeavouring to keep their hold on Scotland.

    0
    0
  • The church of St Mary, a fine cruciform structure, Early English and later, with a lofty and richly ornamented central tower, was enlarged in the reign of Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • After the accession of Queen Elizabeth, and the beginning of the breach between England and Spain, they were joined by English sea-rovers.

    0
    0
  • Between 1586 and 1603 Sir Walter made successive efforts to settle a colony in the wide territory called Virginia, in honour of Queen Elizabeth, a name of much wider significance then than in later days.

    0
    0
  • On the 4th of March 1590, as one of the chaplains of Queen Elizabeth, he preached before her a singularly outspoken sermon, and in October gave his introductory lecture at St Paul's, undertaking to comment on the first four chapters of Genesis.

    0
    0
  • Queen Elizabeth abolished the office of constable.

    0
    0
  • South Portland was part of the old town of Cape Elizabeth (pop. in woo, 887) until March 1895; the legislature granted it a city charter in 1895, which was not accepted by the town until December 1898.

    0
    0
  • Negotiations were opened in 157 9 with Queen Elizabeth through certain British merchants; in 1580 the first Capitulations with England were signed; in 1583 William Harebone, the first British ambassador to the Porte, arrived at Constantinople, and in 1593 commercial Capitulations were signed with England granting the same privileges as those enjoyed by the French.

    0
    0
  • HAMPTON, a city and the county-seat of Elizabeth City county, Virginia, U.S.A., at the mouth of the James river, on Hampton Roads, about 15 m.

    0
    0
  • In the reign of Queen Elizabeth, the master of the Mint, finding the allowance under his contract to be insufficient, availed himself of the remedy on the silver coinage, which amounted to 6±d.

    0
    0
  • But Anabaptism was not to remain an abiding force on the continent; and though colonies of its exiles settled in England, they did not produce the Congregationalism which sprang up there under Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • On Elizabeth's accession they ceased to assemble, until it was plain that she did not intend a radical reformation.

    0
    0
  • To afford a home for the centralized activities of the Union, the Memorial Hall, Farringdon Street, London, was built on the site of the Fleet prison - soil consecrated by sacrifice for conscience under Elizabeth - and opened in 1875.

    0
    0
  • In 1590 there were many poor, for whose relief Elizabeth gave a fair for a day in Lent and a market on Thursdays.

    0
    0
  • The first system consists of a trunk line, formed by the junction of lines from Cape Town and Port Elizabeth, which crosses the Orange at Norvals Pont, traverses the province from south to north, passing through Bloemfontein and Kroonstad, and enters the Transvaal at Viljoens Drift (331 m.

    0
    0
  • (1326-1382), called "the great," king of Hungary and Poland, was the third son of Charles Robert, king of Hungary, and Elizabeth, daughter of the Polish king, Ladislaus Lokietek.

    0
    0
  • In 1583 he went as James's ambassador to the court of Elizabeth, and is said to have behaved rather badly.

    0
    0
  • The duke of Kent wished her to be christened Elizabeth, and the prince regent wanted Georgiana, while the tsar Alexander I., who had promised to stand sponsor, stipulated for Alexandrina.

    0
    0
  • little love, and when the death of the duke of Clarence's second infant daughter Elizabeth in 1821 made it pretty certain that Princess Victoria would eventually become queen, the duchess felt that the king might possibly obtain the support of his, ministersif he insisted that the future sovereign should be brought up under masters and mistresses designated by himself.

    0
    0
  • Ridley suggested changing it to Elizabeth as "more accordant to the feelings of the people";.

    0
    0
  • Mary was odious to her Protestant subjects, Elizabeth to those of the unreformed religion, and both these queens succeeded to the crown in times of general sadness; but the youthful Queen Victoria had no enemies except a few Chartists, and the land was peaceful and prosperous when she began toreign over it.

    0
    0
  • On the day after this curious document had furnished both amusement and uneasiness to the Commons, a woman, describing herself as Sophia Elizabeth Guelph Sims, made application at the Mansion House for advice and assistance to prove herself the lawful child of George IV.

    0
    0
  • He canonized Saints Elizabeth of Thuringia, Dominic, Anthony of Padua and Francis of Assisi.

    0
    0
  • He served for a short time in the army of Prince Henry of Nassau, and in1660-1662was gentleman in ordinary to the queen of Bohemia (Elizabeth Stuart, daughter of James I.

    0
    0
  • Greenwich is illustrious as the birthplace of Henry VIII., Mary and Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • Bocton Malherbe was the seat of the Wottons, from whom descended Nicholas Wotton, privy councillor to Henry VIII., Edward VI., Mary and Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • Louis was to marry Anne of Austria, daughter of the Spanish king, Philip III., and the Spanish prince, afterwards Philip IV., himself was to marry the Princess Elizabeth, the king's sister.

    0
    0
  • the Saint, who married St Elizabeth, daughter of Andrew II., king of Hungary, and acted as guardian for his kinsman Henry III.

    0
    0
  • At Baltimore he fell in love with Miss Elizabeth Patterson, and,though a minor, married her.

    0
    0
  • The Bonapartes Of Baltimore are a branch of the family settled in America, descended from Jerome Bonaparte (VII.) by his union with Elizabeth (b.

    0
    0
  • in 1547, by Mary in 1553, by Elizabeth (who granted a court of admiralty) in 1558 and 1573, and by James I.

    0
    0
  • His presentations of character and motives, whether truthful or not, are undeniably fine; but his doctrine that there should be "no theorizing" about history tended to narrow his survey, and consequently he sometimes, as in his remarks on the foreign policy of Elizabeth, seems to misapprehend the tendencies of a period on which he is writing.

    0
    0
  • In 1861 Bishop Tait set apart Miss Elizabeth Ferard as a deaconess by the laying on of hands, and she became the first president of the London Deaconess Institution.

    0
    0
  • From his mother, Elizabeth Vitlitsaya, he inherited most of his characteristics, an insatiable love of work, an almost pedantic love of order and the most rigorous sense of duty.

    0
    0
  • In December 1741 he was adopted by his aunt, Elizabeth Petrovna, as soon as she was safely established on the Russian throne, and on the 18th of November 1742 was received into the Orthodox Church, exchanging his original name of Karl Peter Ulrich for that of Peter.Fedorovich.

    0
    0
  • Bancroft was present at the death of Queen Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • In default of male issue, Casimir left the Polish throne to his nephew, Louis of Hungary, who ruled the country (1370-1382) through his mother, Queen Elizabeth, Wladislaus Lokietek's daughter.

    0
    0
  • On the death of John Zapolya, the Austro-Polish alliance was still further cemented by the marriage of Sigismund's son and heir, Sigismund Augustus, with the archduchess Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • Here may be mentioned, although living a little time before the reign of Stanislaus, a Polish poetess, Elizabeth Druzbacka (1695-1760), whose writings show a feeling for nature at a time when verse-making of the most artificial type was prevalent throughout the country.

    0
    0
  • Mention has already been made of the poetess Elizabeth Druzbacka.

    0
    0
  • It is sometimes called the palace quarter, from the royal palace erected between 1868 and 1870, on the site of the older structure dating from the time of Tsaritsa Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • 1633), Elizabeth (b.

    0
    0
  • A passage in Churchyarde's Choise (1579) gave offence to Elizabeth, and the author fled to Scotland, where he remained for three years.

    0
    0
  • Churchyard lived right through Elizabeth's reign, and was buried in St Margaret's church, Westminster, on the 4th of April 1604.

    0
    0
  • Under Elizabeth, Ramsgate was still unimportant though possessed of a fair before the reign of Henry VIII.

    0
    0
  • ELIZABETH [PAULINE ELIZABETH OTTILIE LOUISE] (1843-), consort of King Charles I.

    0
    0
  • In the Russo-Turkish War of 1877-1878 she devoted herself to the care of the wounded, and founded the Order of Elizabeth (a gold cross on a blue ribbon) to reward distinguished service in such work.

    0
    0
  • Elizabeth, princess of England >>

    0
    0
  • It was only with reluctance that he supported the ambitious projects of Elizabeth Farnese, queen of Spain, in Italy by guaranteeing in 1729 the succession of Don Carlos to the duchies of Parma and Tuscany.

    0
    0
  • is Colt Park (106 acres), the gift of Mrs Elizabeth Colt, the widow of Samuel Colt, inventor of the Colt revolver; in the S.W.

    0
    0
  • is Elizabeth (loo acres); in the E., along the Connecticut river front, is Riverside (about 80 acres); and in the extreme N.

    0
    0
  • In September 1246 he married Elizabeth (d.

    0
    0
  • The Westminster Greek Grammar presented Latin verses to Queen Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • He received an excellent education, became elector of Brandenburg on his father's death in January 1499, and soon afterwards married Elizabeth, daughter of John, king of Denmark.

    0
    0
  • king of Poland and Elizabeth of Austria.

    0
    0
  • ELIZABETH (1533-1603), queen of England and Ireland, born on Sunday the 7th of September 1533, and, like all the Tudors except Henry VII., at Greenwich Palace, was the only surviving child of Henry VIII.

    0
    0
  • Elizabeth has been censured for having made no effort in later years to clear her mother's memory; but no vindication of Anne's character could have rehabilitated Elizabeth's legitimacy.

    0
    0
  • Elizabeth thus lost all hereditary title to the throne, and her early years of childhood can hardly have been happier than Mary's.

    0
    0
  • Queen Catherine Parr introduced some humanity into Henry's household, and Edward and Elizabeth were well and happily educated together, principally at old Hatfield House, which is now the marquess of Salisbury's stables.

    0
    0
  • away to greater dignities, and Elizabeth was left in the care of Catherine Parr, who married in indecent haste Thomas, Lord Seymour, brother of the protector Somerset.

    0
    0
  • This unprincipled adventurer, even before Catherine's death in September 1548, paid indelicate attentions to Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • Any attempt to marry her without the council's leave would have been treason on his part and would have deprived Elizabeth of her contingent right to the succession.

    0
    0
  • Accordingly, when Seymour's other misbehaviour led to his arrest, his relations with Elizabeth were made the subject of a very trying investigation, which gave Elizabeth her first lessons in the feminine arts of self-defence.

    0
    0
  • He or his tragic fate may have touched a deeper chord, but it was carefully concealed; and although in later years Elizabeth seems to have cherished his memory, and certainly showed no love for his brother's children, at the time she only showed resentment at the indignities inflicted on herself.

    0
    0
  • For the rest of Edward's reign Elizabeth's life was less tempestuous.

    0
    0
  • She thus avoided the enmity and the still more dangerous favour of Northumberland; and some unknown history lies behind the duke's preference of the Lady Jane to Elizabeth as his son's wife and his own puppet for the throne.

    0
    0
  • It was not so much Elizabeth's religion as her nearness to the throne and the circumstances of her birth that endangered her life in Mary's reign.

    0
    0
  • While Mary was popular Elizabeth was safe; but as soon as the Spanish marriage project had turned away English hearts Elizabeth inevitably became the centre of plots and the hope of the plotters.

    0
    0
  • Had not Lady Jane still been alive to take off the edge of Mary's indignation and suspicion Elizabeth might have paid forfeit for Wyat's rebellion with her life instead of imprisonment.

    0
    0
  • This did not make Mary Tudor any more friendly,and,although the story that Elizabeth favoured Courtenay and that Mary was jealous is a ridiculous fiction, the Spaniards cried loud and long for Elizabeth's execution.

    0
    0
  • The great nobles, the Howards, and Gardiner would not hear of such a proposal; and all the efforts of the court throughout Mary's reign failed to induce parliament to listen to the suggestion that Elizabeth should be deprived of her legal right to the succession.

    0
    0
  • After two months in the Tower she was transferred to Sir Henry Bedingfield's charge at Woodstock, and at Christmas, when the realm had been reconciled to Rome and Mary was expecting issue, Elizabeth was once more received at court.

    0
    0
  • "An Englishman Italianate," ran the current jingle, "is a devil incarnate," and Elizabeth was well versed in Italian scholarship and statecraft.

    0
    0
  • Elizabeth herself patronized Giacomo Acontio, who thought dogma a "stratagema Satanae," and her last favourite, Essex was accused of being the ringleader of "a damnable crew of atheists."

    0
    0
  • A Spanish ambassador early in the reign thought that Elizabeth's own religion was equally negative, though she told him she agreed with nearly everything in the Augsburg Confession.

    0
    0
  • The compromise that resulted from these conflicting forces suited Elizabeth very well; she had little dislike of Catholics who repudiated the papacy, but she was forced to rely mainly on Protestants, and had little respect for any form of ecclesiastical self-government.

    0
    0
  • She respected the bishops only as supporters of her throne; and, although the well-known letter beginning "Proud Prelate" is an 18th-century forgery, it is hardly a travesty of Elizabeth's attitude.

    0
    0
  • Her features were as handsome as Mary's, but she had little fascination, and in spite of her many suitors no man lost his head over Elizabeth as men did over Mary.

    0
    0
  • In the same way the impossibility of marriage made her all the freer with her flirtations, and she carried some of them to lengths that scandalized a public unconscious of Elizabeth's security.

    0
    0
  • She could not marry Philip II., but she held out hopes to more than one of his Austrian cousins whenever France or Mary Stuart seemed to threaten; and later she encouraged two French princes when Philip had lost patience with Elizabeth and made Mary Stuart his protegee.

    0
    0
  • Her other suitors were less important, except Leicester, who appealed to the least intellectual side of Elizabeth and was always a cause of distraction in her policy and her ministers.

    0
    0
  • Elizabeth was terribly handicapped by having no heirs of her body and no obvious English successor.

    0
    0
  • Elizabeth could hardly be expected to go out of her way and ask parliament to repeal its own acts for Mary's sake; probably it would have refused.

    0
    0
  • Nor was it personal enmity on Elizabeth's part that brought Mary to the block.

    0
    0
  • Elizabeth resisted the demand, not from compassion or qualms of conscience, but because she dreaded the responsibility for Mary's death.

    0
    0
  • Elizabeth delayed the breach as long as she could, probably because she knew that war meant taxation, and that taxation was the most prolific parent of revolt.

    0
    0
  • With the defeat of the Spanish Armada Elizabeth's work was done, and during the last fifteen years of her reign she got more out of touch with her people.

    0
    0
  • That period was one of gradual transition to the conditions of Stuart times; during it practically every claim was put forward that was made under the first two Stuarts either on behalf of parliament or the prerogative, and Elizabeth's attitude towards the Puritans was hardly distinguishable from James I.'s.

    0
    0
  • The loneliness of a queen who had no husband or children and no relatives to mention must at all times have been oppressive; it grew desolating in old age after the deaths of Leicester, Walsingham, Burghley and Essex, and Elizabeth died, the last of her race, on the 24th of March 1603.

    0
    0
  • Bishop Creighton's Queen Elizabeth (1896) is the best biography; there are others by E.

    0
    0
  • Wright, Queen Elizabeth and her Times (1838).

    0
    0
  • Elizabeth of Russia >>

    0
    0
  • He was in secret communication with Elizabeth before Mary died, and from the first the new queen relied on Cecil as she relied on no one else.

    0
    0
  • His intervention in Scotland in 1 5591560 showed that he could strike on occasion; and his action over the execution of Mary, queen of Scots, proved that he was willing to take responsibility from which Elizabeth shrank.

    0
    0
  • Generally he was in favour of more decided intervention on behalf of continental Protestants than Elizabeth would admit; but it is not always easy to ascertain the advice he gave.

    0
    0
  • From 1558 for forty years the biography of Cecil is almost indistinguishable from that of Elizabeth and from the history of England.

    0
    0
  • of that university on the occasion of Elizabeth's visit in 1564, and M.A.

    0
    0
  • In 1572, however, the marquess of Winchester, who had been lord high treasurer under Edward, Mary and Elizabeth, died, and Burghley succeeded to his post.

    0
    0
  • With a maxim such as this, it was easy for him to maintain that Elizabeth's coercive measures were political and not religious.

    0
    0
  • M.P.'s; Rymer's Foedera; Collins's Sydney State Papers; Nichols's Progresses of Elizabeth.

    0
    0
  • and of Queen Elizabeth, this standard is deposited in the Jewel Tower at Westminster.

    0
    0
  • Standard Hundredweight (112 lbs) of Elizabeth; C. Ale Gallon of Henry VII; D.

    0
    0
  • The part especially known as the " city " occupies two hills, and along the valley between them runs the thoroughfare of Elizabeth Street.

    0
    0
  • of the general post office in Elizabeth Street; but outside them and within the 5 m.

    0
    0
  • of the seventh earl in 1743 the estates devolved upon his niece Elizabeth, whose only child married Sir Bysshe Shelley of Castle Goring.

    0
    0
  • The woollen trade was established here through the agency of Flemish immigrants in Edward III.'s reign, and in Elizabeth's time this industry was of such importance that an aulneger was appointed to measure and stamp the woollen cloth.

    0
    0
  • Some time after the accession of Queen Elizabeth an attempt was made to improve the authorized Great Bible, and in this way to challenge the ever growing popularity of the Calvinistic Genevan Bible.

    0
    0
  • Returning to England after Elizabeth's accession he was elected M.P. for Banbury to her first parliament, which sat from January to May 1559.

    0
    0